15 Burst results for "Arianna Trail"

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Uh, well, you know, indeed, there have been many over the years, and if we had a title, it would probably help us to remember it, Uh, city lights, books. And there is an institution that I'm sure you have many memories off City lights. Books has tweeted. Everyone at city lights sends our thanks to you. We're supporting the institutions endeavors over the many, many, many years. Bravo! Thank you. The city lights that was privileged enough to be part of Lawrence Ferlinghetti is 100 birthday party, Which wasn't that long ago and I'm glad to say He is still is a centenarian now very much with us. Isn't that remarkable? I mean, that is off all the people who have lived to be a century old Lawrence Ferlinghetti. I mean, my goodness. So many things to look back on so many San Francisco institutions that you've been part of and you've celebrated Michael, I know you have some prepared remarks, maybe some UN prepared remarks. That you'd like to share to end this show. So I want to give you that opportunity. And thank you so very much for giving me this opportunity to share this hour with you on the thank you so much Ron for doing this. Like I said, in the beginning, you've always been one of my favorite guests and It's I'm grateful for you to have taken up the opportunity here, as well as the responsibility of this final show of mine and final words before stepping off the stage can be very challenging. But I do find myself thinking mostly of gratitude. That's gratitude. Having been able to serve the public all these years as a curator and broker of news and ideas and ideals and our mission. I emphasize our because I've had a superb team working with me. Every broadcast day has been too Present you our listeners each morning with a fair and high minded level of discourse, and I'm thankful to the team, the producers, the engineers, the manager's reporters and interns. I'm at the mic is the public face of form, but this is a team operation with those behind the scenes doing Standing and enduring work, and they have my deep admiration and respect and special thanks to our daily troopers. Dan's Old Any bringer Judy Campbell, Penal Arberg Block a Taurus and Arianna Trail. And again thanks to my friend Ron Elving. I'm also appreciative of you, our listeners and of our supporters who've been with us through both elevating a dispiriting news and a wide range of other topics. Center of Shown loyalty and support not only to forum in this radio station, but also to me. I have been overwhelmed by the generous tributes and incredibly kind words that so many of you have sent since I announced my retirement Thanks Also to all who have appeared on for him over the years to tell their stories, which were often are stories that have made their case or debated issues or live, enlightened or entertained us. What a privilege. It has been for me to meet so many outstanding people, local state national and international leaders and government officials Nobel and Pulitzer and MacArthur Prize recipients, authors and scientists. Technology and business innovators and artists, leaders in nearly every field and heads of state and wide range of popular and beloved entertainers and extraordinary people who are not necessarily well known, but we're doing very important work and have spoken out and taken control. See me taken action. Sometimes control is well on issues that have significant impact. I'm proud that we have public radio program have had great overall success not only in the marketplace but in bringing ideas and issues into your places of residence and work..

Ron Elving Judy Campbell Ron Michael San Francisco Lawrence Ferlinghetti Nobel one 100 birthday each morning Pulitzer both MacArthur Prize Penal Arberg Block Dan Arianna Trail favorite guests century a Taurus
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Classes and movie nights. All on all via Zoom. And that And the ukulele People are all over here. Oh, nice adopted it Wholesale. And Jonathan Rights. I have done a 17 day long road trip with no plan just driving across the country. It gave me joy and I have reconnected with myself. The whole road trip was recorded as a vlog and his viewable on instagram. That reminds me to that. Just the sharing. You know, there is one thing to connecting, you know, and everybody logging into zoom on time but also more sharing on social media of You know, maybe a road trip but also mundane activities that just help you feel a little bit more connected in that way. Ray Alexander I completely agree, But I do think what Tony was talking about earlier with the small connections people are making in their communities has been probably even more impactful. You know, we talked about sour dough earlier. I do not cook. I'm not going to ever make Salado but I was glued to next door watching people leaving little gift for each other around neighborhoods almost like treasure hunts. So I think finding new ways of communicating and connecting has been a real theme this year. And like everything else, I think that will continue. Um Yeah, we got more creative for sure And sorry, said Ray Alexander, before I met Ray Alexandra, Let's go to collar Joan in Berkeley. Next, Joan, you're on. Uh, thank you. Uh, well, I am a quiet activist, I guess, but, um, specifically for this seriously, mentally ill who are homeless. I'm into preventing homelessness. I guess, because my son of one of my sons who's mentally ill, I don't want him to become homeless. So I go to the laundromat. Because a lot of homeless hang out there and I've been to many laundromats in the East Bay and even love in San Francisco on guy. I, um They just go in there to keep themselves warm, So I bring more than my one. Basket of clothes that I want to wash. I bring clothes at my mentally ill son buys of the ass between market and a lot of them. Don't fit him. He just liked to Would be a buyer, I guess Hey, will well, so take the dresses and Well, the stuff that doesn't Busan. Andre. I keep them in my car. I give them out at the Laundromat, um or even on the street, and they throw something. Out the window wearing a coat, But I think I wish people would do that. Because you see people. I mean, nobody. If you're not blind, you can see that there are people out there. And you know the weather is cold so you can give it to them and, according to a book by DJ Jaffe called insane consequences. Most of the homeless there mentally seriously, mentally ill. So thank you, Joan for sharing for sharing your experience and what you're feeling. Call you how you're feeling called to give back And going to some more comments that we have. Ah, listener, writes. I am a woman in long term recovery who has been able to deepen my commitment to my sobriety insanity because alcoholic Alcoholics Anonymous, Anonymous and other 12 step programs created an amazing assortment of zoom gatherings. Support in connection has never been more important. These gatherings are available to all who struggle with their various issues for free. Plenty of new people are getting clean and sober because of the commitment to service by these groups. Tony Bravo. Do you have any reflections on that? I know we talked about therapy before as one resource and that was getting people through. Anything that I think allows people to feel like they are in control of their decisions that they are finding a community that they don't have to resort to something that they think is a destructive behavior or has been destructive in their lives, I think is incredible. In addition to sort of the therapy, 12 step routes. I know that people have reached out to friends that they haven't spoken to in years because of how available some people are now via social media. I know that family relationships in some cases of strengthened significantly, even in spite of distance and things that prevent us from being together in person. I think that we will leave this year, many of us More empathetic like, Jones said, not able to ignore what we see in terms of suffering other on our streets or Among the people that we know I hope that we take that. Into 2021. I think it is one of the positive sides of the pandemic. And Kathy Roads. My daughter and son in law on the East Coast, worked from home with their 2.5 year old son. I face time my grandson daily and spent two hours playing blocks making up stories, mixing food coloring and glasses, reading, dancing and hiding. I couldn't always see him on my screen. But I could hear him and I could hear Mommy on zoom calls in the background, Amazing Embry Alexandra Family time was another theme that emerged in your call out right? It was an interestingly it was we heard from so many grand parents having similar situations, a lot of grand parents, it seemed like even if they weren't able to be in the same room as their grandchildren During this, they did find connection online on FaceTime on scape, helping with lessons. Helping keep them distracted, because obviously a lot of parents are working from home. So yeah, I actually think, despite a lot of people being worried about, you know, tensions at home and being too close to his personal that kind of thing. It's actually been very good for families on some levels, particularly the grand parents. The grandparents seem to be having quite a nice time. We're talking about What Got you through 2020. This is Forum. I'm Arianna Trail. Let's go to color. Linda and Nevado next, Linda, you're on. Well, this is a good follow up to the Congress issue with Grand parents. I will first say KQED has gotten me through a bit of this time. But as a grandparent, I connect with my grandson in Los Angeles. Your face time and we start. We have.

Joan Ray Alexander Tony Bravo Jonathan Rights Linda Busan Ray Alexandra Los Angeles KQED East Bay Embry Alexandra Family Arianna Trail DJ Jaffe San Francisco Congress East Coast Kathy Roads Jones Berkeley
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listens from a village of Ernie and Adam Grant, a party B and LeBron James. The Carlos Watson show offers in depth interviews every day on YouTube. And Sierra Nevada brewing Company family owned operated in argued over since 1980 proud supporter of independent thought, whether that's online over the air or in a bottle Maurizio Nevada dot com Support for NPR comes from C three c three dot Ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ai and total wine and more wherein stored. Teams can recommend a bottle of wine, spirit or beer for the holidays. Shoppers can explore more than 8000 wines, 2500 beers and 3000 spirits more at total wine dot com. And the listeners of KQED. I'm Beth Housing is sitting in for Michelle Hunt again this afternoon and well, what have you managed the chaos, the stress and the uncertainty of 2020. That was the subject of this morning's form. The second hour with Arianna trails sitting in for me to Kim, and that will be rebroadcast tonight at 10 P.m. your phone calls, Did you discover a new passion? Did you get lost in the outdoors? Did you re ignite a friendship? You'll learn more at 10 o'clock tonight. All this month. We've been looking at the year's best pop culture, and when it comes to music, the competition is savage Come..

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nice adopted it wholesale. And Jonathan Rights. I have done a 17 day long road trip with no plan just driving across the country that gave me joy and I have reconnected with myself. The whole road trip was recorded as a vlog and his viewable on instagram. That reminds me to that. Just the sharing. You know, there is one thing to connecting, you know, and everybody logging into zoom on time but also more sharing on social media of You know, maybe a road trip but also mundane activities that just help you feel a little bit more connected in that way. Ray Alexander I completely agree, But I do think what Tony was talking about earlier with the small connections people are making in their communities has been probably even more impactful. You know, we talked about Salado earlier. I do not cook. I'm not going to ever make salad. Oh, but I was glued to next door watching people leaving little gift for each other around neighborhoods almost like treasure hunts. So I think finding new ways of communicating and connecting has been a real theme this year. And like everything else, I think that will continue. Yeah, we got more creative for sure And sorry, said Ray Alexander, before I met Ray Alexandra, Let's go to collar Joan in Berkeley. Next, Joan, you're on. Uh, thank you. Uh, well, I am a quiet activist, I guess, but, um, specifically for the seriously mentally ill who are homeless. I'm into preventing homelessness. Guess, because my son of one of my son who's mentally ill, I don't want him to become homeless. So I go to the laundromat. Because a lot of homeless hang out there and I've been to many laundromats in the East Bay and even love San Francisco. And I, I, um They just go in there to keep themselves warm, So I bring more than my one. Basket of clothes that I want to wash. I bring clothes at my mentally ill son buys of the Ashby swing market on a lot of them don't fit him. He just likes to Would be a buyer, I guess Hey, will well, so I take the dresses and All the stuff that doesn't Busan. Andre. I keep them in my car. I give them out at the Laundromat, um or even on the street, and they throw something. Out the window wearing a coat, But I think I wish people would do that. Because you see people. I mean, nobody. If you're not blind, you could see that there are people out there. And you know the weather is cold so you can give it to them. And, according to a book by DJ Jaffe called Insane consequences. Most of the homeless there mentally seriously, mentally ill. So thank you, Joan for sharing For sharing your experience and what you're feeling. Call you how you're feeling called to give back And going to some more comments that we have. Ah, listener, writes. I am a woman in long term recovery who has been able to deepen my commitment to my sobriety insanity because alcoholic Alcoholics Anonymous, Anonymous and other 12 step programs created an amazing assortment of zoom gatherings. Support in connection has never been more important. These gatherings are available to all who struggle with their various issues for free. Plenty of new people are getting clean and sober because of the commitment to service by these groups. Tony Bravo. Do you have any reflections on that? I know we talked about therapy before as one resource and that was getting people through. Anything that I think allows people to feel like they are in control of their decisions that they are finding a community that they don't have to resort to something that they think is a destructive behavior or has been destructive in their lives, I think is incredible. In addition to Sort of the therapy, 12 step routes. I know that people have reached out to friends that they haven't spoken to in years because of how available some people are now via social media. I know that family relationships in some cases of Strengthened significantly, even in spite of distance and things that prevent us from being together in person. I think that we will leave this year, many of us More empathetic like, Jones said, not able to ignore what we see in terms of suffering other on our streets or Among the people that we know I hope that we take that. Into 2021. I think it is one of the positive sides of the pandemic. And Kathy Roads. My daughter and son in law on the East Coast, worked from home with their 2.5 year old son. I face time my grandson daily and spent two hours playing blocks, making up stories, mixing food coloring and glasses. Reading, dancing and hiding. I couldn't always see him on my screen. But I could hear him and I could hear Mommy on zoom calls in the background, Amazing Embry Alexandra Family time was another theme that emerged in your call out right? It was an interestingly it was we heard from so many grand parents having similar situations, a lot of grand parents, it seemed like even if they weren't able to be in the same room as their grandchildren During this, they did find connection online on FaceTime on scape, helping with lessons. Um, helping keep them distracted, because obviously a lot of parents are working from home. Um so yeah, I actually think, despite a lot of people being worried about, you know, Tensions at home and being too close to his personal That kind of thing. It's actually been very good for families on the on some levels, particularly the grand parents. The grandparents seem to be having quite no stone. We're talking about What Got you through 2020. This is Forum. I'm Arianna Trail. Let's go to color. Linda and Nevado next, Linda, you're on. Well, this is a good follow up to the conversation with grand parents. I will first.

Joan Ray Alexander Tony Bravo Jonathan Rights Busan Linda Ray Alexandra Salado East Bay Embry Alexandra Family Arianna Trail DJ Jaffe San Francisco East Coast Kathy Roads Jones Berkeley Nevado
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Classes online. They include the topic. Great. Thanks for calling, and Lucinda and also in the area of kind of artistic expression was rediscovering public art. Tony, Can you speak a little bit, too? That In a year, where museums and galleries were opened and then closed and then opened again and then closed again a little bit over a month later, the art that was immediately available to us became, I think more important than ever for some people What inspired me was watching people generate new kinds of public art in a way that felt really organic and of the community. Notable among that would be some of what we saw painted on plywood that was covering shop windows during the early days of the pandemics, and during some of the protest. What was what was painted on those facades I thought was pretty Indicative of how many of us were feeling around the loneliness around issues around social justice. We also watch people create very personal, very small poetry projects that were just specific to their own neighborhood. Artistic projects. I mean, Yeah, yeah, including a poet, that Yeah, I profiled a great poet Jean Kane, who he's actually with us every day on the line. So, Jean, are you here? Chincha hang Oh, I guess I thought we had him on the line. But he just might be. You might just be muted, which is just again. Part of what's gotten us through is sometimes having to banter. Little bit when a technical difficulty happens. Gene, are you there with us? I am here. Okay. Great. Yes. So, Tony was just doing a brief introduction of you. Toc hair. How poetry was approaching Project that you initiated helps get you through this year. Can you tell us a little bit about it? Yeah, For sure. I don't wanna think, Tony for helping to spread the word about my project. Yeah. Back in March. I When the quarantine first happened. I noticed there is an increase of folks walking through my neighborhood I live across was small Park on good idea kind of popped into my head that it might be kind of fun to have something for them to read. I had been Putting out public poetry or posting poetry around town where I live in Alameda before that for a couple of years, But what I did was I took He's a cardboard and strung them to five trees in this this little park across from where I live, and each day since March, 19th I posted a poem on sometimes. Encouraging so something to you know, cheer people up there walking by, but whimsical and thoughtful, sometimes political. Never do it every day since then, and it's been I think for the people who read the poems onto myself equally a positive and a nice ritual. I'll put it that way. Well, thanks for sharing that with us teen and Tony, if you want to just add on kind of what? You what you enjoyed of seeing in that project. What I think was really inspiring to me about Jean's poetry was that it was so from the heart. He was reacting to things that he is reacting to things because this project is ongoing. It happens sometimes the day before. It's clear poetry. It's poetry that has some really beautiful illusions and it but it's not poetry that I have had to get another advanced degree in order that understands a Zay joked with him. It was poetry that told the story. And putting it on Instagram was the way that I discovered Gene. I think he's at five tree poems. And that's connected him to readers, not only in this neighborhood but around the world, and that led into another theme that I thought was really important this year, even though we are apart physically, I feel like Connections to people reconnecting with people, either via social media, or as we're doing now, on zoom was a really significant arc for many people in 2020. And we're getting a lot of other comments as well, Shelley writes. I enjoyed not having to rush around reading and crushing Lisa in San Jose writes my new BFF's Pino and Chardonnay where what helps her get through 2020 and Bill in Santa Barbara writes the Lakers and the Dodgers winning championships in the same year. This listener writes running before the pandemic. I commuted more than two hours per day, so I rarely had time to exercise and had been and had stopped running when my second daughter was born. Once I started working from home, I started going on almost daily jobs and long walks with my kids and the double stroller. I feel healthier and less stressed. S O. If you want to share what's gotten you through. 2020 can give us a call it 8667336786 you can email us at Forum at kqed dot org's or post your messages on Twitter and Facebook. Where at KQED Forum um or email your questions to form at KQED. Dot organ and I think I actually have time for one other comment. ELISA writes. The things that have gotten me through 2020 carrying safely delivering now raising twin boys, also Cuban salsa, soca and Afrobeat mixes and reading very smart brothers block posts. So we'll have more with Tony Bravo, Ray Alexandra and all the things that are getting you through 2020 after the break. Stay with us. I'm Arianna Trail. This is formed. Support for KQED comes from a generous gift from Young Schramm and Maria Manetti Schramm, founders of the Manetti Schramm Museum of Arctic, UC Davis, who believed that all people deserve access to education and culture to enrich a lifetime of exploration and learning. And good eggs now offering delivery to Richmond, Hercules Final Elsa Bronte in San Jose. Learn more about good eggs, fresh produce and meal kits. A good.

Tony Bravo Jean Kane KQED San Jose Maria Manetti Schramm Lucinda Manetti Schramm Museum of Arct Alameda Gene Arianna Trail small Park Afrobeat Elsa Bronte Zay Twitter Shelley Richmond
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You also wrote a story about the high prevalence of coronavirus among grocery workers, which illustrates the challenges of fighting the pandemic. You know, people need food and employees need to work so they are willing to risk exposure. What can be done to curb those infections, given that we don't know where the outbreaks originate. No, I mean, it's really tough with so many people sick and the county we just don't have And this is true throughout the state. We don't have good data on how the virus is spreading. Our contact. Tracers are really focused on Finding out who did you come in contact with once you were infectious, so they could make sure to contact those people and keep them in isolation. But they're not dedicating. A lot of resource is to figuring out how did this outbreak spread in the first place? It's just they're kind of Triaging the situation And so that means that we just don't know, And I mean, it's the things we all We've been hearing forever, which is masks and social distancing, But I don't know how much you can social distance while you're at work, especially if you're working in the back and you're moving packages and Even close quarters with masks on for 10 hours. Ajay is not great. That doesn't your mask isn't going to necessarily prevent the transmission of Kobe and Sort of close quarters like that. And so it's just really tough. I mean, I think a lot of grocery workers are trying Hard, but we know once one case gets into a store, and this is that any kind of store that's still up in the case gets into a store. The environment is just conducive. Just Fred We just have about 45 seconds left her. So we have a comment from Rose, Who writes Why isn't California implementing travel requirements? You know, quarantine requirements for returning travelers. And I know San Francisco has issued a travel order that when in effect last Friday for travelers arriving at SFO, they have to quarantine for 10 days. Is Los Angeles. Considering a travel order for l A X Do we see any other widespread travel orders happening in the near future? So, Newsom governor, Newsome said yesterday. But they're considering some new travel orders based on the prevalence of the virus, and also this new straighten and what's happening in the UK and concerned about that coming to the U. S. So I think Uh, that combined with just how things how bad things were getting, we might see something. That's some you Carla Mangal, a staff writer covering health care for the Los Angeles Times. Thank you so much for your reporting, even though it's really difficult and challenging to hear. We appreciate your reporting. The first happy to do it and stay tuned for more. After the break. Congressman Adam Schiff will join us. I'm Arianna Trail in from Munich him. You're listening to the rebroadcast of this morning's forms. So the producers are not here to take your phone calls tonight. Let's go to the roads and find out what's happening in Antioch with a sig alert there. It's Lori Sanders. Hey, Lori. Hi there, Beth. It's eastbound.

Lori Sanders Ajay Congressman Adam Schiff Los Angeles Los Angeles Times San Francisco Carla Mangal UK Antioch Arianna Trail California Beth Rose Newsom staff writer Munich Newsome
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Low forties around the bay Tonight, it's KQED public radio. This is form. I'm Arianna Trail in for Meena Kim. Yesterday, California reported more than 62,000 new cases of covert 19, another daily record. Strain on hospitals is worsening across the state with fears that people gathering for Christmas and New Year's holidays could bring another surge in the coming weeks. Joining me now with the latest news is Sonia Carla Mangal, a staff writer covering health care for the Los Angeles Times. Welcome back to form Sonja first. Thanks for having me and listeners If you have questions or comments, email us at form at kqed dot org's or post them on Twitter and Facebook. Where at KQED form we just have Sonja Carla Manga, Carl among glow with us for about 10 minutes. So if you have your questions and comments, please get them in now. So MIA, Let's just start with what is the picture like in California right now, in terms of ICU capacity. No, it's pretty bleak throughout the state. We just start running out really quickly. If I see you beds, California in general just doesn't have a lot of hospital beds compared to other states per capita And so work first, starting with an uneven playing field. And every day we get these updates on how different parts of the state are doing how many ICU beds they have left and The San Joaquin Valley and the Southern California region, which is you know, the biggest region in the state have both been at 0% capacity for the past five days, probably and that's continuing on today. It seems on doctor you spoke to at an L. A County hospital says they foresee having to start rationing care by early January. What would that look like? Yeah, it's kind of the worst case scenario. We got this document that the public hospitals and health in Los Angeles County circulated to all their physicians last month because they knew this was going to happen or it could happen. And the document basically goes over what you do if you get to this scenario where it's not really the third, they think there won't be enough ventilators, which is kind of what we thought in the spring. It's that there may be won't be enough. I see you nurses, critical care physicians. And so how do you make those decisions? Do you give the nurse 10 patients to take care of? So they're scrambling or do you put you know a doctor that's not really trained to take care of a patient on a ventilator on assigned them to those patients, So it's like The sort of take away is that you can ration the care or distribute the care when it's this scarce, however you want, but the ultimate result is that the quality of care declines. And that's where also, staff have to make some difficult choices in terms of which cases to continue treating, and others to maybe not devote as much treatments that might otherwise treat. Is that right? Yeah, so they have to kind of do an analysis on like, you know, as things air progressing, they have tol look at okay. These are the patients that we have. What is this person's chance of surviving Who's going tol who's most likely to survive with this treatment? And if they give someone a treatment, and it helps them And they'll keep giving them that treatment. But if they get some treatment, and within two days, it's not helping them. You know, the guidelines say that they are supposed to stop and give it to someone who maybe it would have a better chance of saving. So they're these really tough. Decisions that no one wants to make. And what are the estimates of how many people who contract over 19 will need hospitalization? And of those how many would need an ICU bed? So it fluctuates a little bit, because well because of how much testing we're doing, But in general in California, it's 12% of people who test positive need to be in the hospital. I think that number has gone down a little bit recently. Because we just have had a lot of people but getting tested. Maybe it's around 10%. And then about 12% of those people need icy level care. So with the huge numbers of people testing positive You know, every day in the past two weeks, you can see that our hospital hospitalization numbers. Think of your nuisance said could increase sixfold from what it is now by the end of January. And what do we know about the temporary field hospitals being set up in different parts of the states that help with these overflow patients? I think the issue with those is staffing that we don't necessarily have enough stuff who can come help work on those hospitals? Some of them, I think, come with their own stuff, But to set up extra facilities is useful to a degree. But when you have a shortage of staffing already, and you have these surges across the country that makes it really difficult to bring in staffing from other parts of the country, too. This is you know, in the spring, we had a big surge in New York and so people could go to New York. But now they're searches everywhere. And so California doesn't have. They're just not as much flexibility with getting People on the ground. And what else are you hearing from health care providers. How are they feeling about what's happening and what's potentially to come? We seem to be way beyond you know, feeling concerned, right? Yeah, I mean, everyone I have talked to recently sounds like like, describes a scene in the hospital. That sounds a little bit like people running around with their heads chopped off like there's just so much anxiety, stress panic. They just don't Know how they're going to handle this number of patients, and then they look at the case numbers and they feel even more worried because you know the 11,000 people in L. A county that tested positive yesterday. Are nowhere near needing hospital carrier. So I think people are really stressed. They don't want to. They don't want Los Angeles or any other parts of California to become like what happened in New York and has happened in other parts of the country. But it does seem like that's where this is headed. And I know just in in preparation for speaking with you. I did look at Los Angeles Times story. That's a photographic story that really shows goes inside and I see you And I really encourage our listeners to Tucek out that story as well. It's really sobering to see the images and I think we can post that on our Web post for the show. It's really sobering to see inside the ICU in terms of the scope of what these healthcare providers are dealing with on a daily basis now and just imagining that it could Just go up from there. Yeah, the images like make it look, It just looks on real because they're wearing so much gear, And there's just so much precautions. It looks like they're wearing like space suits, just the amount of protection that they have on. On and Yeah, it's just I don't know what's gonna happen in the next few weeks is not something that we've ever seen before. And what are some of those kind of where are those numbers Trending right now, In terms of where do we stand with? Um, death to covert 19 and the state and an overall cases. Yeah, So we have around 20,000 deaths a little bit over 20,000 deaths. But what's really alarming is how quickly those numbers are changing. So on In mid November, we logged a million cases of the Corona virus throughout the course of the pandemic in California, so that took us Some eight months to hit on board this week. If our numbers continue, which at the pace that they are, which I imagine they will, around Christmas day, we should hit two million, so that means that It took us eight months to get a million cases and six weeks to hit another million s. Oh, that's just incredible. Like he, You know, California throughout the panda, Michael's had a lower rate of pieces elaborated deaths than the rest of them most almost any other state. But the rates that we have now are putting us among the worst states. I think California has the second highest rate of cases of any state. In the country right now, you know that if you just look over the past week, so we're we're sort of at risk of losing our lead if you will, which is, you know, really alarming because that means undoubtably more people in the hospital and that death toll create starts to sort of creep up a month after the cases, and so we're only now just seeing the beginning of that. The result of all of these new cases and think last week we broke our our death toll, and we're now logging about 233 deaths a day in California, so it's just it's I mean, it's really, really bad. And as a result, Newsome said he's likely to extend stay at home orders for Southern California in San Joaquin Valley that are set to expire in the next week. Um So, um, your color manga. You also wrote a story about the high prevalence of coronavirus among grocery workers, which illustrates the challenges of fighting the pandemic. You know, people need.

California Los Angeles Times KQED Sonja Carla Manga Southern California San Joaquin Valley New York Los Angeles County Sonia Carla Mangal Twitter ICU Arianna Trail staff writer Los Angeles Facebook Meena Kim Carl
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:44 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"B D Sacramento Valley Sunshine on the way after another day of some dense fog in the Valley, look for a high of around 58 in Sacramento winner Spare the air alert in effect for the Bay Area again today some morning cloudiness. More sunshine as we get into today, Bay Area highs Upper fifties to the low sixties. This is form. I'm Arianna Trail in for Meena Kim. Yesterday, California reported more than 62,000 new cases of covert 19, another daily record. Strain on hospitals is worsening across the state with fears that people gathering for Christmas and New Year's holidays could bring another surge in the coming weeks. Joining me now with the latest news is Sonia Carla Mangal, a staff writer covering health care for the Los Angeles Times. Welcome back to form Sonia. First. Thanks for having me and listeners If you have questions or comments, email us at Forum at KQED dot org's or post them on Twitter and Facebook. We're at KQED form. We just have some you Carla Manga, Carl, among glow with us for about 10 minutes. So if you have your questions and comments, please get them in now. So MIA, Let's just start with what is the picture like in California right now, in terms of ICU capacity. No, it's pretty bleak throughout the state. We just start running out really quickly of ICU beds. California in general just doesn't have a lot of hospital beds compared to other states per capita And so work first, starting with an uneven playing field. And every day we get these updates on how different parts of the state are doing how many ICU beds they have left and San Joaquin Valley and the Southern California region, which is you know, the biggest region in the state have both been at 0% capacity for the past five days, probably and that's continuing on today. It seems on Dad Doctor you spoke to at an L. A County hospital says they foresee having to start rationing care by early January. What would that look like? Yeah, it's kind of the worst case scenario. We got this document that the public hospitals and health in Los Angeles County circulated told their physicians last month because they knew this was going to happen or it could happen. And the document basically goes over what you do if you get to this scenario where it's not really the third, they think there won't be enough ventilators, which is kind of what we thought in the spring. It's that there may be won't be enough. I see you nurses, critical care physicians. And so how do you make those decisions? Do you give the nurse 10 patients to take care of? So they're scrambling or do you put you know a doctor that's not really trained to take care of a patient on a ventilator. On assigned them to those patients, So it's like the sort of take away is that you can ration the care or distribute the care when it's this scarce, however you want, but the ultimate result is that The quality of care declines, and that's where also, staff have to make some difficult choices in terms of which cases to continue treating, and others to maybe not devote as much treatments that might otherwise treat. Is that right? Yeah, so they have to kind of do an analysis on like, you know, as things air progressing, they have tol look at okay, these of the patients that we have. What is this person's chance of surviving Who's going tol who's most likely to survive with this treatment? And if they give someone a treatment, and it helps them Then they'll keep giving them that treatment. But if they get someone to men, and within two days it's not helping them. You know, the guidelines say that they are supposed to stop and give it to someone who maybe it would have a better chance of saving so there. He's really tough. Decisions that no one wants to make. And what are the estimates of how many people who contract over 19 will need hospitalization? And of those how many would need an ICU bed? So it fluctuates a little bit, because well because of touch how much testing we're doing, But in general in California, it's 12% of people who test positive. I need to be in the hospital. I think that number has gone down a little bit recently because we just have had a lot of people but getting tested. Maybe it's around 10%. And then about 12% of those people need icy level care. So with the huge numbers of people testing positive You know, every day in the past two weeks, you can see that our hospital hospitalization numbers think Governor, Newsome said, could increase sixfold from what it is now by the end of January. And what do we know about the temporary field hospitals being set up in different parts of the state to help with these overflow patients? I think the issue at those is stuffing that we don't necessarily have enough staff who can come help work on those hospitals. Some of them, I think, come with their own stuff, But to set up extra facilities is useful to a degree. But when you have a shortage of staffing already, and you have these surges across the country that makes it really difficult to bring in staffing from other parts of the country, too. This is you know, in the spring, we had a big surge in New York and so people could go to New York. But now they're searches everywhere. And so California doesn't have. They're just not as much flexibility with getting People on the ground. And what else are you hearing from health care providers. How are they feeling about what's happening and what's potentially to come? We seem to be way beyond you know, feeling concerned, right? Yeah, I mean, everyone I have talked to recently sounds like like, describes a scene in the hospital. That sounds a little bit like people running around with their heads chopped off like there's just so much anxiety, stress panic. They just don't Know how they're going to handle this number of patients, and then they look at the case numbers and they feel even more worried because you know the 11,000 people in L. A county that tested positive yesterday. Are nowhere near needing hospital carrier, So I think people are really stressed. They don't want to. They don't want Los Angeles or any other parts of California toe become like what happened in New York and has happened in other parts of the country. But it does seem like that's where this is headed. And I know just in in preparation for speaking with you. I did look at Los Angeles Times story. That's a photographic story that really shows goes inside and I see you And I really encourage our listeners THX out that story as well. It's really sobering to see the images and I think we can post that on our Web post for the show. It's really sobering to see inside the ICU in terms of the scope of what these healthcare providers are dealing with on a daily basis now and just imagining that it could Just go up from there. Yeah, The images like make it look just looks on real because they're wearing so much gear, And there's just so much precautions. It looks like you know, there were like space suits just the amount of protection that they have on. On and Yeah, it's just I don't know what's gonna happen in the next few weeks is not something that we've ever seen before. And what are some of those kind of where are those numbers Trending right now, In terms of where do we stand with? Um, death to covert 19 and the state and an overall cases. Yeah, So we have around 20,000 deaths a little bit over 20,000 ducks. But what's really alarming is how quickly those numbers are changing. So on In mid November, we logged a million cases of the Corona virus throughout the course of the pandemic in California, so that took us Some eight months to hit on by this week. If our numbers continue, which at the pace that they are, which I imagine they will, around Christmas day, we should hit two million. So that means that It took us eight months to have a million cases and six weeks to hit another William S. Oh, that's just incredible. Like he, you know, California throughout the pandemic has had a lower rate of cases elaborated deaths than the rest of the most almost any other state. But the rates that we have now are putting us among the worst states. I think California has the second highest rate of cases of any state. In the country right now, you know that if you just look over the past week, so we're we're sort of at risk of losing our lead if you will, which is, you know, really alarming because that means undoubtably more people in the hospital and that death toll creep starts to sort of creep up a month after the cases, and so we're only now just seeing the beginning of that. The result of all of these new cases and think last week we broke our our death toll, and we're now logging about 233 deaths a day in California, so it's just it's I mean, it's really, really bad. And as a result, Newsome said he's likely to extend stay at home orders for Southern California in San Joaquin Valley that are set to expire in the next week. Um So, um, your column on But you also wrote a story about the high prevalence of coronavirus among grocery workers, which illustrates the challenges of fighting the pandemic. You know, people need food and employees need to work so they are willing to risk exposure. What can be done to curb those infections, given that we don't know where the outbreaks originate..

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"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And that's been something that I've been sitting with. And you know most people that encountered or having Totally different experiences and Kimba even set out, you know, to architect we began creating the book, and I think it's just so wonderful to see something take on a life of its own like that. Well, this listener writes, the issue of cultural appropriation has come up so often this year, and media companies keep getting it wrong. For example, I'm thinking of Bon Appetit magazine and how, In the latest issue, they misattributed a soup that is intrinsic to Haitian culture. We obviously need more diversity among the gatekeepers of quote unquote culture, and it can't happen soon enough to either of you have any reactions to that comment? You know this was another one of the media snafu is that I barely caught window because we're so busy getting ready for the book. I did hear some mentions of it on Twitter. But again, it's like You know, I think it really speaks to the need for people of all backgrounds to be in these rooms and not mean Kimberly is so much more brighter than I am on these ideas of diversity, inclusion, and that's not exactly I'm talking about because Is something Kimberly says very often, But inclusion often are first to a quota or a percentage or a portion of black people are Non white people in a room and that in itself is an incredibly embarrassing and limiting. But again, I think it's just There really needs to be a reorientation and rethinking of so many of the infrastructures that we take for granted. And that is just another example of what happens when you don't have enough people. Or maybe it's example of what happens when you try to. However, a culture or geographical territory or, you know ideas that you're not familiar with, and you don't have people in the room who are familiar with them to take it on? Right? And we have another commenter. Lauren asks. First, I'd like to say I have been a big fan of Jenna Wortham for some time now, and I'm excited to discover more about Kimberly Drew and her work as a white woman. I wonder how the authors would advise their non white readers to engage with their work. And what does it mean to purchase this book for ourselves and our community? I know we touched on that a little bit at the top, but maybe just in reference directly toe Lauren's question. Yeah, I mean, it's it's a doozy of a question. I mean, I think there's you know, the devil on my shoulder is like engaged with it as you would any other book, Um, you know, by free community as you would with any other book, or, you know, engage with it in the way that you might engage with black music, which many people do very comfortably. I know many of us are beyond, say, fans. But then I also say in a more angelic note, Thank you for taking the time to consider this text. I mean, it is. It is such a gift that people of many walks of life and of many points of origin are learning about this text and taking it seriously and making this consideration off whether they want to engage or not. I think I can't answer why anyone should get it. But I can't say that I hope if you do That resonates for you in some way that there could be some opportunity for engagement and learning and expansion and the way that both Jenna and I, as black writers and editors encountered all the content of the book because they were definitely many, many moments, a surprise for each for each of us. And so I think, you know, I hope to invite everyone on this journey of learning on this journey of recording and of this journey of witnessing And Kate Tweets. Now let's hope KQED includes black people in everyday conversations about how policy procedures and politics affect them affect them, where black voices in segments about climate change the Bay Area housing market or the restaurant industry. Blackness isn't segregated. That's me. That's Something that I think you're also a theme of kind of blackness is in segregated while your book is specifically black futures and highlighting black life and experiences. It's really showing just how fully integrated Black folk and our ideas and our work is just everywhere, right? Absolutely. Yeah, I was just going to say I think that this text Mrs Kimberly speaking that this time, though, it is a collective gesture. It is not a gesture of hoarding. You know, we're not trying to silent, low it away or pull it away. And anyway, we really want to be this generative, active sharing and encouraging and inviting, enticing, inciting curiosity in so many and I think You know, it's Yeah, it's so much bigger than thinking about, you know, separation. It's really about thinking about integration and thinking about really sitting with the incredible contributions that black folks have made and will make every day. And Jenna. Did you want to jump in a swell? Just to underscore everything that can really said, And I also think, too, I mean Just thinking about that that listener question from a few moments ago. And, you know, I think this book speaks to a broader experience. There's so much about the black experience in this country and around the world that is always Addressed or responded to in moments of crisis, and I would really encourage anyone who's curious about you know black people and the black experience outside of moments of crisis to engage with this book, and not just, you know, view when there's an uprising or an unjust killing or You know, write something equally problematic happening to then pay attention to thinking about black life on black issues, you know, but to also take it on beyond that, And then the other option two is you know if there's someone in your life that you think I enjoy this book, you could always give it to them. And it's just a gift that keeps on giving. So We're talking with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham Co editors of black Futures. I'm Arianna Trail. This is Forum. So I'm curious just briefly. What's in your futures? I know it's hard to plan things these days. But are there any other project that you're working on? Right now that you're you're excited about Kimberly. My greatest project right now is thinking about rest. I'm I think where we're definitely just about in the halfway point of our virtual book tour, which we invite everyone to participate in, and I think I'm dreaming of what you know. Personal close to 2020 might look like I think this year has asked so much of us. I carefully choose, ask over demand, and I think for myself, I'm really looking forward to having some meditative moments to really sit with all that this year has given and taken away. Right, Jenna. Yeah. I mean, I'm also focusing on rest and reflection. I think there's just so much has happened this year that I would really love to spend some time processing and integrating In terms of material projects. There are many will continue to be on book tour throughout 2021..

Jenna Wortham Kimberly Drew Mrs Kimberly black Futures Lauren Twitter Kimba Kate Tweets Um KQED Arianna Trail Bay Area
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Johnson called what I know about the ocean and it's about you know, climate change and ocean injustice and how important our coastal cities are for black communities. And that's something that all the readers can read and be engaged by an activated by and throughout the book there a lot of limitations as well, to start thinking about what it means to create and start your own archive. You know, one of the things that's Incredibly important to combine eyes just acknowledgment that this is a finite product. This is a book, you know, and it's already such a big book. It's almost 600 pages. We try to cram in as much stuff as possible. And even with that, with that much space we still there's just so much I didn't make it in so We really hope readers will take the invitation to pick up where we missed at the baton down and take it as far as they want. You mentioned Ion Elizabeth Johnson's peace and we loved having her on the show recently for her, her latest book. But also wondering at what are some of the pieces that other pieces that are on each of your minds. Today or this week. I'm not asking to pick favorites. I know that's always a hard question to answer. But what's a piece that resonates most for you at the moment that you can talk a little bit about on Dwight? You wanted to include in the book Kimberly Drew, Let's start with you. Yes, we love all of our contributors and all the pieces in the book. Equally let that be on the room record. I will say I am thinking, perhaps the most today in this exact moment in this exact space so much about Eve Ewing's poem that is Paired alongside Sydor immersed photography in the book. I think about the pairings that we were able to accomplish through the book and the trust that each of our contributors gave to us in making those decisions and having those conversations about artist that they may know and have known for decades or artists at their new too, and seeing that symbiosis that happened. Through the pairing of of words and images, because I think at that intersection is You know? The dawn of so many potentials for connection than connected tissues and maybe viewing a reimagining the contributions that they've made in a new way. And Jen, is there another piece that's been resonating for you today or this week. Definitely my heart is very much with a piece called static resilience by an artist stable the Smiths and it's a poem essay. A collection of Incredible, Um Vignettes about the experience of feeling liberated on the dance floor, and how embodied the artists felt when moving in tandem with community and accompanying that is a serious of images from around the world of document gathering and celebrating each other and just feeling Just deeply alive, and you know, we're in the middle of a global pandemic. We're heading into the 2nd and 30 years of that, And I think this book has felt a little bit like that gathering, even though you know we're still separate. Obviously, we're doing everything remotely in virtually it still feels very much like the spirit embodied and captured in that piece of what it feels like to come together. And be joyful and celebrating commune even though we physically can't do that right now and kind of in that vein, the book feels on apologetic to me amongst many other things, but unapologetic stands out. Was that feeling or intention when you felt in your process of putting it together at all? Kimberly, That's a great Yeah, That's a great launching point. I think unapologetic is definitely a virtue. That's imbued in every step of this text. But I also think it really is vulnerability. It started with Jenna's vulnerability of reaching out to me and saying This is a project that I want to see. Realize it started with the vulnerability of saying, OK, let's start this first shared document and see where it goes. It was a vulnerability of going toe One roll world. With our book proposal. It was the vulnerability of our outreach strategy to each of our contributors. It was a vulnerability that was founded in the conversations that we commit that we commissioned for the text. This book is really so much about being unapologetic, but also being soft and tender virtues that I think are so important in a moment like this one where we find ourselves. Really seeking softness, tenderness and forgiveness. Jenna. Did you have any thoughts You wanted to add to that? Hmm. No, that was perfect. Kimberly's just imagine spending every single day with his brilliance. I'm so lucky. If you're just joining us, we're talking about the book Black futures with co editors. Kimberly Drew, who's author. Also of This is what I know about art. She's also a curator and activist, and Jenna Wortham, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine and co host of the still processing podcast, and in just a moment, we'll go into the break with another track that's featured on the mixed by King Brit for Black Futures. It's an instrumental of Katrina. Auda's nothing like you. And following that, we'll have more with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham and Black Futures. I'm Arianna Trail. You're listening to forum. And you KQED Traffic update at 10 19 starts with the traffic problem in Richmond. Good evening, not prevented. Good evening, Michelle. Traffic extremely light Tonight. Freeways are not necessarily deserted, but they're very little traffic. Westbound 5 80 enrichment, However, a Bayview Avenue reports of a grass fire off the roadway Watch for fire crews responding to that and reminder, tomorrow's a spare the Air Day. Wood burning illegal indoors and outdoors. I'm Michael Bennett for KQED. All right, that's good. Thank you. Michael. Traffic support.

Kimberly Drew Jenna Wortham Ion Elizabeth Johnson Michael Bennett Black Futures Eve Ewing Dwight Richmond KQED Jen Michelle Sydor Arianna Trail Auda The New York Times Magazine staff writer King Brit
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We obviously need more diversity among the gatekeepers of quote unquote culture, and it can't happen soon enough to either of you have any reactions to that comment? You know, this is another one of the media snack foods that I barely caught window Because we're so busy getting ready for the book. I did hear some mentions of it on Twitter. But again, it's like You know, I think it really speaks to the need for people of all backgrounds to be in these rooms and not mean Kimberly is so much more brilliant than I am on these ideas of diversity, inclusion, and that's not exactly what I'm talking about because Something Kimberly says very often. But inclusion often refers to a quota or a percentage or a portion of black people are non white people in a room and that in itself is an incredibly embarrassing and limiting But again, I think it's just There really needs to be a reorientation and rethinking of so many of the infrastructures that we take for granted. And that is just another example of what happens when you don't have enough people. Or maybe it's example of what happens when you try to. However, a culture or geographical territory or, you know ideas that you're not familiar with, and you don't have people in the room who are familiar with them to take it on? Mm hmm. And we have another comments or Lauren asks. First, I'd like to say I have been a big fan of Jenna Wortham for some time now, and I'm excited to discover more about Kimberly Drew and her work as a white woman. I wonder how the authors would advise their non white readers to engage with their work. And what does it mean to purchase this book for ourselves and our community? I know we touched on that a little bit at the top, but maybe just in reference directly toe Lauren's question. Yeah, I mean, it's it's a doozy of a question I made. I think there's you know, the devil my shoulders, like engaged with it, as you would any other book, Um, you know, by free community as you would with any other book, or, you know, engage with it in the way that you might engage with black music, which many people do very comfortably. I know many of us are beyonc fans. But then I also say in a more angelic note. Thank you for taking the time to consider this text. I mean, it is. It is such a gift that people of many walks of life and of many points of origin are learning about this text and taking it seriously and making this consideration off whether they want to engage or not. I think I can't answer why anyone should get it. But I can't say that I hope if you do That resonates for you in some way that there could be some opportunity for engagement and learning and expansion and the way that both Jenna and I, as black writers and editors encountered all the content of the book because they were definitely many, many moments of surprise for each for each of us. And so I think, you know, I hope to invite everyone on this journey of learning on this journey of recording and of this journey of witnessing And Kate Tweets. Now let's hope KQED includes black people in everyday conversations about how policy procedures and politics affect them affect them, where black voices in segments about climate change the Bay Area housing market or the restaurant industry. Blackness isn't segregated. That's maybe that's Something that I think you're also a theme of kind of blackness is in segregated while your book is specifically black futures and highlighting black life and experiences. It's really showing just how fully integrated Black folk and our ideas and our work is just everywhere, right? Absolutely. Oh, yeah. I was just gonna say I think that this text thistles Kimberly speaking that this text, though it is a collective gesture. It is not a gesture of hoarding. You know, we're not trying to silent, low it away or pull it away. And anyway, we really wanted to be this generative, active, caring and encouraging and inviting, enticing, um, inciting curiosity in so many and I think you know it's it's It's so much bigger. More than thinking about, you know, separation. It's really about thinking about integration and thinking about really sitting with the incredible contributions that black folks have made and will make every day. And Jenna. Did you want to jump in a swell? Just to underscore everything that can really said, And I also think, too, I mean Just thinking about that that listener question from a few moments ago. And, you know, I think this book speaks to a broader experience. There's so much about the black experience in this country and around the world that is always Addressed or responded to in moments of crisis, and I would really encourage anyone who's curious about you know black people and the black experience outside of moments of crisis to engage with this book, and not just You know view when there's an uprising or an unjust killing, or, you know, write something equally problematic happening to then pay attention to thinking about black life on black issues, you know, but to also take it on beyond that, And then the other option two is you know if there's someone in your life that you think I enjoy this book, you could always give it to them. And it's just a gift that keeps on giving. So We're talking with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham Co editors of black Futures. I'm Arianna Trail. This is Forum. So I'm curious just briefly. What's in your futures? I know it's hard to plan things these days. But are there any other project that you're working on? Right now that you're you're excited about Kimberly. My greatest project right now is thinking about rest. I think where we're definitely just about in the halfway point of our virtual book tour, which we invite everyone to participate in. And I think I'm dreaming of what you know. A personal close to 2020 might look like I think this year has Asked. So much of us. I carefully choose, ask over demand, and I think for myself, I'm really looking forward to having some meditative moments to really sit with all that this year has given and taken away. China. Yeah. I mean, I'm also focusing on rest and reflection. I think there's just so much has happened this year that I would really love to spend some time processing and integrating In terms of material projects. There are many will continue to be on book tour throughout 2021. So you can follow us on our Instagrams Kam, please at Museum and me and I'm at Jane Deluxe. For more information about where will be and we both have excited new projects coming out, and so stay tuned for all of those as well. Great So we'll every Friday we've for the past few months on forum we've been playing a listener recommended Song is part of the many segment called the Music Getting You through 2020. And fittingly, we had a listener recommend the song optimistic by Sounds of Blackness, which is mentioned in an essay by Jasmine Johnson for your book, The optimistic challenged the vice decisive Black joy, not divisive decisively..

Kimberly Drew Jenna Wortham black Futures Lauren Twitter Um Kate Tweets Instagrams Kam Jasmine Johnson Jane Deluxe KQED Arianna Trail China Bay Area
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And even with that, with that much space we still there's just so much I didn't make it in so We really hope readers will take the invitation to pick up where we missed at the baton down and take it as far as they want. You mentioned Ion Elizabeth Johnson's peace and we loved having her on the show recently for her, her latest book, but also wondering at what are some of the pieces that other pieces that are on each of your minds today or this week. I'm not asking to pick favorites. I know that's always a hard question to answer, but What's a piece that resonates most for you at the moment that you can talk a little bit about on why you wanted to include in the book Kimberly Drew, Let's start with you. Yes, we love all of our contributors and all the pieces in the book. Equally let that be on the room record. I will say I am thinking, perhaps the most today in this exact moment in this exact space so much about Eve Ewing's poem that is Paired alongside so immersed photography and the book I think about the pairings that we were able to accomplish through the book and the trust that each of our contributors gave to us in making those decisions and having those conversations about artist that they've made know and have known for decades or artists at their new too, and seeing that symbiosis that happened. Through the pairing of of words and images, because I think at that intersection is You know? The dawn of so many potentials for connection than connected tissues and maybe viewing a reimagining the contributions that they've made in a new way. And Jen, is there another piece that's been resonating for you today or this week. Definitely my heart is very much with a piece called static resilience by an artist stable the Smiths and it's a poem essay. A collection of Incredible, Um Vignettes about the experience of feeling liberated on the dance floor, and how embodied the artists felt when moving in tandem with community and accompanying that is a serious of images from around the world of document gathering and celebrating each other and just feeling Just deeply alive, and you know, we're in the middle of the global pandemic. We're heading into the 2nd and 30 years of that, And I think this book has felt a little bit like that gathering, even though you know we're still separate. Obviously, we're doing everything remotely in virtually it still feels very much like the spirit embodied and captured in that piece of what it feels like to come together. And be joyful and celebrate and commune even though we physically can't do that, right now and kind of in that vein, the book feels unapologetic to me amongst many other things, but unapologetic stands out. Was that feeling or intention when you felt in your process of putting it together at all? Kimberly, That's a great Yeah, That's a great launching point. I think unapologetic is definitely a virtue. That's imbued in every step of this text. But I also think it really is vulnerability. It started with Jenna's vulnerability and reaching out to me and saying This is a project that I want to see. Realize it started with the vulnerability of saying, OK, let's start this first shared document and see where it goes. It was a vulnerability of going toe One roll world. With our book proposal. It was the vulnerability of our outreach strategy to each of our contributors. It was a vulnerability that was founded in the conversations that we commit that we commissioned for the text. This book is really so much about being unapologetic, but also being soft and tender virtues that I think are so important in a moment like this one where we find ourselves. Really seeking softness, tenderness and forgiveness. Jenna. Did you have any thoughts You wanted to add to that? No, that was perfect. Kimberly's just imagine spending every single day with his brilliance. I'm so lucky. If you're just joining us, we're talking about the book Black futures with co editors. Kimberly Drew, who's author. Also of This is what I know about art. She's also a curator and activist, and Jenna Wortham, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine and co host of the still processing podcast. And in just a moment, we'll go into the break with another track that's featured on the mixed by King Brit for Black Futures. It's an instrumental of Katrina is nothing like you. And following that, we'll have more with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham and Black Futures. I'm Arianna Trail you're listening to form. Support for KQED comes from a generous gift.

Kimberly Drew Jenna Wortham Black Futures Ion Elizabeth Johnson Eve Ewing KQED Jen King Brit Katrina The New York Times Magazine staff writer
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Segue Way to the Queen's gambit, cause the Queen's gambit is the name of an opening. Can you just kind of breakdown? Um, what openings are and just some of that dynamic. Yeah, Opening. So the start of the game. There's a lot of different good ways. You can develop your pieces and try to start the goal of tests to checkmate your opponent. But on the way to check meeting you have to develop your pieces. Attack your opponent's king. Get your own king into safety, so they're different strategies to go about that, and one of the best is the Queen's gambit. And even though that Is actually the title of a novel from 1983 that was adapted for the hit Netflix series. It also is considered one of the best openings in history. And that reputation is on Lee Rising. Actually, computer computer and artificial intelligence are saying that this idea of moving your ponds on the queen's side To get some really nice space and development is perhaps the best opening of all. And so what did you think of the Queen's Gambit? Netflix show how it represented the game and also how it represented the experience of a young woman and chest. I loved it. I thought it was phenomenal. All the all the stars. I think that it showed the glamour side of chests which hadn't really been shown before. I think in that same way, it told the importance of Ah woman being you know known for her mind and what's inside, even though of course in the serious you happen to be stunningly beautiful. That wasn't what was important right? And that's such a powerful message to girls, and it's just so well crafted. I mean, it's the kind of thing that will pull people in and not let go, and that Happened to apparently 60 million households and how many of those people are actually going to enjoy test for the rest of their lives? I think a large number And did you have the opportunity to travel four chests with chests and kind of what were those experiences like? What's yet international community like I did. It is such an awesome community. I mean, that's one of the reasons why I also resonated with the show because Beth got to go all over the world and the country to play chess and seen with me when I was 15 years old. I got invited to a chess tournament in Brazil and then another one in Iceland, and these were my first trips out of the country and I only got to go because of chess. You know, I was one of the highest rank chess players in my age group. So the U. S Chess Federation and the International Chess Federation invited me and my family got to go and open up this whole new world to me. If you're just joining us, we're talking with Jennifer Shehadi, two time U. S women's champion. She's author of play Like a Girl. She's also Women's program director of the U. S Chess Federation. We're getting your take on the Queen's gambit Netflix show and just the impact and ripple effect that it's having on chest and fewer. Interested in joining the conversation We'd like to hear from you. So do you play chess, competitively or for fun? If so, What do you love about it? And especially if you're a woman or person of color who plays what's been your experience? And have you seen the Queen's gambit? Serious? What did you think of it and have you taken up chest since watching it? Give us a call now at 8667336786. That's 8667336786. You can also get in touch on Twitter and Facebook. Where at KQED Forum or email your questions to forum at KQED dot or g'kar. On Jennifer Shehadi, Can you tell us a little bit about the work that you do with the U. S Chess Federation and what that kind of outreach looks like two women and girls and getting them into chess. Absolutely well. Our goal at US chests and with our women's program is to get more women into the game and also with the focus on Intersectionality. So we went all women to be able to play whatever is there wherever they come from on. Do you want to help people who most need its benefits? So we do give out grants to smaller organizations to help promote their women's initiatives. We also have weekly classes. For different age groups. So we have an adult class. We have a girls group where we bring in guest lectures. Gary Kasparov was even nice enough to come and they inspire the girls and teach them the chess strategy. But more than anything, these opportunities are to create community because a lot of times a girl, especially now during the pandemic, doesn't have friends that he can Hang out with him play chess with But now we're in a zoom call, and there's 100 of us, and they start chatting and making friends on chest dot com and challenging each other. We also even have a program where some of our top US girls I meet with the top Kenya chest girls, and they learn from each other's cultures, and they also have chess tournaments and training sessions together, and all of this started the flourished during the pandemic, So you know again away of solace for a really difficult time for kids and teens. And that's that is hard into your knowing Also, because you know the online I just heard, you know, there's sometimes be a lot of bullying or just kind of a toxic environment, sometimes in the gaming world Online, especially when it comes to, you know, women and girls participating. So it sounds like working Toldo community there may be offset some of those factors. Especially in a male dominated game like chess, right? Exactly because every woman and girl is gonna have something negative experiences, and it's all about the inner strength. But it's also about the network that she has the community. She has fallen back on and get that support. And sometimes that comes from the family. Sometimes it comes from the school. But if we can create stronger network, so the woman never feels alone never feels like there's nobody to talk to is something inappropriate happens. I think that's like the biggest fool of all. Well, we'll talk more with Jennifer Shehadi, two time U S. Women's champion, author of play Like a Girl in the Women's program, director for the U. S Chess Federation. And some more chess players After the break, you're listening to forum I'm Arianna Trail and for Michael Krasny. Support for KQED this morning comes.

U. S Chess Federation Jennifer Shehadi Netflix International Chess Federation US KQED KQED Forum Lee Rising KQED dot Gary Kasparov program director Beth Twitter Brazil Arianna Trail Kenya Iceland
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is KQED Public radio Sunshine today and tomorrow temperatures, mostly in the mid sixties. Welcome back. I'm Arianna Trail from KQED in San Francisco. And I'm Rose Scott from WSB in Atlanta. This is America amplified election 2020, your voice counts. We've been taking this hour to process this moment in time as we near the end of a tumultuous and challenging year to say the least. We want to spend the rest of this hour imagining a way forward, and we should acknowledge that for some folks, they may not be in the mood for healing our reconciliation, as we heard from Dr Katherine makes early in the program. However, she did offer a framework for getting started, which is tell the truth be compassionate, Listen, and above all else do not abuse the other view, right? Because this time isn't just about having different views on the tax code or small government versus big government. You know, there's been a lot of talk about the soul of our nation in this election. And a reckoning on multiple levels over the identity of our country and different, very passionate views of what that identity is, and should be. So we want to consider what communities air doing at this time to navigate through the differences, And to do that we welcome to America amplified from the Navajo Nation in New Mexico, Allie Young From Liberty City and Miami, Florida, Valencia veeg under and from Allentown, Pennsylvania. Tim Rameau's So, Tim, thank you for joining us again. I'll begin with you your in the battleground state of Pennsylvania, where it was a tight race. Joe Biden is the projected winner there. There's also ongoing litigation from the Trump campaign. What's your overall feeling right now? Post election and the feeling in your community? Is just a sense of frustration. I always said personally who, no matter who won or lost. I just wanted it to be As Clear as possible that there would be no fraud. No any of that. You know, there's a lot of hypocrisy going around and I'm just not the guy who can sit back and just watch it and not speak up about it, Pete, you know, people need to be held to account. And there's no way forward. If people are going to create a continuing adversarial spirit. That's what I see. Let's go out to New Mexico and Allie Young moving forward. What does that look like? Through your lands to ask, moving forward means making sure that indigenous peoples are included in the conversation, Um, holding our elected officials accountable where excited about this win. But we're also there's still a lot of work ahead of us. And, um for indigenous people who have deep knowledge about Mother Earth and how to respect her. How Tonto have a relationship with her. And so we were expecting to be included in the discussions around climate change. Um and This nation has a lot of healing to do. So that's what we're working towards as as a nation as Navajo Nation. Um, and we're excited because, um, In the neck culture. It's about balance. And for the first time in the highest office of the federal government, we're gonna have the male and female energies and that's the kind of energy that is needed to heal this country. Allie, Let me ask you this because you know, the outcome of the election doesn't magically eliminate issues because the work is going to continue for your organization protect the sacred And while you're hoping that energy And the White House is doing what it's supposed to do. You still are committed you on your organization committed to doing your work. What does that look like in 2021? Absolutely well coveted still here, and that's how I protect the sacred started. That's why it started. A psycho been released because Navajo nation became the number one hot spots in the country per capita and so our Work is going to continue and shipped back to that covert relief work. Because we're in the winter months. Navajo nation can get hit pretty hard with winter weather. On go to ensure that our elders in our cultures are, um will survive and persevere because it is scary in Navajo nation. The death toll is up above 580 people who lost their lives to covert 19 and over 60% of those deaths are elders. Six years and older who hold our language is our ancestral knowledge, and we're still learning all of that from them. And it is our obligation to protect that. On And since we're all still in the mist of this pandemic, what does the work look like? Going forward for you and your community? You know for me moving forward after this election after this year. This has been very heavy on everybody. I think the focus shit be back, grounded on people. The needs of people start in 2021. Michael's in my local community institute, some political education. Communities around her K preparedness around pandemic to health issues because places like South Florida and even rule areas in Florida. Really got hit when it came to Cove it and that's something that you know, straight out the fence. I'm planning on focusing on to show the lack of equity when it comes to disaster preparedness and relief and what the long term recovery looks like for all people. And do you feel like you're seeing any Yes. Lessons or solace. And in the way people are coming together around those efforts. Yes, So when you deal with his actor, people don't usually talk politics around that. People are like my neighbor needs help. I'm going to assist my neighbor. I wish that's how it worked in the political world. But it doesn't even throughout the pandemic, walking through communities, talking with a lot of different boats, helping to feed individuals. You don't hear them talking about who's the president? Who's going to be the president? Democrat to Republican until what they need help we see a need fill me. And that's just how the community functions and I wish we all function like that on every level, And I appreciate you saying that I know it might seem like an obvious thought. But I feel like definitely in the time that we're in. We kind of need some of those reminders of again each other's humanity and kind of shared experience. And Tim. I want to go back to what does the work look like for you in your community going forward? I'm continuing like Valencia just said just continuing to educate our community. We need to create a new environment where we forced both parties or whoever their candidates are. Had any level toe. Actually be representative of that community. So it's not you pushing your agenda is that you know, benefits you It's you pushing the agenda that benefits the community at large, So I always lead from informational position. I'm heavy on information. I When I speak to people from our community, always give them the history of the situation or initial and tell them what the city has done and then give them the solution. This is what we can do to stop that particular issue, so it's always educating and leading from that perspective..

Navajo Nation Um Allie Young Tim Rameau KQED America New Mexico Florida Rose Scott Atlanta Pennsylvania Dr Katherine Joe Biden federal government San Francisco president fraud Valencia Allentown Tonto
"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"arianna trail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Enabled device by saying open 2020 Donate your vehicle to take the baby and reroute your pollution with an environmentally responsible solutions. 86% of a car can be recycled and used, donating helps remove your car responsibly and professionally. Q e d dot org's slash cars Coming up at 10 o'clock tonight on forum. We're going to listen back to this morning's program with guest host Arianna Trail about how this pandemic is putting a greater burden on working women. That's the forum rebroadcast coming up in about 20 minutes tonight at 10. The Bay Area will be sunny tomorrow with highs in the upper eighties and then Sunday will be sunny with highs in the upper seventies. You're listening to FM 88.5 San Francisco and pick me I FM 89.3 north Highland Sacramento or live online at dot or get 9 40. Support for NPR comes from this station and from the National Endowment for the Arts, the federal agency that supports the arts and creativity and communities across the nation. More information is available at arts dot gov. From the Ford Foundation, Working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms. Learn more at Ford foundation dot And from the Public Welfare Foundation committed to advancing transformative youth and criminal justice reforms. Let's get back to the Friday news round up..