19 Burst results for "Ariel Waldman"

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

Short Wave

01:42 min | 2 months ago

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

"Thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explorer aerial. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study and articles extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of the creatures that they studied there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. Couldn't could not have been easy going to antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to aunt hartika and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy and then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society which i am now the president of

Antarctica Ariel Waldman Nasa Hartika San Francisco Microscopically
"ariel waldman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Experience for the microscopic world around us, and that's really where I'm hoping to take everything. That's Ariel Waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker. At the microbial scale. You can see all her microbes at life under the ice stat or g'kar, and you can watch her talk at ted dot com. On the show today through the looking glass, and so far, we've taken the looking glass, quite literally, Scientists peering into space or magnifying the tiny universes that exist in a drop of water. But how about we turn that looking glass inward and into our own minds? I think we could talk about the human mind the unconscious as the final frontier. This is therapist Rick Doblin and what we need to do. Who is to engage in a deep understanding an exploration of the unconscious and Rick Research is the final frontier of the unconscious with psychedelics. Preparing for this talk has been scarier for me than preparing for LSD therapy. Here he is on the Ted stage psychedelics are to the study of the mind What the microscope is Biology and the telescope is to astronomy. Doctor Stanislaw graph spoke those words. Right now, There are clinical trials using psychedelic drugs in conjunction with therapy to treat PTSD, depression, social anxiety, substance abuse, alcoholism and suicide. And so far, the results are promising. Psychedelic psychotherapy is an attempt to go after the root causes of the problems with just Relatively few administrations. As contrast that tow most of the psychiatric drugs used today that air mostly just reducing symptoms and are meant to be taken on a daily basis. Changing people's minds over the safety and efficacy of psychedelic drugs has taken decades in the 19 fifties and sixties, psychedelic research flourished and showed great promise.

Ariel Waldman Rick Doblin Stanislaw today ted dot com 19 fifties Rick sixties Ted
"ariel waldman" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:48 min | 3 months ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Them. This is Ariel Waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale, and I An adviser to NASA, and I'm also in Antarctic Explorer aerial first became interested in an Arctic microbes back in 2013. She was working with NASA and she met Astrobiologists who study Antarctica is extreme conditions and the life forms that actually thrive there. I had learned that a lot of biologists go to Antarctica, but they very rarely, ever Take any photos or videos of the creatures that they study there. And so I kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people you know, around the world, actually. Get to see all this amazing stuff. So that realization that is what inspired you to basically become the first film maker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen? Couldn't it could not have been easy? Going to Antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months, and this was after it took me five years of applying to go to Antarctica and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so I was self taught in my cross copy. And then I ended up joining the San Francisco microscopic ALS Society, which I am now the president of Super G s. So you had to become an expert. My cross capicik. Am I saying that right? Yes, exactly. Exactly. And and so do you. Remember like Do you remember what it was like when you first got to put a sample under the microscope in Antarctica and peer into this tiny alien world for the first time,.

Ariel Waldman NASA Antarctica 2013 five years Antarctic first time Arctic both scientists first Francisco first film maker ALS Society Super G San
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:38 min | 3 months ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"So i could help direct divers to take collections from the ceiling and from the sea floor and then i would take the samples back to the main laboratory at mcmurdo station in filter them and look at them under the microscope. As freshly as. I could so that i could see them interacting in the way that they would interact in their home environment. So so tell us about the microbes you found and the footage that you took them. We're actually going to look at them and describe some of them here and the first one is a her agreed area. What is the grade so tardy. Great is also known as a water bear or sometimes even a moss piglet and they are tiny microscopic animals. They are actually animals. They have eight legs. They're incredibly cute. They look like little. Gummy bears with claus. I always like to say they've got two little ice spots tar degrade slow walker so they are not the quickest microbes that you'll see under the microscope but they're just adorable and they're famous for being hard core for being able to survive extreme cold or extreme dryness radiation and lots of other things so it looks like to me. Okay yes gummy bear. You say gummy bear. I think it also looks like a manatee with through and microscopic and it's just kind of moving around with its little arms. what is it doing. Yes the little claws on grades are really good at going through moss so their most common environment that you'll find these cards in is moss and those claws allow them to be really nimble but when you put one on a glass slide. It has trouble. It's kind of like a is skating rink for it. So what you're seeing is a top grade which is able to navigate through maas fairly easily but once it tries walking over the glass slips and slides and has trouble getting traction. Wow so much going on for the little grade okay. So let's take a look at the next one. I'm just going to describe it. It's kind of oblong translucent. With looks like these little green beach balls kind of moving around inside of it. Oh and it's it's moving a bit it's got a little shimmy. What is happening here ariel. Who is this. Yeah so this is a silly it. It's a type of protest and protest. They're not animals plants and they're not fun guy they are their own thing and you saw it just pooped out like a little piece of stuff from its stomach and this is what i love about. Conciliates elliott's because they have silia on their outside which just means little fringy bits. That are like little hairs that they use to get around and feel for food and other things like that but the thing. I love about silly. It says that you can see their entire digestive system. Pretty much. Just a circle of digestion. That you're looking at you know earlier in the show we spoke to emily hlavac. She's an astronomer. And it strikes me that you both have been transported into places that it's kinda hard to believe. They exist without seeing them. You may not believe them. Is that what happened to you with this project. I feel like i feel. It's the same as telescope. Really shows you another world. But i think microscopes even more so because this is the world that you already live in so instead of showing you this far away distant planet and imagining what that is like you already know what earth is like. It's just that you don't know that you're walking by entire zoos of tiny animals every day you know tar grades while they're famous for surviving these extreme environments they live in moss everywhere across the planet so every single sidewalk crack that you walk by that has a little piece of moss embedded inside it. There's most likely a lot of tartu grades in there. And this is what i love about. Microscopes is really it gives you much more insight into your experience as a human on earth which is a pretty amazing planet when you study space and so has that outlook and this experience changed you in some way. And we're where you're headed for me. My own journey and microscopes. I think is is really growing. I'm wanting to do more field microscopy in different locations so a whether it be going into prairies or the rainforests of madagascar It's very clear that being able to go into the field and look at the microscopic critters that are around and and being able to showcase that to the world is something that's really useful because there's just so much that you know. We enjoy from bbc documentaries of wildlife and we should have that same experience for the microscopic around us and and that's really where. I'm hoping to take everything that's ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker. Microbial scale you can see all her microbes at life under the istat and you can watch her talk at ted dot com. This message comes from. Npr sponsor forward the all electric mustang mach e and a twelve foot rocket. Take off the rocket launches up into the atmosphere while the all electric pony takes off toward the horizon at full speed visit for dot com for a new perspective on range..

ariel waldman emily hlavac eight legs dot com Npr both earth first one ted dot com bbc twelve foot rocket two little ice spots mcmurdo mustang mach e single sidewalk crack madagascar one
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm minutia summer odi today on the show. We are venturing through the looking glass extending our perception and exploring strange new worlds including here on earth. So when you land on the packed snow runway in mcmurdo You don't see anything it's just no so there's no trees if no bush's there's no grasses. None of that. Most people think of antarctica is really desolate covered with over a mile of ice in many locations. It's the coldest continent it's Also extremely dry. It's a polar desert. But the thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explore. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study antarctica's extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of The creatures that they study there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. I couldn't could not have been easy going to end. Arctic oh required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to antarctica and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy. And then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society Which i am now. The president of super geeky. So you become an expert microscopy fisk and my saying that right. Yes exactly exactly and do you remember like you remember what it was like when you first got to put a sample under the microscope in antarctica and peer into this tiny alien world for the first time just about fainted. I the very first sample. I got to look at was from divers who had gone under the c. I s and i had an idea of like a few of the different critters that i was going to see but when i put the first sample under the microscope i saw these beautiful diatoms which are micro algae with glass shells which are just beautiful. Their geometric gems of the sea and of different areas of water around the earth. But but i found diatoms that had triangular shapes and they just looked like they had been manufactured by humans. There so gorgeous. And i i. It's hard to put it into words. Just how excited i was. Okay so talk us through it like. What was the plan for you and your trustee microscopes so the plan in antarctica was to take my microscopes around to different locations and really be able to find life that was under the ice so i was looking for a life underneath the cis i was looking for life. Embedded inside glacier ice life that was Near frozen lakes and i would go around and i would take samples from different locations and some of the areas where i sampled that. We're more hardcore to get to. I would join up with another team. And and one of those hardcore places. was beneath the ice like into the water. Absolutely right absolutely freezing water. I believe the water is negative to celsius so because it saltwater it can go a little bit beyond the normal freezing point of water and they're divers in antarctica that regularly go down Under nine feet thick of sea ice and explore the ocean down there. It's it's really amazing. I was watching these divers going like. Why would anyone want to do that. Is freezing called like there's nothing that can be that worth it but thankfully there's this this metal tube that Mcmurdo station put into the ice. And you can crawl down to.

ariel waldman antarctica Arctic antarctic mcmurdo five years earth today first time first sample both scientists first first filmmaker one Under nine feet a mile nasa two thousand thirteen san francisco minutia
"ariel waldman" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:43 min | 11 months ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Hi! It's Ted talks daily. At least you, you may think of it as just a giant sheet of ice, but on Antarctica you can find an oasis of life. That's invisible to the naked eye. We're talking about microbes in Ariel. Waldman is an Antarctic explorer at NASA better who explores this kind of wildlife at the microscopic scale in her Ted Twenty twenty talk, she shares the wonder of the continent that is indeed ninety eight percent ice, and why its ecosystem is powerful and crucial to life on this planet. I I'm Salim. Russia Walla host of a new podcast from Ted called pin-drop. Every week you'll travel to a different location around the world. Get lost in a new vibe and tap into a surprising idea. Next up, we get into dinosaurs and deep time all behind a hardware store in a very normal New Jersey suburb. That's pin-drop from Ted. Out pin-drop on Apple PODCASTS spotify or wherever you listen. What if I told you? There's a place where the creatures are made of glass. Or that their life forms are invisible to us, but astronaut see them all the time. These invisible glass creatures aren't aliens on a faraway exit, planet or diatoms, photosynthetic single celled algae responsible for producing oxygen and helping see clouds on a planetary scale. And with intricately sculpted geometric skeletons made of. Glass? You can see them in swirls of ocean surface colors from space, and when they die, their glasshouses sink to the depths of the oceans, taking carbon of the air, and with them to the grave accounting for a significant amount of carbon sequestration in the oceans. We live on an alien planet. There is so much weird life here on earth to study, and so much of it lives at the edges of our world of our sites. End of our understanding, one of those edges is Antarctica. Typically when we think about Antarctica, we think of a place that's barren and lifeless, except for a few penguins, but Antarctica should instead be known as a polar oasis of life host to countless creatures that are utterly fascinating. So, why haven't we seen them? On the latest nature documentary? Well, they lurk beneath the snow and ice virtually invisible to us. They're microbes, tiny plants and animals living embedded inside of glaciers underneath the sea ice in swimming in glacial. And they're no less charismatic than any of the megaphone that you're used to seeing in a nature documentary. But how do you compel people to explore what they can't see? I recently led a five week expedition to Antarctica to become a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. With one hundred eighty five pounds of gear I, boarded a military aircraft and brought microscopes into the field to film an investigate these microscopic extreme files so that we can become more familiar with a poorly understood ecosystem that we live with here on earth. To film these invisible creatures in action. I needed to see where they call home. I needed venture under the ice. Every year the CIS nearly doubles the entire size of Antarctica. To get a glimpse below the nine feet thick is I climbed down a long metal tube inserted into the sea ice to witness, a hidden ecosystem full of life, hoping suspended between the sea floor, and the illuminated ceiling of ice. It was just absolutely magical. Some of the critters I found were delightful. Things like seed, shrimp and many more beautiful geometric diatoms. I then went farther afield to camp out in the dry valleys a couple of weeks. Ninety eight percent of Antarctica is covered with ice, and the dry valleys are the largest area of Antarctica. Where you can actually see what the continent itself looks like underneath all of it, I sampled bacteria at blood, falls a natural phenomenon of a subglacial ponds, spurting out iron oxide that was thought to be utterly lifeless until a little more than a decade ago. And I hiked up a glacier to drill down into it revealing countless hardcore critters, living their best lives, all embedded inside layers of ice. Known as Craig night holes, they form when tiny pieces of darkly colored dirt get blown onto the glacier, and begin to melt down into soupy holes, then freeze over preserving hundreds of dirt pucks inside the glacier like little island universes each with its own unique either system. Some of the critters I found. You may recognize the door harder. Grade I absolutely love them like little gummy bears the clause. Also known as a water bear famous for possessing superpowers that allow them to survive in extreme conditions including the vacuum of space. But. You don't need to travel to space or even Antarctica to find them. They live in Moss all over this planet from sidewalk cracks to parks. You Likely Walk Right by tons of these invisible animals every day. Others may look familiar, but be stranger still like nematodes, not a snake, earthworms nematodes are creature all their own. They can't regenerate like an earthworm or crawl snake, but they have tiny dagger like needles inside their mouths, but some of them use to spearfish or prey and suck out the insights. For. Every single human on this planet there exists fifty seven billion nematodes. And some of the critters you may not recognize it all live out equally fascinating lives such as road offers with amazing crowns that turned into room, but like Maoz. Silly at swift, I just system so transparent that it's almost TMI and cyanobacteria. That party confetti exploded all over a petri dish. See in popular media are scanning electron microscope images of microorganisms looking like scary monsters. Without seeing the move, their lives remain elusive to us. Despite them living nearly everywhere, we step outside. What's their daily life like? How do they interact with their environment? You only ever saw a photo of pain Gwyn Zoo, but you never saw one waddell around and then glide over ice. You wouldn't fully understand penguins. By, saying micro creatures in motion gain better insights into the lives of the otherwise invisible. Without documenting the visible life in Antarctica and our own backyards, we don't understand just how many creatures we share our world with, and that means we don't yet have the full picture of our weird and whimsical home planet..

Antarctica Ted Ted Twenty twenty Russia Walla NASA Waldman New Jersey Gwyn Zoo spotify Apple Craig spearfish waddell TMI
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

17:19 min | 1 year ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"To subscribe to your furniture where you can just have the furniture in your home option so if you if you move you don't have to keep it and you can keep swapping it out that's one of the benefits of people do that with phones to where they they paid for a plan it gives them the newest phone every year speakers on the other hand not something I mean I've had my soda speakers for an embarrassingly longtime probably like seven years so it's not something that is swap out maybe that's more important to somebody's well and Sonos is and I have some of those old sonos speakers as well Tom but I also have a couple of Dose Ones I've been looking at the beam but I've been holding off because it's actually quite expensive sonos is a premium audio brand you know if you're into it and afford it it works great but it is priced out of a lot of people's hands and so the idea that you can get into something at a lower price which as any lease option works as anybody knows who has a car you you will end up paying more over time one but this is a subscription model that people are getting more and more familiar with on the hardware side it's a little interesting to me that Sonos is doing this but it's like I don't know look at creative cloud that you know so many subscription services people kind of go like yeah well but then you get free updates everything's kind all part of the deal you just pay once a month and you get all that stuff what I think is somewhat strange about this is it's almost as if Sonos is selling this as if to say but you get all the new stuff automatically they're not releasing a new speaker like every few months it's more like once every a year or two so that has to be something that you have to take into consideration you know if you think you're getting the latest and greatest it's not like some sort of IOS update no but the irs only updates once a year so sonus we're updating once a year maybe that would make sense I think they're updating much less frequently than that and and almost to the point of like so I don't know reo would you would you subscribe to speakers. I mean I personally wouldn't but I you know I to me it's all brings up blake if people are going to have ways to managed like what you subscribe to because there are so many subscription services but also I'm someone who has my own subscription service I have Patriot you have patriotic like you know when people subscribe to that and that's meant for people who are fans of your work and just want us gortat and equally I guess this sounds a little bit like the the Apple Program of if you want the latest greatest and you're a fan you know then the is a way to go for it and maybe maybe they just launched this as sort of low hanging fruit and maybe they're not expecting it to be something you know like Netflix that takes over our I don't think it's for me but what I've heard of people who do have these speakers a lot of them are like super fans of Sauna so you know maybe it's just meant for their super fans I'm not really sure well it's it is a test so maybe it's not really sure either we'll we'll see how it goes in the Netherlands speaking of Apple Apple released Mac. Os Catalina to the public downloadable from the MAC APP store for free the gone if you get catalina replace by standalone music podcasts TV APPs that are mimics of the ones you find on IOS and TV os IOS device management now goes through the finder instead of in so if you want to sink your phone still or an ipod touch that's where you'll find it apple ID management as part of a new profile setting and system preferences and a lot of folks are really excited about sidecar that let's turn an IPAD into a secondary display for your Mac with Apple Pencil to turn the IPAD into a drawing tablet when using Photoshop and illustrator on the Mac duet might be better for those sort of situations but it's now built in they've sure locked that feature to some extent so we both upgraded our Max to to Catalina I upgraded my laptop because I'm a coward not my production machine that I'm streaming on now but Sarah you were braver than me you went right to the you're using catalina to stream right now I live a life on the edge and did I upgraded at about Ten am knowing this might take a while ten am Pacific knowing that this might take a while and it's still kind of barely finished by the time she Oh time started however it was fairly seamless didn't have any hiccups and boy and again these are these are AH jerk reactions because I've had a very short amount of time to live with us but as somebody who hated the I tunes up more than life itself particularly on extend the fact that music and podcasts in the new TV up are all separated makes my life so much better music and particular because I've subscribed to apple music for a couple of years now love it use it all the time the experience within I tunes US ten was you could get there but it was just convoluted and made no sense now it mirrors exactly what it looks like on us I mean besides the fact that you have a little bit or screen real estate on Os ten depending on your display and you know but for the most part it it makes more sense than it ever did man I just lawn while you were describing that I launched sidecar and connected to the IPAD that I use to launch the sounds on DNS connected like that it was pretty fast pretty impressive so yeah folks if you want to get all the tech headlines each day in about five minutes be sure to subscribe to daily tech headlines Dot COM all right let's talk about aunt Arctic first of all how were you able to make this happen I won't even ask you why because I think it's Artika is the answer to that but like how were you able to get this all together yeah so I I got really obsessed with the idea of going to Antarctica but because I don't have a formal background ryan's I didn't really know what my pathway there would be but I discovered that the National Science Foundation has a grant called the Antarctic artists and writers grant so they send every year they send down a couple artists and writers to Antarctica to Do interesting creative work that communicates a certain aspects of Anna Antarctica so I thought that was a good pathway am unbeknownst to me it ended up taking me four applications over five years to this grant up getting there so it was a long haul but but last year I finally got the go-ahead from from this program to go down there so I spent five weeks down there bill and you were you were studying and writing about extrema files particularly I know right yeah so I I went down to film all of the microscope topic extreme files that live beneath the ice in different locations so beneath the sea ice or beneath glaciers things of that nature and I wanted to film them using microscopes because a ton of biologists get sent onto Antarctica to tell us like what species are down there and their distribution but they don't really take many McGrath typically our they may be one or two photographs and they end up in a scientific paper and you never see it so no one really knows that Antarctica actually full of life and no one really knows what that life looks like so that that was my whole project yeah the storytelling aspect of it I would think is is was very needed did you like the you know the science community that you were hanging out with for five weeks was was was happy to have you there and kind of understood the the general uh-huh yeah that was the most surprising in a in a good way to a aspect to me so I do a lot of work in science but it's not all the time that I go to a community and get introduced as an artist even though that's my background I was a little bit nervous that people were going to think that so much of like a camaraderie of like you made it to Antarctica who here's what you do or how you made it here like we're all here together like let's be like awesome friends there's something so people were really fascinated no one no one treated me like I didn't know my stuff about the clients that I was there to do and everyone was actually really just interested because if anything going down to Antarctica as an artist serving food all day like getting to Antarctica as an artist is a pretty special thing and it is a pretty special program one of the things I enjoyed about your series was kind of in costume and and you were able to use your your normal technology there's some there's some antiquated technology going on like I know you're issued a pager what what's the balance between the nine hundred ninety s era stuff that still persists because it works and what you are able to bring in us on your own most of that's okay in in the McMurdo area because you are at sea level so it wallets definitely very cold in the summer there it's not yeah they do use very antiquated technologies because there's very few satellites that are polar orbiting and because of that they Collab I'm going to be like thirty minutes lay and they're not at their home or office I can't God club who've enjoyed this broader.

Sonos Apple irs Netflix Tom blake Netherlands gortat five weeks thirty minutes five minutes seven years five years
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Mm Studio Feline I'm Sarah Lane and I'm Roger Chan the show's Britta's it very excited to have area Waldman NASA advisor and author of what it's like in space Korea silicon tablet case and a Free Year of free time unlimited both devices are available for preorder today shipping October thirtieth the ten starts at one two hundred forty nine dollars and the H. E. Ten kids edition starts at one hundred ninety nine dollars to your replacement warranty not battery although if your battery rigs you get a replace do years so it works either way and that that's that's really important when selling these kids editions the fire tablet was the first one to kind of pioneer this idea of having a kid friendly version of the device so I'm not surprised to see them kind of updating that along with bringing it out to the kindle the new fire hd ten tablet certainly seems like it's well specked but people seem most excited about the fact that it has a USB port on it like p we've gone from complaining about things with UC ports did like cheering when a USB port say I have so many of them anyway now thank you just get on board California Governor Gavin newsom signed two bills into law last week regulating the distribution of deep fake videos bill AB seven thirty now our law ABC thirty makes it illegal to distribute manipulated videos aimed at deceiving voters or discrediting candidates within sixty days of an election? I guess if it's sixty one days before and election you can distribute all you want ABC six zero two gives people in California the right to do to sue someone for creating pornographic deep fakes using their likeness without consent and a study released Monday from debt security company deep trace found that ninety six percent of the more than fourteen thousand depict videos identified online were pornographic in nature not necessarily revenge porn or something like that but that seems to be what it's used most four so ABC six Oh to making it easier to sue someone for creating deep fakes using their likeness seems like it is called for since that's the majority use of this eighty seven thirty which is the one about not distributing manipulated videos aimed deceiving voters I mean why limit sixty days is my is my question yeah you mentioned if it's sixty one days are we in the clear here yeah it seems like it's a rule that is designed to confuse and you know and perhaps unfairly manipulate something can election it should just be a real hundred percent at the time I suppose I suppose there's reasons to say well we're we're limiting speech too much we do that so just around elections we want to dampen down but if you're limiting speech limiting speech whether it's not area I'm curious if you have a take on on that particular part of this that that idea of of saying you can't distribute something meant to deceive voters and who gets to decide that too yeah well and also how is it enforceable also if something's created at sixty seventy days but then it doesn't really pick up until within the sixty day frame and someone else who disseminates it from someone who's the irs is just it seems very strange I'd I'd be very curious where that came from and a little bit dismayed if it just came from well the sixty days leading up to the election as when you can really distort voters we've found or something I don't know it's I don't know it's almost like they created it to be shot down it seems very ano- strange I wonder somebody's going to challenge that in court especially that what you mentioned does it really interesting scenario of like I have a bunch of things up that are there could be considered deceptive and then it sixty days do I have to take them all down for sixty days until the nations over and then I can put them back up or if somebody re tweets them are or something similar distributors it come back to me distributor there is it you know it's it's interesting we'll see how this ends up being enforced and if it gets taken into court I also wonder if it's really about individuals or about the social networks themselves who are they trying to hold to account is it is it the conspiracy theorists or is it Jack Dorsey oh now well it's the distributor so my guess is it's going to it's targeted at the platforms because they are the distributor of things there also the companies that will pay out more money one suit yes this is perhaps a letter notes sonos launched a test of option service for its hardware called Sonos flex five hundred homes in the Netherlands can now choose from three different plans fifteen euros per month gets you too so I once mark speakers which is equivalent buying after just more than.

ABC California Governor Gavin newsom Waldman NASA H. E. Ten Britta Sarah Lane advisor Korea Roger Chan sixty days sixty one days one two hundred forty nine dol one hundred ninety nine dollar ninety six percent sixty seventy days hundred percent sixty day
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Features include reading badges kids earn for how often they read or the types of books they read and more some gamification kind of stuff and a new feature also puts a quick definition of challenging words available between the lines of the book and turn that on or off there's a few other dictionary related features in there for helping kids understand words but first time that Amazon has targeted an e reader particularly at kids I love this idea as a kid I read prolifically I often challenging word where it was like mom what does this word mean she say isn't sentence we'd figure it out amongst nice to have a little bit of like a some sort of a something that echoes my smartwatch where it says like you've read a really good amount keep going you know smarter that kind of thing I I think that that is really motivated and certainly for certain kids and I'd be interested to see if this could be integrated into schools a little bit more so that Teachers could help you know what champion was kids along Yeah Yeah Yeah Roger I'm curious if that free time service you know I don't know that you have a bunch of these Amazon devices so so maybe that's a nonstarter right there but is it attractive to you and your two daughters actually but I don't like you said I don't actually have a lot of amd or amdi Amazon devices I can see it being more useful as my daughter gets older but she's still at the stage where she wants to watch very erratic stuff so it's she doesn't have the attention span guests to sit through anything more educational than five minutes. What about other educational situations I I mean I'm like got some possibilities however I don't know if there's an educational version of free time or if it's really seems to be really targeted a parent's right now in fact I don't think that there is one I think that it would be a great idea for Amazon to figure out how this could be integrated into schools because you know oftentimes the teachers are the ones that are encouraging kids to read and do more educational things on on tablets anyway Amazon also updated the fire Jacobites of internal storage with Microsoft E card expansion any USB port battery life is ready to.

Amazon amd Microsoft five minutes
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Kids that's something can't cut your five dollars a month depending on where the prime or not but you for free if you get the Amazon Kids Edition Kindle kindle kids edition is available ourselves and it would have said Sarah there's there's all kinds of ways that I could see teachers taking advantage of this maybe you know having some reading time for folks seems like a a really.

Sarah Amazon five dollars
Hulu finally lets you download shows to watch offline

Daily Tech News Show

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Hulu finally lets you download shows to watch offline

"Launched the ability to download shows for offline viewing users can download up to twenty five titles across five devices keeping their for thirty days although once you start watching a title it expires two days after you start playing it back if you're on the commercial free plan you can download the majority of whose catalog using lose IOS APP who says it will bring that function to android soon but caveat if you have the cheaper plan the one with commercials you don't get the offline viewing plan you got to pay for the top

Thirty Days Two Days
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"I think they record and then the like. They'll say they did it with us. Which we super dope would record an episode and then they were charred on their podcast and we were shared on our podcast to i'm confused so we would we we would record it together. Yeah we would there would be or or they would argue. Okay okay okay well. Let's reach out to this fucking people that cool. It's these two women aaron and aaron and thank god. It's women great can we can you reach out to them both white. You should probably do that. You're better know you're on the website. You're the there's a gift. He's being all used around the internet of you you think so i found on the gifty site you can track how many views your gifts have said the word analytics and i believe you said what does that mean yeah and now i'm just telling you that i looked into it because you asked me you fucking always ask me shit and i looked into it and i couldn't see how many from what i could tell there was take me to see how often it was used but it was viewed very often now but i like what does that and who cares. I view a lot of gifts that i don't use i said. Did you set up analytics so we can see the area and you said i don't know those words yes. Oh thank got it so <hes> yeah we'll open up at the contact page opened up here for this podcast will kill you. I got <hes> a- all kinds of other tabbed opened. Should i have to do look at something called buffer and share this thing about post mates all super intrigued so buffer started us as like lightweight way to schedule your tweets just like hey. Here's a calendar and you plug it in your your shit. I was pretty simple <hes> but but it's it's definitely gotten much more comprehensive over the past year or so since we've been using hoot suite which is good expensive as shit got and and not i mean not the simplest interface on the planet so buffer is a more cost effective and maybe but i don't know if that's why i asked you to look oh. I have to look at the cost of the whole thing. That's why i said. Could you put together a whole <hes> my god. Who do you think i am. It will take twenty minutes right. It would be really great. You could excited about it. <hes> yeah so anyways. Hey here's a superfund thing ooh <hes> that i haven't even told you about yet so back way back we had on a lovely woman ariel waldman yep remember that and then she went to antarctica incentives postcards yep she is the creator and founder behind something called science hack day that we talked about yes we did had <hes> there have been nine of those and they're about to have the tenth one own and the last one oh in san francisco and we are going to be fucking sponsors of it. Whoa get so finishing that up with her. That's awesome yep pretty pretty pretty cool. Why she said scientific day san francisco so <hes> information science hack day she said basically <hes> as far as wise. It ending wears it again. I lost it again. Mother fucker falker something about basically it's good end on the tenth one like it's been good but devolve and see something else. Oh hell anyways it. It is october nine thousand nine hundred twentieth at fun tober nineteenth and twentieth in san francisco. It is at get hub headquarters. Thanks to give up get hub who has right now is the only other sponsor here's the deal it is free and <hes> it is is awesome for people to sign up make teams you can come with ideas. You can come with some hardware. They have some stuff. There's all that stuff on the website part of where our responser money is going is to help pay for childcare and travel bursaries.

san francisco aaron ariel waldman founder twenty minutes
"ariel waldman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"We have a professor there. Dr Stacey Kim. And she goes Stanford Artika grill drills to the ice looking at animals there. So maybe it start with Antarctica. I if I was going to go down this route your way up and figure out what it's like to kind of do that from earth. And if I can survive that then maybe space about you that you for years is not that bad in my mind is someone's that's a four year trip. It like it's a long time. My biggest concern always with these sort of laundry human dishes. I would one hundred percent like if someone was like can I transport you to grow up today and put you in radiation chilly. Yes. No, no doubt about it. If it's for the problem is always I think, there's nobody. And I love my family my friends. I don't think there's anybody in the world that I want to be stuck in ship with for four years. And I just don't know that like I could that's the part that would get to me. Not the not the, you know, the time and space because I feel like okay, you have some more every day. You've got books to read. It's I'd get a little ANSI definitely one of those people. But you know, you know, treadmill a bicycle down there. All right. I'll make this work part of not worrying about four years gets me through grad school. Oh, there you go HD. I don't need to talk to anybody else on the advisor in that case. Because there's nobody else you can really judge that that work better known needs to prove free this. I'm with you. I, you know, I would I would probably like want to work my way up and see how comfortable I am actually trying to go down towards laser this year, which I hope it will happen. But yet for me Antarctica is like my version of going to space like my extreme. I'm good with. So you tell me how it goes. And if it works out that trying to rope. Okay. We'll just not killing we'll see Jupiter in this. I mean like that picture. This guy off so beautiful that. Yeah. That might be worth right before you die of reduced part might not be worth. Okay. Well, thank you guys so much for being on the show today. And this is Kim Yeah. fun. That's fun. Tricks in space. Rushing sharks. A little astronaut helmets on. So that was pretty incredible having them both here and having that conversation, I'm personally really excited for us actually going to Europa in real life. That might be something that happens in the twenty twenties. And you know, I don't know. I I can only hope that it doesn't play out the way the movie did right in right now. I know a lot of lower space exploration talk is focus on Mars. And so we see a lot of science fiction about that. And so as we get to focus on Europa and Bobby is already talking about that kind of stuff. Maybe we'll see more representations of Europa in pop culture in film, and TV and books. Yeah. That would be really exciting. Thanks so much for listening. Again. I'm Ariel Waldman. At Ariel Waldman on Twitter at enchant on Twitter. And you can also follow our guests on social media as well. Thank them for having scrape conversation with you and thank you all for listening. We'll see next time..

Antarctica Ariel Waldman Dr Stacey Kim Twitter professor Kim Yeah. advisor Bobby four years one hundred percent four year
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"There's so many people that are helpful and have made a huge impact on my life over the last six months. So I'm forgetting a gazillion people, but, but that's at least my short answer. I know we're running a bit long, but yeah, I just wish he were thankful about the things that have happened to you in your health down. It would be heavy. Perfect. Okay. All right, real quick lightning round of questions here. Number one, what do you do when you feel overwhelmed aerial? I do a lot of different things, and that's do Matt. Look us give you one answer. What would when you're just like, fuck this. When I'm overwhelmed to like a frustrating point, I usually try to do something like, you know, get Boba t and go to the park, and you know, even if I've got meetings or if I'm too busy, I try to really utilize what I call eight sort of independence muscle, which is, you know, I'm self employed and it something where it's a lot of it's a surprising amount of work when your employees nothing ever turns off. So being really conscious about doing things like in the middle of the week, you know, like I'm gonna go to the park when everyone else is at work, but I'm even though I'm really busy doing things are important because if you don't sort of exercise that that muscle, it's very. Easy to just not want to be self-employed. Any, right. I did a lot of that when the World Cup was on and it was great. And I'm also very behind on some. So to point to a point, I how do you consume the news nowadays through the web and the webcam social media I used to for years on anti fell. I was the only millennial that every day I would watch the five thirty pm NBC nightly news the I watched that every day it until the election, and then I quit cold Turkey because I couldn't handle large anymore. It's I can't. I can't watch video of that person at bothers me on a deep level. Speaking of that person, if you could Amazon prime one book to Donald Trump, what would it be. We have such a wide spectrum. And again, context, we have an Amazon a wishlist where we list all of these at our guest recommend and go and they click on them and they get sent straight to the White House. So how we have it, I make actually gets done. We've had everything from coloring books to the constitution, so hit me how God I don't even. I don't think I have a good answer for this, but I'll just, you know. Yeah, I just feel like there's much much smarter answer is out there than what I'm going to give. But there's a book called the psychology of the internet, which just kind of details behavior is an how people interact on the internet and why you know interactions on the internet are, you know, need to be taken seriously also sort of the thinking behind is way way way above his reading level. But it's also. All. I mean, you know, I'd really like to recommend fundamental books about human rights and things of that nature Lewis baby steps. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So I, you know, I if I if I could come up with like the perfectly human rights book, that would be his reading level. That's what I would go with. But absent of that I'm going with the psychology of the internet. Perfect. Awesome. Hey, we're canola Oliver followers. Follow listener. Sorry, follow you online. Yeah. So I'm Ariel Waldman on pretty much everything. I have a YouTube channel. I'm on Twitter. I'm on Instagram. I'm on patriotic and so all of those is just my name Ariel Waldman. Perfect. Awesome. Hey, I knew we kept you forever. I hope you glass of water lasted throughout. We. Thank you so much for all that you're doing for all that you've done for all that you're paying forward and for taking the time to to chat with us today and put them up Ryan awash yet. Thanks a lot. Thanks so much for having me. Yeah, for sure. Please keep kicking ass out there and I'm gonna go order some pillows from your website. So. Yeah. All right. Have a great day. Thank you so much area to see. I. Thanks to our incredible guests today and thanks to all of you for tuning in. We hope this episode has made your commute or awesome workout or dishwashing or fucking toll walking late at night that much more pleasant as a reminder. Please subscribe to our free Email newsletter at important, not important dot com. It is all the news most vital to our survival as a species and you can follow us all over the internet..

Ariel Waldman Amazon NBC Donald Trump self employed Boba t YouTube Matt White House Ryan Lewis six months
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"Welcome to important. Not important. My name is an I am Brian Colbert Kennedy, MRs zip code forty forty. We got a question today, Brian. Yeah, we what would take a young woman from art school to NASA? And why might that change everything forever for everyone. Severi question for good, and to have it answered. In such a thoughtful thought provoking entertaining, and not at all exasperated by us way. Right. Which is great. Our guest is Ariel Waldman. She's an author, an advisor to NASA. I think. I think she's just in charge now anxious the boss of NASA. Right, got it. She is the founder of space hack dot org. Awesome. She is the global director of science hack day an all around just superb human being building. She calls it quote unquote, massively multi player science, which is just so cool and doing that literally for everyone's benefit. Yeah, just just so nobody could participate in have fun and learn and experiment building a great new future. You know is great. Just we talk a lot about just get out there and do do something right every day to to contribute, whatever skills you might have. She's doing all all of the things. Yes, she doesn't want to do all of them. But she, you know, it's a hell of an example. Yeah, it was really, really impressed. And obviously we'll get into on the podcast but with how she sort of not accidentally, but it just went with rolled with it as things happened and it turned out in made something of it rare in she, she combined what she already was good at. It was good at and felt was important in her with the new opportunities that that were given to her. And now look, she's the boss of NASA. Yeah, there you go kids. All right. Let's go talk to. Yeah. Our guest today is area Waldman end together. We're gonna ask, how does they enterprising young lady go from art school to NASA area. Welcome. Thanks for having me for sure. This is very exciting because I check smart classes, so maybe I could be NASA one. Nope, this once again, this one's not about you aerial, let's get started by maybe just telling us who you are and what you do. Yeah, yeah. As mentioned, I'm Ariel and I do a lot of different things. So I am an advisor to NASA, innovative advanced concepts, a program at NASA that funds the more futuristic Sifi sort of out there. Concepts that could be transformative to future space. Missions maybe tend to forty years down the line. I am also the global director of science heck day and event that get scientists, designers, developer an all sorts of people together in the same physical space to see what they can rapidly prototype in twenty four consecutive hours. I am also. So the author of a book called, what's it like in space, stories from astronauts who've been there. I am the founder of tucked Oregon directory of ways for anyone to participate in space exploration, and I do a lot of other things, and I'm planning on going to Antarctica in just a few short weeks. Whoa. She's really nothing going on then. Wow. You just described the best job ever. It sounds like you're right. How's that? Brian has a computer to your typical day and moving on..

NASA Ariel Waldman Brian Colbert Kennedy global director advisor founder Antarctica developer Oregon forty years
"ariel waldman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Welcome back to offer all the show where we talk about all things, space exploration, and pop culture. I'm Ariel Waldman and I'm norm Chan and Eero this week you're doing something a little different. You and two guests are going to be discussing film that just came out. Yes. So this is definitely a major spoiler alert so we are talking about, I man the movie that is about Neil Armstrong and the space race, and everything's are leading up to the Apollo. Eleven moon landing. And so you joined by both Adam Savage and species story and Megan linger for fun discussion and review of for span the listen. Today, I'm with tests very own Adam Savage and also Megan pray, linger space, historian and co leader of the prey, linger library and archives things Ariel. Yeah. Hey, yeah. Yeah. Well, so let's jump into first minute, so we all saw I am fairly recently, so let's just go into. Did you like it? What did you like about it? If you liked it a lot. I enjoyed the experience of watching it immensely. So like what specific points like stuck out as you as like things that you really appreciated about it. I really enjoyed how personal it was. I enjoyed that one of my favorite things about having visited NASA facilities and touching pieces of NASA hardware is that when you touch them, it's really clear that people made these things and you can feel unlike something like this, which shields you from knowledge of its creators. Everything that NASA builds carries that narrative and the movie really demonstrated that these were these tin cans. These men were going up into space with and it was scary and tenuous, and they helped me appreciate even more than I already knew that tenuousness by talking about its effect on a family. And I thought that was really great. I really liked about it was the way it kind of slowed down since stories that are so often skipped over in the lead up to Apollo eleven, especially the emphasis on the Gemini mission which was in its own way, just super exciting, and that they let that really play. Out and let him modern audience, feel excitement. Yeah, I feel like a lot of people don't know too much about Gemini eight and that whole experience. Yeah. And I feel like a now, it's actually even very recently relevant because Swedes capsule had an emergency sort of departure. It was only in space for a few seconds and then had to do an emergency landing. And when I saw that happening and having recently seen this film that like you hear the creaking of the medal and you hear like these sound effects that are amazing. It really kind of shows you just like your, you know, for better or worse, you kind of our spam in a can even with all the controls. And so even with modern day spaceflight you sort this movie gives you a feeling of what it sort of like. I found the Gemini eight sequence. Absolutely. Exhausting really, really was like, I needed a glass of water when it was over. It was so intense because it went on for so long. The idea of what these like. Each of the sequences were difficulties happened. They really, like you said they took their time kind of really letting you feel what it was like. Yeah. I mean for me it's one of my favorite parts of the movie was just like little moments that sort of contextualized what it was like to live through that period that I think oftentimes space movies have looked overlooked..

NASA Adam Savage Ariel Waldman Megan Neil Armstrong Apollo Eero norm Chan
"ariel waldman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Are you cake waigel shannon from walking dead and idaho man steal a of our orleans ira as a so go see shape of water give it your go see it didn't theater is super worth seeing in the theater i'll go i'll give one more thing into something that i didn't i didn't realize by had to read about it by want to share it i thought it was special the movie poster is of them bracing the water and it's it's in the film this is the scene in the film and is right before the monster says and that's the shape of what but there bracy in water and hurt their her shoes are falling off and it i think it's even the poster received or she has a beautiful visually beautiful seen apparently that is carmen tension lee putting their as a reverse cinderella moment ooh done oh that's a lovely yeah that's a lovely elaborate i mean i i'm excited to go see this and theater usually his films are so big and there's so much detail and texturing each shot that like when you watch pacific rim even on a sixty five inch tv at home stadium looks like a cartoon instead of like something that has real impact um and it's a different spirit so i'll i'm gonna go this week pedro both trains are things and gyp it water did bad things the cats this year if if fultz ota for life or anything on the site this week yes we are launching a new regulars show with our front ariel waldman how awesome places where science fiction and science intersect and pop culture authorized guest is dr jill tartar from the city institute as we discussed the movie contact which was partly based on her work awesome and then next week we might be off we might be doing hopefully something remote we might do some travelling yeah so we'll be on location next week and you'll have to wait 'til next week to find out where yup.

pedro ariel waldman idaho dr jill tartar sixty five inch
"ariel waldman" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

"Are you cake waigel shannon from walking dead and idaho man steal a of our orleans ira as a so go see shape of water give it your go see it didn't theater is super worth seeing in the theater i'll go i'll give one more thing into something that i didn't i didn't realize by had to read about it by want to share it i thought it was special the movie poster is of them bracing the water and it's it's in the film this is the scene in the film and is right before the monster says and that's the shape of what but there bracy in water and hurt their her shoes are falling off and it i think it's even the poster received or she has a beautiful visually beautiful seen apparently that is carmen tension lee putting their as a reverse cinderella moment ooh done oh that's a lovely yeah that's a lovely elaborate i mean i i'm excited to go see this and theater usually his films are so big and there's so much detail and texturing each shot that like when you watch pacific rim even on a sixty five inch tv at home stadium looks like a cartoon instead of like something that has real impact um and it's a different spirit so i'll i'm gonna go this week pedro both trains are things and gyp it water did bad things the cats this year if if fultz ota for life or anything on the site this week yes we are launching a new regulars show with our front ariel waldman how awesome places where science fiction and science intersect and pop culture authorized guest is dr jill tartar from the city institute as we discussed the movie contact which was partly based on her work awesome and then next week we might be off we might be doing hopefully something remote we might do some travelling yeah so we'll be on location next week and you'll have to wait 'til next week to find out where yup.

pedro ariel waldman idaho dr jill tartar sixty five inch
"ariel waldman" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"ariel waldman" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Star thought i'll hair murmured cardio derby janet barney started sketch fast were in san francisco for the sixteen th annual skift steps sketch fast and our science a advocate science activist this week is ariel waldman and so she's talking about how we are going to hack our way into the future we're going to hack our way into space exploration and you think the people who show up at science hack day for example are going to do this is going to be like citizens science yeah absolutely say who through science hack day we has people who are artists and technologists an scientists coming together to see what they can rapidly prototype one out away find out about science heck science hacked day dot org whoa whoa yeah you can anyone can create a science hack day in their city and they're we are now in twentyfive countries i'm the global director for science hack dan so i happily helps people create director people twentyfive countries and the is just awesome because it's really about growing butting science enthusiasts communities but also king scientists to learn new things as well getting them to prototype with our reno's and uh design and a lot of things that maybe they don't have experience with so what if they bring stuff to science to bring bringing our duino bring your own copper.

Star janet barney san francisco ariel waldman space exploration global director reno director