35 Burst results for "Ari Shapiro"

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:41 min | 4 months ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Summers. And I'm Ari Shapiro, the author of Tessa moshfegh has a reputation for writing about the disgusting and depraved. Over the pandemic, her novel my year of rest and relaxation about a woman who tries to drug herself into sleeping through an entire year became a hit. And she has continued to rise from there with two Hollywood adaptations of her books on the way. She spoke with NPR's Andrew limbong about her latest book lap vona, which is her most disgusting yet, just a heads up, we will be making some mention of sex. Here's Andrew. The nugget of the idea that would become levon had been gnawing at otes and Moshe beg for a bit, almost quite literally haunting her. It's funny because I've never killed anyone ever. And I never want to, ever, ever. It's a nightmare. But for a really long time, I felt like I had killed someone. And I would have nightmares about the guilt of having killed someone. Latvia is the name of the fictional medieval European village the book is set in. And it starts with a boy named marek, who kills another boy. The prince of Latvia, in fact. Some way, somehow, marek ends up taking this prince's position in the royal family. And it was that question. How do you live as the replacement for someone who died that mosh veg kept thinking about? A lot of that had to do with her brother, who died of an overdose in 2017. I felt so connected to him that when he left a part of me sort of snapped back into place, it's a hard thing to describe. It's like as though I had been sharing a bubble and then half of it disappeared and so the bubble snapped closer around me. The book is heavy on themes of guilt, religion, oppression, and it's also obsessed with what the body and all of the various juices that it excretes. Tastes like and feels like and smells like and remember, we're talking about medieval peasants here. So the answer generally is not great. There's one character. Ina, who served as the wet nurse for the entire village. Nursing is a big part of the book, by the way. And there's a fairly graphic passage early on in the book, where young marek, whose own mother died, visits ena, after being beaten by his father. He cuddles up next to her and ina lets him find comfort in some old habits. He felt at home. He knew every inch of ena's body by heart. Her face, like a desiccated Apple, her large drooping ears, her

Ari Shapiro Tessa moshfegh Andrew limbong marek Latvia summers levon NPR Moshe Hollywood Andrew prince Ina ina Apple
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:42 min | 8 months ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's all things considered for NPR news I'm Daniel estrin And I'm Ari Shapiro Things are quiet now at one of Jerusalem's holiest sites for both Jews and Muslims But earlier today the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound known to Jews as the Temple Mount was the scene of violence between Palestinians and Israeli riot police It's a scene that's all too familiar My colleague Daniel estrin who's been co host and all things considered this week covers the ongoing violence between Palestinians and Israelis day in and day out And this week he's been bringing us a story that takes us behind the headlines and shows us how this simmering conflict shapes everyday life even when there is no violence And Daniel this story you've been telling us takes place in Gaza which is home to 2 million Palestinians Yeah Ari in Gaza it is just so many aspects of life Routine life that are affected by the ongoing conflict including the healthcare system and it's all the way down to the story of one father named Yusuf kurd and his quest to get heart bypass surgery that could save his life And you've reported this week on why his case is too complicated for Gaza's health system which has been degraded by war and a blockade by Israel and Egypt since Israel's enemy Hamas took over 15 years ago Yeah they can't do his surgery in Gaza and his condition is getting worse He's been waiting for more than two months and finally he gets his Israeli security clearance to leave Gaza and to go to a Palestinian hospital in the Israeli occupied West Bank So today we have the final chapter of our story I travel with him on his journey from Gaza through Israel to the West Bank hospital The era's crossing is one of the world's most heavily fortified border crossings It's Israel's one civilian crossing.

Daniel estrin NPR news Ari Shapiro Aqsa Mosque Gaza Temple Mount Yusuf kurd Jerusalem Ari Israel Daniel Hamas Egypt West Bank
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:11 min | 8 months ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"News I'm Elsa Chang And I'm Ari Shapiro The new HBO comedy special from Gerard Carmichael has a title that's a spoiler And the show is all about secrets I've been trying to be very honest Because my whole life was shrouded in secrets And I figured the only route I haven't tried was the truth So I'm saying everything Here's everything He tells us that jerod actually isn't his first name But he waits until the last moment to tell us what it is The title of the special raw faniel Aisha Harris is one of the hosts of NPR's pop culture happy hour and she's here to talk about this new side of the well-known comedian Hey ayesha Hey Ari There were moments watching this show that I thought if this were not in a comedy club would people be laughing I mean he covers some really dark topics some personal struggles the content is not sort of obvious funny ha ha joke material Yeah Well I mean a lot of comedians are probably argue that you can make comedy out of anything But you're right this is different It feels different It feels almost like a therapy session like a completely airing of dirty laundry because he's talking about his family and the fact that many men in his family have cheated and had multiple families that their partners did not know about He talks about his name obviously And of course the big thing that everyone has been sort of grasping onto out of this is the fact that he comes out for the first time publicly as gay It was something that he had hinted at in a previous HBO special that he did a few years ago that he had had sexual relations with men but he didn't elaborate on that or actually come out So this is all new and it's all it feels very very different from other things He talked about the fact that he's still struggling with it that his mother is not okay with it The tone is also really different from other comedy specials Like there are times the audience just asks a question or makes a suggestion and he responds in what feels like a very genuine way or after the moment he reveals that he's gay the audience applauds and he has what feels like this really authentic reaction It means a lot It means a lot And I'm accepting the love but I really appreciate the love Are you sure what struck you about this Well it's clear he's still working through this This is as much as it was a sort of it's a filmed performance at stage He's still processing this as we watch him perform this And I love the back and forth of it because some could argue this is oh those are plants Those are people who were asked to ask those questions ahead of time but it doesn't feel like that to me It feels like a natural outgrowth of what happens especially in black spaces where if you get comfortable enough with whoever is performing you will verbally react It's a common response It has a very religious feel almost like you're in a church in a way So I just loved an aspect of it You've interviewed him before you followed his career closely You described yourself as a huge fan of his sitcom the Carmichael show What's going to stand out to you from this special Well I think for me it is that level of trust that he just seems to have with this audience at this point The fact that he got to the point where he felt comfortable enough sharing this with an audience and sharing this with the world I think it'll be really interesting to see where he goes from here and how comfortable he feels talking about how his family has reacted and he is again he is talking about his family in ways that people don't usually do Outside of therapy Outside of therapy And so I will be very curious to see where it goes but I just feel so happy for him and I think this is such a great moment for art for comedy and for the LGBTQ community Aisha Harris is one of the hosts of NPR's pop culture happy hour podcast talking with us about the Gerard Carmichael special on HBO called Rafael Thanks ayesha Thank you Two months after its release the video game elden ring is still the talk of the gaming world And a lot of the talk is about how incredibly.

Gerard Carmichael Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Aisha Harris Hey ayesha jerod HBO NPR Ari Carmichael Rafael Thanks ayesha elden ring
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Considered I'm Kelsey Snell And I'm Ari Shapiro Picture two circles One is the modern environmental movement and the other is the far right movement including anti immigrant and white supremacist groups In the Venn diagram with these two circles how much do you think they overlap Part of making America great again is making it green again We know there's information out there that says that every time someone crosses the border they're leading between 6 to 8 pounds of trash in the desert Now this track illegal immigration comes at a huge cost to our environment Researchers say this intersection between the far right and environmentalism is bigger than many people realize and it's growing As climate change kind of turns up the heat there's going to be all sorts of new kind of political contestations around these issues Alex aymond used to track hate groups at the southern poverty law center and these days he researches eco fascism He says once you start to look at this overlap you find two big misconceptions One that the right is always a climate denialist movement and two that environmental politics are always going to be left leaning Let's take those one at a time starting with the idea that the far right always rejects environmental arguments Conservative leaders have certainly denied climate change in the course This is a world wide hulks from Rush Limbaugh to Donald Trump It's probably getting a little bit warmer And then in a number of years or decades it'll get a little bit cooler But today a different argument is becoming more common on the conservative political fringe On the podcast the people's square a musician who goes by storm king described his vision for a far right.

Kelsey Snell Ari Shapiro Alex aymond southern poverty law center America Rush Limbaugh Donald Trump king
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"App We have mostly cloudy skies and 74° in Atlanta at four 46 It's all things considered from NPR news I'm Ari Shapiro And I'm Sarah mccammon mask mandates police in schools and how to teach American history Protesters all over the country are bringing these issues to school board meetings but many educators say the debates have grown vicious and personal And school board members say they fear for their own and their children's safety and that their public service mission is harder than ever NPR's Anya cabinets has been reporting on this and she takes us to gwinnett county Georgia to meet one school board member Karen Watkins works in supply chain management and has two children in the public schools She says she was one of those moms who was always very involved in her kids education so much so that local officials urged her to run for school board last year They said you should this is probably going to be a good thing for you And you can probably make a difference on here But didn't realize it came with a package A big package The package meaning the blowback Watkins started getting as soon as she put up her Facebook page to announce her campaign Even before I actually took office and took C I would get I was getting hundreds of message hundreds They were sent via Facebook via my website whatever means they could reach me right calling And I said I was called the demon I was sat in spawn Some of the messages used similar language to this online video ad from last fall And herein gwinnett county our kids face a grave threat A ticket of radical liberals is running for school board The ad connects Watkins and the other school board challenger candidates to teen pregnancy Marxism and because of their position on school resource officers the Parkland school shooting in 2018 And.

NPR news Ari Shapiro Sarah mccammon Anya cabinets Karen Watkins gwinnett county Atlanta NPR Watkins Georgia Facebook Parkland school
Charlie and Dr. Rashad Richey Debate the Threat of the Delta Variant Among Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Charlie and Dr. Rashad Richey Debate the Threat of the Delta Variant Among Children

"Delta variant has changed the game in many ways where now you have children who not only have the virus but they are experiencing adverse reactions from the virus. Look like never before. I take place. Called jackson county. Mississippi school superintendent. This guy decided to ignore all nineteen protocols. He says he's going to live a life. That's external of the fear of the pandemic. Will his school system. They have a seven percent. Cove it positive rating. They've already lost a schoolteacher. Here's the other dynamic. That people are considering you think children go to school in silos these children who can be carriers of covert nineteen can infect environment such as their parents their grandparents oh the peer groups people that their families associate with and then it becomes an issue of the ecosystem of our safety. Not just the silo of the school system very good. I i will respond. So i'm glad you brought up the delta variant so a lot of people have done some at least initial studies of the delta variant so according to dr roberta debiasi of the children's national hospital. She was asked about ari shapiro from national public radio about the delta verion the national public radio host said wait a second if kids under twelve or not vaccinated is is the delta variant a significant risk and she said quote children are still somewhat between twelve to fifteen percent of all kobe cases and still three to four percent of hospitalizations and we have not seen a huge change in that even with the delta variant. Now i'll add to that. Where the boston globe. Not exactly you know a politicized paper to the right ask. The question is the variant more severe in children. Dr sharon door and epidemiologist at tufts medical center says no. I've not seen any peer reviewed data or data from reliable sources. Suggest that so. I would submit. Doctor that there is no data. To show the delta variant has any harsher 'cause in fact the data shows the opposite

Mississippi School Jackson County Dr Roberta Debiasi Children's National Hospital Ari Shapiro National Public Radio Host Boston Globe Dr Sharon Tufts Medical Center
"ari shapiro" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. It is summer driving season and if you have hit the road, you probably noticed gas is expensive right now that is mostly due to high crude oil prices. And if you're wondering where oil prices may be going next year, not alone, especially after an OPEC meeting ended with a big surprise. NPR's Camila Domino Ski joins us to explain how Camilla Hi Mary Louise. So a dramatic OPEC meeting. What exactly happened Well, so we have OPEC, this powerful cartel led by Saudi Arabia. And they were in a routine meeting with allies, including Russia. Collectively, they're all known as OPEC Plus and pretty much everyone expected them to make a deal to produce more oil. They have a bunch of oil they're holding back. Prices are high demand is rising. It seemed straightforward. But instead there was drama, a fight between the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. Long story short. They called off the whole meeting with no boost and output. The call off the meeting completely. Okay, So go on. Where does the story go from here and just talk us through between that the meeting that collapsed and what's playing out in the oil markets. Yeah, well, I'm actually gonna go back in time because I think it's helpful to remember where this deal that OPEC has that they're negotiating over where it came from. Last year, Oil demand just disappeared abruptly, right. We all stayed home. We stopped driving. We stopped flying, which, through oil markets completely out of whack. Prices went unbelievably low basically overnight. And so OPEC plus struck this deal to cut their production a lot. It was a way to balance out markets. Now, demand is coming back. We're driving. We're flying again. Here in the U. S. There are actually a record number of road trips over July 4th. So now we have a different problem, which is oil supply just isn't keeping up. Louise Dixon is a senior analyst with Rice Stat energy. We've seen a bit of a pivot, and now we're actually looking at well, what is going to happen if there is a supply shortage? So since this pivot happened, prices have been going up and up. Add this OPEC announcement and okay, are you ready for things to get a little bit weird? Always. Give me a lot. Let's get weird, okay? There are actually two completely different concerns at play right now. One is that OPEC has all this infighting, so they're not going to be able to strike a new deal on oil, which means that the old deal is still in place, which cuts production so much that it would drive prices crazy high. That's the one concern, okay. The other is that they might actually fight so much that they abandoned the deal completely. And in that case, there's a free for all. They all produce as much oil as they want, which would flood markets and cause prices to go way. Down. So the market's been on a bit of a roller coaster over the last two days as everyone tries to make a sense of which of these two completely opposite outcomes we might be looking at, which is more likely, right? Well, for those of us who are just trying to ride the roller coaster of budgeting for filling up our car every week or so it would. Where does this land Yeah, The big question right is how high will gas prices get, and this is something A lot of people are worried about. For one, the Biden administration, which has talked to OPEC members to try to encourage them to strike a compromise. If they make a deal, they might stabilize markets in the middle and avoid either of these two extremes, right? Long term. There's a lot of uncertainty about what this looks like over the months and years ahead. In the short term, it's much easier to say gas prices are high. They have been climbing for months. They're likely to stay high in the near term. NPR's Camila Domino's key Thank you. Thanks. Now to Iran, where we'll meet a veteran photographer. His most famous photo was of an Iranian protester years ago, but he's also used photography to explore the world. He spoke with NPR's Peter Kenyon in Tehran about his career and some of his favorite scenes. The walls of Jamshid by Romney's Tehran apartment are lined with some of his photographs from Iran and around the world by Romney says he dropped out before graduating from high school convinced that he needed to learn about the world firsthand seeing for himself. He says through an interpreter that he also fell in love with capturing images of the people in places he saw double down. By doing you know what do system. In fact, I'm in love with traveling and journeyed to various places. I love to take my camera. Then I am traveling to take photos, So in fact, I can say it started with social documentary photos, affairs and later on, Indirectly, I was taken into news journalism. One of my Romney's best known news pictures landed on the cover of the Economist magazine. It was taken during student protests in 1999, which were brutally put down by security forces. It features a young demonstrator holding a bloody T shirt above his head. Romney says the young man was chanting along with the other demonstrators. But it was when he suddenly fell silent that the photographer saw the image he wanted them came job running T shirt together, So that's fish. I took my child several photos, Several frames from this gentleman. I noticed one of them Mitch, in which he is silent. And his silence at drawn my attention to it, And to me that picture and then that person looks the more like Che Guevara. And that's why I decided to choose this photo and send it to the newspapers..

Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Louise Dixon Camila Domino Ski Peter Kenyon 1999 Romney Mary Louise Che Guevara Tehran Last year next year Iran United Arab Emirates Camilla NPR Rice Stat energy Camila Domino two extremes Mitch
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. It is summer driving season, and if you have hit the road, you've probably noticed gas is expensive right now that is mostly due to high crude oil prices. And if you're wondering where oil prices may be going next year, not alone, especially after an OPEC meeting ended with a big surprise. NPR's Camila Domino Ski joins us to explain how Camilla Hi Mary Louise. So a dramatic OPEC meeting. What exactly happened Well, so we have OPEC, this powerful cartel led by Saudi Arabia. And they were in a routine meeting with allies, including Russia. Collectively, they're all known as OPEC Plus and pretty much everyone expected them to make a deal to produce more oil. They have a bunch of oil they're holding back. Prices are high demand is rising. It seemed straightforward. But instead there was drama, a fight between the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. Long story short. They called off the whole meeting with no boost and output. The call off the read it completely. Okay, So go on. Where does the story go from here and just talk us through between the meeting that collapsed and what's playing out in the oil markets. Yeah, well, I'm actually going to go back in time because I think it's helpful to remember where this deal that OPEC has that they're negotiating over where it came from. Last year, Oil demand just disappeared abruptly, right. We all stayed home. We stopped driving. We stopped flying, which, through oil markets completely out of whack. Prices went unbelievably low basically overnight. And so OPEC plus struck this deal to cut their production a lot. It was a way to balance out markets. Now, demand is coming back. We're driving. We're flying again. Here in the U. S. There are actually a record number of road trips over July 4th. So now we have a different problem, which is oil supply just isn't keeping up. Louise Dixon is a senior analyst with Rice. Dad Energy. We've seen a bit of a pivot, and now we're actually looking at well, what is going to happen if there is a supply shortage? So since this pivot happened, prices have been going up and up. Add this OPEC announcement and okay, are you ready for things to get a little bit weird? Always. Give me a lot. Let's get weird, okay? There are actually two completely different concerns at play right now. One is that OPEC has all this infighting, so they're not going to be able to strike a new deal on oil, which means that the old deal is still in place, which cuts production so much that it would drive prices crazy high. That's the one concern, okay. The other is that they might actually fight so much that they abandoned the deal completely. And in that case, there's a free for all. They all produce as much oil as they want, which would flood markets and cause prices to go way. Down. So the market's been on a bit of a roller coaster over the last two days as everyone tries to make a sense of which of these two completely opposite outcomes we might be looking at, which is more likely, right? Well, for those of us who are just trying to ride the roller coaster of budgeting for filling up our car every week or so it would where where does this land Yeah, The big question right is how high will gas prices get, and this is something A lot of people are worried about. For one, the Biden administration, which has talked to OPEC members to try to encourage them to strike a compromise. If they make a deal, they might stabilize markets in the middle and avoid either of these two extremes, right? Long term. There's a lot of uncertainty about what this looks like over the months and years ahead. In the short term, it's much easier to say gas prices are high. They have been climbing for months. They're likely to stay high in the near term. NPR's Camila Domino's key Thank you. Thanks. Now to Iran, where we'll meet a veteran photographer. His most famous photo was of an Iranian protester years ago, but he's also used photography to explore the world. He spoke with NPR's Peter Kenyon in Tehran about his career and some of his favorite scenes. The walls of Jamshid by Romney's Tehran apartment are lined with some of his photographs from Iran and around the world by Romney says he dropped out before graduating from high school convinced that he needed to learn about the world firsthand seeing for himself. He says through an interpreter that he also fell in love with capturing images of the people in places he saw a man down. But I don't know what do system. In fact, I'm in love visit, traveling and journeyed to various places and I love to take my.

Ari Shapiro Louise Dixon Mary Louise Kelly Peter Kenyon Romney Camila Domino Ski Mary Louise Tehran Last year next year United Arab Emirates Iran Rice NPR Dad Energy Camilla Camila Domino One U. S. two
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour the Supreme Court sides with the state attorney general of Arizona, upholding to voting laws that Democrats say are too restrictive. It's not just about Arizona. It's Also after almost eight months of conflict, Ethiopia's government declares a ceasefire, but opposition forces dismiss it and fire experts have a warning for the Western US this fourth of July. Skip the fireworks, This is not the time to get complacent. There's still an awful lot of risk out there all those stories and more after these news headlines Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Jack Spear. Former President Donald Trump's family business and its longtime chief financial officer, are facing criminal charges in New York City for alleged tax related offenses. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports the indictments. Others ordered a three year investigation into the business dealings of the Trump Organization. Prosecutors with the Manhattan district attorney's office claimed that the Trump Organization and its chief financial officer, Alan Weiss, Ahlberg, allegedly committed tax fraud and falsified business records as part of a scheme to pay the Trump organization's top officials off the books. The goal, prosecutors allege was to pay less taxes and they should have whistle. Bergen. Attorneys for the Trump Organization pleaded not guilty to the charges. Charges are expected to be the first ever continuing investigation by New York City prosecutors are partnering with the New York State Attorney General's Office. Hansi Lo Wang. NPR NEWS NEW YORK New Federal Trade Commission chair Lina Khan presided today over the first public meeting of her tenure at the agency. NPR's Shannon Bond reports. Con is already facing big challenges. In her first month in office, Lina Khan says Going forward, the FDC will hold regular open meetings as a democratic institutions. We have a vital responsibility to connect our work to the people we serve at This meeting, commissioners voted to give themselves more power to crack down on unfair monopolies. It was a party line vote won by Khan and her fellow Democrats. Con is already in an intense spotlight since being named FTC chair last month. A federal judge has given the agency 30 days to rewrite a blockbuster antitrust lawsuit against Facebook. After ruling the government failed to make its case, and Amazon is calling on Khan to recuse herself from matters involving the company because of her past criticism. Facebook and Amazon are among NPR's financial supporters. Shannon Bond NPR NEWS The federal government is mobilizing Covid 19 surge response teams to help snuff out hotspots around the country. NPR's Rob Stein has that story. White HOUSE COVID 19 advisor Jeffrey Zion says the teams are at the ready to help state local health officials fighting new surges. Federal personnel will help boost testing track down people who might have been infected and provide treatments and vaccinations. CDC director Russia Willis, he says there's been a worrying 10% increase in the seven day average number of cases being reported in the United States and the highly contagious Delta variant now accounts for at least a quarter of all new infections nationwide. Rob Stein. NPR News number of Americans filing first time jobless claims fell again last week, dropping to the lowest level since the pandemic struck last year. The decline just the latest evidence, the job market and the broader economy are rebounding rapidly from the coronavirus recession. First time claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 51,000 last week to 364,000. Federal government releases its monthly snapshot of the nation's hiring Tomorrow on Wall Street. The Dow was up 131 points today You're listening to NPR It's 77 degrees and windy, sunny skies 54 I'm Lisa lobbies with WBZ news. A federal grand jury has indicted a veteran member of the Chicago City Council, WB's Dan Metropolis reports. More than two years ago, federal agents raided the Southside Office of Alderman Carrie Austin and today, Austin and top aide Chester Wilson Jr were indicted in the latest city hall corruption case. U. S Attorney John Walsh alleges they took bribes from a developer who got millions of taxpayer dollars. For a project in Austin's 34th Ward. Prosecutors say a construction company owner and other contractors provided Austin with home improvements, furniture and appliances. After the raid in 2019. She had said she was innocent. Austin was an important ally to former mayors Rahm Emanuel and Richard M. Daley, Dan Megalopolis. WBZ News. An evacuation order is still in effect until nine o'clock tonight in Morris, Illinois. Atop Morris Fire official says good progress has been made against a massive blaze of a building that contains lithium batteries. That blaze has been burning for the past couple of days. And he says tons of concrete was poured on the fire last night, so there is no longer smoke. Morris is about 70 miles southwest of Chicago. Food pantries typically typically have a lot of.

Jeffrey Zion Richard M. Daley Ari Shapiro Jack Spear Alan Weiss Amazon United States Hansi Lo Wang 30 days 2019 Khan Facebook Chester Wilson Jr New York City Rahm Emanuel 77 degrees Rob Stein Trump Organization Shannon Bond WB
"ari shapiro" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Benjamin netanyahu to work with four different states in an effort to normalize relations. But along the way he moved the capital to jerusalem so right away. There's a major provocation. Right i mean the holiest city on the planet. It's the monotheist true arc of enlightenment and whether you're a muslim or christian or jewish that's where you go whether you're going for your bar mitzvah whether you're going for your baptism or whether you're going for you know that opportunity to to visit the Temple mount but but provoking traditional turbulent forces around you and then being surprised when they turn up against you and and there's an uprising. I mean the the intifada tatis what it means when you subjugate people for too long and it is a former subjugation. When people live in territories that are small spaces they cannot go either on land sea or air outside of them. I mean what are we talking about here you know. Sometimes i say to myself that this is such a sad legacy progressive israelis who understand these sad sick disgusting irany of what exists there right because it's the last thing that people who come from a background of systemic oppression want to do others. You know i don't think. The israeli government has a mandate to do that but in their efforts to control a situation that has now become very difficult to control. Which is like i said. It's not seven hundred thousand palestinians anymore. It's over six million people who feel they have a right to self-determination because their previous leaders through the oslo cords camp. David made legit progress in that regard. This is why i was so broken about the death of rabin because to me it represented the last real dove. That could've done it. Although my name my namesake tried you know. Arial sharon actually went out and did his best to try and realize why being being someone who was privy to a massacre someone who who learned why at some point in history you go from being a hawk and you realize through your grandchildren's is maybe i should be more of a. I don't see that that balance point anymore. I just see really extreme parties because one of the reasons israeli society so fragmented is because there's a reckoning. They're looking into their past week canadians now..

David jerusalem Benjamin netanyahu seven hundred thousand jewish one over six million people Temple mount four different states israeli government past week rabin muslim oslo cords camp palestinians canadians christian sharon israelis israeli
"ari shapiro" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. Coming up, African countries are dealing with growing coronavirus cases and vaccine shortages. This is a nightmare. I mean, The whole situation was the nightmare. Also, one year after the death of George Floyd was his murder, a turning point on race in America. It's just like living while black gets you killed later why the BBC is apologizing for the way it handled an interview more than 25 years ago, and how a robotic arm with a sense of touch is allowing people to perform tasks that they couldn't before first Sidelines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear on Egyptian brokered cease fire between Israel and Hamas, which many hope will end 11 days of spiraling violence that has caused widespread destruction in Gaza and Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced the Security Council approved the Egyptian mediated proposal today. Mosque quickly said it will honor the deal move follows heavy pressure from the US to halt the fighting. At least 130 Palestinians have died in the fighting with 12 dead in Israel. President Biden is expected to address the ceasefire soon at the White House. President Biden has signed the covert 19 Hate Crimes Act. A law aimed at reducing attacks on Asian Americans, which have risen during the pandemic is NPR's Tamara Keith explains, the bill passed with bipartisan support, something the president emphasized during his remarks. The law calls for the Department of Justice to designate a point person whose role will be to expedite the processing of hate crimes cases will also expand efforts to make it easier to report these crimes at the state and local level and for those governments to track them. Under reporting has been an issue, Biden said. There has been a shocking spike in hate crimes against Asian Americans during the pandemic. Grandparent's afraid to leave their homes even to get vaccinated for fear of being attacked. Small business owners targeted and gunned down. Students worried about two things. Over 19 and being bullied. Biden argued the bill's passage with overwhelming bipartisan support was an indication the parties can come together. Tamer Keith NPR NEWS The White House, the Department of Homeland Security announced today it is removing immigrant detainees from two controversial detention facilities and Georgia and Massachusetts. NPR's John Burnett reports. Both county owned jails were under federal review for mistreating detainees. DHS secretary at 100, New Yorkers instructed the head of Immigration and Customs enforcement to stop sending migrants to the Carlos Carneiro Immigration detention Center in north Dartmouth, Massachusetts because of criticism, the sheriff's office used excessive.

Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly John Burnett George Floyd Jack Spear Tamara Keith America Hamas BBC 11 days 19 Hate Crimes Act NPR 12 dead Department of Homeland Securit President Gaza Israel Department of Justice Security Council Georgia
Senate Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing on Reducing Gun Violence

All Things Considered

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Senate Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing on Reducing Gun Violence

"I'm Ari Shapiro. The flags that the White House are at half staff at a Senate judiciary hearing on gun violence this morning. Committee chair, Senator Dick Durbin called for two moments of silence. One for the mass shooting in Atlanta That left eight people dead a week ago today and one for the mass shooting at a Boulder Colorado grocery store yesterday. 10 people

Ari Shapiro Senator Dick Durbin White House Senate Atlanta Boulder Colorado
"ari shapiro" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. The Corona virus is mutating. We know that worrisome new strains are popping up around the world. We know these variants could reduce the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing covert 19 so manufacturers may need to update those vaccines. But how well companies prove to the Food and Drug Administration that these changes are safe and effective. NPR pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin says the agents He is working on a plan. He said me. Hey, Mary Louise first just catch us up on how widespread these variants are in the U. S. So there are now nearly 1000 confirmed cases of variant strains of covert 19, and that's considered an understatement. Most of the variant strains are those first identified in the United Kingdom. But there are others scene originally in Brazil and South Africa that are causing some concern. Some of the mutations allow the virus to more easily infect people, and some make it harder for immune systems to fight the virus off. So the fear is that the vaccines that the United States has spent billions of dollars researching, developing and purchasing will be rendered less effective. And how will we know? Will it be immediately obvious if the vaccines are just not working well enough against the variance? Well, it's definitely not time to panic yet Dr Anthony Fauci and said during a White House briefing this week that the Madonna advisor vaccine seemed to be effective against the variant identified in the UK That's the very an expected to become the dominant strain in the U. S by the end of March. So he says, to keep following public health guidelines and getting vaccinated as far as when it's time to change the vaccines. Here's Dr Paul off it, who serves as an adviser to the FDA, You know that the line is crossed if you see people who are fully immunized with these vaccines that say the immigrant vaccines But nonetheless when infected with a variant or being hospitalized, That's when the line gets crossed and that the date that has not happened Still everyone should prepare, he says, and the FDA is doing that. And how is the FDA? Preparing? How would they go about evaluating an altered vaccine? Or I suppose maybe we're talking and altered booster shot. Lot is up in the air. But FDA officials have said they're working on a playbook and they'll publish guidance documents for industry in the coming weeks. What we do know is that the agency is aiming to be nimble, which likely means officials will look for studies of a few 100 people, rather than the tens of thousands required the first time around. Acting FDA Commissioner Dr Janet Woodcock says. A lot will depend on how fast variance trains crop up. And how the existing vaccines stand up to them. So the situation is very fluid, but we think they're things short of doing full pledge 60 trials that we can use. To shift or perhaps add components to existing vaccine. She says the agency will likely also convenience advisory committee before making a decision on an updated vaccine on how long how long might that take? Probably a few months. Of course, this pandemic is unprecedented in so many ways, but we can look to historical examples for clues. Genevieve Cantor, a health economist at the University of Pennsylvania, says the best analogy is the H one and one pandemic in 2000 and nine That year, the FDA learned about the seriousness of H one n one after it had already approved the seasonal flu vaccine. It convened an advisory committee in late July. By September, mid September, 4 supplements had been approved. Against each one in one so they could do it you certainly under two months, it's worth noting that it takes the agency time to carefully review reams of data and documents. The public usually first hears about trial results from company press releases. But the FDA needs to make sure that the underlying data are solid that the company can make the vaccine according to its own recipe, and that the shots stay stable when they're stored and transported. So many moving parts. That's NPR's Sidney Lumpkin. Thank you. You bet. When the federal government started making pandemic loans to help keep workers on payrolls. Businesses owned by black and Latino people were often at the back of the line. Those firms often had to wait longer for money, even though many were desperate for financial help. With a new round of business loans in the pipeline. Authorities are now trying to address that disparity as NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Like a lot of business sellers. Jennifer Kelly's income took a hit last year when the pandemic struck. She's a clinical psychologist near Atlanta, and some of her clients didn't make the adjustment to online or telephone counseling. Kelly, who has two employees applied to her regular bank for a loan under the federal government's Paycheck protection program. But she says the process was frustrating. It's kind of like trying to get the vaccine. They put my name on the list. And there they, Polly said, Oh, we all have anymore, And we're sorry that first round of P P p loans was exhausted In less than two weeks. Lots of businesses complained that banks were prioritizing their biggest customers. Loans were especially hard to come by in neighborhoods with a lot of black and brown residents When I needed them, they were not available to you and including I'm not the big business, but I'm a small business and communities like with the fabric of America. When Congress okayed a second round of P P p loans last year, Kelly applied again. This time through a bank 250 miles away in Savannah, Georgia that specializes in working with black own firms. They were very patient through that entire process, and I didn't get approved for the loan, and I do hope. That especially the small black banks will survive because we need to have those institutions. But second bank Kelly worked with Carver State Bank was founded 94 years ago with the goal of.

Food and Drug Administration Mary Louise Kelly Sidney Lumpkin federal government NPR pharmaceuticals Ari Shapiro flu vaccine Dr Anthony Fauci Mary Louise United Kingdom Dr Paul United States NPR America Polly University of Pennsylvania Dr Janet Woodcock Carver State Bank
"ari shapiro" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly 67 votes that is what will be needed to convict Donald Trump in the impeachment child that got underway today in the Senate. And with the Senate evenly divided, the question remains will enough. Republicans joined Democrats to find the former president guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors. Well. A month ago, Republican Congressman Adam Kinzinger of Illinois told me he thought there was a significant chance It could happen and he's back now. Congressman Welcome back Thank you. It's gonna be with you. So you and I last spoke on January 13th the day that the house voted to impeach Trump A second time you were only a you were one of only 10. Republicans voting to impeach. Do you still believe there is a significant chance the Senate will vote to convict Well, boy, it just reminds you how it hasn't been that long. But it feels like an eternity and I'll play of, I think less and less likely that they're gonna vote to convict. I think the question is how many Republican senators, you know, end up voting that way, But it really has been kind of disturbing to see how what happened on January 6th. The next day, we were clear eyed And then it's kind of faded, and it's faded to the desire of politics and political victories. And so I don't know the number I think like you think it's faded. Hmm. Yeah, well, look, I think what's happened is Again. You wake up with the emotion of the moment and then you know, the politics comes into play and Donald Trump price to reassert his power. Of course, if you're Republican, the Republican base Eyes still with Donald Trump. Generally, even though that's starting to crumble Little and I think politics just comes into play and it it clouds what I think is really a constitutional Keeping decision about whether or not this was an impeachable offense, and I think there's no doubt it. What is it? This isn't I really can't speak of what unimpeachable on removable offense would be It's funny listening to you. That's almost verbatim the line that Democrat Jamie Raskin, who's leading the House. Impeachment managers made on the floor of the Senate today, which you know prompts me to ask this. I know you were watching the trial today in the Senate, as many of us were, I wonder if you were struck. As I was that, unlike the first impeachment, which was about Ukraine, and things happening far away, this is such a deeply personal trial for for every member of Congress sitting there, listening Got really is And you know, every member of Congress with this firsthand, and so I think some of the people that kind of rely on the crutch of process in this and you know time and we don't have enough You lived it. You know, you saw it and Words that went to this weren't just on January 6. That was really a foundation for the last four years of setting up to a stolen election. And, you know, I've become friends with some of the officers, one in particular that was involved and really just know now for his defense of the Capitol. I'll tell you, Uh, I realized it's one thing in the military to fight a foreign enemy on behalf of your country. It's another thing to face down. Fellow Americans speaking the same language you do sounding like Ugo saying the things that were being said, and it's just a whole new level Ystad and it's one that if there is no accountability for I can't imagine after one police officer Is dead, too. Took their own life. Um, how in the world is this going to get better without people taking a stand and saying this is wrong? I read your op ed in The Washington Post this morning, which was titled My fellow Republicans. Convicting Trump is necessary to save America. You're pleading in it with others in your party to choose a path away from Trump. And as I read it, I thought, I wonder what kind of conversations he's having with other Republicans. When you make this case to them. What do they tell you? Well for colleagues. They're receptive. They you know there's obviously political pressure and public pressure. But I'll tell you when I want the country first movement, Um, the one thing that I started noticing. Is there a lot of people that came out of the woodwork that were or are Republicans? So I'm thinking of leaving. Some have left. Some are fine Being. Republicans are concerned that just were saying Thank you for giving us a voice and a place to go first. Um, a lot of independence. I've been hurt from some Democrats that are saying things like we recognize the need. Very functional Republican party, So I think there's a real desire out there for getting back to doing politics professionally and starting the lead by inspiration instead of fear. Are you thinking of leaving five years from now? Do you think you will still be a Republican? I think the answer to that question will be evident when it's evident. If this party continues to go down the track of you know, authoritarianism and Pledging loyalty to a man above a constitution. And certainly I wouldn't be a Republican, but my hope Is that as people wake up and take inventory of what happened, no realized how wrong this path is. And that's what I'm gonna try to lead people toe. Understand? Wonder if you're thinking about it, though. You know people like to talk about big tents in American politics. Is the Republican tent big enough to hold Donald Trump, Marjorie Taylor Greene and you? I don't think it is big enough to hold all of us as they are now, and I think that's where you can't just leave. I think you know there's gonna be these two major parties. I think the Republican Party will be around for a long time. The key is to fight for it and to do battle for it. If we lose this battle the battle for sanity, the Republican Party will eventually recognize it. Ali because gonna lose elections everywhere. My hope is to get the Republican party there sooner than in 10 or 15 years. I want to follow on something You just said when you were talking about hearing from from thousands of your constituents, most of whom have been overwhelmingly supportive. Until in you. They appreciate your efforts to try to return the GOP to a foundation of principle, not personality..

Donald Trump Republican Party Senate Um Trump Congressman Adam Kinzinger Congressman Ari Shapiro Congress president Jamie Raskin Illinois Mary Louise Kelly Ukraine The Washington Post Ali Ugo America officer
"ari shapiro" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Senators will gather tomorrow for the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump, The former president is accused of inciting the deadly insurrection by his supporters on January 6th at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the arguments this week will shine a light on Trump's role in that riot. You must have all the truth come out and then the accountability Once the truth comes out, that's what we aim to do with this trial. Trump's lawyers say the former president can't be blamed for the actions of his supporters. We're joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas to talk about what we know and what lies ahead. Hello there. Hi. Hi To start with you, Ryan, President Trump's legal team filed their pretrial brief today. What did it say? Well. Last week, we got an outline of their defense in the response to the article of impeachment. And then today we got it was a 78 page brief, So there's more detail on this. But one thing that stood out is the jabs that they take. Trump's lawyers take it. The House managers and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. They argue that the impeachment push is driven by what they called Trump Derangement syndrome in the hunger for quote unquote political theater. They say Democrats are using impeachment as a tool to silence a political opponent. And they accuse Democrats have taken advantage of what they call the horror and confusion that all Americans felt when watching the violence on January 6th at the Capitol, and they say that instead of trying to heal the nation after this violence that Democrats Quote, have callously tried to harness harness the chaos of the moment for their own political gain. So attacks on Democrats there in terms of legal arguments. What's the nature of their defense? What are they arguing? Well, Trump's lawyers, David Cronenberg's cast are leaning very heavily into the constitutionality argument. They say that the Senate Has no jurisdiction to hold a trial of Trump Now that he is no longer president. They say a conviction in a Senate trial requires the possibility of removal from office. Since Trump is no longer in office. They say there can't be a trial in this whole process. This whole thing is unconstitutional. Now. As for the incitement of violence allegation, they say Trump didn't direct the violence and shouldn't be blamed for the crimes of a small group of criminals. They argue that this speech that he gave a zwelithini allegations of election fraud, baseless allegations we should say leading up to the January sticks that all of that speech is constitutionally protected. And they say a high crime and misdemeanor can't be something that is protected by the Constitution. And I know we got a response from the members of the house. We're going to be managing the impeachment in the Senate. Kelsey. What did they say? Basically, they dismissed everything that Ryan just outlined there. They didn't dismiss the entire argument from the Trump team. They say that evidence against the former president is as they describe it overwhelming and they say what Trump is trying to do is to escape accountability. They also say that you know that the arguments that his lawyers are putting up basically don't meet the definition of what is constitutionally protected. They say that they're going to argue. That the president should have been held to account for his actions because they happen well. He was in office, therefore, making him subject to impeachment. They're basically trying to undermine all Republican attempts to make this an argument about the process about the constitutionality about whether or not the Senate could even have the trial. They want to bring it back to having an argument about the events of that day. And Trump's actions leading up to that day. Let's talk about how this is gonna play out. Listeners may remember a year ago, the first impeachment trial of President Trump took almost three weeks, the two sides argued late into the night and on the weekends. Kelsey What's the plan for this one? Well, this time we expect things to get underway tomorrow, and instead of just jumping right into the trial, we're going to see four hours of debate on the constitutionality question. And then they will revote that question because we've already seen the Senate voting. The majority of Republicans Voted that this is an unconstitutional trial. After that. The trial will begin Wednesday at noon, and each side will have up to 16 hours toe to present their arguments after that is when we get some debate and vote on witnesses if the House managers choose to call witnesses that is NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks to both of you. Thank you. Okay, Panda. My canoe is now Corona virus. Vaccines are available, but many questions persist. Like where do you go to sign up to get one? Do you need to get on a local health department list? Or do you contact that hospital where you got surgery a few years ago or hang out at the grocery store in case the pharmacy has an extra dose or two left over at the end of the day. Do you do all of the above? It is a messy, confusing patchwork out there right now, So we have asked NPR health policy reporters Selena Simmons Duffin to round up a few tips Say, Selina. Hi, Mary Louise before we get to your tips, why is it such a mess? Health officials knew once vaccines were out there, we're going to need to get the shots out to people. Right, but it seems like what happened is there just wasn't a lot of attention on this part of the rollout, the scheduling appointments and managing the band part so clear Hannon, who runs the Association of Immunization Managers, the people who worked for months through the fall, planning the vaccine rollout in each state. Told me that it just wasn't a big focus. We did talk about this a little bit, but not a lot. The focus from CDC and the focus from Operation works speed was that initial rollout, So Yeah, there wasn't a lot of vision for the next phase where we are now. And you don't have to tell her that it's a mess. She herself could barely figure out how to get a shot for her dad in Maryland. He's on the pre registered waiting list for our county since January, 15th and we haven't heard one thing and I'm like, who could possibly be ahead of him. He's 95 Come on. I should say she was ultimately able to get him vaccinated in another county. Well, that's good news. Help us understand one other piece of this puzzle, which is how does this actually work in terms of the vaccine, getting to the places that are scheduling the shots? Right, so you can kind of picture this vaccine flow chart. The federal government buys the vaccine doses and then allocates them out to states and then states distribute them into three separate buckets. Local public health departments, hospital systems and sometimes pharmacies. The pharmacy program is actually expanding later this week. But now here is a key point. They don't talk to each other, which is why you might feel like you're clicking randomly from one system to another, and they're all different. Local health departments often don't even know who has.

President Trump Senate president Ryan Lucas NPR Kelsey Snell Kelsey What Chuck Schumer Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Kelsey Nancy Pelosi fraud Maryland CDC David Cronenberg Mary Louise
"ari shapiro" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. The World Health Organization is holding an emergency meeting of its top vaccine experts to determine whether it needs to change its guidance around the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. This comes after South Africa decided to delay a vaccination campaign that was supposed to start next week. South Africa made that decision after a small study called into question whether the AstraZeneca vaccine works against a variant that is now the dominant strain there. So is this a setback for AstraZeneca? Is that a detour? Is it nothing at all? NPR's Jason Beaubien is here with hopefully some insight on all down. Hey, Jason. Hey, Mary Louise, So I think I have to start by asking the big question. Are these new variants mutating so fast that there rendering the vaccine useless before we can even get it out and everybody's arms. You know, that's what everybody's really worried about. I can tell you definitively that it's way too early to say that right now that this AstraZeneca vaccine isn't useless against the variant that's spreading in Southern Africa, but we are seeing some worrying signs. This was a fairly small study. It was predominantly of young, healthy South Africans, and it found That a reasonable number of people who got vaccinated still ended up getting mild cases of a disease like nobody got sick, really, really sick. Nobody died and the study was even designed to test for that. But this was combined with some lab studies in Southern Africa that showed some other worrying signs. And there's concern that you know, South Africa. It was supposed to be starting this mass vaccination campaign next week. Onders Gonna be the first mass vaccination campaign in all of southern substation in Africa on bit was going to be with the AstraZeneca shot and Salim Abdul Karim. He's annoyed visor to the South African government. He told the W. H o today that South African sided to put that campaign on hold. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people of two million people with a vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease. So instead, they're going to switch to doing the mass vaccination campaign with Johnson and Johnson's vaccine into a much smaller distribution of the AstraZeneca vaccine that closely monitor that, And if there are higher rates of hospitalizations or cases among the South Africans getting AstraZeneca, then we'll deal with that, at that point Okay, so some important really important qualifiers you've given us this was a very small right study and AstraZeneca, which is not one of the vaccines being given out right now, in the U. S. Correct, so the so the guidance stands if you can get the vaccine when it's your turn. Get the vaccine. Absolutely in United States. This vaccine has not been been authorized yet in United States, although the U. S has purchased some for down the road, okay, but but there are global implications to this. How big a deal is this development outside of South Africa. You know, there's sort of two parts to that one is that this very isn't as much of a problem outside of Southern Africa. You know, at least not yet It might become a some point time. But the expectation is the AstraZeneca vaccine will continue to be effective in other parts of the world. The second part is that this vaccine is an incredibly important part of the global efforts to get people vaccinated. Particularly in low and middle income countries, And if there are cracks with this vaccine and turns out, it doesn't respond to variants very well, then that could really be problematic. Also, why? Because couldn't other countries switch to another vaccine, just like it's some South Africa is going to try to switch to Johnson and Johnson. So the problem is that right now, there just isn't enough vaccine out there or even in the pipeline, and AstraZeneca is a huge portion of both the current supply and the expected supply that's supposed to be coming in the coming month. On Dis is also gonna be. People are hoping sort of this vaccine workhorse. It would work well in low and middle income countries. It's cheap. You don't need some special super cold fridge to store it, you know, and it's currently being made in Europe and in India and South Korea. They're manufacturing in Argentina and Brazil. In the WH Ose program to distribute vaccine equitably among 190 countries. At the moment, it's plan was to depend almost entirely on the AstraZeneca vaccine. That is NPR's Jason Beaubien reporting. Thank you, Jason, You're welcome. Tomorrow as former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial gets underway. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer will be a key player after more than 20 years in the Senate. He's facing one of the trickiest balancing acts of his career. He must manage the ideological divides of a 50 50 Democratic majority all while running for reelection in his home state of New York. Progressive activists say If humor doesn't deliver, he could face a primary challenge. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has more. Shortly after the 2020 election, veteran Senator Chuck Schumer joined with three newly elected Progressive House Democrats to echo their call for Joe Biden to cancel up to $50,000 in student debt. I have spoken to him Have told him how important it is. He is considering it. Progressive activists will lead Shahid with Justice Democrats, a group that supports progressive candidates in primary elections took notice. That's something Senator Schumer has never supported in his entire career. In recent years, Schumer has aligned more closely with the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, particularly on issues like climate change. Well, progressive activists support the shift. They're skeptical. I think what progressives are worried about is that Senator Schumer might be doing a bunch of press conferences in New York, talking about his progressive bona fii days, but he's not doing much. To organize and unite his caucus around those policies. If progressives in New York are feeling a little bullish these days, it's not without reason in no other state has the progressive wing mounted as many successful and high profile primary challenges to incumbents in recent years. Delivering victories for progressive stars like freshmen congressmen Jamal Bowman and Congresswoman Alexandria Cossio Cortez, who progressive view as a possible primary challenger, veteran Democratic pollster Geoffrey Polic has worked for New York Democrats, including Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Governor Andrew Cuomo. He thinks Schumer's risk of a primary challenge is really low. She's not a guy who has ignored his own politics and brand, particularly as it comes to Democrats across New York State, But.

Senator Chuck Schumer AstraZeneca South Africa Jason Beaubien Southern Africa New York NPR Johnson Africa Ari Shapiro World Health Organization Mary Louise Kelly United States Salim Abdul Karim Mary Louise Senator Kirsten Gillibrand
"ari shapiro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. The World Health Organization is holding an emergency meeting of its top vaccine experts to determine whether it needs to change its guidance around the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. This comes after South Africa decided to delay a vaccination campaign that was supposed to start next week. South Africa made that decision after a small study called into question whether the AstraZeneca vaccine works against a variant that is now the dominant strain there. So is this a setback for us treason ago? Is that a detour? Is it nothing at all? NPR's Jason Beaubien is here with hopefully some insight on all down here, Jason. Hey, Mary Louise, So I think I have to start by asking the big question. Are these new variants mutating so fast that there rendering the vaccine useless before we can even get it out and everybody's arms. You know, that's what everybody's really worried about. I can tell you definitively that it's way too early to say that right now that this AstraZeneca vaccine isn't useless against the variant that's spreading in Southern Africa, but we are seeing some worrying signs. This was a fairly small study. It was predominantly of young, healthy South Africans, and it found That a reasonable number of people who got vaccinated still ended up getting mild cases of disease like nobody got sick, really, really sick. Nobody died and the study was even designed to test for that. But this was combined with some lab studies in Southern Africa that showed some other worrying signs. And there's concern that you know, South Africa. It was supposed to be starting this mass vaccination campaign next week. Um there's gonna be the first mass vaccination campaign in all of Southern substation in Africa on bit was going to be with the AstraZeneca shot and Salim Abdul Karim. He's annoyed visor to the South African government. He told the W. H o today that South African sided to put that campaign on hold. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people of two million people with a vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease. So instead, they're going to switch to doing the mass vaccination campaign with Johnson and Johnson's vaccine into a much smaller distribution of the AstraZeneca vaccine that closely monitor that, And if there are higher rates of hospitalizations or cases among the South Africans getting AstraZeneca, then we'll deal with that, at that point Okay, so some important really important qualifiers you've given us this was a very small right study and AstraZeneca, which is not one of the vaccines being given out right now, in the U. S. Correct, So the guidance stands if you can get the vaccine when it's your turn. Get the vaccine. Absolutely in United States. This vaccine has not been been authorized yet in United States, although the U. S has purchased some for down the road, okay, but but there are global implications to this. How big a deal is this development outside of South Africa. You know, there's sort of two parts to that one is that this very isn't as much of a problem outside of Southern Africa. You know, at least not yet. It might become a some point in time. But the expectation is the AstraZeneca vaccine will continue to be effective in other parts of the world. The second part Is that this vaccine is an incredibly important part of the global efforts to get people vaccinated, particularly in low and middle income countries, And if there are cracks with this vaccine and turns out, it doesn't respond to variants very well, then that could really be problematic. Also, why? Because couldn't other countries switch to another vaccine, just like it's some South Africa is going to try to switch to Johnson and Johnson. That the problem is that right now, there just isn't enough vaccine out there or even in the pipeline, and AstraZeneca is a huge portion of both the current supply and the expected supply that's supposed to be coming in the coming months on this is also going to be People are hoping so this vaccine workhorse, it would work well in low and middle income countries. It's cheap. You don't need some special super cold fridge to store it, you know, and it's currently being made in Europe and in India and South Korea. They're manufacturing in Argentina and Brazil and the W. H O is programmed to distribute vaccine equitably among 190 countries. At the moment, it's plan was to depend almost entirely on the AstraZeneca vaccine. That is NPR's Jason Beaubien reporting. Thank you, Jason, You're welcome. Tomorrow as former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial gets underway. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer will be a key player after more than 20 years in the Senate. He's facing one of the trickiest balancing acts of his career. He must manage the ideological divides of a 50 50 Democratic majority all while running for reelection in his home state of New York. Progressive activists say If humor doesn't deliver, he could face a primary challenge. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has more. Shortly after the 2020 election, veteran Senator Chuck Schumer joined with three newly elected Progressive House Democrats to echo their call for Joe Biden to cancel up to $50,000 in student debt. I have spoken to him Have told him how important it is. He is considering it. Progressive activists will lead Shahid with Justice Democrats, a group that supports progressive candidates in primary elections took notice. That's something Senator Schumer has never supported in his entire career. In recent years, Schumer has aligned more closely with the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, particularly on issues like climate change. Well, progressive activists support the shift. They're skeptical. I think what progressives are worried about is that Senator Schumer might be doing a bunch of press conferences in New York, talking about his progressive bona fii days, but he's not doing much. To organize and unite his caucus around those policies. If progressives in New York are feeling a little bullish these days, it's not without reason in no other state has the progressive wing mounted as many successful and high profile primary challenges to incumbents in recent years. Delivering victories for progressive stars like freshmen congressmen Jamal Bowman and Congresswoman Alexandria Cossio Cortez, who progressives you as a possible primary challenger, veteran Democratic pollster Geoffrey Polic has worked for New York Democrats, including Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Governor Andrew Cuomo. He thinks Schumer's risk of a primary challenge is really low. She's not a guy who has ignored his own politics and brand, particularly as it comes to Democrats across New York State, But pressure is on the newly Democratic controlled Washington to deliver on some of the party's most ambitious legislative goals. Here's Maurice Mitchell with the Working Families Party, a liberal, New York based minor political party. The word of this of this Congress has to be action, and I think he understands that humor is a critical player because getting legislation through the Senate is one of the biggest hurdles to getting bills to Biden's desk. It's why progressives one Schumer to change the Senate rules to scrap the filibuster. The past all legislation was simple majorities. Even though Democrats don't have the votes to do it right now, Here's what lead sheet again. The issue of the filibuster is in Chuck Schumer's hands, and he'll have to explain to voters and his primary electorate. Why he did or didn't hand control of the Senate over to Republicans like Mitch McConnell. Evan Webber is the co founder of the Sunrise Movement, a liberal climate change advocacy group, he says if Democrats get nothing done Schumer's political fate will be moved. Well, this is what I would say that. Oh, Chuck Schumer, you know, I think with you can't get your agenda done. Um, you're not gonna be majority leader anymore. I think if we don't deliver this transformational change for the American people right now, it's very hard to imagine a scenario where Democrats Maintain control of the Senate.

Senator Chuck Schumer Senate AstraZeneca South Africa Southern Africa New York NPR Jason Beaubien Johnson Africa World Health Organization Ari Shapiro Joe Biden Mary Louise Kelly
"ari shapiro" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang, renowned actress Cicely Tyson has died at the age of 96. In a career that spanned more than 60 years, Taison was an elegant, dignified presence on stage and screen. Less than a week ago, she spoke with NPR's Michele Martin, looking back on her career. It's remarkable to me that I have arrived at where I am today because I had anticipated it. No matter what happened in my life, it did not. Ah did not deter break from reaching the goal that I had set for myself. Tyson commanded attention in such movies as Sounder and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. She won Emmys and at age 88. A Tony Award. She also inspired generations of African American actors who grew up watching her MPR's Elizabeth Blair has this appreciation Sicily, Tyson brought grace and gravitas to the roles she played, and boy did she have range in sounder? She was a wife and mother in a family of black sharecroppers in Louisiana in the 19 thirties. Apart called for Tyson to be tender with her family. Bits and a bacon caper. David later take your daddy this time. Make a chocolate cake. Mom, Daddy legs, things this chocolate and seethe when the town's white sheriff won't let her see her husband who's in jail. You got you a low life job, Mr Sheriff. Taison. It was her eyes that spoke, They could sparkle in one scene and then pierce the soul. In another critic, Roger Ebert wrote that it was a wonder to see the subtleties in her performance. 1972 sounder was one of the first movies to show the strong bonds of a loving black family. Tyson once told NPR. It was also the movie that made her realize she needed to look for roles that reflected her experience as an African American woman. During a press conference for Sounder Ah white journalist told her the movie made him aware of his own prejudice because he said he was surprised to hear African American Children call their father, Daddy, just like his kids called him. He could not equate the fact that this man was on the same level as he and I, really I I admired him for standing up in an audience and saying that and I thought to myself, Sicily You really can't afford the luxury of just being an actress Cicely Tyson was born in Harlem. Her parents were from the Caribbean. Her father was a carpenter and a painter. Her mother was a housekeeper who was deeply religious. In 2005. Tyson told NPR. Their lives revolved around the church. We did everything in the church. I mean, we had I played the organ. I played the piano. I taught Sunday school, I sang in the choir. And then on Monday, we had prayer meeting and Tuesday we had a young people's meeting Wednesday. We had old people's needing and we just Saturday between the church and Sunday, we were right back in the church. My entire social life was in and about the church. And so that is the basis. My foundation. Tyson was also gorgeous. She started modeling after high school. Soon she was acting in movies and on TV. It was the 19 sixties, the civil rights movement. New York was a place where black artists formed alliances Taison performed in shows with all black casts alongside artists like Maya Angelo and James Earl Jones. One of Tyson's first roles was in the socially conscious but short lived TV series East Side West Side. Dyson played a poised, intelligent secretary in an office of social workers. He found out that I like to read books, but I couldn't go to the library. Negro Children didn't go to the library. Tyson's short Afro hairstyle inspired other black women to also wear their hair natural. She was on magazine covers like Ebony and Miss. She married jazz star Miles Davis. Photographers swooned over the famous couple. Sicily. Tyson always looked for positive portrayals of black women in 1974. She took on one of her most famous characters, the lead in the autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. You 100 in 10 years old. Hmm. So did tell me. Far back. Can you remember? Off their back. You won't go with the help of a stunning makeup job. Tyson transformed herself to play Miss Jane Pittman. She made her body look withered and frail. It was a rare event for a TV network to broadcast a feature film about the brutal struggles of African Americans in prime time from the point of view of African Americans. Dyson played Ms Pittman at various stages in her life as a young adult. She's beaten up by Klansmen, friends and family members or murdered Taison captured her weariness as well as her resilience. You have a day. They thought girl jail. Trying to drink from the felt Today. He killed my Jimmy. And I've seen I'm going, Miss.

Cicely Tyson Miss Jane Pittman Taison NPR Sicily Daddy Dyson Ari Shapiro Tony Award Michele Martin Louisiana Roger Ebert Caribbean African American Children Mr Sheriff Miles Davis East Side West Side Elsa Chang
"ari shapiro" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"ari shapiro" Discussed on KQED Radio

"II NORTH Highland Sacramento. It's 5 36. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. The governor of Puerto Rico has declared a state of emergency. The reason gender violence, he says violence against women has caused too much harm on the island for too long. Governor Pedro Pierluisi is declaration is a victory for feminist groups that have spent years calling for this move, and we're joined now by NPR's Adrian Florido. Hi, Adrian. Hi, Ari. What does it mean exactly for the governor to declare a state of emergency over gender violence? What the governor is done is given himself broad authority to implement policies across government agencies aimed at preventing and responding to violence against women. This is something that activists and feminist groups have been demanding for almost three years. Ever since they noticed an increase in domestic violence and women murdered by their intimate partners in the months after Hurricane Maria I spoke today with a mighty release by Gone from Proyecto Materia. It's a women's rights group on the island. It's really epic story off the feminist movement in Puerto Rico. It is the first time with in the past decade in which a governor at needs that violence against women is different from other violence is You know Ari, despite evidence of a growing problem in Puerto Rico, the two most recent governor's record voter CEO and one that Vasquez had resisted issuing this kind of declaration. So now that the governor has done this, you say he can take all kinds of executive actions. What if feminist groups expect from him? The order takes a lot of concrete steps. And among the most important of these, it forms a committee with representatives from more than a dozen agencies to figure out a government wide strategy to combat violence against women. It also direct certain agencies to take very specific steps. The Department of Education will develop a curriculum to teach students about gender violence. Theater Knee General's office will have to develop new trainings for prosecutors handling cases. The island's police will update their protocols for responding to domestic violence calls and for investigating the cases of murdered women. Now I also spoke today with Salon Davila. She is the leader of the collective a feminist and constructs Yon, a feminist group. And she said, Look, Puerto Rico actually already has Laws and policies aimed.

Puerto Rico Ari Shapiro Governor Pedro Pierluisi NPR Salon Davila Adrian Florido Elsa Chang Sacramento Los Angeles Proyecto Materia Washington Hurricane Maria Yon Department of Education executive Vasquez CEO
Biden Secures 85 Votes in Electoral College

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Biden Secures 85 Votes in Electoral College

"News. This is special coverage of the 2020 election of Lulu Garcia Navarro and I'm Ari Shapiro. Polls have now closed in Florida and Pennsylvania, two key battleground states that could sway the results of the presidential election. And, according to the AP, the race is too early to call in both states. As of now, this is what we do know about the race. So far, President Trump has 55 electoral college votes after winning and reliably Republican states like Kentucky, West Virginia in South Carolina and former Vice President Joe Biden has 85 electoral college votes after winning in Democratic strongholds like Vermont, Virginia and Illinois.

Lulu Garcia Navarro Ari Shapiro President Trump Pennsylvania Florida AP Vice President Joe Biden West Virginia Kentucky South Carolina Vermont Virginia Illinois
Parents of 545 children separated at U.S. border can't be found

All Things Considered

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Parents of 545 children separated at U.S. border can't be found

"I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. It's been two years since the Trump administration ended its policy of separating migrant families that the U. S Mexico border. And still, hundreds of Children are separated from their parents. As part of a lawsuit over the policy lawyers and non governmental groups were assigned to reunite parents with their Children. And now we learn that in 545 cases, parents have not been located or reached yet. That's according to a court filing made yesterday by the EU and the U. S. Justice Department. Earlier. I spoke with legal arts, the lead lawyer on this case for the value and I asked him to tell us what's known about these Children, so they're very young, many under five many, many under 10. We believe the Children are in the United States, either with foster families or relatives, sometimes distant relatives where they've never met. The parents are overwhelmingly In Central America, having been deported without their Children, and I think what what's important to understand is why we still haven't found all these families. First of all this is a second batch of Children with the government hid from us it from us and the court. The government originally told us about 2800 families. We in the court assumed that that was the extent of the separations Onley later in the winter of 2019 because of HHS investigative report, Did we find out their mayor in many, many more kids separated at the very beginning of the Trump administration. I just want to be clear. You're saying the government hid them from you. Initially, the government denied that this program existed after it became public after the national outcry after the involvement of the courts. You're saying the government still didn't totally come clean at that point, exactly. The government never told us about this additional group. Of Children that were separated on Lee because of an HHS internal report that we learn about them. Ultimately, the court ordered them to give us the list of the families on a rolling basis within six months. So we got started looking for these families very, very late in the process because the government and hit all the families We then started looking for them. But the contact information the government gave us was largely stale because the family's been separated so early in the Trump administration's tenure. And then what happened was we had to go on the ground and look for the families in Central America, literally town to town Pandemic kid and that largely had to be halted for For months. So the combination of the government hiding the families from the court even after the court outlawed the policy and then having a search for them town to town in Central America and the pandemic has meant that there are hundreds and hundreds of

Government Trump Administration Central America HHS Ari Shapiro United States U. S Mexico EU Washington LEE U. S. Justice Department
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 2 years ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"News. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up force. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports burnt banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 2 years ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up for us. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports parent banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film that

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 2 years ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Michigan To Pay Flint Residents $600 Million Over The City's Drinking Water

All Things Considered

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Michigan To Pay Flint Residents $600 Million Over The City's Drinking Water

"Million settlement with residents of Flint over the city's drinking water crisis. The problems began in 2014 when improperly treated water corroded the city's pipes. And leeched lead into the tap water, making people sick. We wanted to hear what Flint residents thought. So we called up Jenna McDonald. She's a substitute teacher and mother of two young boys. When my co host Ari Shapiro, met Jenna four years ago in February, 2016 she had taught her boy's a really important lesson. We've continued to check in with her throughout the years, and she joins us again. Now. Welcome back. Thank you. So Governor Gretchen Whitmer called this a step toward making amends. How do you feel? What's your reaction to the settlement? Is like a little ray of sunshine it for me and for my family. My biggest fear is that everyone will forget about Flint. It would get swept under the rug, and no one will remember. So I'm very excited to know that our wonderful governor kept her promise about keeping this on her four part of her mind in their Flint residents matter. Much of the money will be devoted to Children who are six years or younger when first exposed to the contaminated water and your son's justice and Josiah fall into that category. Will you be seeking compensation? And is it enough? There is no amount that will be enough ever if each of us got the 600 million apiece that's still will not replace the damage that was done. I have very close friends who lost parents two Legionnaires. I'm still under the belief that my son's autism is a result of these lay a tainted water, so there's no amount of money. Deca, replace or even tried Tio comfort lifelong things like that. Are you going to see compensation? 100%? Yes. And you know, I've been thinking about this. You haven't been on the programme since the pandemic started. And I've really wondered how Cove in 19 has impacted you and your neighbors, especially with all this necessary, extra hand washing big, big amount of stress. You already tried to kind of limit how much you were playing or in the water are trying to wash your hands. But now you don't have a choice. I can live with whatever little damage that that late is possibly doing to my body and just meant through my skin. But I can't live through Cove it I have. Ah, you know, auto immune disease with my Lupus, So I think it would take me out. So I'll take my chances washing my hands with the Flint water versus getting called it. You know, during that last interview, you told

Flint Jenna Mcdonald Cove Gretchen Whitmer Ari Shapiro Josiah Legionnaires Deca TIO
How the U.S. and China Settled on a Trade Deal Neither Wanted

Marketplace

05:34 min | 3 years ago

How the U.S. and China Settled on a Trade Deal Neither Wanted

"This week the US and China are set to sign the first phase of a trade agreement farmers and manufacturers hope this could be a sign that the trade war between the two countries is ending at a time when politicians are skeptical of global trade agreements are co host ari Shapiro talked with an author who is an unapologetic advocate for trade you could say that Fred Hochberg was born to be a voice for global trade his mother's name was Lillian Vernon the same Lillian Vernon who created a multi million dollar mail order catalogue company selling everything from clothing to toys that company grew from his mother's kitchen table to a household name partly by buying products that were made in China Nixon open China in nineteen seventy two lily was hot on his trail went to China in nineteen eighty one we started buying in trying to parlay Taiwan became too expensive so companies started moving from Taiwan into China and to the manufacturing there during the Obama administration Fred Hochberg ran the export import bank making him one of the country's top cheerleaders for global trade deals now the political tides have shifted president trump pulled the US out of the trans Pacific partnership started a trade war with China and scraps nafta so you can understand why Fred Hochberg called his new book trade is not a four letter word part of the reason I wrote this book was because I was kind of surprised and thunderstruck over the last eight years how we got so negative on trade the problem is we as a country were not candid when not honest with the shortfalls about trade the fact is there are losers and we did not really sufficiently as a country really address the people who got badly hurt we have many things in our economy that says yes it's a where a market economy but at the same time we have to have things that take action when the market's not perfect we didn't put enough time and attention into making that work the way you structure this book you tell the story of global trade through a handful of everyday products and I'd like to zoom in on one of them the avocado well I think you know the avocado follows the path of the banana which is also in this book and that is being this exotic delicacy that became more mainstream so bananas a once in a delicacy and then became the staple and frankly the most consumed fruit and the American family of any fruits vegetables that we consume a lot of as to a global trade and has to do with the importation from central and South America and avocados are similar in that regard in two thousand we consumed a billion avocados we double that within five years and then double that again and another ten years so we now consumer of four and a quarter billion avocados a year so I think that they did catch fire and part of it catches fire importing nafta and the importation of the fact that was free trade going back and forth and I use the example of the taco salad you can now or joy at soccer ball in all fifty states in twelve months of the year that would not be possible if US only relying on our own local products local agriculture and local ingredients and more broadly than avocados or even just the taco salad you talk about the way diversity in supermarkets has just exploded because of global imports yes I mean the choices we have in this illustration in the book about when Boris Yeltsin visited a supermarket in Houston and was just flabbergasted at the array of products that we have that degree of opportunity plenty selection and variety was something that we now take for granted in America that was largely because of global trade largely because we get agriculture products year round cheeses from around the world meet some around the world and they can go to every corner United States there's a stunning figure here where you write that in nineteen seventy five before the first free trade agreements were written the average U. S. supermarket carried just under nine thousand products by two thousand eight that number had mushroomed to nearly forty seven thousand that's because of global trade global trade and as a result changing eating habits I one of things I put in the book I would never have guessed growing up as a little kid we all the you know the going to seafood restaurant was like the worst thing in the world and the fact that Americans have so embraced sushi and virtually every supermarket you go to you can buy fresh sushi every day is remarkable you obviously think more trade is a good thing so I was surprised at the end of the book to see that you think the US should take a pause on entering into any new trade deals why this is been such a divisive issue that I think it's it's not healthy for a democracy to have such highly divisive issues that are often decided by one vote now since they wrote the book U. S. M. CNA the United States Mexican Canadian agreement that passed the house of representatives with three hundred eighty five votes to forty one is the largest single majority we have ever seen on a trade agreement ever so maybe we are now moving towards that recent surveys have shown a majority of Democrats and Republicans believe in free trade majority Democrats public thinks it's actually better for our economy Fred Hochberg is former chairman of the export import bank of

United States China
Federal Financial Aid Form Causes A Stir — Over Selective Service Question

All Things Considered

00:12 sec | 3 years ago

Federal Financial Aid Form Causes A Stir — Over Selective Service Question

"The selective service question on the fax the form caused a stir on social media over the weekend All Things Considered has the details from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and Ahmadi Cornish another bit of fallout from the U. S. strike against Iran a burst of social media memes from young people worried about checking off the box for selective service on the federal financial aid form

Iran NPR Ari Shapiro Ahmadi Cornish
Putin meets with Ukraine leader Zelensky for the first time

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 3 years ago

Putin meets with Ukraine leader Zelensky for the first time

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro the leaders of Russia and Ukraine have just wrapped up talks in Paris it's an attempt to end the war in eastern Ukraine where thirteen thousand people have already died this is the first time you cranes new president Philo demerits Lynskey has met with Vladimir Putin the two leaders talked about the outcome of the meeting in a joint press conference and we're joined now by NPR's leucine Kim who's been watching from Moscow hi Lucy in a R. E. this was supposed to be peace summit in hopes of resolving a five year long conflict between the two countries that were there any breakthroughs no this was largely a confirmation of the status quo of the peace process called the Minsk agreement that started in twenty fourteen this process has been completely frozen for the past three years so in some sense it could be considered progress that the lens can Putin even met the less he said going into this meeting he was looking for a lasting ceasefire along the whole front line and an exchange of all prisoners

Audie Cornish Russia Paris Ukraine President Trump Philo Lynskey Vladimir Putin NPR KIM Moscow Lucy Ari Shapiro Minsk Three Years Five Year
Trump's whistleblower complaint

All Things Considered

05:02 min | 3 years ago

Trump's whistleblower complaint

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and an Audi Cornish ridiculous that's how president trump is describing allegations that he had improper conversations with another foreign leader they're reportedly at the heart of a whistle blower complaint from someone in the intelligence community that complaint and the acting director of national intelligence is refuse refusal to share it with Congress has resulted in a stand off between the executive and legislative branches of government president trump says there's nothing wrong with how he talks to other world leaders during a news conference with Australian prime minister Scott Morrison today I've had conversations with many leaders that always appropriate thanks god can tell you that always appropriate at the highest level always appropriate and anything I do a fight for this country I fight so strongly for this country it's just another political hack job speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi doesn't see these accusations as a political hack job I sat down with her this morning in a conference room just offer office along with NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis who begins this part of our conversation I'm sure you're aware of the reports of a whistleblower raising questions about actions the president took his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani said he spoke to the government of the Ukraine asking to investigate the Biden family just this morning president trump said quote someone ought to look into Joe Biden quote your reaction just another example of the lack of integrity decency and patriotism on the part of this administration we don't know the facts we don't know if the Ukraine is the country that is the subject of the telephone conversation that remains to be seen but what is the fact is the law and the law says the director of national intelligence shall not should not may we encourage shell convey the whistle blower information to the intelligence committees in the Congress and right now they're breaking the law. to that end if there is evidence that there is law breaking or if there is evidence that the president is trying to interfere with the twenty twenty election by asking a foreign entity to investigate political opponents does that change the calculation on impeachment we've always been in search of the fax and that is the calculus is whether the facts were in court on four cases right now whether it's the president's taxes whether it's his bank accounts whether it's as accounting and his emoluments this case has a national security piece to it that is very alarming because it inspector general is appointed by president trump if in fact it is as is described described this of urgency enough concern and again the law says this director of national intelligence shall send the information you refer to a lack of integrity decency and patriotism by this president you are as different station in the path of them on the blanket you're describing potential acts of lawbreaking and many people here that and say if Congress does not pursue impeachment does it forever change the standard of what is acceptable behavior by any president I don't know about lawbreaking and said we don't have the information of immense suggested I said that because we don't have the information and I while others may speculate I have to go on the basis of the law and the facts and that's where decisions will be made our founders could never suspect the president would be so abusive of the constitution of the United States that the separation of powers would be irrelevant to him and that he would continue any president would continue to withhold fax from the Congress which are part of the constitutional right of inquiry so this is in a different class in terms of his behavior but again the facts and the law I do think that we will have to pass some laws. that will have clarity for future presidents president should be indicted if he's committed upon doing any while in office any presence there is nothing any place that says the president should not be indicted as if it's the justice department interpretation by the president's lawyers that's what that is so that people will steal okay well if he does something wrong should be able to be indicted the president should not be able to interpret the national security act as something that gives him free reign to do anything he wants by his personal declaration that something is an emergency and it behooves Congress to make sure whether it's trade agreements that he says he has the ability to do this that and the other thing Congress has to retain its power in all the days of rain but hasn't he proven the point that Congress is not very strong right now and not very effect but he's at thirty eight percent in the polls I think the public is making some judgment about him and it will remain under fifty percent in the polls four five R. can it's beat him when they we haven't even decided who are can

Donald Trump NPR Ari Shapiro President Trump Thirty Eight Percent Fifty Percent
Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census

All Things Considered

00:40 sec | 4 years ago

Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census

"This is NPR. And you're listening to WNYC in New York at five oh four. I'm Jamie Floyd legalizing, recreational marijuana, passing congestion pricing and rapidly increasing renewable energy usage. These are just some of the items on New York governor Andrew Cuomo to do list for this legislative session at the state of the union address this afternoon governor Cuomo conceded, the laundry list may seem ambitious. It's a lot no doubt about it. But there's been a lot that has been bottled up for many many years that we couldn't get done. And in many ways, I feel the state is now liberated with the Senate Democratic caucus. And of course, it's the state of the state the governor called on lawmakers to continue passing progressive legislation in the coming weeks among his top budget priorities. Cuomo said our public transportation and infrastructure, healthcare and cutting taxes for the middle class. For years, the NYPD's response to questions about its use of surveillance technology has been to neither confirm nor deny whether records bowed. It exists. It's called the glow more response. But now in New York state court judge has ruled in a case over whether NYPD spied on the cell phones of people attending black lives matter protests that the police can no longer keep that claim of confidentiality. It's a win for civil libertarians. And state supreme court Justice, Arlene, blue shot down, the NYPD argument that responding to complaints would compromise counterterrorism or criminal efforts because the police in question, we're not the people in question rather were not breaking the law at the time New York Times reporter, Ali Watson covered the case. Judge's ruling right now, depending on whether or not the NYPD appeals actually puts a very firm boot the neck of his response. They can't really use it in the future. The NYPD does have thirty days to appeal. The ruling. A statement a spokeswoman said that it uses the global response exceedingly sparingly and only after careful consideration of the interests involved tonight, mostly clear, a low around twenty seven degrees. Currently, it's thirty four degrees. The time is five oh six support for NPR comes from C three providing a software platform that enables organizations to deploy artificial intelligence in IOT solutions at industrial scale. Learn more at C three dot AI. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro in a Senate hearing room today attorney general nominee William bar has been walking a fine line bar is pledging to protect the Justice department. But he also says the president has sweeping constitutional authority NPR national Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been following these confirmation hearings and joins us now to talk about them. Hi, hey, okay. He has been nominated to lead the Justice department at a time when the president is attacking it. So how did bar address that tension today? Well, Bill Maher said he has a very high opinion of deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, he says he has no reason to doubt that the Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. And he says he doesn't believe that special counsel. Robert Muller would be conducting a witch hunt in fact, Barr says he would quit rather than fire Muller. If there were no good cause to get rid of him. And as one of Muller's friends for thirty years Barr says it's unimaginable that. Muller would do anything to prompt? A firing Senate Democrats went into this hearing wanting bar firmly committed to protecting the Russia investigation. Did they get that commitment? Not affirm one Ari Dianne Feinstein, the top democrat on the committee was pressing Bill bar a lot about what people will learn in the end about the Russia probe. Will you commit to making any report Muller produces at the conclusion of his investigation available to congress and to the public as as I said, my statement, I am going to make as much information available as I can consistent with the rules and regulations now Bill bar talked about wanting transparency, but he also said that he s the attorney general make the ultimate call about what becomes public and later on Senator amazing. Geraldo, Hawaii said just asking us to trust. You is not enough. She said this president will do anything to protect himself, and Mr. bar was kind of tough in his response. He said, I'm not going to surrender the responsibility of the attorney general. To get this title. We know that bar has had some contact with lawyers involved in the investigation. Did we learn anything new today about his interactions with the White House? We did bar told lawmakers he actually met with President Trump awhile ago, and the president seemed to want bar to join his legal defence team bar politely declined. He said he didn't want to stick his head in a meat grinder bar. Also said he discussed some legal theories with attorneys for the president the vice president and with Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, but bar said he didn't recall learning anything of substance. Anything confidential about the pro from the beginning of this investigation. The issue of recusals has been a very big deal. What had bar say about recusals today? He said he thinks Jeff Sessions. The former attorney general probably did the right thing to recuse himself in Democrats pressed bar to step aside to given this context with lawyers involved in this investigation and a memo he wrote criticizing the investigation, but here again, far would not commit. He says he will ask career. Ethics officials at Justice to evaluate the question, but he won't necessarily do what they advise. He also said the president is not above the law. The president can't for example, offer pardons to people who promise now to incriminate him taking a step back. There is one question about Bill bar that people on both sides of the aisle have which is why would he come back to lead the Justice department after twenty seven years to be attorney general again in excellent question bar, basically says because he loves the Justice department as an institution he says, he's sixty eight years old, and he has nothing to lose. If you take this job, you have to be ready to make decisions and spend all your political capital and have no future because you have to have that freedom of action, and I feel I'm gonna position in life where I can do the right thing and not really care about the consequences and Ari so far nothing has emerged to block Boris path confirmation. NPR national. Justice. Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Thank you. My pleasure for analysis of the hearing and of what Bill bar may do if he's confirmed. Let's bring in Jennifer dascomb. She's an associate professor of law at American University. She used to work at the Justice department. Professor Daska welcome. Thank you. So to the central question today, which is whether bar will protect the Muller investigation based on what you heard from his testimony. Are you persuaded that he will? So he he answered that pretty clearly he said that he he likely I mean, he had he would protect mother and the absence. Something extraordinary that mother would be allowed to continue. I think the key question and the one that several senators pushed on the a question of what is going to be made public, and what's going to be made available congress. We heard Bill bars say repeatedly that he was committed to transparency, but transparency considered students consistent with the law transparency consistent with rules and regulations and bar. Has a very broad view of executive privilege and a very broad view of executive power including power over criminal investigation. So when he says he needs to be consistent with rules and regulations on the question of whether whatever final report Muller producers should be made public. That's what he would be referring to executive privilege that the president might say, no, exactly executive privilege abroad claims our national security, our range of different reasons. Why transparency would be limited according to his his views and the president's articulation of of what's necessary to keep private secret. He also as we just heard there from Carrie Johnson did not seem to suggest that he's likely to recuse himself from overseeing the Mueller investigation. Did that surprise you in any way? It comprises me only because it seems like a clear case where recusals would be appropriate, but he has been consistent on along in suggesting that he would not recuse himself. And I wasn't surprised that he didn't change his mind today. But giving his engagement given the nemo that was that he chose to write and to send to the president about concerned about obstruction of Justice charges targeting the president and given what he acknowledged today about conversations, it seems like this would be a clear case for recusal has been consistent about that. Well, that prompts my next question, and it's one that he was asked today by senators in in one way or the other a number of times, which is would he protect the independence of the Justice department against executive overreach. Do you think when push comes to shove Bill would tell the president? No, no, sir. You can't do that. So again, I think it depends on what's being asked. And he did get today that there were certain red lines that he went cross, but that being said he has an expressed repeatedly previously very broad views of executive power and executive privilege, and there are certainly in a whole range of areas in which the president could assert executive privilege in my assumption is and based on bars previous, writings and statements. That bar would agree. Did you learn anything about Bill today that you didn't already know? Some of the contacts that he's had were interesting to hear about you know, he is as as expected he was incredibly articulate and and respectful. I think that the key is is reading the testimony in light of what he started written in the past. Did you hear anything today that might derail this confirmation that poses a serious threat to his chances of being confirmed? I'm just given given the politics and given the makeup of the Senate unlikely at this point is there a question to you to you would have asked him that the senators did not. Again, I think that really pushing him on this question of transparency what happens when the president asserts a claim of national security what happens when the president says, you know, we just want a very brief cursory summary of this report sent up to congress. What do you do? Then you would have liked to have heard an iron clad, whatever Muller wants to be made public. I'll back. Exactly, that's Jennifer Gasco. She she choose constitutional and national security law at American University Jennifer desk, thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you.

President Trump Bill Bar Justice Department Robert Muller William Bar NPR Attorney Executive Nypd Bill Carrie Johnson New York Senate Democratic Caucus Senator Senate Andrew Cuomo Bill Maher American University
Student loan company Navient used deceptive practices, audit suggests

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 4 years ago

Student loan company Navient used deceptive practices, audit suggests

"Washington debate is slated this evening between two candidates in unexpectedly. Contentious Mississippi Senate race, Republican Senator Cindy Hyde. Smith faces a runoff next week against democrat. Mike Espy the runoff race has become embroiled in controversy after a video surfaced on Twitter from a campaign event for Senator Cindy, Hyde Smith in Tupelo Mississippi earlier this month, and it she can be heard praising supporter by saying, quote, if he invited me to a public hanging. I'd be on the front row given Mississippi's history of racist violence against black people many observers heard that comment as a disturbing reference to lynching Hyde Smith who is white said in a statement that quote, any attempt to turn this into a negative connotation is ridiculous her opponent. Former congressman in US agriculture secretary. Mike Espy is African American. No candidate got more than fifty percent of the vote on November six sending the race to a runoff. Next week. You're listening to NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd, the head of New York City's board of election says the ballot is the reason for long lines on election day, the perforated to page ballot presented a series of problems never before experienced by the board or anywhere in the country. The only executive director Michael Ryan, he spoke to city council members during a nearly four hour long hearing today said his agency just didn't have enough time to test the scanners with that amount of paper city council speaker Cory Johnson said he expects a full plan from the city and state officials about how to fix these issues for quote, the next election and the one after that and the one after that. The man accused of killing a New York City. Toddler best known as baby hope has died in custody. The New York Times reporting that Corrado Juarez died Sunday due to complications related upon create a cancer. The fifty seven year old former restaurant worker was awaiting trial for the last five years. What is was charged in the murder of four year old on Djelic Custodio whose body was found in a cooler left in a wooded area area in upper Manhattan back in nineteen Ninety-one. Prosecutors say she had been suffocated and molested her killing remained unsolved for more than two decades, and predatory lenders in New Yorker taking advantage of an arcane legal document that allows them to immediately sees borrower's assets when they default, and in some cases, even when they don't the loophole is called a confession of judgment it forces small-time borrowers to forfeit their rights. If the lenders. Decide to sue Bloomberg BusinessWeek reporters Meyde Meidlinger says that most of these lenders are actually from out of state. The lenders have figured out that the New York state court system is the best for what they're trying to do here. And so they typically go to upstate county clerk's offices where people are just kind of sitting there rubber-stamping these judgments, there's no judge involved and mitre says these are impossible to overturn forty seven degrees. Support for NPR comes from i-drive may grow remote PC, providing real time remote access to PC's Maxon servers from anywhere for use win telecommuting or for remote management. Learn more at remote dot com slash NPR. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Ari Shapiro before heading to his mar-a-lago resort for thanksgiving today. President Trump took questions from reporters on the lawn of the White House as his helicopter waited. The topics included his statement on Saudi Arabia. A legal setback on his new asylum. Restrictions and his daughter Ivanka is use of a personal Email address. He spoke out against the ninth circuit court of appeals the federal appeals court for the western US. That's where judge yesterday temporarily halted the administration's new restrictions on asylum-seekers, Trump suggested the court was biased. No matter. What you do? No

New York City Hyde Smith Mike Espy NPR United States Senator Cindy Hyde Senator Cindy Tupelo Mississippi Mississippi President Trump Washington The New York Times Twitter Cory Johnson Ivanka Audie Cornish Senate
U.S. prosecutors talking with accused Russian agent to resolve case

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 4 years ago

U.S. prosecutors talking with accused Russian agent to resolve case

"In US stocks today, though for the week the US natural markets still posted losses. The Dow was up one hundred twenty three points today to twenty five thousand four thirteen. The NASDAQ fell eleven points, the SNP up six points. This is NPR. And this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson, New York City officials say plummeting temperatures and an unexpected amount of snow contributed to widespread chaos last night. Marital Bazi city Commissioner said they were expecting one to two inches of snow instead of more than six transportation Commissioner Polly trot and Burg says without enough warning the city was not able to salt and plow roads, effectively this event had been described to something where it was not going to get below freezing. And everything was going to it got icy and not just on the George Washington Bridge. Bayonne bridge cross Bronx major Deegan. A bunch of places where trucks and cars started slipping and sliding marital Bosnia said there will be an audit of how the city and other agencies like the port authority could have reacted more effectively. Meanwhile, New Jersey transit has suspended service on to train lines due to damage from this storm. The agency says the north jersey coast line will be shut down until tomorrow morning. That's because overhead wires came down in Middletown that significantly damaged signal lines. The Gladstone branch will also be shut down until Monday morning. That's to make time for repairs to a signal crossing in new providence where a strain or a train struck a car last night. Nj transit. Bus and rail tickets and passes will be cross honored across the system and with private buses for the rest of tonight. Mayor de Blasio says he has fired the head of New York City's watchdog agency to preserve its honor and integrity, the mayor announced this afternoon that he removed department investigation Commissioner Mark Peters. The Blasios said his decision was spurred by recent report, accusing Peters of abusing his power the very top leadership at DIO. I've repeatedly undermined the values critical to its mission. My job as mayor to make a change. So that deal I can do. It's important work going forward. Tensions between the two men were high after Peter's issued hard hitting investigations of the city's housing authority correction department and child services agency earlier this year to Blasi reportedly the ordered his staff to find ways to get rid of him. The mayor has nominated the state's executive deputy attorney general for criminal Justice says Peterson replacement for the rest of tonight mostly clear with a low of thirty five wind chills between thirty and thirty five wind gusts to twenty eight miles an hour. Support for NPR comes. From the YMCA committed to opportunities for all and the belief that no one should be defined by zip code. They're born into details on the impact of donations YMCA dot net slash for a better us. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. It's another day of counting actually recounting in Florida across the state workers are counting ballots by hand in the US Senate race where Republican challenger Rick. Scott maintains a narrow lead over democratic incumbent Bill Nelson in Broward County this morning. Local election workers went through a PowerPoint full of instructions on how to decipher ballots that have been remarked with crossed out. Check marks even written on by voters voter marks

New York City United States Commissioner Mark Peters NPR Mayor De Blasio New York Bayonne Bridge New Jersey George Washington Bridge Commissioner Polly Trot Sean Carlson Ari Shapiro Commissioner Bosnia Audie Cornish Middletown Bill Nelson
Pittsburgh synagogue-shooting suspect wheeled into courtroom

All Things Considered

01:45 min | 4 years ago

Pittsburgh synagogue-shooting suspect wheeled into courtroom

"Summer says he was helping his ninety year old mother fill out her absentee ballot. When he went to stuff it into the envelope. And he noticed he had a problem. It didn't fit to white. They took it out to see. Maybe I folded it wrong. But there's only one way to fold it. Michael Ryan, the head of New York City's board of elections says yes, some of the ballots didn't quite fit their envelopes. We got them back from the vendor folded in three sections. They probably should have been folded in four sections is city is reminding people there are two pages in two sides to the ballot. The candidates are on one side and ballot proposals are on the other for the rest of tonight here no area, no precipitation. It'll just be mostly cloudy overnight tonight. We'll see low of about forty three degrees. Tomorrow, Tuesday, mostly sunny through the day with a high near fifty seven it'll remain clear tomorrow night, low about forty. Eight and then on Wednesday, very nice day. It'll be mostly sunny through the day on Wednesday. The high reaching about sixty five degrees right now, though here in New York City, fifty six degrees under cloudy skies. You're listening to WNYC at four zero six. Support for NPR comes from visit Saint Petersburg Clearwater, along Florida's Gulf Coast offering artistic draws including St. Pete's Dali museum the to Hooghly collection and the museum of fine arts more at visit Saint Pete Clearwater dot com. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro. The man accused of killing eleven worshippers and wounding six others in synagogue, Saturday appeared in federal court today Robert Bowers has been charged with twenty nine federal crimes and could face the death penalty NPR's Brian man was in the courtroom in Pittsburgh and joins us now. Brian IRA at describe what the scene was like in there today. Incredibly

New York City NPR Brian Man Ari Shapiro Brian Ira Mary Louise Kelley Saint Petersburg Clearwater Saint Pete Clearwater Wnyc Summer Michael Ryan Robert Bowers Museum Of Fine Arts Dali Museum Pittsburgh Hooghly Gulf Coast Florida Forty Three Degrees
Ted Cruz, Harvard and NPR discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

13:31 min | 4 years ago

Ted Cruz, Harvard and NPR discussed on All Things Considered

"Stocks finished lower today on Wall Street as shares of IBM slumped after the fed signaled the need to continue to raise interest rates despite criticism from the president the Dow dropped ninety one points. This is NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson, New York governor Andrew Cuomo is joining a growing list of officials who say they won't appear on local news channel, New York. One. His move followed mayor de Blasios decision on Monday to cancel his weekly appearance on the channel both say they want appear because of a standoff between the stations parent company charters spectrum and electrical workers who've been on strike for more than a year. Thirty five other elected officials signed a letter pledging to stay off the station as well. Tom Robbins, a longtime New York reporter and faculty member at the CUNY journalism school said the move doesn't really surprise them. New York is a union town, or at least that's the perception. It's toxic Titian to cross the picket line a spokesperson for New York. One said in a statement. It's quote, a shame to see New York. One us as a political prop at a time. When there are fewer and fewer objective. Local news outlets. New York City councilman wants to tighten regulations on the iconic water towers that Dohrn the city skyline. That's after an investigation by the city and state news website found the many rooftop tanks are decrepit and potentially hazardous Manhattan. Councilman Ben Kahlo says his new Bill would require landlords to clean their water towers after city officials test them inspections of the water towers were actually happening after cleaning. And of course, they will passing with flying colors despite reporting to the contrary that these water towers were in poor condition. The Bill would also allow the city to conduct surprise inspections to make sure the reservoirs are being kept clean right now. They're scheduled with the landlord a near state health department committee has missed its deadline to recommend regulations for three types of toxic chemicals in drinking water right now. The state has no rules on whether water systems even have to test for PFOS PF and one four dioxin. Liz Miranda is with the environmental advocates of New York right now. There are thousands of people who have no idea PF away. Even in their water. They haven't had the same kind of testing that other communities have had and if they don't know what's in their water. Well, what if it's there the APA does require testing, but not for small towns so beginning for years ago residents of who sick falls, upstate New York tested the water themselves last year, they discovered their levels of PF. Oh, a were eighteen hundred times higher than the federal safety standard. The state says it plans to make recommendations by the end of the year for the rest of tonight here in our area. The sky should remain mostly clear, we'll have a low of about forty degrees tonight. It'll be breezy. Gus up to thirty six miles an hour and then tomorrow Thursday sunny through the day with a high near fifty degrees. You're listening to WNYC at seven thirty five support for NPR comes from member stations and from zoom. Zoom offers cloud video conferencing, online meetings and a video conference room solution in one platform, featuring digital video and audio screen sharing account registration and more at zoom dot US. And transfer wise a service that helps people send money internationally three million people and businesses use transfer wise to send receive and convert currencies in more than seventy countries. More at transfer wise dot com or from their app from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Mary Louise Kelley last night, the two US Senate candidates from Texas debated in San Antonio three weeks before election day. There was an important opportunity for democratic congressman veteran Rourke an incumbent Republican Ted Cruz to make their cases to voters the debate. Like the race was downright nasty as NPR's. Wade Goodwin reports Senator Ted Cruz is reelection campaign has not been shy about attacking his opponent. Congressman Beto were Rourke on TV. I'm Ted Cruz, and I approved. This message metalwork is more extreme than he wants. You didn't know what attack at which eventually seemed to backfire cruise. Campaign. Misleadingly edited videotape to make it appear as if a Rourke said he supported flag burning which he did not say better. Rox positions are too extreme even for them just to reckless for taxes until now better work has declined to participate in negative campaigning. But with the poll showing cruise with anywhere from a six to a nine point lead, the congressman relented and has gone on the attack Republicans and Democrats alike know that we've got to lead on immigration reform, and yet Ted Cruz is the only Senator to vote against moving forward with that conversation is bounded to deport every single dream last night and their debate in San Antonio this trend continued crews painting or work as a dangerous extremist if you work in energy, if you work in oil and gas congressman rox record on this is extreme he didn't just vote for a ten dollar a barrel tax on oil. He's also voted for aggressive regulations of fracking. But unlike their first debate. Last night Aurore hit back. This is what you can expect over. The course of this debate Senator is not going to be honest with you. He's going to make up positions and votes that I've never held or ever taken is dishonest. It's why the president called wine Ted, and it's why the nickname stock because it's true, although crews would force a laugh when a work attacked him. His face revealed is true, emotions and the Senator didn't like it. But the debate in San Antonio was more than just battle. It was substantive to cruise has the numbers on his side. There are hundreds of thousands more Republican voters in Texas, the Democrats as a result. Cruise spoke mostly to his base. The state of Texas is booming. We've got right now. The lowest unemployment in forty nine years, Texas is seeing the benefits of low taxes and lower regulations and congressman or rock position is always always always in favor of higher taxes if Cruz generally played two Republican fears. What would happen? If Democrats gained any power work tended to speak to voters better angels. Whether we will remain the inspiration of the world is an open question right now. The partisanship pettiness the dishonesty that defines so much of the national conversation. We are in desperate need right now of inspiration. Although orcas running way ahead of other taxes. Statewide, Democrats close still get you know cigar? I think that a very good democratic candidate running against a flawed Republican candidate has a chance to break through. That's why Iraq came up so strong on cruise. Cal Jolson is a professor of political science at southern Methodist university Cruzan is an acquired taste people respect him as a conservative fighter. They don't necessarily like him. They gave a rock a look. But Democrats have to recognize that competitiveness is a decade or two decades out. It's not two years. It's not for years is longer than that. Because demographic change is very slow. Beto O'Rourke will appear in an hour long CNN townhall event tomorrow evening and mcallen on the Texas border Ted Cruz declined to participate. So our work will answer the voters questions himself. Wade goodwin. NPR news. Harvard is defending its admissions policy in a Boston courtroom this week. The question is whether the school discriminates against Asian American applicants the case could go to the supreme court with broad implications for -firmative action in schools yesterday. We spoke with an Asian American student who believes Harvard should consider factors including race. Kelly. Bap avant has the opposite view. She is also the daughter of Asian immigrants, and she's a junior at Harvard. Welcome to all things considered great. Thanks for having me. Why do you believe Harvard's admissions policy needs to change? I think race nearly creates illusion of diversity, and I'd love to see admissions policies change, not to have recent now Harvard says that when they do consider race, it's one of many factors that they consider it's complicated role in students life experiences would you like to see race just totally omitted from the list of factors that Harvard is considering when it assesses a student's qualifications. Yeah. I think so because when it comes down to it raises sort of something that is becoming not just merely a factor. But oftentimes the factory that a decision is based on. I think Harvard is saying that they don't do that. But what students for fair admissions has been showing in the past few days in has really brought to light is that oftentimes it is the single risk factor that comes down to someone's rejection students other admissions is the group that brought this lawsuit we should say. Yes. Yup. And I think it's scary to see this repeating in history because back in the nineteen twenties. Harvard sort of did this with Jewish applicants as well. Insert of USA personal reading to artificially keep their numbers lower. Although they were scoring higher on everything else. Similar to what happening with Asian Americans right now, some supporters of Harvard in this case have alleged that the group that brought this suit is using Asian-Americans almost as a front trying to drive a wedge among minority groups and that at the end of the day this lawsuit if it goes to the. Supreme court and a successful is really likely to help white people more than any other racial group. What do you think of that argument? I don't think that that's true at all. Clearly affirmative action has failed in its school right now. It's instead discriminated against Asian-Americans under the guise of diversity anything. This is a critical time to reevaluate. How -firmative action policies are impacting different communities. I'd like you to respond to something that Harvard senior Sally Chen said to us on the program yesterday. She plans to testify for Harvard at the trial. Here was part of our conversation. Merit means nothing without context. The kinds of barriers that people face and the kinds of the ways that they overcome and work despite these barriers I think is really important to how we're thinking about the ways in which people can succeed and can lead merit means. Nothing without context. What do you think of that idea? So I think that a lot of admissions processes should be based on just merit. But I come from an inner city public high school background, and I do recognize that merit does need to be put in context. Sometimes what resources and opportunities. People have available to them is really important. But I think that when we look at it we shouldn't just be looking at merit in the context of race. But again, like I said married in the context of economic status or something that speaks more to someone's opportunities and resources is really important. It sounds like you both agree that there are things about a person's application that cannot be quantified in grades and test scores. You just disagree about whether that list of things includes race or not. Yeah. I would agree with that. I would say that all of a sort of have the same goal of diversity on a college campus, whatever the benefits of it are, but we just don't believe that we have to resort to racial izing admissions. And instead focus on something like poverty because when we focus on something like race. I think it. Creates a sort of division in sort of diversity for the sake of diversity. And I think chief Justice John Roberts said it best when he said the only way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race, but Kelly thank you so much for talking with us today.

Ted Cruz Harvard NPR New York Texas Congressman San Antonio Wnyc Senator Rourke Wade Goodwin President Trump United States Supreme Court Sean Carlson Kelly Mayor De Blasios
President Trump, Trump and Brenda Lopez discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

06:28 min | 4 years ago

President Trump, Trump and Brenda Lopez discussed on All Things Considered

"Election day is less than eight weeks away. But in a midterm year majority of voters don't cast a ballot and particular young people are far less likely to vote than older people in the last midterm election. Only about twenty percent of voters underaged thirty showed up at the polls NPR's Muhammad has been exploring why so many people sit out elections in America and has this report from Nevada in the two thousand fourteen election the area around the Las Vegas strip. Which is Nevada's first congressional district had one of the worst youth voter turnout rates in the country less than five percent of eighteen to twenty nine year olds voted that's according to estimates. From Tufts University, Brenda Lopez was one of those non voters the day, we met she left. Her house at five thirty in the morning for a job at an armored cash handling company by the time, she gets back home the home. She shares with her parents, grandma siblings. Her husband and her daughter. She is exhausted. It's not easy. You know, being being mom in Hawaii having to cook. And still trying to. Keep up with work and school. And I feel like I have no time for myself. Lopez is twenty six and she's not registered to vote. One of the main reasons why haven't voted is. Because I feel that. I'm always too busy. Lopez doesn't like how President Trump talks about immigrants. She would love better healthcare Medicaid. She says was a godsend when she was pregnant. But even if she registers she's not sure who she would vote for many young people like Lopez feel they haven't learned enough about American politics in high school. And so like Twenty-three-year-old Shelby. Maybe they don't see the point in voting. Maybe this is a stocky blond marine corvette taking a mandatory political science class at a community college in Vegas. I've never voted before from what I know about voting shop so whole place, and you hope I don't know what I need to bring. I don't even know what happens during their a recent survey of working class youth found that nearly twenty percent say they don't think they know enough to vote as for how and where to vote that can be found with an internet search, but for Mavis. It's not just about education. It's about location. He grew up in Missouri. That's where he registered to vote right now being away from home. I don't feel connected to the the political system here at all analysts say young people tend to move around a lot. And so they often feel less invested in local elections. They also want to choose individual candidates. Not just a party label many say they felt uninspired by both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen so like Jonas rand they

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