17 Burst results for "Arian Campo Flores"

"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

03:54 min | 9 months ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Could shake it in for a Gordon deal on this weekend with the presidential election. In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning's Gordon deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at the Wall Street Journal. His species gold in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened kind of set the scene for Jacksonville and Duval County. So Jacksonville is that city is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican stronghold. It's an area that's gotta has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margins. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andrew Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is a county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, but but it just shows that there's been a significant Change a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is now become a real a true Battleground in the state of Florida. All right, so get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? So this is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry has long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly. So if we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the few It is around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution they have. You know, Deutsche Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial tech knowledge e company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing more educated professional of some cases. You know, young, professional job seekers who are coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role in this group. This influx Younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associated with Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been out migration over time. More conservative, right? More affluent to have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of a redistribution is well. Of the population. So those kind of the major demographic changes that the area has undergone this morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that worked and technology that didn't work.

Jacksonville Florida Wall Street Journal Campo Flores Arian Campo Flores Gordon Andrew Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Joe Biden Duval County reporter Ari Deutsche Bank Wanda County
"arian campo flores" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Stand up with us. I got this abalone. Jennifer could Shaka and for Gordon deal on this weekend with the presidential election. In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning's Gordon deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at The Wall Street Journal. His species called in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened kind of set the scene for Jacksonville and Duval County. So Jacksonville is the city is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican strongholds. It's an area that's got a has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margins. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andrew Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is the county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, but but it just shows that there's been a significant Change a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is Now become a real a true battleground in the state of Florida. All right, so get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? This is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry has long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly, so they've had we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the few Cities around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution They have, you know, Deutsche Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial tech knowledge, a company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing, more educated professional of in some cases, you know, young, professional job seekers who are coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role in this good this influx. Younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associated with Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been a out migration over time. More conservative, right? More affluent to have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of a redistribution is well of the population, so those are kind of the major demographic changes that the area is under God. This morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that worked and technology that didn't work in 2020..

Jacksonville Florida Wanda County The Wall Street Journal Arian Campo Flores Gordon Campo Flores Andrew Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Duval County Shaka Joe Biden Jennifer Deutsche Bank reporter Ari
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:47 min | 9 months ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning scored in deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at the Wall Street Journal. His species gold in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened Kind of set the scene for Jacksonville in Duval County. So Jacksonville is that the city is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican stronghold. It's an area that's gotta has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margins. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andrew Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is the county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, but but it just shows that there's been a significant Change a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is Now become a real true battleground in the state of Florida. All right, so get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? This is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry of long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they've they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly, so they've had we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the of the few. Cities around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution They have, you know, Deutsche Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial tech knowledge e company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing more educated, professional. In some cases, you know, young, professional job seekers who are coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role in this this influx. Younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associated with Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been out migration over time. Have more conservative lights. More affluent who have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of a redistribution is well of the population. So those are kind of The major demographic changes that the area has undergone this morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that.

Florida Jacksonville Wanda County Wall Street Journal Campo Flores Arian Campo Flores Andrew Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Ari Duval County reporter Joe Biden Deutsche Bank
"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:50 min | 9 months ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Election. In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning's Gordon deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at the Wall Street Journal. His species gold in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened Kind of set the scene for Jacksonville in Duval County. So Jacksonville is that city is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican strongholds. It's an area that's gotta has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margins. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andrew Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is the county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, but but it just shows that there's been a significant Gains a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is now become a real true Battleground in the state of Florida, right? So get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? This is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry has long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly. So if we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the of the few. Cities around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution They have, you know, Deutsche Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial technology company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing more educated professional of some cases. You know, young, professional job seekers who are coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role is this good? This influx Younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associative Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been out migration over time. More conservative rights, more affluent, who have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of a redistribution is well of the population. So those are kind of The major demographic changes of the area's undergone this morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that worked and technology that didn't work in.

Florida Jacksonville Wanda County Wall Street Journal Campo Flores Arian Campo Flores Andrew Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Duval County reporter Gordon Joe Biden Ari Deutsche Bank
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"With the presidential election. In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning's Gordon deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at The Wall Street Journal. His species called in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened kind of set the scene for Jacksonville and Duval County. So Jacksonville is that it is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican stronghold. It's an area that's cut up has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margin. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andra Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is a county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, But it just shows that there's been a significant Change a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is now become a real true battleground in the state of Florida. All right, so get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? This is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry has long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly. So if we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the of the few. Cities around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution They have, you know, George Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial technology company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing more educated professional of some cases, you know, young, professional job seekers who were coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role in this competition in flux. Of younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associated with Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been a out migration over time. More conservative, right? More affluent to have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of redistribution is well. Of the population. So those are kind of the major demographic changes that the area's undergone this morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that worked and technology that didn't work.

Jacksonville Florida The Wall Street Journal Campo Flores Arian Campo Flores Andra Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Joe Biden Duval County reporter Gordon Ari Wanda County George Bank
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I'm Oscar Ramirez in listening to the daily dive weekend edition one of the interesting cases throughout this whole corona virus pandemic has been the state of Florida Florida has begun to reopen safer business as they were able to Dodge some of the worst of coronavirus despite not issuing early state wide stay at home orders many of the decisions were left to local authorities on whether to shut down they had a lesser population density and warmer climate and those could have played a role in fewer infections but one other big factor there was an attitude change in Florida residents themselves smartphone data shows that by mid March before a stay at home orders were put in place residents had already begun to hunker down and limit movements still with a larger population of people over sixty five there's fears of a second wave of infections for more on how Florida made it this far and whether they made smart decisions or we're just lucky we spoke to Arianna cumple Flores reporter for the Wall Street journal so what the governor and Florida was widely and persistently criticized for not taking a more uniform approach to walking down the state and implementing stay home order what he did instead was to defer to local governments to make those decisions for themselves he did do some things that have been praised as early actions in particular how you moved relatively quickly to cut off access to nursing homes and assisted living facilities and to really lock those down because of how vulnerable bat populations but in terms of do you stay on orders for residents at large that was really up to the locals and what ended up happening is that in particularly hard hit areas like Miami beach Miami Dade County Broward county fort Lauderdale area those areas did move relatively quickly which sort of became very famous for having these pictures of partying spring breakers which were very unsettling to large parts of the country what happened is that that created a lot of alarm among local officials and so that was relatively quickly shut down within days after that so this critical period of about March fifteenth to March twenty seconds was really it I don't clamp down but that was done based on the actions of what local and county officials were doing that was not something that was being directed or pushed by the governors I think in that respect sort of fortunate right that turned out the way that it did one of the things a lot of people point to is population density when we're talking about places like New York everybody is packed in really tight and you just really have no option but to be around people in Florida it's such a big state it varies a lot you know and as you mentioned some of the local mayors and some of the more populous areas they should moved quickly to shut things down but in other areas of the state where you didn't really need it the governor haven't put any state home orders in place so they were able to kind of operate a lot more freely your research like a blanket stay home order as a blunt instrument why would you put in place the same thing and same Miami beach that you would put in place and one of the many more rural counties that have been much less affected by this and so density is an S. or something that public health experts have raised as another potential factor that has played a role in this Florida as dense pockets it has some dense urban cores but it's largely a state that has a lot of sprawl as a lot of suburban tract housing and very limited public transit and so those are factors that at least in this instance seem to have helped out the state one of the other major factors a lot of people point to is this change in behavior by Floridians and their people are looking not smartphone data to see how people were moving if they were staying home and they said that by mid March and this is obviously before the statewide said home order was put in place people were already starting to hunker down and we keep talking about the senior population there it's about twenty percent of Florida I mean maybe they just started seeing everything happening across the country and knowing that they were in the most at risk category and then they just started staying home so even the people of Florida started doing this on their own that's one of the most interesting aspects of this and reporting on it which is that even though the governor took weeks beyond when people thought he should have to put in a stay at home order even in the absence of bad and Floridians in general really started hunkering down in mid March right around March fifteenth is when you start to see a really significant decline and mobility as measured by locations of cell phones and so what that suggests is that people are taking it upon themselves they were alarmed enough by what they were saying and years reports and this was a period in which you were saying news reports of just a horrible situation in Italy you know military trucks ferrying coffins doctors have to make really difficult decisions about rationing care now I was getting a lot of coverage there was also is also great in which it was growing alarm about what was gonna happen in New York City and Florida's a place that has a lot of connections to New York and so that seems to have generated this response in people you're just whatever officials are saying they were gonna take it upon themselves anyway to log out you know one of the interesting things I noted in your report that it was that the state contacted researchers at the university of Florida emerging pathogens institute to get help on what to do when they were still very few cases and they wrote a one page assessment that's had shut everything down now or you can start seeing huge community spread and deaths but the US state officials said you know what we're tracing everything we're not finding a lot of community spread and that's why dissent is the governor there took a more targeted approach to just the hard hit counties and everything else kind of all of this is what we're kind of seeing from all there so even despite some early recommendations to start shutting things down he resisted cell and there was concern among these public health experts these epidemiologist modelers deep concern that the state was not taking this seriously on us and so when the state reached out to ask for some guidance from this group and this is an institute at university of Florida that specializes in this the researchers made clear that in their opinion the state really needed to act quickly and aggressively to cancel mass gatherings get people at home cancels schools etcetera and really implement aggressive social distancing and they warned that if not there was a likelihood I was more than a thousand deaths over the course of the following month and that is actually what happens doesn't now topped thirteen hundred and the state it certainly has come out much better than a lot of love the early modeling was projecting a lot better than a lot of people feared but you know that it's still a significant number of people right but yeah as you noted that the governor and they felt the approach that they were taking was one that made the most sense and so they essentially did not take action in response to these warnings that were raised by these experts testing is still a huge issue I think I. experts say there needs to be thirty two thousand taps a day to detect and respond to any flare ups that might be occurring where is Florida out with testing according to one official was addressing this recently said it basically needs to double in terms of capacity and so the state is trying very hard to do that this is a very challenging environment for any state any governor there's just a deep shortage of of kits and supplies but they have been steadily ramping that up and so you need to have that infrastructure in place to be able to quickly detect any new outbreaks or flare ups and be able to then do contact tracing and track down a nice local folks okay I thank the people may have had contact with so some people believe it that it is too early to be talking about a re opening of the state and until you have that's firmly in place what the state is doing is going ahead with a very gradual reopening and governor Sanders has been more cautious about it and some other governors in the south and for instance in Georgia and other states where they're moving more quickly to open things up and Florida it is going very slowly this first phase is a gradual reopening of retail stores and restaurants outside of South Florida so the South Florida counties are carved out of this and they need to remain under the stay at home orders there will be almost undoubtedly new instructions are gonna gonna gonna crop up in the state needs to be very effectively clamp down on those and so there is understandable concern about whether the state is going to really be able to avoid a potentially more lethal second way Arian Campo Flores reporter with the Wall Street journal based in Miami thank you very much for joining us sure thing was my pleasure listen to the daily died weekend edition on KFI am six forty I'm back we'll talk about how extreme bracelet for over ten hours Venezuela's president Maduro Hey everyone dean sharp you.

Oscar Ramirez Florida Florida
"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Monday through Friday for more news without the noise one of the interesting cases throughout this whole corona virus pandemic has been the state of Florida Florida has begun to reopen state for business as they were able to Dodge some of the worst of coronavirus despite not issuing early state wide stay at home orders many of the decisions were left to local authorities on whether to shut down they have a lesser population density and warmer climate and those could have played a role in fewer infections but one other big factor there was an attitude change in Florida residents themselves smartphone data shows that by mid March before a stay at home orders were put in place residents had already begun to hunker down and limit movements still with a larger population of people over sixty five there's fears of a second wave of infections for more on how Florida made it this far and whether they made smart decisions we're just lucky we spoke to Iran contra Flores reporter for the Wall Street journal so what the governor and Florida was widely and persistently criticized for not no more uniform approach to walking down the state and implementing stay home order boy he did instead was to defer to local governments to make those decisions for themselves he did do some things that have been praised as early actions in particular how you moved relatively quickly to cut off access to nursing homes and assisted living facilities and to really lock those down because of how vulnerable bat populations but in terms of the stay home orders for residents at large that was really up to the locals and what ended up happening is that in particularly hard hit areas like Miami beach Miami Dade County Broward county fort Lauderdale area those areas did move relatively quickly Florida became very famous for having these pictures of partying spring breakers which were very unsettling to large parts of the country what happened is that that created a lot of alarm among local officials so that was relatively quickly shut down within days after that so this critical period of about March fifteenth March twenty seconds was really a clamp down but that was done based on the actions of a local and county officials were doing that was not something that was being directed or pushed by the governors I think in that respect sort of fortunate right that turned out the way that it did one of the things a lot of people point to is population density when we're talking about places like New York everybody is packed in really tight and you just really have no option but to be around people in Florida it's such a big state it varies a lot you know and as you mentioned some of the local mayors and some of the more populous areas they should moved quickly to shut things down but in other areas of the state where you didn't really need it the governor haven't put any state home orders in place so they were able to kind of operate a lot more freely search a like a blanket stay home order as a blunt instrument why would you put in place the same thing and save Miami beach that you were put in place and one of the many more rural counties that have been much less affected by this and so density is an S. or something that public health experts have raised as another potential factor that has played a role in this Florida as dense pockets it has some dense urban cores but it's largely a state that has a lot of sprawl it has a lot of suburban tract housing and very limited public transit and so those are factors that at least in this instance seem to have helped out the state one of the other major factors a lot of people point to is this change in behavior by Floridians and their people are looking not smartphone data to see how people were moving if they were staying home and they said that by mid March and this is obviously before the state wide state home order was put in place people were already starting to hunker down and we keep talking about the senior population there it's about twenty percent of Florida I mean maybe they just started seeing everything happening across the country and knowing that they were in the most at risk category and then they just started staying home so even the people of Florida started doing this on their own that's one of the most interesting aspects of this the recording I wish is that even though the governor took weeks beyond when people thought he should have to put in a sterile water even in the absence of battered Floridians in general really started hunkering down in mid March right around March fifteenth is when you start to see a really significant decline and mobility as measured by locations of cell phones and so what that suggests is that people are taking it upon themselves they were alarmed enough by what they were saying and years reports and this was a period in which you were saying news reports of just a horrible situation in Italy not military trucks Schering cough and doctors have to make really difficult decisions about rationing care now I was getting a lot of coverage there was also is also great in which it was growing alarm about what was gonna happen in New York City and Florida's a place that has a lot of connections to New York and so that seems to have generated this response and people you're just whatever officials are saying they were gonna take it upon themselves anyway to log out you know one of the interesting things I noted in your report that it was at the state contacted researchers at the university of Florida emerging pathogens institute to get help on what to do when they were still very few cases and they wrote a one page assessment that's had shut everything down now or you're gonna start seeing huge community spread and deaths but the state officials said you know what we're tracing everything we're not finding a lot of community spread and that's why Disentis the governor there took a more targeted approach to just the hard hit counties and everything else kind of all of this is what we're kind of scene from all there so even despite some early recommendations to start shutting things down he resisted so and there was concern among these public health experts these epidemiologist modelers deep concern that the state was not taking this seriously and so when the state reached out to ask for some guidance from this group and this is an institute at the university of Florida that specializes in this the researchers made clear that in their opinion the state really needed to act quickly and aggressively to cancel mass gatherings get people at home cancel schools etcetera and really implemented aggressive social distancing and they warned that if not there was a likelihood of more than a thousand deaths over the course of the following month and that is actually what happens doesn't now topped thirteen hundred and the state certainly has come out much better than a lot of the early modeling was projecting a lot better than a lot of people feared but you know that it's still a significant number of people right but yeah as you noted that the governor they felt the approach that they were taking was one that made the most sense and so they essentially did not take action in response to these warnings that were raised by these experts testing is still a huge issue I think I. experts say there needs to be thirty two thousand taps a day to detect and respond to any flare ups that might be occurring where is Florida out with testing according to one official was addressing this recently said it basically needs to double in terms of capacity and so the state is trying very hard to do that this is a very challenging environment for any state any governor there's just a deep shortage of of kits and supplies but they have been steadily wrapping that up and so you need to have that infrastructure in place to be able to quickly detect any new outbreaks or flare ups and be able to then do contact tracing and track down an ice like the folks that I talk to people may have had contact with so some people believe that that it is too early to be talking about a re opening of the state until you have that's firmly in place what the state is doing is going ahead with a very gradual reopening and governor Sanders has been more cautious about it and some other of governors in the south and for instance in in Georgia and other states where they're moving more quickly to open things up in Florida it is going very slowly this first phase is a gradual reopening of retail stores and restaurants outside of South Florida so the South Florida counties are carved out of this and they need to remain under the stay at home orders there will be almost undoubtedly your sections are gonna gonna gonna crop up in the state needs to be very effectively clamp down on those and so there is understandable concern about whether the state is going to really be able to avoid a potentially more lethal second way Arian Campo Flores reporter with the Wall Street journal based in Miami thank you very much for joining us sure thing was my pleasure you're listening to the daily died weekend edition I'm Oscar Mayers and we'll be right back Pasco news radio WFLA ninety nine point one FM bio cell regenerative medicine shares your concern over the rapidly evolving covert nineteen situation many of the things we do every day have been dramatically.

Florida Florida
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Facts and not fear and I think that there's been a lot that's been done to try to promote fear we were told over and over again Florida was going to be just like New York when it came to the coronavirus well let's look at the tale of the tape how close are we to New York fatalities obviously a much different picture you know we have this is equal population per one hundred thousand much much less even if you did absolute numbers we have two million more people New York far far and above what Florida is same thing with hospitalization hospitalization rate that is a mere fraction of what you see not just in New York but many other states and so saying Florida was going to be like New York was wrong people need to know was wrong why was it wrong to they did say there's a claim that because Florida has a particularly top heavy population when it comes to H. right you have a a bowls at the top of the age bracket although not as much as per capita Maine I didn't know this interesting fact Maine has the highest per capita senior citizen population anywhere of any state in the country so as a percentage of overall population not in total numbers but Florida did not get hit nearly as badly as people were saying it would you had flight from New York City at the and really at the height of spread to Florida and so they're all these concerns that you are going to have that effectively new Yorkers infecting Florida and adding to that rate that rate of spread of the disease and we all these very concerning news stories coming out about this and everyone's saying well Florida's not locking down fast enough or with enough urgency so it's going to suffer this terrible fate and then we saw with the numbers work and Wall Street journal pull this together in a in an editorial over the weekend by Arian Campo Flores and Alex Leary smart or lucky how Florida dodged the worst of corona virus now remember we we saw we saw what this virus does when it has essentially unrestricted ability to engage in community spread and to go all over population we keep hearing about all we we did lock eyes with the lockdowns this was in the state this was in America at least starting in our middle of January and most states were not really locking down until April so you had spread and spread it spread and we see in New York City one in four people are believed to have been infected with this so this had an enormous spread now now we're going to want to because the lockdowns we prevented a catastrophe from being so so much worse than it was well okay but explain Florida because Florida has not suffered a catastrophe relative to other hearted states at all despite having an older senior so a lot of senior citizens in the population Florida court as well as usual piece had code six deaths per one hundred thousand people as of Saturday compared with forty two in Louisiana fifty six in Massachusetts and ninety seven in New York per one hundred thousand so Florida has six per hundred thousand New York has almost a hundred per hundred thousand that's an enormous enormous difference for two states that both have large population a lot of senior citizens tree in a lot of major urban areas I mean if you look at this you say well hold on a second how do we get a bit but in there's no interest really looking with Florida right instead they just wave it aside and say oh well Florida you know they got lucky I guess really lucky maybe the fact that people in Florida have more outdoorsy lifestyles and they do in New York maybe the fact that the governor they're allowed for high risk areas to move more quickly lower risk areas of the state he localize the response did not do a one size fits all lockdown policy as we're told was necessary if you want to save lives you must do this right if you want to save lives then you look at as of Friday for example there were this is this is from last week there were one thousand three hundred eighty four residents of long Kerr for sale of long term care facilities in the state with code nineteen four point nine percent of the total resident population there were three hundred eighty eight deaths of long term care residents people age sixty five and up make over twenty percent of Florida's population and again the second highest apportionment anywhere after Maine so Florida was supposed to be just like New York just like Italy and it didn't happen why now there are some as I said lifestyle differences between the way New York City operates and the way Florida operates but you look at northern Italy are they all in mass transportation why were they hit so badly there are lessons to be learned here and lock is not I'm sorry luck is not one that we're just going to accept and move past because Florida didn't do with the ultralight down crowds said they had to do in a sense Florida this way is kind of like Sweden people were saying that the consent Wesley people I mean the consensus view is that Sweden was heading for disaster disaster did not befall Sweden even though Sweden did not do what the lockdown course was saying Sweden needs to do so now we turn around and say well hold on a second Sweden okay fine maybe that's far away and I hear all these stories about how Sweden has like a particular culture and serve different although why did South Korea managed this without blocking why Japan manage a locking down its whole economy countries have done this without the lockdown and everyone can can claim now which I see happening well they're basically doing a lot down there just not calling it that really because a couple weeks ago was there heading for disaster because they're not doing it and it will bring people see results that don't fit with what their view was what their advice was all of a sudden what they said a week or two ago no longer matters I don't like that I don't accept that Florida was supposed to be heading for disaster however there was so much pressure all the governance locked down the beach as lock in lock the beaches down fast enough he's the mayor from jaws which I just rewatched recently and there's a lot of covert nineteen great white shark theoretical crossover when you watch all you say oh yeah this is the economy versus saving lives and there's some real it's a it's a movie for our time it's such a great movie I was just talking about to us no princess and my mom about it over the weekend it's such a great film you know really holds up so well and it's it's in that pantheon of just great cinema where you're it's not great because people tell you it is it's great because you want to watch a hundred times and it's super entertaining and well done so Florida was was supposed to be at this really great risk it didn't end up happening why they don't have answers and they want to find out the answers they just want to tell you lockdown shut up we'll tell you when you come outside where they like to be just down fast enough but it turns out that they were okay member of the spring breakers that we're getting all this abuse heaped on them you know people that were in our high school college age spring break if you're eighteen to twenty two your risk from this virus is almost zero now you can say Bach but what they they're going to in fact older people they're around we should work on separating young people who are twenty from old people who older people rather who are at higher risk because herd immunity is happening one way or another so controlling the spread within the herd is a better public policy and that had been public health policy until now but nobody wants to look at Florida's example they they just want to find excuses for.

Florida New York
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Facts and not fear and I think that there's been a lot that's been done to try to promote fear we were told over and over again Florida was going to be just like New York when it came to the corona virus well let's look at the tale of the tape how close are we to New York finality is obviously a much different picture you know we have this is our equal population per one hundred thousand much much less even if you did absolute numbers we have two million more people New York far far and above what Florida is same thing with hospitalization hospitalization rate that is a mere fraction of what you see not just in New York but many other states and so saying Florida was going to be like New York was wrong people need to know was wrong why was it wrong to they did say there's a claim that because Florida has a particularly top heavy population when it comes to H. right you have a a bowls at the top of the age bracket although not as much as per capita Maine I didn't know this interesting fact Maine has the highest per capita senior citizen population anywhere of any state in the country so as a percentage of overall population not in total numbers but Florida did not get hit nearly as badly as people were saying it would you had flight from New York City at the and really at the height of spread to Florida and so they're all these concerns that you are going to have that effectively new Yorkers infecting Florida and adding to that read that rate of spread of the disease we all these very concerning news stories coming out about this and everyone saying well Florida's not locking down fast enough or with enough urgency so it's going to suffer this terrible fate and then we saw with the numbers work and Wall Street journal pull this together in a in an editorial over the weekend by Arian Campo Flores and Alex Leary smart or lucky how Florida dodged the worst of corona virus now remember we we saw we saw what this virus does when it has essentially unrestricted ability to engage in community spread and to go all over population we keep hearing about all we we did lock eyes with the lockdowns this was in the state this was in America at least starting in our middle of January and most states were not really locking down until April so you had spread and spread it spread and we see in New York City one in four people are believed to have been infected with this so this had an enormous spread now now we're going to want to because the lockdowns we prevented a catastrophe from being so so much worse than it was well okay but explained Florida because Florida has not suffered a catastrophe relative to other hearted states at all despite having an older senior so a lot of senior citizens the population Florida court as well as regional peace head coach six deaths per one hundred thousand people as of Saturday compared with forty two in Louisiana fifty six in Massachusetts and ninety seven in New York per one hundred thousand so Florida has six per hundred thousand New York has almost a hundred per hundred thousand that's an enormous enormous difference for two states that both have large population a lot of senior citizens tree you know a lot of major urban areas I mean if you look at this you say hold on a second how do we get a bit but then there's no interest really looking with Florida right instead they just wave it aside and say oh well Florida you know they got lucky I guess really lucky maybe the fact that people in Florida have more outdoorsy lifestyles they do in New York maybe the fact that the governor they're allowed for high risk areas to move more quickly lower risk areas of the state he localize the response did not do a one size fits all lockdown policy as we're told was necessary if you want to save lives you must do this right if you want to save lives then you look at as of Friday for example there were this is this is from last week there were one thousand three hundred eighty four residents of long care facil of long term care facilities in the state with code nineteen four point nine percent of the total resident population there were three hundred eighty eight deaths of long term care residents people age sixty five and up make over twenty percent of Florida's population and again the second highest portion of anywhere after Maine so Florida was supposed to be just like New York just like Italy and it didn't happen why now there are some as I said lifestyle differences between the way New York City operates and the way Florida operates but you look at northern Italy are they all in mass transportation why would they hit so badly there are lessons to be learned here and lock is not I'm sorry luck is not one that we're just going to accept and move past because Florida didn't do with the cultural lockdown crowd said they had to do in a sense Florida this way is kinda like Sweden people were saying that the consent lesser people I mean the consensus view is that Sweden was heading for disaster disaster did not befall Sweden even though Sweden did not do what the lockdown course was saying Sweden needs to do so now we turn around and say well hold on a second Sweden okay fine maybe that's far away and I hear all these stories about how Sweden has like a particular culture and it's a different day although why did South Korea managed this without locking while Japan manager of locking down its whole economy countries have done this without the lockdown and everyone can can claim now which I see happening well they're basically doing a lockdown they're just not calling it that really because a couple weeks ago was there heading for disaster because they're not doing it and I will bring people see results that don't fit with what their view was what their advice was all of a sudden what they said a week or two ago no longer matters I don't like that I don't accept that Florida was supposed to be heading for disaster however there was so much pressure all the governance locked down the beach as lock in lock the beaches down fast enough he's the mayor from jaws switch I just rewatched recently and there's a lot of covert nineteen great white shark theoretical crossover when you watch all you say oh yeah this is the economy versus saving lives and there's some real it's a it's a movie for our time it's such a great movie I was just talking about to us no princess and my mom about it over the weekend it's such a great film you know really holds up so well and it's it's in that pantheon of just great cinema where you're it's not great because people tell you it is it's great because you wanna watch it a hundred times and it's super entertaining and well done so Florida was was supposed to be at this really great risk it didn't end up happening why they don't have answers and they want to find out the answers they just want to tell you lockdown shut up we'll tell you when you come outside a lot could be just down fast enough but turns out that they were okay member of the spring breakers that we're getting all this abuse heaped on them you know people that were in our high school college age spring break if you're eighteen to twenty two your risk from this virus is almost zero now you can say park but well they they're going to in fact older people they're around we should work on separating young people who are twenty from old people who older people rather who are at higher risk because herd immunity is happening one way or another so controlling the spread within the herd he's a better public policy and that had been public health policy until now but nobody wants to look at tourism example they they just want to find excuses for.

Florida New York
"arian campo flores" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Facts and not fear and I think that there's been a lot that's been done to try to promote fear we were told over and over again Florida was going to be just like New York when it came to the corona virus well let's look at the tale of the tape how close are we to New York fatalities obviously a much different picture you know we have this is our equal population per one hundred thousand much much less even if you did absolute numbers we have two million more people New York far far and above what Florida is same thing with hospitalization hospitalization rate that is a mere fraction of what you see not just in New York but many other states and so saying Florida was going to be like New York was wrong people need to know what's wrong why was it wrong to they did say there's a claim that because Florida has a particularly top heavy population when it comes to age right you have a a bowls at the top of the age bracket although not as much as per capita Maine I didn't know this interesting fact Maine has the highest per capita senior citizen population anywhere of any state in the country so as a percentage of overall population not in total numbers but Florida did not get hit nearly as badly as people were saying it would you had flight from New York City at the I really at the height of spread to Florida and so they're all these concerns that you are going to have that effectively new Yorkers infecting Florida and adding to that rate that rate of spread of the disease and we all these very concerning news stories coming out about this and everyone saying well Florida's not locking down fast enough or with enough urgency so it's going to suffer this terrible fate and then we saw with the numbers work and Wall Street journal pull this together in a in an editorial over the weekend by Arian Campo Flores and Alex Leary smart or lucky how Florida dodged the worst of corona virus now remember we we saw we saw what this virus does when it has essentially unrestricted ability to engage in community spread and to go all over population we keep hearing about all we we did lock eyes with the lockdowns this was in the state this was in America at least starting in our middle of January and most states were not really locking down until April so you had spread and spread its right and we see in New York City one in four people are believed to have been infected with this so this had an enormous spread now now we're going to want to because the lockdowns we prevented a catastrophe from being so so much worse than it was well okay but explain Florida because Florida has not suffered a catastrophe relative to other hearted states at all despite having a an older seniors are a lot of senior citizens the population Florida court as well as usual piece had code six deaths per one hundred thousand people as of Saturday compared with forty two in Louisiana fifty six in Massachusetts and ninety seven in New York per one hundred thousand so Florida six per hundred thousand New York has almost a hundred per hundred thousand that's an enormous enormous difference for two states that both have large population a lot of senior citizens you know a lot of major urban areas I mean if you look at this you say well hold on a second how do we get a bit but then there's no interest really looking with Florida right instead they just wave it aside and say oh well Florida you know they got lucky I guess really lucky maybe the fact that people in Florida have more outdoorsy lifestyles and they do in New York maybe the fact that the governor they're allowed for high risk areas to move more quickly lower risk areas of the state he localize the response did not do a one size fits all lockdown policy as we're told was necessary if you want to save lives you must do this right if you want to save lives in the look at as of Friday for example there were this is this is from last week there were one thousand three hundred eighty four residents of long Kerr for sale of long term care facilities in the state with code nineteen four point nine percent of the total resident population there were three hundred eighty eight deaths of long term care residents people age sixty five and up make over twenty percent of Florida's population and again the second highest apportion anywhere after me so Florida was supposed to be just like New York just like Italy and it didn't happen why now there are some as I said lifestyle differences between the way New York City operates and the way Florida operates but you look at northern Italy are they all in mass transportation why were they hit so badly there are lessons to be learned here and lock is not I'm sorry luck is not one that we're just going to accept and move past because Florida didn't do with the ultralight down crowd said they had to do in a sense Florida this way is kinda like Sweden people were saying that the consent lesser people I mean the consensus view is that Sweden was heading for disaster disaster did not befall Sweden even though Sweden did not do what the lockdown course was saying Sweden needs to do so now we turn around and say well hold on a second Sweden okay fine maybe that's far away and I hear all these stories about how Sweden has like a particular culture and serve different although why did South Korea managed this without locking while Japan manager of locking down its whole economy countries have done this without the lockdown and everyone can can claim now which I see happening well they're basically doing a lot down there just not calling it that really because a couple weeks ago was there heading for disaster because they're not doing it and it will be when people see results that don't fit with what their view was what their advice was all of a sudden what they said a week or two ago no longer matters I don't like that I don't accept that Florida was supposed to be heading for disaster however there's so much pressure all the governance locked down the beach is like if you lock the beaches down fast enough he's the mayor from jaws which I just rewatched recently and there's a lot of covert nineteen great white shark theoretical crossover when you watch all you say oh yeah this is the economy versus saving lives and there's some real it's a it's a movie for our time it's such a great movie I was just talking about to us no princess and my mom about it over the weekend it's such a great film you know really holds up so well and it's it's in that pantheon of just great cinema where you're it's not great because people tell you it is it's great because you want to watch a hundred times and it's super entertaining well done so Florida was was supposed to be at this really great rescue didn't end up happening why they don't have answers and I want to find out the answers they just want to tell you lockdown shut up we'll tell you when you can come outside where they like to be just down fast enough but it turns out that they were okay member of the spring breakers that we're getting all this abuse heaped on them you know people that were in our high school college age spring break if you're eighteen to twenty two your risk from this virus is almost zero now you can talk about whether they're going to in fact older people they're around we should work on separating young people who are twenty from old people who older people rather who are at higher risk because herd immunity is happening one way or another so controlling the spread within the herd is a better public policy and that had been public health policy until now but nobody wants to look at Florida's example they they just want to find excuses for why doesn't count somehow lockdowns must continue until we say.

Florida New York
"arian campo flores" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved and erected memorials some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism, many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores are on what you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing, some of the some semblance of normalcy that they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling of you know, they they've they've commemorated those loss they'd grieved. They've come together. In all variety of of groups. And so in some sense, Dave, advanced the healing process. It's still very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seems a constant stream of reminders of how awful that day was and how messy the aftermath has been can you had just recently the submission? Of a report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened, and what the lapses were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report more than four hundred pages that just outlined a litany of errors in the way, for instance, law enforcement handled the situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shooting and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's it's it's a it's still a very emotional time for and park land. Did you say to that? There are some folks are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation and the power report that suggests going taking the measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the guardian program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's very this is just a reality that we live in the other people who are aghast at it and say that this is. Makes people feel less safe to the of teachers now carrying weapons of an inside the classroom. So it's just been. The security issue has been really really difficult. The school district has come under fire from a lot of parents would feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Ariane Chempil flora about his piece entitled year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is, you know, gun right, then and there is a few issues that are more divisive in our country, then gods that has triggered quite polarized debates. In the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strengths and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland, largely led by students they were able to get legislation passed in conservative legislature. On Wall Street Journal reporter REI on Campbell.

parkland Wall Street Journal reporter Marjory stoneman Douglas high Marjory stoneman Arian Campo Flores Florida Mark Ariane Chempil Douglas Dave one year
"arian campo flores" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved any erected memorials, some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism, many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan, what you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normalcy. Then that they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. You know, they they've they've commemorated those loss they'd grieved. They've come together and in all variety of of of groups. And so in some sense, they've advanced the healing process. But it's still a very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just that seems a constant stream of reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been can you had just recently the submission? Of a report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the left says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report more than four hundred pages just outlined a litany of errors in the way, for instance, law enforcement and the situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shooting and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's just it's still a very emotional time for for folks in park line. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people including a recommendation and the power report that suggests going taking a measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the regarding program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's very this is just the reality that we live in there. Other people who are aghast at it and say that this is. Mexico feel less safe to the thought of teachers now carrying weapons of an inside the classroom. So. It's just been. The security issue has been really really difficult. The school district has come under fire from a lot of parents who feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Arjan Campo Flores about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right in and there is a few issues that are more divisive in our country, then gods that has triggered quite polarized debates in the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strengths and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland, largely led by students they were able to get legislation passed in conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter on. Kimball. Florus Stillman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would visit a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. It is fifteen minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Capital? One is building a better Bank one that feels an axe nothing like a typical Bank. It's why the reimagining banking and building something completely different..

parkland Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman Douglas high reporter Florus Stillman Douglas Arian Campo Flores Arjan Marjory stoneman Arjan Campo Flores Florida Mark America Mexico Kimball one year fifteen minutes
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved and erected memorials some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism, many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan, what you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normalcy. Then that they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. You know, they they've commemorated those loss they grieved they've come together in all variety of groups. And so in some sense, they've advanced the healing process. But it's still a very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seeing the constant stream of reminders of alphabet day was and how messy the aftermath has been you had just recently the submission. Of a report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the lapses says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, a monster report more than four hundred pages that just outlined a litany of errors in the way. For instance, law enforcement handle this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shooting and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's just it's it's still a very emotional time for for folks park lines. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation the power report that suggests going taking the measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the guardian program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's necessary that this is just the reality that we live in the other people who are aghast at it and say that. This. He makes people feel less safe to the thought of teachers now carrying weapons of an inside the classroom. So it's just been. You know, the the security issue has been really really difficult. The school district has come under fire from a lot of parents feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter on Campo Flores about his piece entitled year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the at the heart of this in many ways is, you know, gun right, then, and there is a few issues that are more devices in our country than guns that has triggered quite polarized debates in. The state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strength and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland largely met by students they were able to get legislation passed in conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter on Campbell Flora's Stillman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would visit a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. It is fifteen minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first.

parkland Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman Douglas high reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan Marjory stoneman Stillman Douglas Campo Flores Florida America Campbell Flora fifteen minutes one year
"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved and erected memorials some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism, many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan, what did you see when you visited a really complicated a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normal p than they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. They've they've commemorated those loss they've grieved. They've come together in all variety of of groups. And so in some sense, David Vance the healing process. It's still very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seems a constant stream of reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been. Can you have just recently mission? A report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the left says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report people more than four hundred pages that just outlined a litany of errors in the way. For instance, law enforcement handle this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shooting and things like that. They're sorta reopened wounds people. So it's it's it's still a very emotional time for. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation and the power report that addressed going taking the measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the the guardian program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's just the reality that we live in the other people who are aghast at it and say that. This makes people feel less. Thanks to the teachers now carrying weapons of an inside the classroom. So. It's just been. The security issue has been really really difficult. The school district has come under fire from a lot of parents would feel that they have. Not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Ariane Campo florist about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school. As have the politics here. Exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right? And there is a few issues that are more devices in our country, then gods that has triggered quite polarized debates in the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the strength and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland Marjorie led by students they were able to get legislation Pat and a conservative legislature sorry on Wall Street Journal, reporter, Arjan Kimball..

parkland Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman Douglas high reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan Marjory stoneman Ariane Campo Florida David Vance Arjan Kimball Mark Douglas Pat one year
"arian campo flores" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on 600 WREC

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved any erected memorials, some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism, many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Ariane Campo, Flores Arjan. Would you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normalcy than they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. They've commemorated those loss grieved they've come together in all variety of of a groups. And so in some sense, Dave, advanced the healing process. It's still a very raw feeling there. Even a year later because obviously the the gravity of what happened, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just constant stream of reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been can you had just recently mission? A report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened, and what the lapses were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report or more than four hundred pages that just outlined a litany of errors in the way. For instance, law enforcement handle this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shootings and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's just it's still a very emotional time for for folks in park land. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures are safety drills that are taking place. Oh sore. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation and the power report that suggests going taking the measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the the guardian program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last here. That's very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's very this is just a reality that we live in. There are other people who are aghast at it and say that. This. Makes people feel less safe to the thought of teachers now carrying weapons of inside the classroom. So it's just been. You know, the security issue has been really really difficult. The school district has come under fire from a lot of parents who feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right? And there is a few issues that are more devices in our country, then gods that has triggered quite polarized debates. In the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the strength and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland, largely led by students they were able to get legislation passed in conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter Arjan Campbell Florus Stillman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would visit a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. It is fifteen minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Capital? One is building a better Bank one that feels an axe nothing like a typical Bank. It's why the reimagining banking and building something completely different..

parkland Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman Douglas high Arjan Campbell Florus Stillman reporter Marjory stoneman Flores Arjan Ariane Campo Arian Campo Flores Florida Mark Dave America one year fifteen minutes
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved and erected memorials some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism. Many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain an anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan. Would you see when you visited really complicated picture year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the semblance of normalcy than they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. You know, they they've been commemorated those loss, they grieved they've come together in all variety of of groups. And so in some sense, Dave, advanced the healing process. It's still a very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just the constant stream of reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been can you had just recently the submission? A report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the lapses says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report people more than four hundred pages just outlined a litany of errors in the way, for instance, law enforcement and this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shooting and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's just a it's a it's a very emotional time for provoking park land. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation in the power report that suggests going taking the measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the guardian program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's necessary. Just the reality that we live in the other people who are aghast at it and say that. This. He makes people feel less. Thanks to the thought of teachers now carrying weapons of inside the classroom. So it's just been. The security issue has been really really difficult school district has come under fire from a lot of parents feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded enough to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Ariane temple Florus about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right? And there is a few issues that are more divisive in our country, then guns that has triggered quite polarized debates in the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strengths and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland largely met by students they were able to get legislation passed and conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter Arjan can. Amble Florus Stillman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would visit a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. It is fifteen minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's.

parkland Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman Douglas high reporter Stillman Douglas Marjory stoneman Arian Campo Flores Arjan Ariane temple Florus Florida Mark Dave America one year fifteen minutes
"arian campo flores" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"arian campo flores" Discussed on KTRH

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved any erected memorials, some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channel their anguish into activism. Many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy, but pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan. Would you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normalcy. Then that they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. You know? They they did commemorated those loss grieved they've come together. In all variety of groups. And so in some sense, they've advanced the healing process. But it's still very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seems a constant stream reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been can you had just recently the submission? Of a report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the left says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report more than four hundred pages just outlined a litany of errors in the way. For instance, law enforcement handle this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shootings and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's just it's still a very emotional time for for park. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures are safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation and the power report that suggests going taking a measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the regarding program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's just the reality that we live in other people who are aghast at it and say that. That makes people feel less safe to the thought of teachers now carrying weapons of inside the classroom. So it's just been. You know, the the the security issue has been really really difficult. The school district had come under fire from a lot of parents feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Iran Campo florist about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right? And there is a few issues that are more devices in our country, then guns that has triggered quite polarized debates. In the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strengths and widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland, largely led by students they were able to get legislation passed in a conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter Arjan Campbell Flora's stoneman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would visit a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. It is fifteen minutes now after the hour on.

parkland Marjory stoneman Douglas high Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan Florida Douglas Mark Arjan Campbell Flora Iran Campo one year fifteen minutes