34 Burst results for "Arielle"

"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:43 min | 10 months ago

"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

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"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

05:20 min | 10 months ago

"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"All right. I have to twirl like that's an important part of the hug. Jump and i really just had the best styro- what would be your last meal. I discussed this answer with my wife. And when i told her what do you think it is. She said. Please tell me. It's not own meal time that it might be. Oh male oatmeal. I think i could have done i. I was like maybe it should be trinidad. Curry my father's from trinidadian roti yom that kind of thing. Maybe it should be i. My mother's from is from quebec grew up in montreal so maybe should be like its till sat his a meat pie. Maybe should be something like that. Something that's culturally meaningful to me. And now i just if. I know that i'm going to die. I want comfort. And i want something else. That is anchoring and that is part of my routine. I want like oatmeal with bananas and peanut butter and a cup of coffee. Like the sounds what. I have to make that right now. Oh yeah highly recommended. I liked that. I liked the as you were preparing. Make an exit that again. It would be about the routine and the comfort that you've found in this life and one would you change that and have dukla range the last moment. Yeah why would i take a chance. Why would you take a chance. It's the last one. I want something consistent and that something that makes me happy sprinkle. Oh if you do it. A little bit of molten salt flakes like on top of the bananas and the peanut butter. Sounds too and you know. I'm sure that some people are hearing this and they're going like this is the most boring thing. I cannot believe that this is what you would eat going out. I don't know. I think when we think of ourselves at the nexus of life and death i think you can judge any single person would say is that the last thought or the last was they would say or the last meal they would eat because that is between them and the life that they lived and whatever they anticipate coming next. Yeah and i wanna feel full. I wanna get wanna ever. I really really really wanna feel full by the way after live. My slightly suck would suck. Doesn't that i mean i don't actually believe in the afterlife but just in case and that's my kind of atheism. Look just in case. I'm going to have this giant glass of wine and bowl of oatmeal. Yes i might supplant the coffee for. Yeah that's kind of a weird combination winding oatmeal Look i do the male decent thinking in a bit of writing. Then i'd have a glass of wine and then cya how about whisky oatmeal. Well that's very scottish by the way. How about making oatmeal with whiskey now. That's a thought if he soaked the oats in the whiskey overnight even and then made them definitely making this. You'd basically completely modifying overnight oats instead of like milk and yogurt. Let's do it. let's do it. Try it out definitely think also one might just be slightly hamid after breakfast. But you've eaten legitimately that sounds delightful. It's been such a pleasure talking to you. I'm so grateful coming on the show. It's just thank you for having me in really really appreciate it. I love the meeting of playfulness and intellectual acuity. I appreciate that. Say hi to meredith for may shows. We will thank you so much for having me. I really do think that this. This is an amazing format. It's very very cool. Thank you you can hear arielle host the vice news reports podcast every week from an iheartradio recent episodes take you from a deep dive investigation into one of the most influential digital disinformation machines. Run by a little known chinese spiritual movement to mexico whether water travels to try to understand. Why so many black. Americans seeking refuge that. I'm be sure to check out her artwork. She makes lots of it. For many of the episodes. Many questions is hosted and written by me minnie. Driver supervising producer are in kaufman producer. Morgan lavoie research assistant marisa brown original music. Sorry baby by mini drive additional music by erin. Kaufman executive produced by bennie driver special. Thanks to jim. Nicolay will poisson addison. Day lisa kasteler an oppenheim at w. k. Pia daily pescador. Kate driver and jason weinberg and for constantly.

trinidad Curry quebec montreal hamid arielle meredith Morgan lavoie marisa brown mexico minnie kaufman poisson addison Kaufman bennie lisa kasteler erin Nicolay Pia daily pescador jim
"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:58 min | 10 months ago

"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Do you like least by yourself. I grew up in a family that prizes rationality integrity moral behaviors. I think above everything else and that comes with a ton of benefits right like. That's that's generally a good environment to grow up in. But i think for me. The way that i internalized some of that information and some of that prioritizing is that i think internalized in sort of a maladaptive way over time. I very good at rationalizing. My feelings into oblivion. Meaning that. If if i'm upset by something that somebody said or something going on in my life i will make backflips really to try and either explain to myself why you know why there's a there's probably a good reason for why they said what they said why you know. I'm just not understanding the context and really like in the grand scheme of things. My problems are rather small rationally. Like this is a very small thing. So i just i in validate my own feelings routinely and you know it might be something perfectly valid. But i'll just tell myself all the reasons why i shouldn't be concerned with it and i can. Yeah i just convinced myself that my feelings are valid. And i really dislike that about myself. Do you try to change it. D- take steps to change that sort of as it's happening or do you say around and think of other approaches. Well i'm noticing more now and honestly like do i try to change. Yes in the sense that i'm in therapy. I love my therapist. She's wonderful. I do this really cool form of therapy. That i enjoy quite a bit. That has really changed my life. Wow what is it. it's called. ifs it's stands for internal family systems. Sir i is a less well known therapy modality but the way that it works and got a anybody who knows. I will probably like think that. I'm explaining this poorly. I you know. I apologize in advance but basically it's like when you say. Oh a part of me feels like this or a part of me feels like that. Those parts are the family system that you're tackling so you will externalize those parts and you will talk to those parts of yourself and try to find out more and learn more about like. Why does that part feel that way. What you know. And and the part that rationalizes. That's a part for me. That's one of those things that i tackle in therapy. That's interesting and it's really useful because you build empathy for parts that you dislike about yourself so i say like i really dislike that part of myself but also i'm trying to understand it also. I'm trying to feel for it. I want to help. The goal is for me to dislike it less and to understand that. It's probably protecting me in some way is changing a processing system though isn't it or maybe in folding into a slightly less rational hug and i think it's just you know over time. Hopefully i think the goal is that i stop invalidating when i'm bothered by something and start letting myself feel it go. Yeah wow i could really stand to feel less i mean what do you mean by that. It's like christ. Do i have to have twenty different feelings about this. You know and all of them feeling sometimes overwhelming and volcanic. I would love a bit more. Rationality that's interesting. I feel like that would calm the waters because my boyfriend is very is very rational but has extraordinary compassion so he can sort of explain it to me without me feeling patronized or unheard which i think is incredibly special quality but we were talking the other day about your knee jerk reaction to a situation is your past and your response to it is your presence. So you're always in charge of your response But that initial kick of what we do in how we are which we so often react to an carry-on reacting to. I thought that was interesting to look at it as kind of past system that felt quite empowering that resonates. I think the thing that that comes to mind hearing that is agreed that your initial reaction is your past. I don't know if you can always control your reaction in the present if your past is so unaddressed that it takes over right and i think that's what being triggered is But what about that space. So what if it were about actually identifying and acknowledging that there is a space that one's initial reaction is this thing this systemic thing in one and then going. If i give this thirty seconds recognizing what it is that perhaps the response would be different and perhaps who i am now if i gave them credence and empowered them would actually have a different response and therefore i could sort of be slightly more in charge of my evolution. I mean it seems like you're primed freia if you know that's that's exactly what it is right it's creating distance between these reactions and then being able to address them and change those patterns over time. It's funny because it's how a lot of my friends who take medication for anxiety depression. It's often how they've explained is that it gives you this moment to not dissolve disintegrate and free fall into the reaction but rather to negotiate and marshall different response. That's interesting that's interesting i Not that i'm equating. The two. But i recently put my dog on prozac because nightly fireworks for a while before the fourth of july were really really specifically in my area of brooklyn. Were really really terrible. I mean it felt like there was a boom every five seconds and my dog got really really upset and she wasn't previously scared of fireworks last summer she was fine but then we moved and there were more fireworks and it's been pretty terrible so for like two months. She would hide in the bathroom every night and just cower and refused to go outside to to do her thing before bedtime like just completely unable to snap out of it and it didn't matter if we gave her a piece of hotdog or a piece of cheese or any healthier dog treat alternative like a just she couldn't snap out of it and the prozac is just doing wonders. She is happy again. She's not scared at night. She and when she does get scared if there is a big boom she recovers so much faster. It's amazing she's a like eight pound chihuahua and i love her deeply and i'm just i'm just relieved. I'm so happy to hear that. My friends dog pete was very very unhappy and he went on prozac. Ac and i feel like he found himself again. I'm glad this lots of therapy going on a new household out shell. Mattress warehouse knows the buying. A mattress can be tough with so many choices. Where do you start introducing bed match a patented diagnostic system. 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"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:02 min | 10 months ago

"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Okay so what question which she must like onset. So i'm a huge fan of octavia butler of her science fiction writing. I think she was brilliant. I truly and in one particular series of her books in the series. It has to do with aliens and it's beautiful. It's really really beautiful. I don't typically go for alien stories but this one is top notch. And in it she writes. The downfall of the human species is that we are extremely intelligent and hierarchical. And i would love to know not necessarily how to alter that but how to harness it for good. I guess the question is. How do you convince species the human species to fight back against our hierarchical nature to take stock of this characteristic and to open our eyes to its negative right. How do you do that I mean i've really. I feel you but i really think if you unpick that sweitzer because it speaks to the fundament of darwinism you know of survival of the fittest. Which is the ultimate hierarchy. And if you start dismantling that then perhaps maybe we would just be happy at a single salami but in the primordial sludge. I mean. i don't know if you'd necessarily dismantle it. Because i do think the beautiful things come out of further competitive nature you know and i certainly don't think that you know communism when actually put in practice often has people who take advantage of the system. What i think would be wonderful would be to just have people realize that this has an impact that this is probably the thing fundamentally that has led to climate change thing that leads to wars that make no sense. It is the thing that prevents us from connecting truly with each other and with people who are different from us. Gee believe the hierarchy is the fundament of those things. I think it's the combination of us being incredibly smart and hierarchy. Ah so the misuse of hierarchy. So how could we use hierarchy. That's really interesting. Yeah yeah and just more collaborative world and how could we make more. Collaborative foil covered clementines for three years. It was hard show. It was hard. It just felt like people weren't listening to each other a lot. Because fair and protectionism those have been the ironically. The unifying characteristic of the world is protectionist. We're going to do it this way. And we will share information but up to a point and we might also show of the information and fares at the roots of that zhou. Fear is at the root of that fear and wanting to protect your family wanting to put them above everybody else which is perfectly understandable. Feeling to have that is rooted in fear and oftentimes that turns into fear of others and a refusal to listen a refusal to open your heart. Open your mind. I think octavia butler had it right. I really do. Yeah i've got to get back and read simone. Because i think you're right. I mean this. Funny i mean we're looking at hierarchical structures and the way that they create systems right now and hoping to dismantle some of those but as with every revolution it feels like we're having a blanket responds to something that is so incredibly nuanced and us reaching four and working to find the nuance is also really important. Yeah and it's tough because this all comes back to the fact that different communities have different values and we don't have a universal list of priorities right like. I don't know how to get to that. But i think just how do we make this world more collaborative. Hang as a really great question. Great question half answered had we.

octavia butler sweitzer zhou simone
"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

08:38 min | 10 months ago

"arielle" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Wherein when we happiest. I was thinking about this question. And i really like it. I really like the whole format of your podcast. If i if i can say that. I think it's replicable in a way that also just everybody's going to have a different answer and it's just innately interesting but yeah i've been thinking about this a lot and i think for me what where i landed was that when i feel happiest when i feel at peace and so it's not these big important moments that feel really monumental in my life. The thing that came to mind for me was this one time. I was reporting for vice news tonight on. Hbo but i was the climate change correspondent four for three years. I was on a reporting trip. We were in greenland in the middle of nowhere. And i was running on this dirt road and i. I'm not really a runner. I'm no longer a runner. My knees don't like it. But i remember really feeling at peace there in that moment and i think it's because it was just part of my routine. It was the thing that no matter. Where wasn't the world. I would run in the morning. And it was an anchor. And i'm happiest when i am able to routinely have alone time. Does that alone time. Does that create connection. Because if you're doing something repeated the in all these different places what would the connection. Be too if that's what you're recreating. It's a good question. I think for me with running and there are other forms of me being alone. I like drawing a lot. So i will go to a place and and draw my environment. I think it is about connecting with the environment that i'm in and also it is about recharging so that i can connect more deeply with the people around me afterwards. So it's both. It's about being present for everything else. After i've completed the run you know after i've completed the drawing i suppose piece is connection like peace is peace action to all of the stuff. That isn't the noise. And i mean that both positively or negatively of our daily lives so that's quite an interesting correlation and. I also like the idea of doing something that you do. Everywhere in all those places and that is that is the thing that brings you back to you. yeah absolutely. I think it's just i really am serious about routine. I think that you know. I thrive when much like children do right. I thrive with routine and some people are better able to just adapt to whatever is happening in their lives. But i need to have something that makes me feel like okay. This is this moment in the day. That i am doing this. One thing that i do almost every day and i you know with the pandemic. It's been a little bit more of a struggle for me to find that. But you know. I think i'm working at a very good. What do you do if you don't my asking. Did drawing replace running. When i was a child i was not super accepted in elementary school. I was different right. I was one of the few kids of color in my school. I'm black tomboys. Daiki and i was bookish and also a jock like a very weird combination of things but i was different. I was very very different. And i felt like i didn't have close friendships. How somewhat bullied. I has to use that word. Because i think it's complicated but i was often alone as a child. I like any neighborhood. Kids like it was just adults living on my street like it. Just didn't have that but what came out of that kind of solitary childhood was my art was was drawing end for me drawing. Was this just amazing thing that i was able to do all the time constantly. Ob in the basement just like working on a project which i always had an art project going and kept it for a while even through my masters i remember handing in once like a comic book page as one of my papers because that was loud and then i stopped completely and then the pandemic hit and i think that's the reason why it's top of mind for me is because i reverted back to drawing in twenty twenty and now i make artwork for vice news reports for the podcast. It brings me so much joy and it takes so much time. It's an absurd thing to do for a podcast host like i. I can't believe my boss in like not only. Lets me do it but asked me to do it. I answered great. I think that's great. Why did you stop doing things like that in my life. So i have a weird background i. After high school. I studied classical guitar and then went onto studies walla g. for my bachelors and then did science writing science reporting and i stopped playing guitar too and i don't know i think it's it's a feeling of like if you can't be the best then why do it at all but for whatever reason during the penick. All of that went away. I care anymore. I don't care that my drawings aren't perfect. I know they're not. But i get so much piece out of it and so much comfort out of it and i learn new things all the time. It's just this wonderful thing that i am not even sad. I stopped like there's no regret it feels like i'm starting a new and i just get to move forward and get back into it with. I'm not there yet. But withdrawing i am and that is truly truly one amazing thing in my life right now a gift. What a lovely gifts and a gift that you can put down and pick up when you're ready. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accept it. 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"arielle" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"arielle" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Ruben and joining me. Today is a former left e. Turn conservative a creator and a card carrying lesbian here to talk about what's going on with the gay community arielle scarsella welcome to the report. Thank it's been law overdo. It says like girl everyone. Everyone says that. I'm the female dave rubin at first has like do they mean that in a bad way and some of them do but like. I know it's a good thing. Even though they might think that thing either way clatter no matter how they meet it. I'm flyer either way much obliged. And i'm glad you're here and we are putting this interview out. During pride month gays get a hold month. I introduced as a card carrying lesbian. Is it true that lesbians have a car. do you have some sort of laminated card. I i mean explore that we now. We have to have a car because now we can't even define the damn word right like nobody knows how to find woman can't define lesbian. So i feel like we need to have a card that says this is what lesbian means to me. This is the card. This is what i am. And this is what i want. Like gay. hanky code back in the seventies when they had the hanging code the reference. The older guys get that. I get the reference. But it's a little bit before my time. But i wanted to have you on for a while because you are when people say that. You're the you're the girl dave rubin or something to that effect. You left the left and you survived. So can we just do like a two minute. Recap because it's pretty review for you. It's only in the last couple years you and you woke up. That's exactly what happened. I think looking back now. The past four years of my content making zomato. Og youtube and making videos since two thousand nine like before you was even a career option before me for me exactly like we were just online. Having fun kids. I was like twenty three at the time. Twenty four and now looking back. My entire outlook on the community has changed back than it was. It was everyone who is humble. Everyone got along. There was like some drama here and there but usually it had to do with who is dating who and who broke up with you not with how someone identified or who wants to sleep with hill and the last five years. I noticed a huge change in the youtube community especially the gay community they..

youtube arielle scarsella Ruben Today twenty three Twenty four two minute seventies dave rubin two thousand nine last couple years last five years past four years zomato
"arielle" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"arielle" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Ruben and joining me. Today is a former left e. Turn conservative a creator and a card carrying lesbian here to talk about what's going on with the gay community arielle scarsella welcome to the report. Thank it's been law overdo. It says like girl everyone. Everyone says that. I'm the female dave rubin at first has like do they mean that in a bad way and some of them do but like. I know it's a good thing. Even though they might think that thing either way clatter no matter how they meet it. I'm flyer either way much obliged. And i'm glad you're here and we are putting this interview out. During pride month gays get a hold month. I introduced as a card carrying lesbian. Is it true that lesbians have a car. do you have some sort of laminated card. I i mean explore that we now. We have to have a car because now we can't even define the damn word right like nobody knows how to find woman can't define lesbian. So i feel like we need to have a card. That says like this is what lesbian means to me. This is the card. This is what i am. And this is what i want. Like gay. hanky code back in the seventies when they had the hanging code the reference. The older gays get that. I get the reference. But it's a little bit before my time. But i wanted to have you on for a while because you are when people say that. You're the you're the girl dave rubin or something to that effect. You left the left and you survived. So can we just do like a two minute. Recap because it's pretty review for you. It's only in the last couple years you and you woke up. That's exactly what happened. I think looking back now. The past four years of my content making zomato. Og youtube and making videos since two thousand nine like before you was even a career option before me for me exactly like we were just online. Having fun kids. I was like twenty three at the time. Twenty four and now looking back. My entire outlook on the community has changed back than it was. It was everyone who is humble. Everyone got along. There was like some drama here and there but usually it had to do with who is dating who and who broke up with not with how someone identified or who wants to sleep with hill and the last five years. I noticed a huge change in the youtube community especially the gay community they..

youtube arielle scarsella Ruben Today twenty three two minute Twenty four seventies dave rubin two thousand nine last couple years last five years past four years
What Is the Significance of VP Harris' Trip to Mexico and Guatemala?

The Takeaway

01:05 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Significance of VP Harris' Trip to Mexico and Guatemala?

"Us now with oriole ruez soto. Who is a policy analyst at the migration policy institute arielle. Welcome back to the show and given me so. What is the significance of vice president harris's trip to mexico and guatemala. Well first of all. I think it signifies that there's going to be a different use approach to the region one. That's focused on co-responsibility and really seeing the capacity so his governments to have a larger role in migration management meaning not just immigration control efforts but also thinking about communitarian pathways Legal employment opportunities to come to united states or to mexico in that scenario and understand and coordinated development easier. I'm more effectively going forward. Of course two visits are not going to change things overnight but they do pointing to it the the a good direction and understanding how to change the dynamics and how to make sure that the governments can do more and should do more In their own neighborhood.

Oriole Ruez Soto Migration Policy Institute Arielle Mexico Guatemala Harris United States
"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"So to me. It feels like obviously it feels like a direct attack at the fact that i'm no longer Progressive or leftist. It has. I don't think it has anything to do like to to the it goes to the point where i got hit two months ago. Then they re monetize me. And then i had not uploaded videos relating to sexuality none and then they d monetize for the same reason again this month and it's like i haven't even posted anything new and everything that you told me to change. That was quote to sexual or whatever meanwhile walk on the website. And that's monetize right. Okay but. I fixed everything that i needed to re monetize and then for having to same content. You d monetize again. It's just it's bizarre and it's obviously it's a direct attack and one hundred percent is and i used to be one of the biggest creators one of these lesbian creators on on the platform you know and in some ways i still am I'm one of the only ones that's you know. The talks about lesbian issues specifically constant consistently on the platform But yeah one hundred percent or feels like i think is a direct attack. Like there's no other way i can explain it unless unless youtube is cracking down on you know. More sexually explicit in quotes content. But that's not true because we see music videos that are showing side boobs and stuff like that all the time. My videos don't even do that. We just talk about sexuality. And i'm not against it but don't don't punish me for doing to think he'd consistent magic that's all keep a consistent because we hear wail very shore boop very pro but you do realize you've just scandalized our audience when our urban moms go home tonight and they look up and they don't know what it means and they know it's not some old ethnic slur from sixty years ago and asked their daughter who listens to pop music. Hey this woman on the michael berry. Show mentioned wop. And they go mom and they explained that it's wap and they look it up and then oh man. This is a cultural breakthrough Breakthrough for the record for folks. Who won't remember. She was saying that that was far more explicit than anything she does. You've taken opinions. You've posted opinions on things like critical race theory. You get criticism that there's this idea that that the left's tent is everything that's not white male conservative. We have to put under one tent and we all agree to agree even when we disagree. Because that's that's how we beat them as we close ranks. So when you have an opinion like this you're breaking with their ranks even though it's not necessarily a lesbian issue at all. What kind of reaction does that get you traitor right. Yeah well. I mean they already think that of mesa. It's it's i don't think it's that much of a different issue. I think the only thing that they'll say that's different is. You're not black. You don't have the right to talk about this at least when it's lgbt issue. They won't say you don't have the right talk about this. 'cause i am gay you know. But they'll say they will say all. You're not trans. you can't talk about it. yeah. But i am a woman and it's a woman a women's issue but with with race i can't get i mean i'm white so i'm italian. I don't maybe i'm halfway but i can't i. I did see a comment on opposed. That said. she's not white. she's italian. So maybe somebody saw. Christopher watkins moment with robert duvall in in true romance where he said. I don't know i don't know i mean..

robert duvall Christopher watkins youtube sixty years ago two months ago tonight one one hundred percent one tent this month trans italian biggest michael berry mesa
"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"It's not even a political thing like because they were giving me. They were hating on me before. I even came out is leaning more conservative at the moment or just non left. They were hating on me. Just because i no longer was allowing them to control me And i i guess. I really wasn't letting them control. I wasn't letting them control me in the first place. But i was definitely giving them more of an ear and now i just kind of i completely don't like you said in the beginning of the interview i just i don't even care anymore. I'm just like whatever. I'm just going to say what i gotta say. And if somebody hates it then let them hate it. They're allowed to hate it and if somebody loves it then it's just gonna just like i've always done. It's gonna help more people know that it's okay to be themselves and think differently. Nbc different. it's the it's the same lesson in this case it's not about being lgbt. It's about thinking for yourself but at the same lesson that i've always taught my channel so it's familiar. It would be easier for you to state your opinions heartfelt opinions and to go along with the flow. What do you hope one. Hundred and fifty. Yeah no one hundred percent it's easier. I've lost a sponsors. I've lost a ton of and i'm gonna say this in quotes friends. I don't believe their friends anymore. But people people that. I went to their like baby showers and weddings and went on like week. Trips with you know people that have to me crying after their ex girlfriends broke up with them and they just completely exited. You know me from their lives and it's sad that it's just. It's really sad that it's come to that. Just because i'm i think differently. And i and i'm telling other people that it's okay to think differently that we all get excommunicated. That's it's not a healthy way of living and it's not a healthy community that would wanna be part of anymore. You monetize your youtube page because you have a lot of followers who want to hear what you have to say on a number of different things and you posted that your channel is no longer eligible to monetize so they basically censored you in kicked you out of the ability to make a living. What's your thought on that I think here's my thought on that. I've been posting the same type of lgbt sexuality dating type of content for ten plus years. I've never been to monetize in those ten years. And this is the truth until i came out as leaving the left Then they started hitting my channel for being too sexually explicit. When it's funnily enough. I've actually become alexa less sexually explicit over the years.

ten plus years ten years youtube first Hundred and fifty one hundred percent lot of followers
"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"We're not going to condemn you. We're not gonna take away your rights and that's fine by me. I don't need your validation. I just need my human rights right so but don't you. I'm gay people. Do need the validation and that that's right right it. Listen as as a as a christian. I don't need a muslim to agree with my religious faith. And i'm perfectly comfortable that they don't and i think that when a person says i need you to validate that's getting into insecurities inning anxieties and asking people to make a change that they can ever make jordan. Peterson has has become very famous. Simply saying that. The pronouns are silly. And i won't follow. You're welcome to have your opinion. But i won't follow it. I notice you've weighed in on that and probably not to the liking of some of your peers. Yeah my my stance on the pronoun thing is if somebody is making an attempt.

Peterson muslim christian jordan
"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"arielle" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"I have a theory that in most every community as we call them such an interesting word Which will get to in a but in every grouping of people where people identify themselves whether it be sexual preference A nation of origin religion skin color. you name it. There are people who will jump up on the table. And say i speak for all those people over there and i am progressive liberal neo marxist. And that's my opinion and anyone who doesn't agree with me is not of that group. You'll remember that. Joe biden said during the campaign. If you don't vote for me then you're not black to a black audience which seemed a very odd statement but you get you get a lot of these sorts of comments. You get a lot of people who claim to speak for groups and the only person more dangerous than their enemy is someone from that group who does not identify doesn't have to be conservative. It can be simply diversity of opinion when in fact diversity was i thought we were seeking with that in mind. Our guest is ariel scarsella. She came to my attention because she makes very bold statements on twitter and just doesn't seem to give a damn who cares. She just states truth her opinion her perspective. And i've noticed over a period of time because she happens to be a lesbian that a lot of people start criticizing her. How dare you have opinions. That are not conforming with the conventional wisdom that's being projected as our community. so ariel. why did you feel the need to start offering opinions. That were outside the quote unquote normal of that community. Thank you for that nice introduction by the way I felt the need to. Because that's what was that felt right to me at the time. I did it because it was a selfish reason. At first because knew that it was what i needed to see for myself to make me feel sane and i just. I didn't know what to expect because lesbian. i guess. Correct me if i'm wrong. But i don't think i don't think a major like a well-known lesbian has ever left the left before their dave rubenesque. You know I i was the first one to do it. And i know that women tend to get more than men. When they're not conforming and i didn't know what to expect and i'm grateful that i have gotten almost nothing but respect from people that are we'll just we'll just say anti hive. Mind is really what it comes down to you know. Let's chart your growth and and We're we're all in a in a process of growing hope. We're always learning experiencing traveling trying new foods in languages and and experiences and and the like as we journey through this earth. But how did you start what what was why were you originally a liberal or progressive. What was what influenced you. I don't even think. I was always a liberal progressive. I think i was always just for human rights but not at the expense of other human rights. You know not at the expense of other people's hard work. And i think being a lesbian and being from new york city i always felt like i had to identify as a democrat progressive liberal. Whatever you wanna call them. And i did back then. I believe in and like the the traditional progressive ways the traditional classic liberal. Things are things that i still believe in Free market free. Speech you know. Lgbt.

Joe biden ariel scarsella twitter ariel first one earth Lgbt new york city dave marxist
Kylie Jenner Responds To GoFundMe Criticism

Comments By Celebs

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Kylie Jenner Responds To GoFundMe Criticism

"Let's talk about this whole kylie jenner go fund me situation. Yeah it would love to okay so for anybody who is unaware. What's going on samuel route. A who is a makeup artist in la. He's most probably known for his handle at makeup. By samuel and in terms of the car dashing community. I personally know him because he does dasa's make lot. He was in this terrible accident this last weekend and he's very close friends. Reo who's kylie's makeup artist and so kylie had posted a photo him with the caption on her story. Watch over you protect you. Make up by samuel. Everyone take a moment to say a prayer for sam who got into an accident this past weekend and swipe up to visit his family's go fund me and when you swipe up the goal for the medical bills with sixty thousand dollars so immediately twitter was kinda sent into a frenzy of people saying you know why kylie jenner. Who's the billionaire asking for her fans and followers to help support this goal of sixty thousand dollars. That is basically packaged share. I will say from what i saw on twitter. A lot of people thought that this was her direct makeup artist and friend arielle which it's not as more acquaintance but anyway that was the initial reaction. I'm sure you all saw that a little bit after that. Tmz came out with an article. That says quote. We're told there's a misconception at sixty k. figure everyone's quoting the original target amount for this go fund me when it first launched with ten thousand dollars and our sources say kylie's five thousand dollar donation. Put it over the top as it was already six thousand dollars at the time since then. The targeted has ballooned likely because of the attention kylie brought it by posting the link on her instagram story. Then i mean just within the last hour kylie made a story and said i feel. It's important for me to clear up this false narrative that ask fans for money and i'm not paying for a makeup artist medical bills. Sam isn't my makeup artist. Unfortunately we don't have a personal relationship anymore. But i've worked with him a few years ago and think he's the sweetest. I saw my current makeup artisan friend arielle. Posted about sam's accident families go fund me and i called immediately to see what happened to sam after learning in more detail about the accident and can tell me visit his go fund me which is set a ten thousand dollars.

Kylie Jenner Kylie Samuel Dasa REO Twitter Arielle SAM LA TMZ
Stan Tatkin On Finding Love and Relieving Relationship Tension During Covid

Untangle

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Stan Tatkin On Finding Love and Relieving Relationship Tension During Covid

"Hello everyone arielle here. And my amazing yesterday as dr stan. Tekken so question for y'all you cooped up with someone and you might be feeling a little bit more anxious than usual and possibly their moments of the relationship. That are not going so smoothly. Do possibly wish you had more tools to help. Support yourself and your partner through this process whether that partner is your husband or wife or your child we'll dr atkins is on the forefront of couples research and therapy and he's the founder of packed the psycho biological approach to couples therapy. He'll share with us. How to observe and understand where partners are coming from and had regulate your and their behavior in some interesting ways. He also which i didn't realize before we started communicating with one. Another is amuse user. And he'll be employing news in some of his psycho biology research. And i have to say. I began to you some of the insights that he shared with me with my spouse and it has already helped so i'm very much looking forward to everybody. Hearing what stan has to share and to bit by bit improving the relationships inside of our very packed homes. Welcome stand high are how're you. I am wonderful and even more wonderful for hearing your voice alot. Thank you and i'm sorry. It had such a problem with my camera yard Should know that. I had technical problems with spilling t on my computer this morning. So that's why am cameras and working otherwise. I'd love to be able to see you so we're talking. That's okay they can hear your voice good. They can be guided by your deep tomba and deep insights wonderful system. And can you share. Just at the gecko one of the things that you've found very powerful in working with couples who are cooped up due to covid. It's interesting that we've kind of gone back to a time that we used to enjoy. Not that long ago. I might be older than some in your audience but before. There were so many distractions in so much information. Just bombarding us speed of information has increased so much just in our lifetimes that now were having to be with each other and there are good things about you sleep and some things that are very difficult and challenging as we kinda turn the clock back and find ourselves suspending more time interacting with each other and maybe for some people more time in reverie and meditating or noticing the small things not being so driven perhaps an even reaching out to people that we may have forgotten about and wondered how they're doing so yeah it is depending on your relationship and whether you have young children like you do when you have teenagers like other people do your courses going courses vary cut. This is a time. I think for people to do what should always be done and that is to think about what's really important and what we know is really important by studying people. On their deathbeds the thing that people lament the most or are happy about the most quality of their relationships and whether they're in good order and not now is a good time to make sure our relationships are in good order to do as best we can to focus on what's important and of course i'm relationships person.

Dr Stan Dr Atkins Arielle Stan
Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

Judaism Unbound

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

"Reo is the CO founder and executive director of a mood. She's a Jewish educator performer and perpetual student who is a former Fulbright research fellow and has taught at the national hoverer institute door to door tutoring and was the two thousand nine. Hundred thousand feature teacher at the Jewish singing retreat. Let my people sing Mirror Rivera is a board member of a mood where she also serves as resident rabbi. She has rabbinic ordination from the Jewish, theological seminary and services a rabbi at New York's Roman Nu- She has also board certified Chaplain Mirror. Rivera is also co chair of the Rabbinical Council of Jews for racial and economic justice. Jay. Fridge. And the CO founder with Rene L. Hill of Harlem. Have Ruta a brave space for Jews of Color Allies and co-conspirators in partnership with the Community of Saint Mary's Episcopal Church a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company before rabbinical school she taught hundreds of New York City Public School children through the National Dance Institute Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera, welcome to Judaism unbounded. So great to have you. Here, thank you. We're really excited to talk about a mood. It's such an interesting and important project. I'll give a little bias in that. I'm really interested in this in particular because I've been on the board of Sfar for many years, which is the issue of the Torah Academy, the Talmud Academy for lgbtq folks are that comes out of the Experience Lgbtq Q. Folks. It's probably a better way to say it and. When I first heard about a mood I was so excited to hear that there was something that seemed similar from edge use of color perspective. So it's something that I've really wanted to explore for a long time that both of us have and and we're really thrilled to finally have this opportunity. So Mirror I was wondering if we could start with a little bit of the origin story of a mood. In, two, thousand, eighteen, I was invited to be in the Selah Cohort fifteen of bend the arc four juice of color by Jews of color and there I met Ya McCoy will meet her the year previously. And part of that training. Was a study that we that she called. J O C. Tour Academy. And it was several afternoons where we would look text from an anti oppression lands, and at the end of that hurt I was sitting with you who the webster was hard the cohurt. We looked at each other and I said, why does this have to be only part of this training? We need this to be real, and so we started talking with start talking about that. So that was may of two, thousand eighteen. By June or July. Are Corman had come back from Israel at, pass it to you. I did a fulbright year in Israel I live in. Jerusalem and when it came back, I became involved in. J. Fridge which is to cherish on economic justice. And Colored. Caucus. Part of my involvement. J.. Fridge I was connected to Huda Webster An. I approached you Huta saying that I wanted to teach a small class on the politics of Hebrew pronunciation and I wanted to teach it for Jews of color of an Alexi that you're smiling because acid is immensely nerdy deeply nerdy. Added belts deeply important but you huda one up to me and he said what if instead of just having your class, we actually create a container for this kind of learning to happen more often. and. So that really launched the idea of. Jesus, Colored Tour Academy, which became a mood colored tour academy and we started out by a every other week having a person in the community, a Jewish person of color in a community teach whatever they wanted and we we started her first Beta run I'm really got to see what what kinds of topics were interesting. How did the groups of people showed up for different topics differ in and we basically got to conduct all this research We launched our first full year after the high holidays. This past fall in two thousand nineteen. And we just completed our first full year of classes. We got here because for as long as there have been Jewish. People color navigating predominantly white Jewish space the roots have been growing and deepening. People like you. Huda. Myself were able to found something like this because of all that work that had been happening. JESSOP. Color entering wet Jewish is being Jewish spaces and also getting to know one another.

Mirror Rivera Co Founder Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera Colored Tour Academy Israel Rabbinical Council Of Jews Ya Mccoy Huda Webster J O C. Tour Academy National Hoverer Institute Research Fellow Alexi REO New York Huta Martha Graham Dance Company Harlem Torah Academy Jerusalem JAY
What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

Inside Podcasting

05:24 min | 2 years ago

What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

"Welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury? This is a post show episode in which I will speak with a special guest about last week's interview. If you haven't heard that episode in which I talked to podcast, critic and Creator Will Williams, I recommend you go back and listen to that first, and then come back and listen to the post show. Today my guess is Ariel Nissenbaum Latte. Welcome to the show aerial. I am excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. You texted me asking to be on the show. I responded within ten seconds. Is that right you did did it was so sweet? And I could feel your enthusiasm Azam coming through my phone. I'm so glad an awesome moment. You never know like Don't really have the bandwidth or Don't have the bandwidth down. Nice so you do like one hundred different things in podcasting and so I'd love for you to introduce yourself then. Maybe you can also share with our listeners where you are right now. Yes, says it's unusual. Place I'll do that first so that the people know why. There are some strange sounds going on, so currently I, am at a farm in two harbors Minnesota. Minnesota, which is somewhere near Duluth, which is on Lake Superior, it is beautiful here I'm on a farm because I'm wolfing, which stands for a worldwide organization of organic farming I'm on my way across the US on a road trip and I thought this would be a fun stop, so if you hear chickens or pigs or dogs or cats or children that what's going on. This makes it so much more impressive that you said. Yes, excitedly to my invitation to come on this show. So I started ear. Buds podcast collective, which is a weekly email that sends a theme and five podcast episodes on that theme. Each week is curated by different person I also run a podcast. A companion to that newsletter called feedback with earbud sort of similar to what you do. Sky Inside podcasting newsletter and podcast, and then I also run another podcast called counter programming Sheron an Arielle. It's a distraction casts started during covid nineteen, and we talk about anything having to do with the word count or counter, so Count Dracula step counters, kitchen counters, anything you can imagine. We're also taking suggestions. I also work for cast box. Do Marketing and business development for them? They're podcast APP and then I help with the outlier podcast festival, and then I do anything that pops up. That has to do with podcasts because I love podcasts. It is very very impressive aerial. I'm so glad that you introduced yourself. Because I'm not sure I would have remembered everything so much, so I will also add on the sound front that the city that I live in chose today to pave our street, and so in addition to sounds of cows and pigs and children on areas, and you might hear on my end paving machines, going up and down and beeping, and doing all manner of things just really like twenty feet away from me, although it sounds pretty quiet at the moment, good, Luxemburgo is in charge of editing this. Exactly okay well, let's get to it We are here to talk about last week's show aerial. What? What did you think of last week's show yes? Oh, I know, will for a long time on twitter, and on other social media platforms, so to hear will chat about her work was really enlightening I. Have to admit that I am not the biggest consumer of audio drama slash audio fiction, and so listening to will talk about it was I opening for. For me I learned a lot, and then I learned a lot through you as well, and I imagine it was kind of some new materials you is that right absolutely and I mean that's one of the reasons. I I wanted to talk to her. Was that like you? I haven't listened to as much fiction, but also I think that someone who's making a fiction podcast has a really different the they're coming from a different creative place in some way. And there's obviously other things that are involved casting and you know working with actors is a completely different ballgame, so I was really excited to talk to her. For for that reason as as well as others mean actually I'll just go ahead and say it another reason why I was. Fascinated by what she was doing. Was that like me? She writes about podcast and. You know like Kerr. I decided to take the plunge and make a podcast and when you're writing about them there is this funny thing where you feel like. Is this supposed to sound like no what I'm doing or am I gonNA? Make giant mistake. And there's a little bit of risk I think with her situation. It's more risky than just doing an interview. Show that require scripts and. Things of that nature, but it was still I could still identify with her feelings of. This is a little risky. This is sort of putting myself out there in a way that I haven't put my out myself out there before and so. I felt a kinship with that and was excited to have her on the show for that

Minnesota Azam Kerr Sky Pillsbury Ariel Nissenbaum Will Williams Twitter Lake Superior Duluth United States Luxemburgo
Salmon Run Home

Peace Out

05:31 min | 2 years ago

Salmon Run Home

"Seven. Three comment Nah pasture some aleinu promenade San. Which means how are you? I'm feeling happy right now because we went for a walk this morning. That usually makes me feel relaxed. What makes you feel relaxed and happy? Maybe it's doing something kind for someone. We have a couple of kindness stories today from listeners who wanted to share about a time. Someone did something kind for them. I here's Abbie Hi my name's Adam. Sold. I live in Neil, you are. and. Reo. Kindness scarring. His one. Man Arrow on the beach. and. He brought the beach chair one for him I'm from me. and. I like him a lot. I think he's the best friend. I could keep. I miss played a area. My friend, I can't wait until of corona thing Lozo. Thank you avi. I'm sure Arielle misses you, too. He sounds like a very good friend and I can't wait for this. Over to. Thanks for sharing your kindness story abby. Now here's Amelia. I, my name is Amelia and I'm ten years old and I'm from Delaware and when someone showed kindness to me is where my mom helped me with my schoolwork, and I also love your show. I listened to it almost every night. Peace Out and peace within. Thanks Amelia. How lucky you are to have your mom able to help you with your schoolwork. Thank you for sharing. A lot of parents and caregivers are now having to do a lot more helping with online school assignments. There are many things that can be frustrating about being home right now. which is why responding with kindness is more important than ever. When we react to something, someone sadder done without thinking about it. It could lead to a saying or doing something that will hurt others. And while it might make you feel good for a little bit. I'm willing to bet that feeling won't last long. However! If we take an extra moment or two to think about how we will respond that lets us think about how to make better choices in our actions and gives us time to choose helpful, not hurtful words. Even when it's hard. It might help to remind yourself to take some deep breaths before saying or doing anything. Give it a try next time. Here's one more kindness story. That was sent an e-mail. It says hi. My name is Armani. I am nine years old. I listened to peace out every night. It all started on my second day at my new school. I had no one to play with. I came up to emily. She is now my best friend. I asked her if I could play with her. And of course she said yes. ps, I love the science episodes. Thank your money. Starting at a new school is definitely not easy time, so glad that emily was such a good friend to you right from the start. And thank you I love the science episodes to. It's fun to read up and Research on constellations and g odes, and for this episode. Salmon! I learned so much writing these stories to. Thanks again to everyone who sent in a kindness story. We will definitely listen and read each one and reply, but it just might take some time. All right, let's get started everyone. Let's sit up in a comfortable position. Rest your hands on your knees. or in your lap. Breathing. As, you up, nice and tall. Gently Roll your shoulders back. Lift Your Chin a little. Look forward. And close. Your eyes if you'd like. For comedown count down. You can just keep breathing as you listen. Or you can try time your breathing with the numbers. Breathing in when you hear number. And breathing out in between the numbers. Ready. Ten. Nine. seven six. Five. Four. Three. Two

Amelia Aleinu Promenade San Arielle Neil Emily Delaware Salmon
End to end solutions against COVID-19  insights from Blok BioScience

Insureblocks

05:16 min | 2 years ago

End to end solutions against COVID-19 insights from Blok BioScience

"For this week's podcast rigby discussing end to end solutions against couve in nineteen with special insights from block bioscience. And I'm very pleased to have returning to intra blogs aerial Walla no CTO of block bioscience and managing director of experts aerial. Thank you for joining us today for those listeners. Who Haven't heard you in our first podcast. Could you please give them a quick introduction on yourself and on block bioscience they'd thanks and It's great to be back. My Name's Arielle. I've been working in the blockchain space for a while. Is it six years now. It's a longtime Komo experts. Blockchain Because we are all still figuring out a lot as we go but I've had the good fortune to work on a number of really interesting solutions from trade finance to insurance And now working Working in the biotech industry on something. That's really needed excellent. Excellent so as you'll recall our first question is could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work but here? I'm I'm curious to see if your definition has changed since the last time you are on the show due to the work you're doing it blocked bioscience so if if memory serves the definition. I gave you a hasn't changed much. Which is that blockchain technology that allows multiple companies where people to share a single version of the truth Without having to spend any time effort or money on reconciliation messaging Synchronization Or other such that the benefit from from gained from That sharing often allows completely new business. Models or new ways of solving problems. Ought to be possible in terms of how it's changed. I think the the main thing that's changed is a very welcome maturation of thought blockchain. I think it's fair to say no longer. A thing on. It is a tool kit For solving problems And for accomplishing what previously would take large numbers of people or expensive software solutions off. That can now be taken for granted when two people are talking and one is sharing a. I found this amazing new APP on my phone. What what we what I wouldn't say to you is. I found this amazing new APP in my phone and it runs the IP stack. That's given so if we're now talking about a solution and that solution includes our two companies Having a common record of a piece of data the presumed solution is that you would use blockchain so that you would share that single solution than do after create a business function hired people or build software to keep our version of that that data and yours in sync great great and I have very fond memories of our podcast where you took us all the way back to the Sumerians to talk about the Boola but I'll let our listeners to check it out for those. Who Haven't had the chance to actually on your on your on your webpage that Keith. Bear actually Commented on similar context of the indeed Princeton this world so in our last podcast I introduced you as managing director offensive experts. Now you've added to that the role of CTO block bioscience. What is blocked by? What is your mission blockbuster? Science is Is A team of thought. Leaders thought leaders in the medical industry thought LEADERS IN TECHNOLOGY THOUGHT LEADERS AND SUPPLY CHAIN. Who grouped together because we think that is needed fast that it needs to reflect how quickly things are changing And that it needs to represent Delivering the best possible medical diagnostic and supply chain capability to the fight The unprecedented impact that covert nineteen is having on the world. Ob conserve experts has entered into a business partnership with block and we are providing The technology delivery capability. But that's only one piece of block block is also about the medical expertise on supply chain in the network of relationships To get things where they need to go on and together we are creating The solution that we're talking about today. Excellent so just to confirm this blog bioscience was created because of the president pandemic or was it created prior to that block solutions. Which is which is this. Group of thought leaders will was already created what we did is mobilized specifically to solve this problem. We've been working on it Pretty much since since Cova I started You know emerging from China in in late January.

Cto Block Bioscience Managing Director CTO Rigby Komo Cova President Trump Keith China Princeton Bear
"arielle" Discussed on Comedians Interviewing Musicians

Comedians Interviewing Musicians

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"arielle" Discussed on Comedians Interviewing Musicians

"Have Design I am not. Could you make me the love? The way gets main role on them. Your heart to the floor Should be have the movie have me swayed time? Can you hold on say come to the floor live campy Live have off slow. Tom All sinking should not be three. Have the fall guy. Life can feel good but then something changes and my heart saw the flow. Life could be have a promise. You Live Selena. Am.

"arielle" Discussed on Comedians Interviewing Musicians

Comedians Interviewing Musicians

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"arielle" Discussed on Comedians Interviewing Musicians

"Thank you all right. Let's keep it going for. Reo like you. I didn't make it as I said it. I knew I fucked it up. I'M GONNA make it easy for you and anyone else at home and here are E. L. That's how you pronounce it. Just think of the letters Arielle and then boom you got my actually does make it a lot easier right. I'll I told them was not the little mermaid so that was a terrible. Yeah you didn't even say it. Clear by bar shots. I told I thought in my head like I would do a shot every time. The exact set her name wrong. That's like good. I mean you do it. I'm just going to be taken. I'm Larry you can see you. Shot of nine banded. Oh drink whisky damage to three. Okay I don't. I'm not a shock. Girl sure is pretty good. It's pretty easy to drip it. Okay man this is going to be a great accidental cycle not the mermaid. That was a terrible choice Also by the way on our like work group chat by the way that just happened. I'm calling you out on this one The sound guy. Ben Are great man who should have a microphone. But we don't let him. He asked Brenda. Who's our puts our lovely marketing ladies. She somewhere back there running around Sh- he asked her out. The sound was great. Sounds like Zoe station. Then decides talk about how he's re watching new girl in the middle of the show in the middle of the show. We're trying to work your man if you could do. Honestly I'm kind of flattered that was giving my follow up like yeah. I feel like Zoe. Additional is triggering subject for most brunette beautiful singer songwriters. Very nice thank you. I'm like. Hey she is doing what she loves and making a living out of it. That sounds fantastic to me. That's how you support other. Women cheers to that and also. It's Ario Ario actually today. I have a weird anecdote about that. I just moved into a new place and I've got my first Internet like I've had internet heard about Internet crazy one of those. Yeah I got one but my I like I got to name it you know and it's Reo speedwagon okay. And you you look up your Wifi. You'll know where I live but is it like like the letters are ale or is it l speedwagon and it's like Internet high-speed oh I didn't think about it it works were yeah. It's the first time I've been. It's like now I have purpose to use that for something. I don't know it's been a thing that's come up and like man. I wish I could like put purpose to that fun little anecdote or whatever Portmanteau when you call it so before the students didn't have Internet as somebody else named it just didn't have Internet. That's cool when outside ever now. I mean obviously like AOL. Darlow the release screechy loud stuff. That your grandparents were swearing this breaking their computer. Isn't it crazy? There's a whole generation that doesn't know the joy of the sound of dial up. Oh yeah the days. They have access to porn like we never had. That's where you went immediately was dial thing when I was like you know getting into some important. Yeah I feel like nothing would make me more anxious watching porn than waiting for when you get like the first the top part of the picture. This man knows what I'm talking about. You get the top part of the picture you have to wait and Oh yeah. It takes three minutes way too long. That's.

Zoe Brenda Arielle Zoe station Ario Ario AOL Larry Ben Reo
"arielle" Discussed on Comedians Interviewing Musicians

Comedians Interviewing Musicians

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"arielle" Discussed on Comedians Interviewing Musicians

"Do those pulling by fooling me from everything only again too Show feels better on my things thinking how things and start stuff to a Sure to seaside.

"arielle" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"arielle" Discussed on Revision Path

"I've talking with Area Wiltz New York City based U. X. designer currently in New Orleans. Now we recorded this of course. They're in the widespread lockdown efforts during the pandemic so the audio quality might be a little crunchiness spot. So I apologize about that. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do name. Reo Worlds and I am at interaction designer. Currently working at frog design is a design consultancy firm monitor the largest ones in globally. Actually Nice. Now what's a regular day like for you there and I know that this is probably a odd question to ask given what we're going through right now at this pandemic but talk to kind of like what your regular day to day is like yes my regular day to day before pandemic usually typically wouldn't frog were teens so the teens are filled with like strategists depending on a project does show designers designers interaction designers like myself. We usually really coming together to brainstorm on whatever the project that we're currently working on so sometimes is is a lot of white boarding the day as sometimes it's about a hits downs like executing the project other times. You may be for myself especially being interaction designer. We're doing like user testing giant to understand how to use fill about the experienced our creating so it really varies like everyday how we work in function but usually when you own a project at rock and your with your team you Richard for months so you are with that team the whole entire time so usually like you in your little corner which you're cheating working brainstorming ideology. Sounds like there's a lot of heads down work that you get to do to focus on a project. Yeah it is a lot of hits down sometimes so when I think of it down. It's like knee working by myself. A lot of times frog really big with collaboration. They believe in like a lot of bringing together you know especially from different disciplines is rare that. I'm just working with people who are interaction designers. I'm usually working with people who are all different types of disciplines. I haven't had the luxury tour Industrial designers have worked with strategist before war and designers of course and design technologist. So a Lotta Times. We're like really working together. And then once we come with an idea concept we're going to execution history but I think so beautiful one thing. I learned from frogs that absolutely love creative process late when I was in school Studying I used to feel like it just came from thin air. Like how do you go from eight to be? You know like what is happening but like with frog and working collaboratively in frock really big like design research in like pulling from all the research to really like conceptualize coming out with these amazing. Did because you know one thing about frog as we push for the next big thing so I think that really phenomenal. That had opportunity to learn this there. How did you get started at fog actually is very interesting? I just really applied more so so my journey to experience interaction design is really one thing about the career that I'm in Or the discipline. People go to like the top schools. Right people go to school. Visual Arts Schools in Europe grew in Asia. They really work vigorously on a per folio. Ten internships me just studied graphic design at Loyola. And I didn't even WanNa do it anymore so I was really big into like art. Nonprofits helping out. My community decided to move to New York. Because that's what I always wanted to do. Some without a job or police live in with my first job just doing digital project management. I just fell into it so I fell into it and I just build my way into becoming a design a lot of ups a Lotta down because I didn't have a lot of the resources like people at those types of schools but when it's two thousand sixteen when I found to bill my foundation regularly at a fulltime job. I work really hard at it so when it came time for when I applied a frog and I learned how to present how to articulate Mar Story. I think that's what really won them over. What kind of projects are you working on right now at frog as much of that as as you can mention so? I can't mention much but frog a lot of practice. I can tell you about the type of project so a lot of projects would frog which is different from like unaccompanied. I work with 'cause like I said Frog is not one of the largest but one of the top design consulting firms in the world. But what they do is is people come to us. Really want us to reinvent in reimagined so think of like any type of like healthcare like how can we re imagine healthcare for Twenty First Century? frog is known for building like one of the first Macintosh and working with Steve Jobs. You know so. That's the history of frog on really from industrial designs mounted digital age and so allied projects Companies COME TO US and letters finance or entertainment or like healthcare is really just reimagining. The experienced reimagining. How can be done coming up with completely new concepts had never been done before? So that's why I say the creative process is so unique to means Amazing on how do you actually get there?

New Orleans Richard
Arielle Wiltz

Revision Path

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Arielle Wiltz

"I've talking with Area Wiltz New York City based U. X. designer currently in New Orleans. Now we recorded this of course. They're in the widespread lockdown efforts during the pandemic so the audio quality might be a little crunchiness spot. So I apologize about that. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do name. Reo Worlds and I am at interaction designer. Currently working at frog design is a design consultancy firm monitor the largest ones in globally. Actually Nice. Now what's a regular day like for you there and I know that this is probably a odd question to ask given what we're going through right now at this pandemic but talk to kind of like what your regular day to day is like yes my regular day to day before pandemic usually typically wouldn't frog were teens so the teens are filled with like strategists depending on a project does show designers designers interaction designers like myself. We usually really coming together to brainstorm on whatever the project that we're currently working on so sometimes is is a lot of white boarding the day as sometimes it's about a hits downs like executing the project other times. You may be for myself especially being interaction designer. We're doing like user testing giant to understand how to use fill about the experienced our creating so it really varies like everyday how we work in function but usually when you own a project at rock and your with your team you Richard for months so you are with that team the whole entire time so usually like you in your little corner which you're cheating working brainstorming ideology. Sounds like there's a lot of heads down work that you get to do to focus on a project. Yeah it is a lot of hits down sometimes so when I think of it down. It's like knee working by myself. A lot of times frog really big with collaboration. They believe in like a lot of bringing together you know especially from different disciplines is rare that. I'm just working with people who are interaction designers. I'm usually working with people who are all different types of disciplines. I haven't had the luxury tour Industrial designers have worked with strategist before war and designers of course and design technologist. So a Lotta Times. We're like really working together. And then once we come with an idea concept we're going to execution history but I think so beautiful one thing. I learned from frogs that absolutely love creative process late when I was in school Studying I used to feel like it just came from thin air. Like how do you go from eight to be? You know like what is happening but like with frog and working collaboratively in frock really big like design research in like pulling from all the research to really like conceptualize coming out with these amazing. Did because you know one thing about frog as we push for the next big thing so I think that really phenomenal. That had opportunity to learn this there. How did you get started at fog actually is very

New Orleans New York Richard
"arielle" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

09:14 min | 2 years ago

"arielle" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Arielle was up next to him in Georgia hi how are you are you guys doing today better than we deserve what's up so I called you guys last week and great give me some really great advice on how to handle my spending while also trying to get my bipolar to disorder under control one of the things that you guys both the death bed look back I hand over my debit card my husband and I did that and doctor decide that a series of little ways will be working in my life and I felt like a little when it felt so freeing and might just it's not so great but now my question and I'm a stay at home mom with a five year old and how how do you guys suggest I go about like getting groceries taking him to the last minute doctors appointments and stuff that just kind of popped up along the way that I might need a debit card or potentially cash for I was gonna say first and foremost I'm high fiving you you are in Georgia we're here in Tennessee I'm I'm gonna say I'm proud of you for him and that over because I know you have a conversation about it has your husband respond the smile you dear he said he he's on board where we're excited if it ramps up for sure so here's next little win next little win is to sit down and map out those trips and that's going to be real frustrating especially if you use if you tell yourself heading into a hypomanic state or a super low state for it for a minute those are gonna be hard for you to to go back to the the agreed upon here's the day I go to the store here's the day they were going to go to the doctor in this few and far between things you can manage those and you know it can be as easy as your husband calls the doctor and says Hey here's the number but there are there are definite things what we can do is when we get to get a little when we go one of the biggest challenges for bipolar is to keep people on their meds they feel great and they're like I'm good so I stopped taking a right and you've you've probably been down that road to in so stay on it because now it's your brain's gonna start doing to start saying but we need a little card you need a little card we need to it so stay on the plan and when you start feeling yourself leaning over a little bit you've got a guy in your life that clearly loves you he's sticking by you and go with it go to him you'll have good conversations that connected now I think it's very easy to just the problem with the debit card is there's no end to it that doesn't have an off button right K. cash as an off button and so if you said okay this is the grocery budget for the week I'm going to the grocery store even if you didn't have a certain day if you need a certain day under John's direction I'm fine with that but from a cash management standpoint if you set up we'll tell me okay what's it take to buy groceries for a week at your house there are real around a hundred Bucks okay so if you had a hundred fifty dollars an envelope in across from that envelope the word food was written whenever you went to the store you would know you would to spend it on that and even if you completely screwed that up and blew that out and misbehaved it's only a hundred and fifty it's very limited okay so you still got good boundaries and limitations on how much quote damage you can do to yourself which is what we talked about the other day when you called is to try to not them you you you were trying to set up some together here with you that you don't damage yourself at your request okay and so yeah I think the envelope system for that and even if you paid the dot the dock in cash or if you have a certain amount of money laying around that was just loose money at the house for two hundred Bucks is not the problem here is the fifteen hundred dollar thing that's the problem right exactly yeah so I mean if you had a hundred Bucks on your route envelope and you got a two and you have two hundred Bucks a miscellaneous envelope miniature emergency because I'm a stay at home mom envelope that you just don't touch even if you screw that whole thing up it's doesn't really damage you accept you just you took a step back on some of your quick wins became some quick losses but so I think you're fine on that the trick is just not to be carrying around a a gun with unlimited ammo which is the the the stupid debit card in that case so yeah I think if you had that again you've got guidelines you're you hold yourself you're saving yourself boundaries that you and your husband agreed to on that amount of money and I can be trusted with that much and then the longer I am Russia worthy with that the more we start moving back to at a different you know different kind of normal you know you moved in you ratchet up as you know if if you don't want ten years from now if you've not had any real problems with your bipolar two and you've been you know you've been managing it for ten years we still what you wouldn't be on the system then you should get better your system should bring you back to a normal see over time as you begin to trust yourself any and you know and you've read or heard of trust with him through this and so lowers I don't hold if somebody called me goes Hey I you know I haven't done cocaine in a month that's different than I have done cocaine in twenty years in terms of how I would advise them on handling their money you know you know it's a it's a different thing obviously this is different and drug addiction but the metaphor still stands so Hey congratulations how five ghetto out of you and you were here if you need some help call anytime love to hear your progress by the way all right Elizabeth is with us in Texas hi Elizabeth how are you I'm good how are you doing better than I deserve what's up one Sunday we put an offer in her house that was accepted and then on Monday the oil market crashed and my husband's a controlling engineer and so now he is in his company's not it already wasn't doing very well so now his job is double at risk and so we have an option period for five more days we close in may and we're just trying to decide should we go ahead and move forward we think excuse if he loses his job it'll be within the month or should we wait to know more and go ahead and pull out of the house is the contract contingent upon a qualifying for a loan and we have no one is still in underwriting okay but I mean you don't want to lose his job you don't qualify for the loan and you'd be out of the contract correct correct correct it is always he lost his job if he's going to before the closing right yeah so I mean either ones okay if you if you know here's the thing there are houses on every corner and if if you pull out and go you know what with what oil did we're not doing this and you've got that right at this stage during those five days and so you've not violate the contract you're not violating moral promise you made and you walk away and you sit on the sidelines for a month and see how this settles out there's nothing wrong with that okay and there's nothing wrong with going forward depending on how scared you are about this what I don't want you to do is for him to lose his job three days after the closing right and if you do if you go past the five day option period your contract is subject to or contingent upon qualifying for a loan and you would no longer qualify for the loan if he lost his job right yes okay so you you could still get out of it between now and the closing after the five day option if he lost his job before the closing and that's just what you've gotta do but here's the thing sometimes we get down these we get down a rabbit hole on this and we get to think it hello this is the one houses of the one house and it's like you know I'm never gonna get married because blocks that one girl you know and so it did there's a house on every corner and you can get in our house so it's just a stupid house I mean there's houses everywhere so you know you if if that gives you permission to sit on the sidelines than sit on the sidelines and that's what I would look at so I think John I think I got disconnected from emotional ownership of homes because I got the real estate business about and I was in my house on a recorder I mean you know I'm hundreds of the right moment hundreds of pieces of property and I've sold lots of properties and been in lots of property for sale in like you know they're everywhere what I'm going through that my wife and I just went through that we put an offer on the house and it didn't pass inspection and so I moved on and she had already planted the garden yeah and had already entered the kid's gonna player and so it and and I I rush to move on and I didn't honor her grief and that process is gonna sit and have a conversation and we decided not to pull the trigger on it we withdrew and now on to the next one yeah but it it it all you do really get committed emotionally to these deals and that's a normal thing and certain people get more.

Arielle Georgia
"Brain Food" Week + Coronavirus Podcast Recommendations

Feedback with EarBuds

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"Brain Food" Week + Coronavirus Podcast Recommendations

"This week's theme is brain food. The curator is Ariel Retro. Here's why Arielle chose this theme. She says hi their minds. Ariel and the theme. I chose for this week's newsletter is brain food. I chose this theme because usually when I eat I just sort of been hailed the without thinking or chewing for that matter so this newsletter felt like the perfect opportunity to kickstart my brain and to get me to put a little bit more thought into what. I'm eating where it came from. And maybe the story behind to hope you enjoy here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Arielle. Monday's episode comes from Radio Cherry bomb and is called climate. Change Food and you. It's forty six minutes long in this episode is your favorite food headed for extinction. Climate change is causing farmers around the world to rethink what they grow and how they grow it which is going to impact what you eat in the very near future. This climate change food connection is the subject of Mandal's important new book. The fate of food will eat in a bigger hotter smarter. World Tuesday's episode comes from the Food Program and is called Pints of progress. The brewers changing attitudes to learning disabilities. It's twenty eight minutes long in this episode brewer and broadcaster. Jay Go wise visits breweries where a progressive approach to employing people with learning disabilities is pouring away. Preconceptions helping tell the story is Michaela. Overton a brewer at ignition in Sydenham south London a brewery founded to create meaningful work for people with learning disabilities which has gone from glorified homebrew to running to taproom selling their beers in this program. We follow their collaboration with London. Brewer Gipsy Hill to make a beer as part of the social brew. Collective Wednesday's episode comes from copper and heat and is called food delivery APPs with homeroom. It's thirty five minutes long in this episode what happens when tech startups backed by venture capital create food delivery. Apps and a whole new system that is relied on by restaurant folks across the US we chat with the folks at home room to go the takeout only location of the Popular California Mac and cheese restaurant about how these APPs have affected their business. David Yaffe Bellany business reporter from the New York. Times joins us to talk about some of the larger National Trent's Thursday's episode comes from point of origin and is called a tale of two yogurts. It's fifty eight minutes long in this episode. The tale of two yogurts and the fight to protect goes fishing villages and waters is all about preservation. It keeps US alive and teaches us how to live this episode features guests. I'm Rita Gupta of the food. Radio Project SANOJA. Very Qadri of Diaster Echo and food writer cookbook author preempt Krishna. Friday's episode comes from gastropod and is called the United States of McDonald's. It's forty eight minutes long in this episode. Mcdonald's is mind boggling. According to Adam Chandler author of the recent book drive through dreams it sells roughly seventy five burgers every second and served sixty eight million people every day. Equivalent to one percent of the entire world's population the Golden Arches are thought to be according to an independent survey more recognizable as a symbol than the Christian crosses around the world. Chandler told us in this episode. We tell the story of McDonald's but more importantly we explore what it has to say about who we are those. Are The podcast recommendations chosen by Arielle for this week's theme brain food? Listen and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a play list on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in brain food into the search bar and the playlist will be right there for your enjoyment. Join the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag Brain Food. This is usually the section of the show where we talk about. Podcast news brought to us by the inside podcasting newsletter skype Pillsbury. The writer of inside podcasting actually manage to put out an episode of the newsletter. This week. That didn't even mention corona virus which is super impressive this week instead of stories from inside podcasting we're going to direct you to sign up for the newsletter at inside dot com slash podcasting and in lieu of. Podcast news. I'M GONNA shout out a few podcast. Creators AND PODCAST. Industry folks who've been tweeting about podcast news as it relates to the corona virus. I make sure to check out. James Cridland his twitter handle is at James Cridland that C. R. I. D. L. A. N. D. He's the founder and editor of pod. News Dot net. Which is an awesome podcast newsletter? That goes out every single day. He's got a lot of statistics. You might find interesting. Plus he's keeping up with all the PODCASTS that are being launched to cover the pandemic next checkout alley award the host of the podcast apologies in each episode of Allergies Alley Interviews Different August about their profession. Her most recent episode is with not one but four allergists each covering a different aspect of the corona virus situation. This episode is entertaining but it also gives some practical advice for how to stay safe. Plus she's keeping up with the news on twitter. Find her at Ashley Ward. That's A. L. I. E. Ward Last. Twitter highlight goes to Michel Yousef at twitter. Handle 'em Yousef that's the letter M. E. U. C. E. P. H. Michelle is a podcast producer. And she put out a tweet. That perfectly shows the connection between corona virus. Podcasts and podcasts advertising. I'll let you see that tweet for yourself when you follow her. That's all for our twitter recommendations. We'll be back next week with podcast news from the inside podcasting newsletter.

Arielle Twitter United States Mcdonald Ariel Retro Writer Brewers Michel Yousef Adam Chandler Brewer Gipsy Hill James Cridland London Ashley Ward Golden Arches California Michaela David Yaffe Bellany Rita Gupta
Heres my fail plan, said no startup founder ever

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Heres my fail plan, said no startup founder ever

"Week gave us a spectacular tech failure with the shadow APP. That basically ruined the Iowa Presidential Caucus Caucus but tech failures aren't always considered a bad thing in silicon valley. There's a mantra fail fast. That suggests you should try things quickly as entrepreneur and then move onto the next thing with lots of great lessons in hand but even though most startups do fail and it can be celebrated and not punished. Most companies. Don't plan for failure. Like think about what happens to their customers or their data or their intellectual property in fact many companies in the tech industry actively actively deny that they will ever cease to exist and that might be bad for business. Arielle parties is a senior writer with wired magazine. Who's written about this? Recently there there is certainly a world in which startups have a sort of Think of it like a pre-nup for your company right and so you sort of plan for that possible. The outcome and there are plenty of examples of companies picture. Life is one that springs to mind that have offered cloud storage for people's photos and what happens ends when those companies run out of money and can't pay for server space everyone's photos disappear and that's a really unpleasant experience to have as a customer so whether the way you plan for that that is having a little bit of extra cash to make sure you have the runway to you know give your customers fair warning notice thinking about it is the most important part part and then what actually plays out is probably a little bit of a case. By case basis once companies do mature. Is there any evidence that that becomes uh-huh part of their planning or they get better thinking about their own ends. I think in a sense Thinking about your own end is also thinking talking about your next pivot so companies. That are big are sort of only big. Because they've managed to do something that serves a need right now but even the biggest companies. You know eventually that need is not useful think about Kodak for example So thinking about your own end might be less about planning your own funeral and more about predicting where you go next right totally could venture capitalists be saying to potential startup. CEO's does you know what's your worst case scenario here. My sense is that as a result of the chaos at companies like we work and with firms like Softbank investors are starting to think a little bit more about these scenarios how it will affect you know start up business models or the way investors choose to invest. I think really remains to be seen But what's what's definitely clear. Is that every startup will die even the big ones eventually so planning for that is You know prudent not just for the companies but for the investors as well and then can you give us another example. We talked about the photo sharing. But you know there are obviously much bigger companies even since then like we work that have employees. Can you give us an example of how a company failing can can have a big big ripple effect on on society. Well I think on the consumer side. There's a very emotional impact to to services or products being discontinued one of the examples. I bring up my piece. Is this wave of sort of home. Robots that All went out of business last year and they're are some great really heart wrenching stories of of consumers who are stuck with these hunks of plastic in their homes that they have emotional connection to you but no longer are supported by the companies companies But I think in in a sort of broader sense you know you can think about Scooter startups there are lots of scooter. Startups have crashed and burned within the last year and whose left picking up all of those scooters that are littered across major cities will. That's the public what happens when A major company like we work Implodes I mean it's not just the company that's affected it's everyone who partners has with its business developers it's real estate developers it's Janitorial and custodial staff it's much broader than just You know a set of investors and founders who are sort of flying around their golden parachutes.

Writer Iowa Wired Magazine Kodak Softbank CEO
What Podcast Newsletters Should I Subscribe To?

Feedback with EarBuds

09:33 min | 2 years ago

What Podcast Newsletters Should I Subscribe To?

"There are tons of podcasts. Newsletters out there. Some are monthly summer weekly and some are even daily since ear. Buds podcast collective was initially a newsletter. The podcast newsletter. Seen is near and dear to my heart. I become friends on and off the Internet with other newsletter writers over the past years and I wanted to give them a chance to share what they're up to some of the newsletters you'll learn about our recommendation. Roundups others are podcast industry info engines and some are a combination of both. You'll hear from these writers in their own words. All about the. Why the how the WHO you get it? All about their newsletters. I asked them to share who they are the names of their newsletters where to find them a bit more so without further. Ado Let me hand the the mic over to my podcast newsletter writer friends. Let's do this. Hi This is Sarah from the audible. Feast appetizer mine. Newsletter comes out monthly in it features the best podcast episodes. I've heard all month links to my listening logs. Right track everything. Listen to and some editorial content about stuff going on and podcast land. I especially like to feature indie shows. You can subscribe to it at audible DOT COM I. I started my website and newsletter. Back in two thousand fifteen because there weren't a lot of review sites at the time and I wanted to create a resource that went much deeper than the popular stuff on it used to be the I tunes charts. Hey ear buds fans. This is Paul Condo and I write the podcast Gumbo newsletter which recommends three main podcast podcast episodes plus a little more every Wednesday. My mom calls snarky fun and self deprecating all the recommendations are episodes. Says I love for one reason or another which is why started this newsletter. I wanted to share all the great shows that I was listening to that may be the average listener. I wasn't aware of. You can sign up at PODCAST GUMBO DOT COM which also gets you a copy of my rather large e book of recommendations and lastly don't let anybody tell you that I don't love puppies. Hey everyone my name is Jenna Spinelli and I. I am the creator of a newsletter called the University of podcast it's a newsletter that looks specifically at the role of podcasting in higher education. I I work at Penn State University where I host and produce a podcast called democracy works and I started the newsletter because I was seeing lots of great examples. Also podcasts in Higher Ed also having people reach out to me ask questions about how to get started or how to shape their show how to find an audience it's the newsletter shares. Tips Resources Best Practices an awesome examples of some really great podcasts that are being produced by colleges and universities abuse throughout the US and around the world you can find it at Jena Spinelli Dot com slash newsletter. That's J. E. N. N. A. S. appea- I N. E. L. L. E. dot com slash newsletter. Thank you to Arielle and air buds for including me in this episode and I look forward to hearing about all the other great podcast newsletters out there. Thanks Hi my name. Is Eric Jones and I write the hurt your brain newsletter. You can find past issues and sign up hurt. Your brain dot com the types of shows that I talk about and recommend in the newsletter are largely non fiction by love learning from podcast. It's one of of The best ways for me to learn about the world so anything that makes me think Ortiz's me something new. I like to share with other people. So that's really how it started was us taking taking notes as listening to these shows anyway and this was a way for me to to share that with others so in addition to the recommendations each newsletter as a bonus of sorts includes a podcast related drawing as well. So thank you and please check it out. My name is an NFL on this collins. And I write the newsletter audio dramatic which is dedicated to showcasing and discussing all things relevant to fiction. PODCASTS you can sign up for my newsletter over at my website site at Honda's Collins Dot Com. I write Minna reviews essays spotlight important news and linked to other commended reading for creators and listeners alike. When I started audio dramatic fiction podcasts desperately needed more platforms like this places that were dedicated to helping those creators find their audiences? I think fiction's fiction having a moment now in audio and I'm excited to see where it takes us. I'm Mike yes and I write this week and podcasts which directs listeners to the most notable so an interesting podcast every week I focus on four things. Kick it off with a hot. Take a funder provocative line pulled from podcast a second I highlight worthwhile all deep dives which are either multi part series or singular dies into a topic stuff you can binge? 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Strong Women and the Power Struggle with Your Mate with Arielle Ford

The Chalene Show

09:49 min | 2 years ago

Strong Women and the Power Struggle with Your Mate with Arielle Ford

"Let's talk about the type of partner that were attracted to if we are a powerful person you know I don't know that there's a short answer to that here's what I do know is that whether you just become successful in business or you've been successful for a long time the power that women exude was there anyway and lots and lots of men are attracted to powerful women justice like we're attracted to certain kinds of guys that may be confident or something like that where the problems have arisen that I've seen in my life and those around me is when a couple decides to go into business together especially if it's the woman's business that he's coming into that creates a power struggle so suddenly you went from being let's say a equals in a marriage partnership to she's the boss you know she's the one who is now having to say give Tass to her partner germ which could be demoralizing the guy who's used to running things his way so I usually recommend that you know if your relationships going well don't do that as your both really conscious enough and willing to work through the issues that will arise I'll tell you what happened in my life as it totally took me by surprise I was the first time right at the age of forty three and then I decided to use every prayer processing ritual I've ever done to build my business to manifest a soulmate and did it brilliantly and I- manifested this amazing exceeded all my expectations we got married and then we decided to start a business together now I went into this marriage not knowing that I had zero partnership skills and be the thing that I was really the best at was being the us being the boss with an Alpha masculine male isn't that a good place to be if you WANNA have a good sex life yeah doesn't work so we ended up having to do a ton of work around masculine and Feminine Energy and learning how to work together because we were both very a successful business people with two very different business styles so I'm a get it done kind of person you know something comes on my desk and it's Atta there in thirty seconds right is a slower much more thoughtful wants to review everything three times kind of person which draw me Rainsy You know so we had lots and lots of issues to work out and eventually for lots of different reasons we closed the business in I just said odor ever again you know we just put too much stress and strain are romantic relationship now I know you and your husband very successfully worked together so I'm curious what are the things that you do that make so well well didn't work well at first much like you've described it was that was a language I was even using my business I need your help today can you help me do this for my business and languages of I piece and then you know he is the quarterback I mean he was like a collegiate quarterback he played professional quarterback that's the guy who's in charge that's the guy who leads the team who takes the fall who glorified in the win got to tell you my husband was captain of his College Basketball Team Championship. and then he was pro so I understand yeah and so it wasn't like I was attracted to someone who was necessarily a milk toast kind of person He's definitely a leader very charismatic I think part of our relationship together it was like it was the first time he was dating someone who was like his equal and it was the first time I felt like I was dating someone who is my equal but I was more powerful when it came to business he had no experience area the type of business with started together and I needed his help and just need like I need a warm body I needed his skill set if we were the next level I mean the things that he's great at I'm horrible at in order for that to work we went through some really horrible nearly marriage ending James nearly hit rock bottom and then it was a matter of going to therapy and realizing like oh so there's a way I am in business and then there's a way need to be with my husband and each of us had to recognize each other's strengths and powers and I stay in and I know this may sound controversial but I stay in my feminine role and maybe it's not feminine or masculine but I stay in that role where you're the man you're the person who's taking era of me and maybe he'll listen to this maybe he won't but I'm really thinking about his ego like all the time in how I respond to his feedback is ideal as his suggestions away that I constantly look for ways to acknowledge all the things he's doing which are so different from the things that I'm doing and it wasn't doing that at first at first I would just be like here do this and it was all the things that I knew how to do but we're within his strength or his interests yeah no lead is being in your feminine energy because in a relationship you want polarity you want the male and the female and as the relationship grows and matures that it becomes a dance where you switch on and off and go back and forth but when women are working we need to be in our masculine energy that it's bonding in your masculine energy and gets done energy yeah the make stuff happen energy it's really fine but then at the end of the day we need to transition and step into the role of our Feminine Energy and for me that became a process I actually created a routine that I did for many years where I would come home from work and I would either take an aromatherapy bubble bath and put on freshmen makeup and change my clothes to go out to dinner or I would come home and do some belly dancing would consciously shipped not up or down just ladder early shift into my Feminine Energy and then he had to learn that he needed to honor that energy so he couldn't be talking business to me late at night 'cause I remember saying to him Oh it's eight o'clock at night and we have to be talking about this contract and in a why not it's fun it's like yeah it's fine in the middle of the day when I'm working I just went through a ninety minute process right you just transformed become your girlfriend in your way you know and it was a dance we needed to learn and the thing that I learned the most and I learned this from John Gray who wrote men are from Mars women are from the yes sure as you know men's brains are wired differently from ours you know you and I we could have a conversation where we are the same mm time talking about the friends we have in common what the latest episode of Grey's Anatomy was like where did you get those shoes and you know who he voting for net exchange we could manage all four multiple conversations yeah got guys brains can handle anything but one topic at a time so if you want the ask them a question don't ask them a multilevel question you ask him where is such and such blank and then you shut up and you let them answer so we have to understand that there are real differences between men and women and communicating with men and women but I think the most important thing and I learned from John Gray is that all men need to be told multiple times a day how brilliant they are and just no matter what it is they say you don't want to lie to them but if they say oh I just made us reservations data on my God that's perfect brilliant I've been wanting to go there you know they need to be acknowledged on a regular basis is it fading their ego chess don't we both need that and you know we're talking a little bit about heterosexual couples but this power struggle exists in same-sex marriages and all relationships I would assume yes yes and yes we want to be acknowledged as well but what I've learned is it's not something you necessarily have to ask for Dr John John and who's the world's leading expert right on marriages read many of his books are great L. Hayes brilliant his the secret to a happy marriage is giving your partner five acknowledgments today why is this important because it means that in order to give them five acknowledgments every day you attention to them on the look for what's right instead of looking for what's wrong what would constitute an acknowledgment okay so let's say so you've got a son a nine year old son who has trouble with math in school and you see your husband's sitting at the kitchen table helping with homework later on that night all you have to do is give them a hug and say you know you're the greatest dad I saw you helping little johnny with his homework I'm just so proud to be your wife

Partner Thirty Seconds Ninety Minute Nine Year Milk
Mastering your mind: tools to create a mindset of success with Ariel Garten

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Mastering your mind: tools to create a mindset of success with Ariel Garten

"Arial say what's up to fire nation and sure so the interesting about yourself that most people don't know hello hello fire nation. It is awesome to be here so something about me. You do not know I just learn that John. One car on the price is right. What you don't know about me is that I cry at of joy and happiness when people win insane things on game shows 'cause I love when I love life and I'm happy for everyone. That is so fun. Although I could tell you a couple of stories about winning my car that might turn your tears of joy of joy tears of sadness ahead nece because it's a pretty interesting little backdrop so that whole game but overall it was a great experience. It was fun and I love that you love celebrating meeting with people so much fun and fire nation as I dropped in the intro. What are we talking all about. Mastering your minds about the tools. They're going to create the mindset instead of success and mail. Let me tell you Arielle has created quite the tool we're going to be focusing on that today but first and foremost let's just start off by sharing with fire nation Arielle. What is meditation so most people have a misconception about meditation. They think your mind is supposed to go blank and then maybe be a levitated neither of those things ever happen. Meditation is just a practice or training that leads to healthy and positive mind states so it's a training that you do over and over again that trains your mind to be healthier and happier there lots of different forms of meditation. Most people have heard of Zen or walking meditation. The most most common one is focused attention refocused attention on your breath. Your mind wanders notice it any return and when you do this activity repeatedly some amazing things things happen to your mind and body which we'll talk about in the rest of the episode so I love the fact that you're really clarifying that I'm not needing to levitating while I meditate so I'm not totally doing it wrong and fire nation going to talk a little bit more my personal meditation in the upcoming segments here but let's just talk about how not she could help people in general so there's has over a thousand published studies talking about meditations ability to make changes in your mind and your body to help you

Arielle Arial John
The Rock N Play sleeper was recalled in the U.S. after 32 deaths

The Big Story

13:51 min | 3 years ago

The Rock N Play sleeper was recalled in the U.S. after 32 deaths

"If you've ever been a parent or taken care of an infant for any length of time, or even just had a baby in the same house, as you, you know, how much sleep matters. When will the baby sleep when will I sleep for how long please don't wake up yet, if this gets bad, and sometimes with kids it gets bad, you'll do anything for a few hours, which brings us to the Fisher Price rock and play sleeper. If there's a device out there that will get a child to sleep and help them stay that way. Then there are parents desperate enough to try it. And sometimes the unimaginable happens. Tonight. Parents warned to stop using the Fisher Price rock and play sleeper immediately. The move comes just days after a consumer reports investigation found at least thirty two deaths linked to the incline sleeper. That's why you can't buy be Rockin play sleeper anymore in the United States anyway here in Canada. It's called the Fisher Price Rockin play soothing seat. And yes, it's the same thing. I can buy this right now. I have an open order sitting on an online retailer right in front of me. Does a label change that much can a new name help parents use this product in a safer way? And look, I get that there are loopholes and regulations around products, but doesn't the term better safe than sorry come into play. At some point. Jordan. He throwing. And this is the big story Arielle Brewster is a senior editor at today's parent, high RAM and Claire ganja is the health editor at today's parent. Hello. Hello. REO. First of all, maybe can you just describe the rock and play, like what does it look like what does it do? It's sort of a waste high place to put your baby down not as far as best in it. It's not as seat like as a bouncer chair. It has mesh sides. It can fold up and sort of collapse into itself to go under a bed, your baby would sort of sit in, in a nestled position and I should mention there also safety straps to keep them in it. It could be used for naps. It could be used when you want to take a shower and drag it into the bathroom wanna unload, the dishwasher and to mobilize baby for a little while. Yeah. Just put them down without putting them on the floor and how. Do parents use it in general. I think it depends a lot of parents probably use it for Notts. They nursed their baby the baby falls asleep. You put them in the rock and play you go unload, the dishwasher. Some parents use it I leap. And that might be up or it might be for the whole night long, obviously with intervals breaks to feed the baby in the US the product was labeled as a sleeper and said, safer overnight sleep right on the box in Canada. It does not help popular are these things. Well, we know that four point seven million of them recalled anyways, so quite a few were sold. You know, when my first daughter was born didn't exist. So it's not something that I had its parent, but I had heard of it, you know, going through my parenting and a lot of parenting groups Facebook where they talk about sleep. It's called a lifesaver. It's something that many parents, sort of have come to rely on as a place where their kids might sleep for three hour stretch versus maybe twenty minute stretch. You know, they were getting in like a flat bassinet type environment. I do think they've been increasing in popularity even between having my first kid and second kid, I started seeing them out. They're more WalMart target when target was in Canada. They started doing designer collaborations as well. So you could not only get the basic rock and play, you could get a Jonathan Adler designed rock and play with special fabric or wouldn't accents. There were a lot of different options. Some of them were as low as like eighty dollars. It could go up to one twenty one seventy depending on how fancy however, for place for your baby to sleep like hundred twenty dollars is actually quite cheap. When you look at the other options out there, which I think, was part of the popularity as well, when, you know, you're only going to use it for a couple of months to be in your room, or when the baby's under three months, it's a seemed like a great option. I think you also saw it's sort of cult like status in the reactions that came out after it was recalled there were stories on how do we know maybe off the rock and play, you know. What are you gonna do? Now that, you know. So you kind of got a sense of how ingrained it had become in sort of an early parenthood news that product that everybody had that they relied on for their kids to sleep in. So this is a major recall in the parenting world done. It's fair to say. Why was it recalled consumer reports didn't investigation and they linked the rock and play to thirty two deaths in the United States to thirty two deaths since two thousand and nine this came out in stages. The consumer Product Safety Commission issued a joint warning with Fisher Price saying that parents should discontinue use of it. Once the infant has been able to start rolling over or is three months of age, and I think I was always in the, the guidelines on how to use the product, but they came up with a warning on April fifth, and then on April eighth consumer reports published a full investigation, and it became clear that they had been looking into it for a while. So they had, you know, interviewed doctors look debt, medical evidence. I think there were some lawsuits that had been launched from some of the families where the baby's head died, and they had been digging around, and they sort of said, hey, we have guidelines for safely, the guidelines are babies should be. Lying flat. Flat surface, there shouldn't be any anything that might cause them to suffocate nearby, like so, like, you know, no blankets in the crib, stuffy no pillows. These are all very long standing guidelines, the very clear and they're arguably doesn't meet those guidelines, so consumer reports seem to be saying, hey, we need to look at this product, we're linking it to these deaths Fisher Price at the time and still to my knowledge is saying that there was misuse of the product. So it was being used longer than the recommended time. So like pass three months or pass when it could roll over. Or maybe there was a digital batting put into the rock and play that shouldn't have been there. I don't think we know all those details at this point. But consumer reports basically was saying, hey, we've got thirty two kids who've died. Let's this product it was shortly after that, that they actually recall the product, how do babies die, and this thing he's at Suffolk Asian. Is it do we know we don't know all the details on that still? CPSC is focusing on rolling over so babies who they've Rishon age where they can turn themselves over, but they can't get themselves back into recession where they can start breathing. And so parents sometimes even know that they can roll over right? Like that didn't roll over yesterday. But the man product and now the they're rolling over. So that is also why it's like three months because three months would be sort of an age of that milestone where, you know, babies more more likely will be able to, to roll over that is one cause of death. There are indications that there could have been, you know, other contributing medical factors in some of the deaths that also needs to be looked at, but there's also something called positional, asphyxia succesion, and that is, is basically, it means you're suffocating based on your position. So the babies would have gotten themselves into -sition where their, their chins were sort of down on their chest, and it's cutting off the airway that is something that can happen in car siege. It can happen in a swing. It does. Happen. And I think it's under that would that they'll be looking at parents might be using it wrong or using it for longer than the intended time. But I mean, I'm I'm a parent and I understand that you do what works, but even for those who aren't parents are because you guys talk to millions of parents, give us a little bit of insight into the mind of apparent that is trying to use contraptions like this to get their kid to sleep share. I think I think let me posted our story. We got a lot of then they're done that moms who were very defensive or saying, you know, I suffered with sleep deprivation. That's just what being a parent is, basically buck up. And I thought that was pretty unfair because my sense, is that when you're using this device, it's because you don't have a good sleeper naturally, and we're not talking about parents who are leaving their kids in Iraq in play for eight or nine hours. And an assuming that early parenthood is a full night's sleep for the most part. I think it's parents who were hoping to get a two or three hour stretch instead of twenty or thirty minute stretch they didn't have. Unreasonable expectations they'd tried bouncing on a yoga ball for one hour. Two hours than gently putting the baby in the bassinet. They'd tried pre warming the best in it with them microwaveable bean. Bet you know, they'd done everything every white noise machine lullaby and the only way they're babies slept longer than thirty minutes was in the rock and play. And that bought them, maybe three or four hours, and that is considered a huge victory when you have a young, baby. So I, I don't think we should think these are negligent, parents, these are parents were actually trying everything, and they're extremely sleep-deprived because what happens to all those cases is start maybe making other decisions that aren't that safe fall asleep with the baby on a coach or just in Iraq. And so parents who are deciding to use products to help the rape sleep or not necessarily taking shortcut or they've actually spent a lot of time, weighing all the risks and benefits and they know that they're not functioning properly southern. Making a choice. I think maybe is safer here in this thing, then with me at this time, so now we get to the risks and benefits, part this product is still available in Canada. Correct. So the product is available in Canada, but it's not called a rock in place, leaper. That is what it's called in the United States in Canada. It's called a rock in place, soothing seat. And so the pictures on the box, and the wording and everything, sort of, implies that it's, you know, for that I use that are was talking about before, where you maybe need to the dishwasher, and you put your happy baby next to you, and they might talk to them a little bit while you're you're doing it, but they're just sitting in it. Sure. I mean that's not reality, especially with a newborn, they newborn sleep for a lot of the day and, and night, maybe not a night. But if you have a baby, that's, that's napping. Those chances are it's going to it might sleep, even though that's what it's called in Canada. It is the same product so a baby might fall asleep in the product in the. United States just as they might fall asleep in the product in Canada. The reason is still for sale here. Is that Health Canada had concerns about it, but they brought their concerns in two thousand eleven when Mattel brought the product to Canada, they said, whoa, they're calling this a sleeper, and it doesn't meet any of our requirements for safe sleep environment? We actually have regulations here. They're called the cribs cradles bass nets regulations and they sort of outlined, what a product that's going to be sold here for that purpose needs to look like you know, probably has to be a certain size. And the one thing that definitely needs to be as flat. This product is not flat. It wasn't until they changed the name of the product and all the labeling to call soothing seat that it was even allowed to be sold here. How different are the actual to products. We did try to find out the best. We could if there were any designed differences. We don't think there are we everyone talks about them, as though they are the same product. We. We asked Mattel, if there are any designed differences, they did not respond to that part of the question they referred to the labelling differences. So we're assuming they are the same product. I can tell you about to about one in the US. My parents are American had it shipped to their house because there's more variety. I was shopping around for a different design, and I got one that I liked better while shopping online in the US smuggled it in and I also I think I got one from an event here in Toronto. I did not notice different labelling on the box. Did I look that closely? I'm not sure if said, soothing C N, one said, sleeper, I can tell you I use both had one upstairs and went downstairs, and to me they were the exact same product just different colors was a bunny was a lamb. Talked to Canadian parents about this. They use it differently. No, they do not. They use the exact same way in American parent would use it. I wanted to add that a lot of parents who use the product have babies who have something called reflex, which is not just spit up. It's a baby who always pukes allot after feet and you're instructed to keep them upright for like thirty minutes after feed. This is actually quite difficult. If you have a baby, who falls asleep while nursing falls asleep, while taking a bottle, and then you're supposed to keep this asleep. Newborn, upright, somehow waking them the rock and play really to me solve that problem. And that's actually why I got it for my second kid. My first kid was super bar fee. It was a nightmare. I thought, oh here's what I needed some way to keep him upright. Without waking him, put them in there to sleep. Definitely and other parents, you talked to in Canada, the same thing. Yes. I mostly did it for naps. I'll admit I never did it for overnight. Because his reflects never seemed as bad, then but I can see. If it's working during the day logically, you would think why not do it at night as well. What do doctors in Canada? Think about the fact that this is available here after it's been recalled.

Canada United States Fisher Price Iraq Mattel Product Safety Commission Facebook Jonathan Adler Jordan Arielle Brewster Walmart Rape Cpsc Suffolk Asian -Sition Health Canada Claire Ganja
"arielle" Discussed on Chewing the Fat

Chewing the Fat

15:09 min | 3 years ago

"arielle" Discussed on Chewing the Fat

"Welcome to chewing the fat the yale sustainable food programs programs podcast that looks at the big complicated world of food and agriculture. I'm your podcast hosts early this week. We look into flavor. Our podcast manager ashida ashani chats in the studio with arielle johnson flavor scientists and director's fellow at m._i._t. Media lab r._e._o. Was also the former residents scientists at the world acclaimed copenhagen in restaurant noma listen in. She shares more about the crazy world of flavor. Welcome mario. Thanks so much for having me. Thanks so much for being here so so for those of us who are unfamiliar with the term. Could you tell us what is a flavor scientist so my formal training is in flavor chemistry. <hes> i studied that at the university of california at davis to do that. I really focused on what molecules we perceive as flavor so so flavors made up of smell and taste <hes> with information from the other three senses sight hearing and touch but smell and taste the most important one's smell and taste are both are only chemical senses so they are census that interface with molecules from the environment directly so to study flavor or flavour chemistry the to the essential parts of that are studying the molecules in food that we're perceiving flavor and studying howard perceiving though uh-huh select what intensities of flavors they cause us to perceive but even in the course of doing that work and especially since then i've while i couldn't stop thinking about and now continue to try to think about and pursuing integrates information from a lot of other types of fields besides chemistry that has a big bearing on flavor so whether that's <hes> this sort of cultural importance that impact the flavor or the <hes> ecological and evolutionary things that lead to flavor molecules being created or or how flavor is used and transformed and thought about in the kitchen so <hes> when i say flavor scientists that tries to incorporate <hes> the many different areas besides just chemistry that impact and relate to flavor so i guess off of that what what is flavor mean to you and how is like your perception of flavor changed. I like throughout your work. Yeah i mean so i. I've a bachelor degree in chemistry so even when i was doing that i was also interested in working on food food. Then when i was going to graduate school i was also doing a degree in basically applied analytical chemistry agricultural environmental chemistry so i i my oppression interest in flavor really started as a chemist so interested in just the huge range of what flavor flavor molecules there are how things like wine or flowers and herbs or other edible things or even cocktails producing. Do you contain molecules but i really think as i've studied of the studied flavor more in much the same way that food is a field old endeavour that really draws on and encompasses a vast swaths of human activity flavors really similar so often gets reduced to what what molecules are around or what sort of perceptions are being created in the brain. I've been thinking a lot about lately. The importance of <hes> what it means that we are able to sense flavor probably the most important component of flavor is smell <hes> when you're when you're eating something and experiencing anything besides sweet sour salty bitter mommy or spicy see you're experiencing that through aroma and aroma is in the history of western philosophy and science has really been sort of denigrated downgraded among offenses so even going back to like greek natural philosophy there the idea that that smell was like the bassist and least important and least like human of the senses and you see that like echoed a lot in nineteenth century science but as it turns out when you look doc genetically <hes> at the at the genes that we use to sense smell we use about two percent of our genome to code for factory receptors which is a vast amount of genetic information to be maintaining <hes> which would suggest that there is there is a reason that we can smell all of these things so then flavored becomes not just about got a bunch of molecules that you can smell but like what what roll those molecules might have played in in our you know millions of years of evolution into humans <hes> we also know that flavor flavor and smell are processed very intimately with emotion and memory and also from anthropology that that foods and flavors are an important way that we define who we are and both cultural way and culturally like interface with our surroundings so i don't want to say that flavor connects absolutely everything but it is a surprising connector of of many <hes> very interesting and fundamental ways that we are human and that we interact with the world so your work seems to blur the boundaries between the laboratory in the kitchen. What does it mean for you to work in a restaurant setting as a scientist. I've collaborated with with restaurants for a long time like while i've also been training to being a scientist <hes> for me one of the biggest one of the biggest things that's important to me about that is well when you're you're training as a scientist at least in the u._s. You don't really get any any formal training in most places in like the philosophy or for the history of science so i really important thing to bear in mind about about both science and technology is that they are fairly neutral tools but that the questions that we use them to answer are obviously hugely reflective of our own values and politics and culture. I think a lot out of scientists don't wanna think about that and like to like to feel that what they're doing is completely objective so i got more into trying to answer questions questions and <hes> just think about what questions should be asked about food. I was noticing that that chefs and restaurateurs and and other people people working in food production had these amazing depth of knowledge about food that wasn't really reflected in the scientific literature and like questions that that no one in my chemistry department was or like the food science department was asking or interested in entertaining but that we're actually like really quite fascinating so i enjoy getting that diversity perspective from from working with chefs but for me also going in the other direction. There's there's like a huge huge wealth of knowledge that has been developed over the last hundred years or so about how it works on a molecular and chemical and biological dialogical level. That's not necessarily accessible or legible to non experts but can really really help cooking in an intuitive way so i also have done a lot of work. A lot of my work at noma was listening listening to questions or problems that came up and then figuring out if someone somewhere in the scientific literature and ever answered like a similar question and then figuring out how to translate that into practice wow that's really cool. Is that like that work that you enjoy doing the translating. Oh yeah it's i mean it is challenging. It's challenging to explain explain stuff not using jargon but i think not to slavishly quote richard feynman but we believe it was him who said that. If you can't <hes> explain something at a level that a freshman can understand you don't really understand it so <hes> rather selfishly also has greatly clarified by own thinking having having to translate things and accessible ways yeah so when you're when you're in the kitchen. Are you usually just collaborating with other chefs or are there other scientists there are there are the people in your field so i will preface this by saying that a most of the work that i've done and even some of the spaces that i've worked in like i or the people i'm working to have like made up as we go along while at noma we occasionally only had interns that had kind of science or technical background but for the most part. It was just chefs that we were working with. I think as far as i know i might you've been the only like p._h._d. Scientists employed full time at a restaurant. <hes> i mean it's a very different kind of work obviously but at places like <hes> the nordic food lab also in copenhagen <hes> the basque culinary center. I've done a bit of work with them. Do you have a bit more of a mix of people still largely with chefs backgrounds but also like with experience in nutrition or microbiology and other things like that at harvard you too yeah a lot of <hes> for a while. I was doing collaborating with two scientists in the systems biology department who were microbiologists rachel dutton and bend wolf and they had done a lot of work with food in new york who are also interested in the microbiology fermentation. A short version of that long answer is that it tends to be very ad hoc and driven by just personal interest and people reaching out to each other so on that no in your p. You snow thi- scientists wrote science and scientists are as yet poorly utilize sources of information that wind directed correctly can become invaluable. Oh you will partners to chefs in the effort to understand and hone their craft. Could you talk a little bit about a trickle down effect because i know that some of the institutes that you're working at a little bit up there. So how are you seeing this newfield of kind of flavor scientists trickling down to more mainstream restaurants. One way that you can really see is that it's not that every chef talk about this but if you mentioned a reaction called the mired reaction to chef. They're more likely to know what you're talking about. The not <hes> so this is the mired reaction was discovered in the early twentieth century nineteenth early twentieth century <hes> and this is a reaction in between amino acids and sugars that creates all of the brown colors and <hes> browned and roasted did and toasted flavors in basically any brown food so lake the aroma of baked bread comes on the mired reaction. <hes> roasted chicken cocoa cocoa beans a roast beef coffee. Basically anything you cook to the point where it it brown's twenty years ago. It was like not really like like a common thing to talk about this but understanding that the mired reaction is a thing that you need protein that has like given off some free amino acid uh-huh and some sugars that happens at a high temperature tends to happen less with water around and it happens less when you have acid around is a pretty lake basic basic principle but it enabled you to either create a lot of the delicious brown flavors if you want them or if you're trying to avoid that in a kitchen context text you can cook something at a lower temperature or reduce the amount of sugars or protein thin- or ensure that it's in a moist environment so the temperature never gets that high so a lot of these things are techniques that that have been passed through kitchen more anyway but understanding just a little bit about the molecular mechanisms behind what's happening allows for a lot what finer control even just in the moment of cooking very cool okay so i just wanna change shift a little bit too just talking a little a little bit more broadly about your work and i was wondering if you had any insight how can the scientific view of food and flavor augment our appreciation for different cuisines rather than a race tradition and culture. I'm glad you asked that because i think that super important and also reflects that like the development element of food science throughout the twentieth and into the twenty first century has generally been used to standardize and uniform is and and <hes> make cuisine less local unless reflective of people in history <hes> and more flexible what's exhibit engineer but i think something to bear in mind is that a super traditional dish like a dora watt or a homemade kimchi or a tortilla has way more science going on than like a precision engineered bottle of vitamin water or or some other standardized thing just because anytime you have the combination of human activity on the natural world. There's more things going on so if you strip them away to make them easier to engineer. I think there's actually less science going on so something like a a very very traditional kimchi. Kimchi is a korean pickle. It can actually be made out of a huge variety of vegetables. Probably the most familiar version is cabbage kimchi and there's all these cam she there's there's salt involved obviously there's often chilly but not always often garlic but not always and and the cabbage gets packed into jars and it ferments and turns into a like lactic acid pickle so it's definitely possible to take a dish like kimchi and try to absolutely standardize the cabbage and then like sterilize the cabbage and take a known strain of lactic acid bacteria inoculated in a way that feels very scientific and technical but in a traditional way population of lactic acid bacteria on on the surface of the raw cabbage varies hugely based on like where it was grown <hes> what the weather conditions were like who has handled it how it's been stored the word the the water content the type of salt that you use can also have a huge impact on the flavor but that's because it impacts like what strains reins of lactic acid bacteria grow and thrive and how they interact with each other and like what sort of synergistic effects they have <hes> how fast they ferment and then the whole acute horiuchi of additional ingredients whether that's like dicon or pear or chili paste or <hes> dried shrimp or dried fish each bring <music> a gigantic and chaotic chaotic in the technical sense of small changes leading.

scientist noma copenhagen food science department ashida ashani arielle johnson richard feynman engineer harvard howard university of california davis director basque culinary center brown rachel dutton
The father of a Sandy Hook victim dies from an apparent suicide

Anderson Cooper 360

03:08 min | 3 years ago

The father of a Sandy Hook victim dies from an apparent suicide

"Sat in difficult news to report tonight news that reminder to us all about how fragile human life is. And how important it is to whenever possible reach out for help. Or reach out to help those need the father of a little girl who was murdered in the Newtown massacre was found dead early this morning. Jeremy Richmond was his name. And he was forty nine years old. His daughter Arielle Richmond was six when she was killed along with nineteen other children and six adults at sandy hook elementary school in two thousand and twelve after the massacre, Mr. Richmond co-founded, the AVI L foundation, a nonprofit name for his daughter focused on violence prevention through research and community engagement. I spoke to Jeremy and his wife Jennifer about their daughter and their lives in two thousand and thirteen for CNN documentary. To such a wonderfully fun child, and she she would light up. You know? I wish that you got to meet her you would've just been blown away. She's fun. She was funny. She would have made you smile, you know, every day we need to. To get out of bed and Jen Jenna came up with distributional idea of to to get us out of bed. And everyday we try to find something of beauty something that makes you feel the world that good place. And then every day we wanna make sure that we try to really strive to give back something of beauty something to the world striving to give back something viewed each the world. Jeremy Richmond is forty nine years old and the cause of death is an apparent suicide. It's often impossible to know for sure what may be in someone's head or hard that leads to depression and sometimes to death by suicide, but there have been several other recent deaths that we wanna make you aware of in Florida mourners, grieving the death of Sydney. Yellow she was two thousand eighteen graduate of Marjory stoneman Douglas high school who died by suicide last week. She survived the attack on Valentine's Day last year. The killed seventeen people that school in parkland, her mom told CNN affiliate W F O R that Sydney suffered from survivor's guilt and had been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder on Saturday night. Another parkland student apparently also died by suicide the student has not been publicly identified, but as a sophomore, according to the Miami Herald, again, we don't know what caused these three people to have these thoughts into unfortunately act on them. It is important to note that help is available reaching out for it can be hard, and it's made harder by the stigma, which unfortunately, still surround suicide, and it's made harder by the silence that also surround suicide it's not easy to talk about it. If you're having thoughts of suicide, and it's really not easy to talk about if someone you know is suffering, and you wanna help them it's often hard to know what to say or. How to help but reaching out in both cases and talking that is essential. There is help out there. And it's just a phone call away if you or someone, you know might be at risk of suicide you can call the national suicide prevention lifeline or showing you the number right now at the bottom of your screen, the number one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five.

Arielle Richmond Jeremy Richmond Marjory Stoneman Douglas High Sydney CNN Sandy Hook Elementary School Miami Herald Jen Jenna Avi L Foundation Valentine Florida Jennifer Forty Nine Years
UFC, Derek Lewis And Madison Square Garden discussed on SportsCenter AllNight

SportsCenter AllNight

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

UFC, Derek Lewis And Madison Square Garden discussed on SportsCenter AllNight

"UFC heavyweight title fight in New York City at the garden at Daniel Corby remains the heavyweight champ defeats Derek Lewis by a second round submission ESPN's Arielle hell Wanni with ESPN UFC analyst shield soda UFC's. Third trip to Madison Square Garden is in the books. Daniel Cormie is still the UFC heavyweight champion he submits Derek Lewis in the second round via rear naked choke had to get it done. Shell data Corp said before this fight. He said, if all you have is a punchers chance, then it gets me. You have no chance ultimately that was true to skilled. He's to conditions. Insight. He's good at the grind. I like the fight. He needed need to do. No upset

UFC Derek Lewis Madison Square Garden Daniel Cormie Espn Daniel Corby Shell Data Corp New York City Analyst
San Antonio Spurs clinch playoff berth for 21st consecutive season and more

01:35 min | 4 years ago

San Antonio Spurs clinch playoff berth for 21st consecutive season and more

"Now let's go ahead and check out the nba scoreboard presented by riyal day meanest when you're in the mood online check at the happy arielle day munis mexican restaurants monday through friday from two to six and again from eight to midnight at all four locations nuggets got absolutely no help tonight from other teams everybody they needed to lose one and the one team that is still playing that they would like to lose is killing the clippers right now the pelicans lead the la clippers eighty three to fifty seven with three thirty five ago in the third quarter finals from today raptors beat the pistons one eight ninety eight cavs take down the knicks won twenty three to one on nine nets beat the bulls won fourteen to one fifteen and the bucks over the magic one or two to eighty six now the teams in the west that really affect what's happening in the playoffs the thunder clinched a playoff spot today we don't know what see but they did clinch a spot as they beat the heat one fifteen ninety three the timber wolves handled the grizzlies one thousand nine hundred ninety four minnesota in denver on wednesday for a playoff spot and the spurs rallied to beat the kings ninety eight to eighty five so the spurs clinch a playoff spot san antonio is going to the playoffs for the twenty first straight season twenty one seasons road spurs are in the playoffs and of course tonight the nuggets over the blazers eighty eight to eighty two will continue the post game show brought to you by land rover denver after break on the altitude radio you're listening to the denver nuggets basketball.

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