20 Burst results for "Argonne National Laboratory"

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on The Pulse

"The power bodies. Never that story was reported by grant hill. I wanna tell you about a podcast. I really like. It's called tradeoffs with dan gorenstein and it's about health policy and this is the kind of stuff that matters to all of us it impacts our health our wallets and what kind of access to care. We will have and i promise. This is not a double decker walk. Sandwich trade-offs unpack sees issues in a really accessible and fun way. You can check it out wherever you get your podcasts. This is the polls. I mike and scott were talking about energy. We can't create energy. But we've learned how to store it so we can use it whenever we need it. No matter where we are so many of the devices we use all day every day get their energy from batteries. I am just personally in awe of them and how they transformed the way society uses energy lynn trae. He is a material scientist at argonne national laboratory in illinois. Even my little kids one or there early words are batteries because they know that batteries make things make noises and make pretty colors batteries. Make the magic happen but once again it's not actual magic. It takes a lot of engineering to make. Work and batteries can become a bit of an killys. He'll in things that otherwise. Were great allen. You has one such example when the nissan leaf came out about ten years ago it was the only mass market electric car now. Many nissan leaf owners wants to replace one specific part. It's the The.

dan gorenstein grant hill lynn trae argonne national laboratory scott mike illinois nissan allen leaf
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

Wall Street Breakfast

04:33 min | 3 months ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

"Dd reported twenty one point. Six billion dollars in revenue last year while the company turned a profit in his last quarter on six point. Four billion in revenue seeking alpha contributor. Em investor is skeptical about such a high valuation writing. The dvd's growth. Potential is without doubt tractive but the key question is at what cost. Investors should buy into this growth story. There are also some worries about investing in a chinese company. The communist party continues to wield a heavy grip on the economy and there are many concerns about transparency examples. Remember looking coffee. Sales scandal in twenty nineteen phoenix tree holdings delisted for shady disclosures in twenty. Twenty are alex technology hit by baked bean. Crackdown plunge in twenty twenty one some. Ipo's not even made it to the market. Like aunt group which was set to go public last year before beijing stepped in while other listings have faced heavy scrutiny. Like chinese giant tencent but dd has taken out the competition known as the uber of china. It literally bought uber. China from uber in two thousand sixteen uber remains a major pre ipo shareholder owning about twelve percent of the ride hailing giant while de also has the strong backing of other asian tech giants the softbank vision fund. Own some twenty percent of the pre ipo stock and tencent holds about a six percent stake. Other investors include alibaba and apple which both have executives on dvd's board as governments across the globe advanced greener transport legislation to be climate targets. A question that continues to surfaces how much cleaner or electric vehicles ev's than traditional automobiles with an internal combustion engine estimates exploring the carbon gap have to cover thousands of parameters such as the extraction and processing of minerals for batteries and the production of power cells. Other considerations are based on after-sale elements like the type of power used to charge an e or the fuel dynamics and upkeep of a gasoline car bigger picture. It's a little complex to delve into all the variables so it may be easier to divide them between the building of the vehicles and their maintenance compared to gasoline cars e bees are not as green when it comes to manufacturing due to the mining of rare earth materials that are for their batteries but once they hit the road the only thing that contributes to their carbon footprint is the sourcing of their energy giving them an advantage over gas powered cars meet the greet model. The framework created by the argonne national laboratory in chicago called the greenhouse gases regulated emissions energy. Use and technologies is being used to help shape policy at the epa and the california air resources board reuters recently took a test drive of the model backing up a tesla model three versus a toyota corolla with the assumption that both vehicles would travel one hundred seventy three thousand one hundred fifty one miles during their lifetimes. The scenario also took place in the us or twenty. Three percent of electricity comes from coal-fired plants results even before hitting the road. The analysis showed that the production of a mid sized e generated eight point one million grams of co two during the extraction and manufacturing process more than the five point five million grams for a comparable gasoline vehicle. One would also have to drive another thirteen thousand five hundred miles in a model three. The average motorist drive each ear before breaking even with the corolla in terms of emissions tesla dimples ahead at year. Five model three has admitted to total of seventeen million grams of carbon emissions versus thirty million for the corolla and year tin. It has released twenty five million grams compared to the fifty two million produced by the toyota vehicle. Not every country is the same if the model three was being driven in norway which gets most of its electricity from renewable hydropower. The break even point would come after eighty four thousand miles. Compare that to the seventy eight thousand seven hundred miles needed to reach carbon parody in nations like china and poland which generate the majority of their power from coal as of six twenty. Am today us. futures golden..

tencent phoenix tree holdings communist party softbank alibaba Ipo california air resources beijing argonne national laboratory china apple toyota corolla
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:13 min | 4 months ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Paper source filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Back in March, The stationery company was founded in 1983 here in Chicago. Okay, anyone in the crowd? You're most likely to go to paper source, I would say Merry Vandeveld. I think we all had this conversation. We all prefer paper, right? You mean stationery. What paper sources said Hi. And sort of. Yeah, no books. No, no, no. No. Okay. Number two, a startup that counts. Oprah Winfrey among its backers is offering a new way to let grocers know when the produce will be passed Peak. As part of its attempt to stamp out food waste. This is a really cool company. It's called Appeal Sciences. Crane says that it started nine years ago with $100,000 Grant from Bill and Melinda Gates. It's now valued at more than a billion dollars. It made its name in this this coding it would put on Different fruits and vegetables to help keep them fresher longer. But now it's adding new technology that can see what's happening inside the fruits and vegetables to help the groceries make their plans. Number three Daily Herald says Argonne National Laboratory is working to provide companies access to its world class computing resource is through an innovative or President Bush would say innovative. Program that uses high performance computing to solve manufacturing and material development change challenges that companies can apply for they get up to about $300,000 funding granted generally A couple of times a year. Number four. You know, Champagne has to be from a specific region of France. Right? Well, Miller Brewing I love this story in Milwaukee is trying to create a zone. Right around the Miller brewery. It's out there by where the Brewers play. I can't keep up with their names. Now it's not. What's the name of the place for the Brewers play? Kevin, not Miller Park. I don't know. Not really. Park, not whatever it is. It's not County stadium anymore. Um, anyway, right out there is the Miller brewing. See the big rod assign revolving around the top of the brewery. They wanted to clear that zone right around it as the only place where you can declare that your beer produced Is the champagne of beer. So you have to make the beer in the Milwaukee brewing area in order to be called the Champagne of Beer number five, There's more for Miller, a new Miller Genuine ad shows the beer brand, launching an alcoholic seltzer in the space, strapping some into a rocket, hurling it into oblivion. The video teases the stunt. They say it will all take place on Thursday at three o'clock, they want you to watch on Miller, Lites, Facebook and Twitter channels and Number six, A tech infused mini golf concept that the founders of top golf came up with is gearing up for an expansion after raising $60 million in fresh funding. They've got a few shops in the UK right now one in Atlanta. It's called Putt Shack. It's a Chicago based company. They're going to open one. An old Brooke this fall. Kevin is a big top call fan, so he'll be apart. Shack coming up in Oprah. I'll check it out. Also American family field for the Brewers, American family field who could ever forget it? Who knows what they will be named next? All right, We're gonna talk TV next. But first, here's Mary. Clear and 48 Clear and cold Tonight Low 32 sunny tomorrow high of 63 still tied on the inbound.

Chicago Oprah Winfrey Atlanta $60 million France UK $100,000 63 Milwaukee Argonne National Laboratory Facebook March Twitter Mary 48 1983 Putt Shack Crane nine years ago Appeal Sciences
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Two flights that killed 350 people. FAA Administrator Stephen Dixon on CNBC this morning, says the relationship between the agency had and Boeing has also changed. I understand the concerns. This is not The old FAA relationship with Boeing. We have reset that relationship, and we will continue to have Ah, very safety focused and compliance focus relationships and since he would put his own family on the 7 37 Max, the plane was Boeing's top seller before it was grounded. US is coming off its highest one day death toll from Corona virus in months. The covered tracking project reported more than 1500 deaths yesterday. That's the most since May. 14th. The project also says about 77,000 Americans. Are in the hospital because of coronavirus 20 states hitting records on those numbers. Winter sports In Illinois Public high schools are now suspended until further notice. Just a few weeks ago, basketball players were preparing for their season. And then basketball was suspended. Now the rest of winter sports are on hold, as well as the state of Illinois enters new restrictions Starting on Friday, scientists hope to gain insight into the spread of covert 19 by studying Chicago sewers. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory say signs of a surge could show up in the city sewers up to a week before a case surge happens. They hope to start studying samples next year. Scientists say the results could help streamline testing and tracking operations. Now, with WGN SPORTS Here's David it's normally in June this year November The MBA holds its draft tonight, with the Minnesota Timberwolves holding the topic and the Bulls. Choosing forth the Bears relieved the Nick Foles injury is not as bad as they thought it might have been when he was hurt late Monday, is lost to the Vikings. He does have an injury to the hip and glute area, his availability. That's a question for the Green Bay game a week from Sunday, Coachman Nagy acknowledged. Everything is on the table, including a quarterback change, but the health Of the quarterbacks, Foals and Mitch Travis Key. The top consideration Theo Epstein had indicated next season would be his last running the show at Wrigley Field. Turns out this past season was his last. Epstein stepping down as the Cubs president baseball operations for going that final season with a suggestion that the many important.

Boeing Theo Epstein FAA basketball Illinois Mitch Travis Key Administrator Stephen Dixon CNBC Corona Wrigley Field Argonne National Laboratory Bears Coachman Nagy WGN Minnesota Timberwolves Nick Foles Cubs Chicago Green Bay Bulls
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:11 min | 11 months ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Agents of the German government in and around the University of Chicago. and. We were told that. And that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers if you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever watch out that people who engage you in conversation. BE Damaging to the war effort. And that the they may actually be the enemy. So. One huge question that comes up about this Manhattan project site at the University of. CHICAGO. And in the middle of this metropolitan site is we're their danger. was there a danger to the University of Chicago Illinois even the Mid West Region and the physicist I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the Chicago at Chicago was very low powered. In comparison to what we see today at most it could have powered A. Two Hundred Watt lightbulb therefore, it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear reactors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now, there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working. One of the dangers although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure that danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control. And they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadmium solution so that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They were poor this over the pile and hopefully it would stop. But as one scientist told me, the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous. You know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later. But at the time from what I read in your story to those folks was sorta matter of fact, it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of Chianti. In all signed the basket that the bottle of Chianti was in, and that was pretty much it. The physicists I talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor Enrico. Fair me was so sure he had done endless calculations. He carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he carried that around with him he did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear. Reactor, and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event, it changed our lives, it changed science and international relations forever the scientists there just pretty much congratulated each other and broke out a bottle were the scientists concerned about the the use of this technology going forward I mean from the time they were working on this had they had some idea in their mind that they could be unleashing something that they'll never be able to put back in the bottle so to speak. The folks I talked to said that the scientists of course are smart people. These were literally some of the greatest brains of the twentieth century scientists at the top of their field. The new the potential of the science that they were working on and. They. Did they know immediately that they were working on a bomb. It's kind of unclear. They certainly became aware of it as their work went on during the Manhattan project. And after. It became clear that there would be bombed developed from their work. Some of them became very concerned about that some of the Chicago scientist especially, and they developed the bulletin of the Atomic Scientists of Chicago. To work on trying to control the use and Thoughts and opinions about this new power they had unleashed after the Matlab in Chicago achieved its goals of creating plutonium and creating the first self sustaining nuclear reactor. Were essential for developing atomic bombs for the war purpose. Some the scientists continued the work on the possibilities of this new nuclear power, specifically some of the peaceful purposes of it, and they continued that work at Argonne National Laboratory in Lamont, which still exists still works today. We talked about the concerns that something could go wrong possibly be dangerous to people around it at the same time there is also concerns that the Germans especially would find out that this work was being done there in Chicago could become a target. During the war that that is something that was drilled into people as well. Yes. In fact. Some of the Chicago scientists working on the Manhattan project were. Refugees, from, Fascist Europe And I spoke to a physicist who wrote a book related to the Manhattan Project and he talks about how they had feared that the Nazis would bomb Chicago specifically because of the work and because of the refugees there here's physicist Stanley worked. Quite rightly. She basically wanted to kill. Them. Finding interesting little note in the are Gone Archive. Many years ago is ineffective course Germans must know where here. So when they haven't atomic bomb, the first one they'll drop in. CHICAGO. That was the risk that they foresaw to Chicago area that the Germans would dropping atomic bomb on. So we know that people high up in the military. I'm guessing would have known about all of this work in the President Administration maybe would have known about what was happening here did everybody at the University of Chicago even the administration there? No. What was taking place? The Manhattan project was extremely secret ultra secret read in one place that even Truman. Didn't know about it which I have a hard time believing that Congress didn't know about it again, I haven't verified. In the big question even today is did the university, of Chicago, President Robert Hutchins know what was going on in his own backyard almost literally beneath his football stadium. And it sounds like there's a lot of disagreement about that. Now I have since read the Robert Maynard hutchins a memoir by Milton mayor and he says absolutely knew about it but was very was under instructions that when he told his deans and trustees number one, he could not even mention the word uranium. And that when they asked him if there was any danger to the University of city, he said unlikely but he couldn't he couldn't rule it out now Here's what a physicist at the University of Chicago current physicist whom I interviewed said about whether or not he thinks the president knew have to know it was only three blocks from his house two blocks from house. Story. Of I'm sure knew about it. He just couldn't officially know about 'cause you can't say you can't. Ask, can I make a nuclear chain reaction on your campus in the middle of the city? That physicist is Dr Henry Fresh and his story is very interesting because he is literally Los Alamos baby his parents worked on the Los Alamos.

CHICAGO physicist Manhattan University of Chicago University of Chicago Illinois scientist bulletin of the Atomic Scienti University of Chicago. University of Robert Maynard German government President Robert Hutchins University of city Los Alamos president Argonne National Laboratory Congress Dr Henry Fresh
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Nerdette

Nerdette

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Nerdette

"From WBZ Chicago this is Internet I'm Greg Johnson and her dad is a show where we talk to people who dare to ask big questions and explore the unknown and these days with a global pandemic going on. It can kind of feel like entering the unknown, just walking outside your front door. So today because field trips definitely feel like a thing of the past we're going to revisit one of our favorite field trips ever from way back in twenty eighteen. That's win that Co host Tricia Bobi Dan I got and my little red two thousand ten Toyota Corolla and drove into the magical beyond to go visit the extremely smart humans who work at. Argonne National Laboratory I'm really speeding. This is a place that TRICIA and I wanted to go to ever since we started this podcast. HAPPENING WELCOME TO OUR ON Our gone is a massive research facility outside of Chicago. Run by the US Department of Energy look at Holy. Show Signs is what are the weird shapes on? Science it's one of ten national labs in the United States and it is enormous. It's almost like a college campus there's almost one hundred buildings and they're all set out among sort of sprawling fields and big trees. Okay. Should we go in and check in and then grab all the stuff sure. Yeah and Argon has a complicated history which they're pretty transparent about ever since we were born out of. The University of Chicago's work on the Manhattan project. In the nineteen forties, we have focused our attention on answering the biggest questions facing humanity from tricia reading a giant inscription about the Manhattan Project at the visitor. Center, at Argun I only knew a little bit about this before we visited, which is that our guns history begins with the discovery of nuclear fission in the technology that brought us the atomic bomb. Are was officially founded by an act of Congress. Just after the war in Nineteen forty-six with the mission of developing peaceful uses for atomic energy are then continues to perform nuclear research but they do a lot of experiments in a great many other things as well. Things like supercomputers and Super Batteries and super physics. Our Guide for the day and fellow science nerd is Justin Bro who picked us up at the visitor center. Right. Is Justin. Bro I work at Argonne National Laboratory I am within the media relations and External Affairs Department today you are. Today I am the trustee liaison for the note that group and now Nerdy desires and word to science designs. On Word Science, there's more than three thousand people working here at gone and I think it's fair to say they are the dirtiest of the nerds and we're going to talk to some of those nerds about three big ideas. If you had one of the fastest computers in the world, how do you decide what problems to solve.

Tricia Bobi Dan Justin Bro Chicago Argonne National Laboratory US Department of Energy Manhattan University of Chicago Greg Johnson United States trustee Argon Congress External Affairs Department
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Worst Firsts

Worst Firsts

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Worst Firsts

"Wonder who they're a fan of not me. Says I have an alien story. I once saw an alien ufo in the Sky I live in Canada and it was like one am I sold these five lights flashing making a perfect circle in the sky I had no idea what it was I went out to our front deck and it was still there five lights in a perfect circle flashing I ag- Nord it the rest of the night and went back to sleep. Hope this makes your podcast. One time I went outside and there were five lights inner circle blinking really crazy and it was weird and so I went inside and went back to. Unite. The fuck I would have been filming Shit. I would have been like so into it like I would have been crazy into it. Oh okay. This is a crazy alien story from Amazon. She says, okay this is a crazy alien story about a year before I met my fiance two, thousand seventeen he was out in his garage doing laundry. He heard what sounded like a helicopter but it was more of a pulsing sound. It got so loud that he thought a plane was about to crash on his house. So he ran out of the garage. What does this sound like the lady? Who said she heard the loud sound for thirty minutes that went away that was a thousand times larger than helicopter. It's weird how this stuff is very similar. You must admit anyway, he said, he said there was a triangle shaped aircraft about the length of a football field hovering not far above the trees it didn't look solid it looked almost transparent. He yelled for his neighbors to come out but it completely disappeared with the flash of light. He wasn't drunk. He wasn't high he saw it and not long after one in Russia was spotted that looks similar I think aliens are washing watching US I don't blame them for not coming to Earth. One about that. I don't I can't say. I blame them either Oh my God guy. Tommy, there's another one that's telling me the craft was a triangle shape I just came across another one from a different person triangle. Supposed to be well I don't know maybe some are triangular just like there's different types of aliens like everybody drives a Mercedes. You know some people have KIA's. Maybe, that's like the different alien dealerships. Maybe there's like the triangle ones or like the Rolls Royces and then the other ones are just like. Toyota's everybody's got around one. Maybe. That's what it is. This from Joe. Montana Montalto thirteen he says aliens story my wife and I were living in lemont Illinois right by where they made the atom bomb. Argonne National Laboratory at around five. Am My phone starts ringing. It turns out. It's my wife screaming for me to get out here. I thought she was in trouble. So I ran out my underwear and I look up and there's a giant aircraft just hovering above us a hundred yards up and just like that. It started flying towards Argun very quickly. It was completely silent. The weirdest thing I've ever seen the craft was a triangle shape and almost transparent. He just said the exact same thing. This. Isn't making you believe a little bit well I. Mean Yeah. That in the marks on people like, yeah. I've heard all that stuff before so I mean, but it's still. Where's the proof famine multiple people seeing the same thing is not proof to you. Not. All these people go crazy people will i. I don't know that's a pretty loaded question because. Somebody could have had some what of slightly different experience but they read about one and thought Oh. Yeah. You know what you're right I did have three spots or like. A I don't know I. Don't know. Okay. Here's the last one. I had an hour. This is from Mary Purdue. There's so many alien sightings in Woodland Hills I thought I saw yes. She said I thought I saw one in Santa Clara growing up my dad and my uncle have the story though. thrills they were at their family's ranch in Colorado in the early seventies they went for a late night hike and they were standing on the Mountain Ridge and saw what they thought was some kind of air force craft over another mountain. All of a sudden out of nowhere shoots out of the atmos- atmosphere in about two seconds. So my grandfather owned aviation parts and aviation parts manufacturing facility my. Dad and uncle had the resources to ask a specialist with the knowledge of Area Aerospace and aviation about what they saw and they were told there is no aircraft even to this day that can shoot straight in a straight line up in the sky out of the atmosphere. As quickly as they witnessed, they were sober. They don't drink or do drugs. They don't tell the story very much because. People. Think they're weird but it's my number one question for them. Wow. Straight up into the sky. This is.

Rolls Royces KIA Mercedes Canada Argonne National Laboratory Toyota Amazon Argun football Tommy Mary Purdue Russia Area Aerospace lemont Illinois Joe Montana Santa Clara Mountain Ridge Colorado
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on 3D Printing Today

3D Printing Today

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on 3D Printing Today

"It's really dangerous. It's really stuff that you don't anywhere in your backyard, and there's tons and tons and tons of it well if you can use ninety four percent of that. And Reuse it. Then, you've only got to store six percent of it leftover. That could solve the problem for a long time, and that means we would stop burning fossil fuels. We would stop. Using any kind of south anything that that creates carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. We could stop doing that completely with almost everything that we do. And that would bring the earth back into equilibrium. That would change a lot of things. I heard a great talk. given by God named Stewart, brand who served the the last person you think to be a cheerleader for nuclear energy. He was the guy that started the whole Earth Tab log back in the sixties and he was sort of You know a bay area. Hippie turned publisher, and He pointed out I. Think this is you can find this on Ted He pointed out that you know when you look at the consequences of global warming and C O, two production from just burning fossil fuels if you take all of the energy that a human. Uses, the average American uses in their lifetime and generated by burning even clean burning natural gas. You're producing sixty four thousand tonnes of co two that's released to the atmosphere, and there's absolutely no way to get it back. versus on if we generated that same amount of of Energy for your lifetime energy. Using you know nuclear power. How much waste would that generate on your behalf? It would fit in a coke can. It be one hell of a heavy coat. It would fit in a coke can at the risk of sounding political which we don't intend to do but we do believe that the earth is in trouble, we believe. There is global warming regardless of your political position. and this nuclear energy done correctly and smartly and not by dummies who just want to make a lot of money? It could save us, and here's one process that would make that more possible, so let's hope this isn't fake. Let's hope this is real and let's hope that there will be a brighter future for our planet, and this is one element of of that happening. National laboratories the real the real deal for sure I grew up in Chicago and we actually had our our science quiz bowl championships. We're at the Argonne National Laboratory, so so I've been out there. We got to take a tour. They're not faking. They're not in the news that much, which means they're not targets of certain political parties, so maybe maybe things will be real here and this is not hype. We'll see what happens in the meantime speaking of. What's happening on our show this week. see this is show three thirty six. We start talking about making circuit boards. We talk about how Race Three D. Went Mendel. and. The reverse Boden. Let's get to it..

Ted He Argonne National Laboratory Boden Chicago Stewart publisher C O
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WTOP

"Be wary of patients who have pinkeye combined with fever and respiratory symptoms including cough and shortness of breath Jim Shannon the CBS news the national cathedral is making a precious donation to some area hospitals as they treat coronavirus patients and the donation had been sitting in the cathedral's basement for more than a decade when the bird flu was the virus people were worried about the national cathedral ordered thousands of the N. ninety five masks that are in high demand now they were never needed it just sat in the crypt we have a a member of our staff who's been on staff for years and you remembered that they were down there so today Randy Hollerith the dean of the national cathedral announced the cathedral's donating three thousand of those masks to medstar Georgetown University hospital the other two thousand are going to children's hospital they're all sealed crates never been opened Giandomenico they're still good WTOP news that's pretty good coming up next on WTOP the Dow is up eleven hundred points I'm Jeff label it's one twenty four years okay mac senior advisor to the chief information officer at the department of health and Human Services on cloud migration and optimization for government sponsored by thundercat technology and dell technologies pace layering technique is a very good technique in terms of things are changing so rapidly that you figure out which application is going to change so often which doesn't change it often and which doesn't really change much at all listen to the entire panel discussion on federal news network search thundercat manager data not your storage thundercat technology a service disabled veteran owned small business is a leading service provider for data storage and management and cloud migration thundercat and dell technologies challenge government agencies to think differently about their storage are you interested in creating massive room for growth with I. salon you can eliminate silos and consolidate all your unstructured data under cat is ready to build a customized.

fever Randy Hollerith Georgetown University hospital Giandomenico senior advisor chief information officer thundercat technology dell Jim Shannon CBS Jeff department of health and Human
Lithium-Ion Batteries Help Power Civilizations, But How Can They Be Recycled?

All Things Considered

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Lithium-Ion Batteries Help Power Civilizations, But How Can They Be Recycled?

"More and more civilization runs on a lithium ion batteries tiny ones in our phones huge ones in our electric cars those batteries break or wear out they mostly get thrown away now scientists are trying to figure out how to recycle them NPR's Dan Charles has the story to understand why a lithium ion batteries are so hard to recycle let's take a look at how they're put together with Linda gains a scientist at Argonne national laboratory outside of Chicago each cell is a series of sandwiches the outer layers of the sandwich are metal foil inside them are thin layers of powder one of them is the really valuable one made of things like lithium and cobalt and nickel and these sandwiches are either rolled out for folded up into a tight package and then the electrolyte liquid is forced to end and the whole thing is put in a little can that's an individual cell dozens or even hundreds of cells get stacked together into modules and a bunch of modules go into the battery pack of a car this whole sealed assemblies almost impossible to take apart which would be risky anyway remember the stories of batteries catching fire it is a high voltage device and you would not want to be poking around in it with your screwdriver when they stop working though it's wasteful and dangerous to just throw them in the trash a few lithium ion batteries go into a crude kind of recycling they get chopped up and go into a furnace the nickel and cobalt survive but almost everything else gets burned away including the lithium and aluminum I kind of find that offensive you know you spend all that energy to make this really neat material on you just burning and as a fuel so all over the world teams of researchers are trying to invent something better to handle the big lithium ion batteries that may power hundreds of millions of climate saving electric cars down the road here's govern Harper from the university of Birmingham in England we need to really make sure that we don't crack a waste management problem with electric vehicles wed Manson's about trees accumulate and we don't know what to do with them Harper and his colleagues are building robots which they hope can take over the dangerous job of cutting batteries open and collecting what's inside in the U. S. a whole group of labs including Linda gains as group at argon is trying to figure out if you just chop up the batteries can you find a way to filter that mass and recover the valuable stuff the medals in the high priced powder at the heart of the battery gains admits it'll be difficult it was easy it wouldn't be interesting and you can kind of imagine it working yeah I can they have a goal within three years the one of a process in hand for recycling lithium ion batteries one the companies will use because it's profitable then Charles NPR news

Three Years
AI for Earth helps researchers get more granular with climate data

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:56 min | 2 years ago

AI for Earth helps researchers get more granular with climate data

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device. Click share. Instantly projects any speakers laptop tablet, or phone onto a presentation screen so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com and learn more. And sign up for your free trial. When you're using big data to adapt to climate change. Sometimes you need to call in big tech from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Ali would. You're on marketplace tech, we've been covering how technology helps us adapt to climate change in our series. How we survive to start with you have to understand the problem and create smart solutions? That's the job of the Chesapeake conservancy, a nonprofit organisation that uses technology to recommend conservation techniques for the Chesapeake Bay and a lot of it comes down to the resolution of the data. Jeff Allenby is director of conservation technology at the Chesapeake conservancy. Now, one thing to know is that the Chesapeake Bay watershed is huge. It's sixty four thousand square miles, spanning six eastern US states and the organization mapped the whole area down to the meter the data set. That'd be created for the Chesapeake of that one, meter resolution was instill is one of the biggest high resolution they uncovered data sets ever created in the world. It took Allenby's team eighteen months and more than. Million dollars to manually process that data as in people having to identify things like the characteristics of a tree or label a house, a house. Then they use the data to advise towns on what to prioritize, whether it's planting trees or restoring wetlands or buying land to conserve and once word got out lots of other nonprofits like around the Great Lakes, wanted to do the same thing with map data. Most don't have the time or the money, but big tech companies do budget simply can't be a barrier to people accessing technology, Lucas Joppa leads Microsoft's AI for earth program, which lends the company's computing power and machine. Learning capabilities to organizations trying to tackle climate solutions the program worked with the Chesapeake conservancy to scale up their approach to land mapping to a much bigger area and faster. We wanted to do that, for the entire United States over ten trillion pixels and it can't take a year and a half to do it. Because if it does you're going to be out of date by the time. You're done right. The company awards grants. Let's organizations and scientists use its cloud computing resources and loans out data scientists to various climate related projects, Joppa, says right now AI for earth isn't meant to be a money maker, but he says tech companies have a responsibility to be part of climate solutions beyond their own in house efforts. We've gotta make sure that we have our own house in order. But then we do have to be proactive in going out and, and ensuring that our products are deployed in ways that empower people to amplify their sustainability impact. And there's business value for Microsoft, and being there, first, where a platform company, and we would prefer to be the platform of choice for everybody. Building technology inspired solutions to environmental challenges for Jeff Allenby at the Chesapeake conservancy, the real value comes and being able to know what's working, and what's not so you know what to conserve and what to let go. So from the side of it, it really allows you to, to understand the context. Of kind of any given action. And it allows you to understand the alternatives. If that action can't go forward and Allenby says those decisions have to be made quickly because there isn't any time to waste. And now I am related links. You can see some of the super detailed maps that the Chesapeake conservancy created and a little more detail about those projects at our website marketplace tech dot org. Thanks, Dan Ackerman, from the water main project at American public media for turning that into a super cool story. And we've got linked to more information about some of the grants that the Microsoft AI for earth project has given out last month in announced five hundred thousand dollars for new grants that will actually be distributed by the Leonardo DiCaprio foundation. And we know that climate intelligence is the first place to start with a lot of these adaptation efforts. So there's a lot more news on that front, all the time earlier this month AT and T shared, the data that it's been using to evaluate the risks to its facilities, and make them more resilient to extreme weather. These data sets were developed by the department of energy's, Argonne National Laboratory, and AT and T made them all available to the public. The company also started a climate resiliency community challenged, so that universities can work with towns in southeastern. States to develop solutions and risk analysis based on that data and just last week in an attempt to get everybody looking at the same peer review trustworthy data the World Meteorological Organization launched the WMO catalog for climate data there. Eighteen data sets in there, so far and the organization hopes more will be added soon, the Wm oh, by the way, I also just learned is basically, the in house, weather, and climate agency of the United Nations. Another fun fact last week, the WMO elected Gerhard Adrian of Germany, as its new president for four year term. And I mentioned this because he beat out our guy. Dr Lewis, you Tonelli who's currently the director of the US national weather service. Sorry, doctor, you Tonelli. I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Marketplace turns thirty this year and to celebrate we're going back to the eighties. Check out our totally radical new. Thank you gifts that you can choose from when you become a marketplace investor, your donation, large or small will help us keep bringing you news and information you trust for years to come. Donate today at marketplace dot org. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share and award winning wireless presentation system with click share, and you're meeting. You can share your screen instantly from any device, no more awkward small talk, or wasted time as you wait for tech problems to be fixed. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop tablet or phone onto a presentation scream so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

Chesapeake Conservancy Jeff Allenby Microsoft United States Chesapeake Bay Chesapeake Bay Watershed ALI Chesapeake Tonelli World Meteorological Organizat Director Great Lakes Lucas Joppa Dan Ackerman United Nations Department Of Energy AT
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

13:42 min | 2 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on KPCC

"Actually at the at the Carnegie institute in Washington. And I watched I wasn't able to watch sort of the creation of this. But I watched I saw all of the us to actually compress hydrogen gas, and you can't Nobis actually, we don't know. But it seems that Nobis created metallic hydrogen yet. But by adding a new element like certain Glanton, for example, you can sort of dope it in a way that it takes on some of these higher temperatures superconducting property, and then they to create it. They squeeze between two diamonds is that pressure. Yeah. So what I what I saw them do was essentially you have a foil made out of this sort of doping Lanston material. And then they used a special kind of powder that under high pressure will spit out hydrogen, hydrogen protons, and they lately they have these these little they're like the size of diesel batteries. And their diamonds at the tips of each of these haves, and they. Screw them together with basically Allen wrenches, and they create pressures inside the between the diamond tips that are equivalent to approximately those in the earth's core. Number eight four seven two four eight five five if you want to talk about this. You can also tweet us at scifi. I want to bring on a couple of more guests to talk about people who are also involved in the research doing this bring of Madeira. So my lose dairy Smith Zulu. All right. Got that. Yes. I'm glad to be on the show Zurich who is professor of chemistry at my alma mater, university of buffalo in buffalo. Walk the science Friday. Thank you pleasure to be here. You're at Argonne National Laboratory. I am two weeks in a row we've had scientists from ARA that's kind of cool. So let's talk about what we're seeing here. Even can you tell us what is happening down on the electron level. When you squeeze it hydrogen that Ryan was talking about right? So first of all what's really interesting when you go to these very high pressures, what can happen is that you can get compounds that becomes stable that you would never have at one atmosphere, so at the you know at the earth's surface. So the first thing that's happening is that you're getting a very new type of compound that's forming without pressure. You might have like Lanham h three for example, but under pressure you get this length in a mate ten so there's really a lot of hydrogen. And it forms this quite complex structure that's similar to what people refer to as a cloth rate. What's yours? A three-dimensional hydrogen cage around the the atoms the metal atoms. And then the interesting bonding between the hydrogen atoms is just right in order to create what is known as strong electron phone on coupling. And that is the driver for the superconductivity in these systems. Majori why do you need to use diamonds? I mean, what's the advantage? Diamond is the hardest material known to mankind. And when you squeeze something between the diamonds, hopefully, don't chatter and the subject materials to immensely high pressures. The only problem is that as learned in high school pressure is for spur Unitaria so higher the pressure. You want to go monitor is the area you want to be. So the tips of the diamonds are really really small and the samples are really really really small. And so therefore we have to work at the advanced photon source here on national apps to be able to understand what's going on between them. Now. Why did you choose hydrogen? I mean years ago people were looking at copper where they're not. Yes. But hydrogen is the is the is the material we want to understand with what happens to it at very high pressures because of the fact that they were these theories which talked about how you can metalized hydrogen extremely high pressures, and as if I would chime in hydrogen is probably the most violent stood molecule in the in the quantum mechanical world. So putting two together and trying to understand what happened with pressure on height. Right. There was actually so there's the BCS theory of superconductivity that explains a certain class of superconductors. It doesn't explain why the copper oxides superconducting. We still don't really know that. But BCS we understand and we can use it to make predictions. Therefore. And there was a prediction in nineteen sixty eight. I believe that if you could. Make a hydrogen medal than it would have all of the properties to be a high temperature superconductor at high pressure. And so where does the art stand? I mean, the art of making this work stand. How close are we to getting the stuff that's in between those diamonds actually superconductor? Well, Zulu measured it, and it does the the problem is that it is at these very high pressures, and there are still issues, for example, the experiments were so difficult that right now they've only been able to measure the resistance, and as far as I know they do not have the perfect Meissner result data yet, and there's only been two labs in the world that can accomplish this feat. So it's very difficult right now. But it's still a proof of concept that hydrogen-rich materials have what it takes to reach potentially room temperature superconductivity. And then the question is how do we make these stable without pressure, and so Madrid can you tell us a little bit about we know that there are multiple teams working on this idea. So what has it been like to sort of be working in tandem with these groups? I know that there's you know, there's you and then there's the other group in Germany. So he tells me about. That. Yeah. I mean, it's it's it's impossible to think that we can achieve these kinds of incredible experiments working all alone in a lab, you know, like the whole time used to be taught people will do. So there are these teams which come together. And you know, we we we worked at events put on source for many years trying to hone techniques and having done that we established the first evidence for superconductivity which will preliminary results which were presented at matter it which triggered the race. And the other group at Max Planck institute in Germany charged ahead, and you know, few months down the road. Both almost Montana could re within reshow our show results to be consistent with each other. And that great because you know, now, we have two different groups charging ahead and trying to come up with innovative ideas about how to make these deals and even today we have collaborating with the that is the group which I worked with his. Is now spread to Illinois at Chicago here to be in close proximity with us the are gone labs with together with them. There are groups in university of Alabama. There is an group in national had Michalik field Tallahassee coming together. It's a it's it's not something one person can do or one group can do. So a lot of these groups are coming together and trying to understand how we can make this material reproducibility and understand what's happening because that's what is most important for four seven two four eight two five five is our number. We're talking about creating superconducting devices. Let's go to Tim in Wilmington, Delaware. Tim. Hey there. Go ahead. Yeah. So I had a question is you are trying to put hydrogen under high pressure in order to turn it into a metal or whatnot. Check, it's kinda pity couldn't we just look at our son, which is made of hydrogen under extreme pressure. What do we know about that? Somebody's. So so we know for sure we have metalized hydrogen at high temperatures the problem is we want to do at very low temperatures. And and also the superconductors are going to be working presumably at at not not temperatures that are the temperature of the sun. So we have done those types of experiments in shock, and it is quite well believed that for example, the core of of Jupiter would be liquid metallic hydrogen. That's cold. Yeah. So if actually wondering as theoretical chemist, it's your job to tell folks like Meduri what compounds should be trying out. So how do you figure out the direction that you should take this research? How to how do we land on land? I'm hydride. And how do we know when it's time to look to try and get Battelle hydrogen and what temperatures and what pressures right? So i've. Started this work about a decade ago. And I use programs that try to solve the short anger quesion approximately for materials, and if you can do that, you can calculate any property material that you want and we use supercomputers and into this supercomputer programs. We can say, okay, this is the chemical composition that we want. And this is the pressure that we want can you help me using various algorithms predict the most stable structure at this given composition at this given pressure. And I mean, it takes a long time to do these computations, but we can get the results and then calculate the properties including estimating the superconducting critical temperature. So like, I said people have been doing these types of simulations for about ten years. And so far we have looked at most systems containing two elements so hydrogen plus another element and. At first this kind of work is experimental because you don't know what will happen. It's very high pressures, and you don't have an intuition. But at some point when those enough excess theoretical calculations available. There was worked on calcium hydrogen system, and that showed that it should be a high temperature superconductor. And then you think well what similar to calcium? Well, you might have strontium or you might have Scandia m-, and then computations looked at those types of systems and also the land and trim have similar properties to calcium and so on so people looked at that. And actually it was a group that Zulu collaborates with that. And also the group in Chicago that were the first to predict the lengthen hydride system computational and experimental the same. I wrote this is science Friday from WNYC studios. So. Route of meat it. Okay. But let me go to the phones we have a call from Whitney in Moorhead Minnesota. Hi, whitney. Hello. It seems the point to be able to get superconductivity and conditions on earth that don't require continuous introduction of electric city for like creating pressures and stuff. So when you're talking about all this high pressure conditions aside from we need more volume of we're going to make this practical. We also need it seems like an exception to the whole temperature thing because obviously high pressure is not do side pressures take more than it's going to save. Okay. So any reaction yet? How do we make it useful? How you gonna get it out of pressure? Cooker? You have it in. Yeah. I I would say that you know, whenever anybody asked me about this. I I point to one of the greatest things in nature graphite converts to diamond under pressure. But if we can find a way of using diamond, or we all want the us diamond, we have found ways of creating it with other in other ways of you know, quenching diamond state at lower pressures. So I would say going forward. If of course, we still have to understand the physics of what's going on here. And you know, we have to go back to people like ever to increase their calculations to predict other complex systems, which where we could lower the pressure or we could quench them to access Feerick. Pressures like diamond squinched Tacna civic pressure into stable, and then you have a situation where he can make a practical material which we can use. So we're not quite at. I mean, I know that we've demonstrated basically evidence that these Lantam hydride systems are superconducting now. And before we even think about turning down the pressure. You know, what steps do we actually have to go through to get to the level where we've totally convinced ourselves that we've created a room temperature or near room temperature superconductor gonna wait ask you to wait for that answer because we break. It's always something stay with us. We're we're talking about superconducting with Madari so has Lou. And also we're talking with. Abras ERC, and we're asking answering your questions on science.

us Germany Chicago Tim Whitney Glanton Carnegie institute Nobis Allen Argonne National Laboratory Max Planck institute Washington Zulu university of buffalo buffalo Ryan Feerick Zurich professor of chemistry Madari
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Science Friday

"I wanna bring on a couple of more guests to talk about people who are also involved in the research doing this bring Madera so my lose dairy Smith Zulu. Sorry got that. Yes. I'm glad to be on the show and Eva Cirque who's professor of chemistry at myemma mater university of buffalo in buffalo woke up the science Friday. Thank you pleasure to be here. Madeira you're at Argonne National Laboratory, let's say I am two weeks in a row. We've had a scientists from our that's kind of cool. So let's talk about what we're seeing here. Eva, can you tell us what is happening down on the electron level when you squeeze hydrogen Ryan was talking about. All right. So first of all, what's really interesting is when you go to these very high pressures, what can happen is that you can get compounds that becomes stable that you would never have at one atmosphere, so at the you know at the earth's surface. So the first thing that's happening is that you're getting a very new type of compound that's forming without pressure. You might have like length Anum h three for example, but under pressure you get this length in a mate ten so there's really a lot of hydrogen. And it forms this quite complex structure that's similar to what people refer to as a cloth rate. What's yours? A three-dimensional hydrogen cage around the the atoms the metal atoms. And then the interesting bonding between the hydrogen atoms is just right in order to create what is known as strong electron phone on coupling. And that is the driver for the superconductivity in these systems. Madari why do you need to use diamonds? I mean, what's the advantage there diamond at the hardest material known to mankind? And when you squeeze something between the diamond, hopefully, don't shatter, and you can subject the materials to immensely high pressures. The only problem is that as all of his learned in high school pressure is force per unit area so higher the pressure. You want to go smaller is the area you want to. Be at. So the tips of the diamonds are really really small and the samples are really really really small. And so therefore we have to work at the advanced photon source here in the Argonne national apps to be able to understand what's going on between them. Now. Why did you choose hydrogen? I mean years ago people were looking at copper where they're not. Yes. But hydrogen is the is the is the material we want to understand what happens to it at very high pressures because of the fact that there were there were these tears which talked about how you can met lies hydrogen at extremely high pressures. And as if I would chime in hydrogen is probably the most vendor stood molecule in the in the quantum mechanical world. So putting two together and trying to understand what happens with pressure on hydrogen. Right. There was actually so there's the BCS theory of superconductivity that explains a certain class of superconductors. It doesn't under explain why the copper oxides are super conducting. We still don't really know that the BCS we understand and we can use it to make predictions. Therefore. And there was a prediction in nineteen sixty eight. I believe that if you could. Make a hydrogen and medal than it would have all of the properties to be a high temperature superconductor at high pressure..

Eva Cirque Argonne National Laboratory myemma mater university of buf buffalo Argonne professor of chemistry Ryan one atmosphere two weeks
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on KPCC

"So again, all different parts of the business can use this as well. So if you're in corporate real estate and needed put a new a new wire center or fury in again networking need to put in a new cell site. You can look at those two things differently. And you have the expertise in your job to know, how these different climate impacts effects that equipment, and again, we're just giving people knowledge and information, so they can make smarter smart. Climate decisions. If there is an area that you see might have more flooding in the future. We William not build their a we will absolutely serve our customers where they are today and wherever they will be tomorrow. That's you know, kind of full stop, right? So what this tool allows us to do though is again better serve those customer. So if our customers area that is the -ceptable for flooding will now we have a tool that allows help maintain the network. So they can keep receiving our our services last question few row, where do you go next with this idea? How do you refine it even better? I actually looking forward to running this whole set of the model, dining Tokyo limited simulation for that. Your. We are now at just started doing the whole thing at four kilometers that fairly large problem for for the entire North American continent. So we have a hundred and forty million grit cells and a lot of computing power needed. But we are going to get an extra scale mission pretty soon. I guess so yeah, we're looking at going a little bit lower at forty minutes. What happens is in physics important parameter for clouds, convict department vision is not no longer required. It is considered result by the mall. So it does seem to make a lot of difference on how the hotel the model. So we're looking forward to running simulations pretty soon. Can you stay with us a little while longer when a ticket to the break because there's a lot of people interested. I want to talk about this China, Carol AT and T and I row cut Marnie who works at Argonne National Laboratory, our number eight four four seven two four eight to five you have a question about climate change in how it affects your phone service or your infrastructure. We'll talk.

Argonne National Laboratory Carol AT Tokyo Marnie William China four kilometers forty minutes
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"As part of let's stay with Florida for the whole state will not the whole can't equally affected, but the the coastal cities on the state, they only quickly affected. Yeah. I mean, Florida is interesting because of in the about I think historically the got about forty percent of all hurricanes game in the word, Florida. I think it's probably more than that. So it's obviously it's a place that these things can happen quite often and the closer you get another interesting thing is when we did the window analysis of again in changing Florida's is actually decrease in Vince Pete's has the future because it's the temperatures increase into. There's more mixing in that misfield saints like the peak of intellectual decrease in an average interesting Plato this science Friday from WNYC studios talking about coping with climate change. Shanavie think other other companies other companies in your business and other business now or having to take this seriously, and prepares you are absolutely I think, you know, if you go out there and do a little bit of researchers definitely companies doing things in this in this realm. I think what we're doing very unique. It's definitely the unique to our particular industry, and we want to promote that uniqueness we want to promote that leadership position. So again that that's why we're gonna make this the state available to everybody encourage everybody. Whether it's peers are or those outside the industry use this data. Let's go to the phones to Robert a little more inland in Evanston, Illinois, though, not far from a lake or whatever. Questions more about how AT&_T is like does it affect their different services differently? For example, traditional phone says, and maybe rural areas where they're still relying on technology or other. You know, similarly, like, I STI services and does not deal with that differently. Are they able to safeguard one type of service more than the other or leaving something behind? They have to be changed their their way of looking at the future in question. So the short answer is yes. In terms of, you know, do we have to treat things differently? And that that doesn't change from today to tomorrow, so copper wires that we have on the ground versus fiber cables, they act very differently the water, but we rely on our network engineers, the experts that they are to, you know, put in the right outta tation steps to either scenario again, what this allows us to do is take the great work that we've done traditionally. In the near term and short term risk management planning and then expand that out to mid century and expand that out to the probability of inland and coastal flooding. So again, all different parts of the business can use this as well. So if you're in corporate real estate needed put a new a new wire center or fury again networking need to put in a new cell site. You can look at those two things differently. And you have the expertise in your job to know, how these different climate impacts affects that equipment, and again, we're just giving people knowledge and information so they can make smarter smarter climate decisions. If there is an area that you see might have more flooding in the future. We will William not build their. We will absolutely serve our customers where they are today and wherever they will be tomorrow. That's you know, kind of full stop, right? So what this tool allows us to do though is again better serve those customers. So if our customers in the area that is the -ceptable for flooding will now we have a tool that allows help maintain a network. So they can keep receiving our our services last question few row, where do you go next with this idea? How do you refine it even better? I actually looking forward running this whole other side of the model is limited simulation for that. We are now at just started doing the whole thing at four kilometers. That's fairly large problem for for the entire continent. So we have a hundred and forty million grid cells and a lot of computing power needed. But we are going to get an extra scale mission pretty soon. I guess so yeah, we are looking at going a little bit lower at four kilometres. What happens is in physics important parameter for clouds. Call convict department vision is not no longer required. It is considered result by the mall. So it does seem to make a lot of difference on how the how well the model. So we are looking forward to running the simulations pretty soon. All right. Can you? Stay awhile longer when take it through the break because there's a lot of people are interested. I wanna talk about this China, Carol AT and T and I row cut a mardi who works at Argonne National Laboratory our number eight four four seven two four eight five you have a question about climate change. And how it affects your phone service or your infrastructure? We'll talk about it after the break. Stay with us. Am I replayed? This science Friday.

Florida WNYC studios Vince Pete AT Evanston Shanavie Illinois Argonne National Laboratory Robert China William Carol AT four kilometers four kilometres forty percent
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The announcement made recently we want to bring in Michael pack of this morning deputy associate laboratory director of computer environment in life science at Argonne National Laboratory talked about this this morning with us Michael good morning. Welcome to the opening bell. Good morning. This is pretty exciting. The computer is going to be named nicknamed Aurora. Give us the headline here. Is our intention world. We'll be done the nation's first extra scale supercomputer. And hopefully, the world's first exit skill supercomputer. It will be capable of a billion billion calculations per second. About. Hundred x wintertime's current machine in Oregon. So this is a great new capabilities for the lab integrate new capability for the nation things. They will be able to. Enable? Some some what I'm thinking even very excited about it and give our listeners as sensitive, and I know this we're going to be doing a little bit numbering here. But for compare this to the average computer CPU today about how powerful this is. It's hard, isn't it? It is hard at one machine. Going to be delivered in in twenty twenty one. So it's a bit out there yet, but the waste of supercomputers work is they build off of the technology that we have at home on our desktops today. Couple of together in a way such that they can work as one uniform computer tackling a large problem. So it will ones that we have today. A good estimate say say Argosy Nira is. Millions and millions of ipads. Our desks are laptop computers working together. And then if you think of a war. Being a hundred times bigger than that or more powerful than that. It gives you somewhat of a subset of the machines. Yeah. It's a mind boggling for those of us who do not dealing computers every day. So Michael the big question you talked about some of the things that's going to be working on here. What is the hope that this? Well, the reality of what this will be working on what kinds of discoveries might we make with something like this. Well, we'll continue to build off the success that we had Argonne as a a basics are. Multipurpose lab supports signs from the very basic to the very applied. So we expect to see similar takes things on a world at the same time. Of course, it is the news on TV and all that all the time about machine learning and deep learning were starting to greatly incorporate that into the to the workflow the mix of jobs programs running on the machine so things that we we hope to do is again just build off of where we're at now. One example would be we currently are doing cancer research on the current set of machines. Where the machine is looking at different. Chemical compositions as as treatment and how they pair together and how they affect tumor cells and do that kind of a small-scale going towards Aurora. We can hope to do this on a tremendously larger number of. Chemicals tour types, and it really kind of drive towards his idea of personalized medicine where your your treatment is tailored to your body's make up the disease that you're trying to fight. So that's a very applied side an example, looking towards the more basic would be the university of baltim- why we're here, and and what's all around us. So there's a group of cosmetologist at Argun stimulating the universe from the very beginning. And all the time in a world will allow us to do that with. More fidelity in more detail than we've ever been able to do in the past. Those are a couple of examples at each end of the spectrum the very applied to the very basic. And there are some other exciting things to just again on the basic level of perhaps even modeling weather forecasting talking little bit about climate change. That's kind of a cool thing because you can go through tons of different scenarios with that. Absolutely. And that is the power computers. Right. Their ability to use multiple scenarios in parallel and allow you to see all these what if I change this. If this was this way, what would happen in. You're absolutely right. When it comes to climate and weather is actually does predictions that you see on TV now of hurricane pass. We'll be able to do those with more detail. More of those pass each generation of the supercomputer, we can add more science into kind of. Simplifying. But make it more realistic. Every time you add a new equation it takes compute time. And that either means that you can't do a problem as big as you like or with an details. He makes them trade-offs move towards a world, we add that more and more detail, and we can make the simulations. One step closer to reality. And then we can run hundreds of thousands of them in. So you're absolutely right. Simulations that will be doing climate space will be greatly enhanced by were when the announcement was made of the computer coming to are gone. I saw that they think it was the energy secretary talking about the possibility to of mapping out the human brain recently was reading about how we just didn't have enough computer power to do do all of the mapping of the human brain to download all this stuff from Bray human brain into the computer. This kind of gets us a little closer to that. And that's kind of exciting, isn't it? It is we do have efforts underway of that sort of argon right now. Argonne national lab. Is a home to use their facilities. Support science around the world. Of course, directors is one example. The advanced photon stores, which is. X Ray machine. Also at Argonne. So they're very nice to be next to each other. So we're working with professors from the university of Chicago who are imaging grains. And. The source right now, we could image brain, mice brains. Most Britons and. Winging it over to our current computers in reconstructed, but having one brain just told you about that individual nappy went understand. The brain in general, we need to look at a lot of them. And that's really where the complexity comes in like, I said, no, we're only doing a mouse brain now, the human brain is much more complex. And so you want to be able to reconstruct these understand how the word. In a large sense in a world. Absolutely. With that. Why was the name Aurora chosen? Well, Secretary Perry suggested it was named after his dog. Pancake. Well, we do like dogs. It's a good fit. But we really look at the idea of the light and. Looking to the future. So it after the word, so we notice anything different at Argun. Will there be a glow on the horizon where where are got is? Or will how will this be? I mean, well how much room does it take for the world's biggest supercomputer, what kinds of things are you going to be getting ready for now over the next month to get ready for its arrival. Over the next. Couple of years will be expanding our machine room space, which is great. I was out there. Actually during the announcement. And just. I think people will be fascinated. This mountain plumbing, electrical work that goes into running thing. So it's water cooled. So there's a lot of plumbing happening right now within the construction site. There's a lot of software code development that the team needs to do to make sure it'd be constructed will use this machine were already working with fifteen application groups so on day one when a war rise, we will stop producing Stein's. So we have five applications in traditional high-performance computing space things like the cosmology play games than we are five in ten of the learning space, which is the cancer example, I gave and then we have five more in what we would call the data space. We're looking at large data sources things that are coming off like a large hydrog collider. So we're being those applications ready. Mourn when award turns on we're producing science right away, those older next two years that will be our focus. Well, Michael, this is very exciting. We appreciate you coming on and sharing a little bit. With us this morning. We're all going to be watching with a lot of anticipation to see what Aurora does. Thank you. Michael Paco with us this morning deputy associate laboratory director, computer environment and life science out at Argonne National Laboratory in Lamont the contract for the computer, by the way to victory to be developed by Seattle based supercomputer maker Cray Inc along with Intel Corporation, and of course, at the Argonne National Laboratory, you can find more about this on line two at a N L dot gov. This is the opening bell on seven twenty WGN time. Do what they traffic.

Michael Paco Argonne National Laboratory Aurora Argonne laboratory director Argun Oregon university of Chicago university of baltim Stein Secretary Perry WGN secretary Lamont Seattle Cray Inc Bray
Project Aurora: U.S. government, Intel aim for nation's fastest computer

Roe Conn

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Project Aurora: U.S. government, Intel aim for nation's fastest computer

"Funding. One of the fastest computers in the world. Now being built near Chicago department of energy's funding the project and today, they said the supercomputer will be able to do over one Quinn till operations per second. That's equal to attend with eighteen zero behind it. The computer will be named Aurora and we'll leave at Argonne National Laboratory and Lamont Oregon's working with chip maker Intel to company says the computer could give the US a competitive advantage. The plan is to turn a roar on in

Argonne National Laboratory Aurora Lamont Oregon Quinn Chicago Intel United States
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on TechStuff

"Alter votes, could steal, votes from one candidate, give it to another and could also act as a virus and spread to other machines if they were sharing a network. So it pretty nasty stuff in two thousand seven, the Ohio secretary of state, Jennifer l. Brunner would authorize a study of these direct electric voting systems in Ohio. And the report would conclude that none of the computer based systems in that state met security standards and all were susceptible to breaches in two thousand eleven Argonne National Laboratory security experts would demonstrate that they could hack a DR machine via remote control. But that heck again, would require getting physical access to the machine. You had to install a component in the machine. Once the component was in there and connected to the system, then you could access the system from up to half a mile away and change things around using a remote control in June two thousand seventeen. That's when the first Hackworth on at Defcon. Really focused on on voter machines. And according to the story, I was reading. A Danish hacker was able to compromise one of the machines that were there for the hackers to work on while the presenters were still introducing the event. So they hadn't even concluded their introductory comments when one of the hackers had already managed to compromise one of the machines. By the end of the day, the various hackers had discovered and exploited eighteen new vulnerabilities in various e-voting e poll book systems. So this is obviously a matter of major concern and the Russian hacking scandal has done nothing but make that even more apparent and the department of homeland security initially stated that twenty one different states voting systems were targeted by Russian hackers in two thousand sixteen Georgia was not among them in that report according to the secretary of state, but then the investigation that Robert Mueller. Conducts as conducting in in Russian hacking. It included the indictment of twelve Russian military officers that were connected to election tampering allegations, and that indictment revealed that the charges included probing attacks on county websites in Georgia. Thus showing that perhaps Georgia did not get away scot-free during that election and that was possibly a targeted. This is what led to that investigation re revolving around the server in Georgia that may have been targeted and tampered with, but then was subsequently white, and then the backups were also white, and there's a whole scandal about that. I'm not gonna go into that because I know you guys have heard way too much about Georgia in a show that's just about technology in general. I want to leave off with echoing something that Mr. Sullivan said, which is that this process is incredibly important. And while there are real. Problems here, challenges that we need to overcome. They are totally solvable problems. These are not insurmountable. There's the things that are standing in our way our willpower and money. So we have to have legislations that are are willing to budget the money necessary to put the proper systems in place. We need to have the willpower to make sure that those are done responsibly and that no one is being told not to vote that we aren't suppressing anyone's vote. And that goes for any political side. It doesn't matter to me whether you share my personal political philosophy or not. What matters to me is that you are able to express that in the manner of voting and that you are not, you know, kept from that activity that you are able to participate fully in the democratic process. That to me is the most important part. And and I'm well, I, if it comes out where the political philosophy I believe in is on the losing side. If the election appears to be completely legitimate, and that's the willpower doesn't is the will of the people. And I just happen to be on the losing side. I can reconcile that a lot more easily than I can thinking. I'll never know if the system reflects what the people really wanted, or if the system failed us because of either inherent vulnerabilities in that system or the perception of those vulnerabilities and it's a complicated thing. But again, I want to thank Mr. Sullivan for joining the podcast and sharing his expertise in his thoughts on the matter. I, I recommend you check out the breach podcast. I think you will really enjoy it. If you guys have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff, you should send me an Email, the address as tech stuff at how stuff works dot com, where you can drop me a line on Facebook or Twitter, the handle it, both of those..

Georgia Mr. Sullivan Argonne National Laboratory Ohio Brunner Jennifer l Robert Mueller Facebook Twitter
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Direct Current

Direct Current

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on Direct Current

"Picture a science lab in your head, just any science lab. What kind of stuff is in their odds are one of the first things that comes to mind is glassware, test tubes, beakers, bubbling flasks of mystery liquids, that sort of thing. It's nearly impossible to imagine science without glass. In fact, you could argue that glassware is one of the iconic images of science from the most basic science to the ultra complex research happening at our national labs. Sophisticated glassware is needed to make big breakthroughs happen. Take Argonne National Laboratory. For example, it's a busy hub of science and engineering just outside of Chicago that collaborates with dozens of other research organizations on everything from chemistry to high energy physics to biology, say you're scientists at Argun. Your specialty is high energy physics, and you're working on a new experiment that needs a special vacuum sealed chamber problem is the chamber union doesn't exist. You've sifted through page after page of laboratory supply catalogs and no dice. So what do you do. Well, you talk to these guys. Hi, this is Joe Gregor. I work at Argonne National Laboratory. I've been a scientific glass blower for fifty two years and have been employed at Argonne National Laboratory for thirty eight years. My name's Kevin molar scientific glass. Blower here at Argonne National Laboratory have been a glass blower or roughly about ten twelve years there been in Oregon for two and a half years. You heard, right? Joe and Kevin glass blowers, and they specialize in creating the kind of custom laboratory glassware that makes argon research possible. Lots of it anyway are former producer, Alison land. Tarot gave them a call earlier this year. Football, we're going to get real simple. What is glassblowing. You said simple. Wow. Well, at Argun we have lots of chemists. Physicists materials, scientists that all do experiments, and they need apparatus to do experiments in and one of the top materials for doing chemical reactions is glass simply because it is inert to almost all chemicals and reagents. So basically the glassblowing we do is we take what we call preforms and we reshape them. We design and build apparatus that works for the scientists in their experiments. Both of them have deep family roots in the craft. Kevin Stanley has been in the glass blowing industry for three generations as for Joe.

Argonne National Laboratory Joe Gregor Argun Kevin glass producer Kevin Stanley Oregon Chicago Football Alison land thirty eight years ten twelve years fifty two years
"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"argonne national laboratory" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Great real quick does it does it just notified the the driver that the light is about to turn red and then you get to some twitter uh we actually urge for something what we actually do on the interface side is the best thing to do is to put up a speedometer or used the spanner the the automaker already has and we put a green arc if you go that speech you'll hit the next like green or red arc and behind that arc is another little arc it's like petrus if you go that speed you'll hit the next lightgreen so you can actually get into the green wave and just like green green some exactly what you want if you're driving on a time carter is there any as chasing cal canister angel investor and host is there any concern that you've got from municipalities that this will induce bad behavior and how do you address that in other words if i see that the lights changing in three to do i gun it and go above the speed limit to try and make it i am so glad you asked on so there are multiple answers we are right now in the middle of a study with argonne national laboratory to figure out exactly what the drivers were response to each of these various information is and what we're gonna do is ravi selena give drivers information that makes them better behaved and withhold information that makes them worse behaved and the other thing we do is whenever we had a countdown you know the lights going to be read in thirty seven seconds that canton stops at five we do not want people seeing the countdown hits zero in office go drag racing it's up to five it makes you look at the light because the only way you can really know if the lights green is you've got to look at grit let's take a final question some final question okay car.

carter argonne national laboratory twitter thirty seven seconds