35 Burst results for "Arctic Ocean"

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:15 min | 4 months ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WCPT 820

"The official position of the United Nations IPCC was that the Arctic was warming twice as fast as the mid latitudes as where we live. The wealthy. It's called the mid latitudes, I guess. And now a new study was just published yesterday. In the peer reviewed journal communications earth and environment. That environment, excuse me. And what they found was that the Arctic is actually warming four times faster than the rest of the planet. And that and even faster than that in some areas, like near Svalbard. Now, Louise and I were in Svalbard, a couple of, three, four years ago, Sean, when we were over there with the crew with Leo DiCaprio, filming ice on fire, his latest environmental movie. And I was interviewing these scientists. It's an amazing place. You know, it's an island off part of Norway. Way up north, the Arctic circle. And there's a university there, and there's all kinds of cool stuff and a big climate center where they're monitoring methane actually in the ocean. And they said that that Eurasian sector of the Arctic Ocean is warming 1.25°C, that would be almost in the neighborhood of 2°F. Every decade, every ten years, I mean, we were all freaked out about 2° or 3° of warming or even four or 5°F between now and 2100. Well, you know, we're looking at 2°F of warming every ten years in that part of the world. And what's causing it is what's called Arctic amplification. Ice and snow reflect light and heat back into outer space. Some of it, of course, gets trapped by greenhouse gases, but a lot of it just escapes. But when that ice or snow melts and exposes either land permafrost, Brown land, or blue ocean, deep blue ocean, those absorb light and heat, as opposed to reflecting them. And so that speeds up the process. This is what's called positive feedback and it doesn't mean it's a good thing. It's not like positive good thing. It's like it's feeding on itself. And the Arctic is like the refrigerator for the northern hemisphere. It's this. It is the thing that stabilizes the jet stream. And the jet stream is what defines and determines our weather. And the instability of the jet stream that we've been seeing that's getting progressively worse. Year after year, but we've been seeing this in a big way for about the last decade in a way that's identifiable. These bomb cyclones and these and massive tropical storms and things. This is the direct result of the Arctic warming. Now the other part of this story, this climate story is what's going on in Europe right now. Just in the last 5 years, large parts of France and Spain have gone undergo on

Svalbard Arctic Leo DiCaprio IPCC United Nations Arctic circle Louise Arctic Ocean Sean Norway Europe France Spain
"arctic ocean" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:40 min | 4 months ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WTOP

"WTO news. It's 7 52, and a congressional panel says about a 135 million more doses of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine from a troubled Baltimore factory will have to be destroyed due to quality problems. You may recall that more than 400 million vaccine doses made at an emergent bio solutions plan had to be trashed in a statement yesterday that was released, Johnson & Johnson said that no dose is produced at the site since the factory restarted have reached the market and it was ending its agreement with emergent. J&J took control of the plan after problems first emerged, the problem plagued Baltimore factory was initially shut down by the Food and Drug Administration early last year due to contamination. The government then allowed production to resume in August of 2021. Federal headlines is presented by periton doing the can't be done for national security. I'm Peter miss early and here are your top headlines from federal news network. The D.C. circuit is upheld a 2020 decision that gives members of Congress the authority to sue the executive branch for information. House Democrats on the oversight and reform committee requested the records for a D.C. lease for former president Donald Trump. And major general John Olson is now the air force's first ever chief data and artificial intelligence officer, Olson's position follows a trend of expanding tech focused leadership roles within the military. For more on these stories, go to federal news network dot com. An armed man in body armor who tried to enter the FBI field office in Cincinnati is now dead. The gunman yesterday led law enforcement on a chase before an hour's long standoff in rural Ohio, gunfire was exchanged. CBS News reports the man had an AR-15 style assault, rifle. Sources say the man may have had ties to extremist groups, including the one that took one that took part in the capitol riot. He's identified as Ricky schiffer and the 42 year old seems to have appeared in a video posted on Facebook, showing him at a pro Trump rally the night before the capitol was attacked. A new study published this week in nature communications earth and environment has found that in some areas of the Arctic Ocean, the warming rate is up to 7 times as fast as previously estimated, the factors that cause more intense warming in the region have long been known heat is transferred from the open sea to the atmosphere, see ice has also been shrinking, which helps reflect solar rays, that leads to the open ocean to absorb more radiation that absorbed radiation then melts more ice and traps more heat creating a devastating loop. Money news at 25 and 55, the ugly start to the year on Wall Street affected the retirement plans of millions of state and local employees, institutional investment consultant Wilshire associates says public pension plans in the U.S. had a median loss of nearly 8% for the year ending June 30th. It's the worst annual performance in the first annual decline for public retirement systems since 2009. U.S. stocks had their worst first 6 months of the year since 1970. Johnson & Johnson will stop selling baby powder made with talc next year worldwide. The company stopped selling talc based baby powder in the U.S. and Canada in 2020. It blamed its decision on a decline in customer demand because of concerns about the safety of one of its most famous products. J&J is facing tens of thousands of lawsuits that allege the talc based powder caused cancer in women who had used it for years. Still a head president Trump calls for the immediate release of the federal warrant, the FBI used to search his Mar-a-Lago estate. It's 7 56. You might think most banks are the same. At premise, we

Johnson & Johnson Baltimore oversight and reform committee D.C. Ricky schiffer WTO John Olson Food and Drug Administration Donald Trump J Olson CBS News air force FBI Wilshire associates Peter Congress Cincinnati Arctic Ocean
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:11 min | 5 months ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"They will, in some of the big rivers and Russia, for instance, that flow north, they will bring trees dead trees and logs up to the north and they can get some wood that way. And same thing in some of the rivers kind of flowing northward from the Brooks range of Alaska. You do get some trees, but just not enough to really produce a culinary art that requires cooking with heat. They do have traditionally blubber lamps where the seals and whales are used to create a little flame. Often that's for light and for a little bit of heat. And less for cooking. But eating things raw is definitely a huge part of the culture there. And while I went on a whale hunting trip out on the spring ice in the Arctic Ocean by barrow Alaska. And two of the guys that guys who had invited me were kind of talking about how eating things raw is sort of the most essential characteristic of a new culture. And the one guy who's half white half a Nubia said people often doubt his ethnicity because he looks like a white guy. So he'll bite the head off of a raw bird to show them that he is truly a new peak in what he said. That's how you prove your legit. We're looking at Instagram pick as a doctor. I was used to knowing fat as the most maligned of all body parts and the culprit and an obesity epidemic. But in Arctic Alaska, fat has always meant health and survival. In fact, the entire story of life in the Arctic, especially human life, is basically a tale of fat. And in borrow, what they gay. Alaska. Alaska, okay. A long covered with whale blubber is still equivalent of a plush green lawn in temperature suburbia swelling in its owner with pride. And that's what we're looking at is a lawn full of will. Blubber. A beautifulness. So this is, I mean, there's a lot of calories there. Oh yeah, and this can feel a lot of people. A lot of energy, a lot of warmth. Absolutely. And it's delicious. This was like I was a kid in a candy store, basically, I rounded a corner in barrow. So when people do get a whale during the spring whaling season, they raise a flag or a whaling captain raises a flag over his house and everyone in town is welcome to come try some..

Alaska Brooks range Arctic Ocean Nubia Russia Arctic obesity barrow
"arctic ocean" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Relations Working in the Arctic is dangerous Norwegian coast guard crew insisted NPR's team put on Arctic survival suits before a short ride on a skiff outside the city of tromso It's like a combination between a wetsuit and a snowsuit designed to keep you alive in the water for maybe an hour while you get rescued Aboard the ship a conversation about search and rescue quickly turns to a conversation about fish So there is a fishery corporation between Norway and Russia Captain Paul brought back rescues fishermen from any nation as they fell a cod around the Arctic Ocean The cold Yeah the cold fishes they don't see the border So we help every boat in our area Management of the barents sea cod fleet is considered a success worldwide both economically and environmentally says Brett back And that's important for Norway and European Union and the NATO and the whole world And it's important for the Russians But he worries things are different since Ukraine The coast guard also enforces the fishing laws Years ago in a rare case a Russian trawler fled from a coast guard ship with Norwegian inspectors on board into Russian waters Back then Russian authorities promptly arrested the captain and returned the inspectors captain brought back hopes the same cooperation would happen today In these days the Russian can use other methods to negotiate like the Ukraine conflict They are willing to use more power than the talking Captain brought back says he's not too worried these fishermen know their work depends on cooperation The same goes with scientists One of the important issues up here is of course climate change Kim Holman is with the Norwegian polar institute in tromso where the international Arctic council would normally be coordinating climate research Well the Arctic council office is in this building and they are of course on hold It's not a something you can point at that failed today but it's ongoing Holman has worked on Arctic climate science for over 30 years collaborating across the border Russia has about half the world's Arctic landmass including permafrost that if it melts could release megatons of trapped carbon and greenhouse gases Scientists like Holman count on their Russian colleagues I mean we have common publications We have a collective date together We've been on each other's cruises I've been to people's homes in St. Petersburg Not only than scientific but good friends At the moment Holman isn't in contact with those friends The lesson from back in Soviet days is that communication will only get them into trouble which would delay getting back to work Ilana Wilson wrote with the Norwegian institute of international affairs in Oslo says the drive to sanction Russia has pushed aside scientific cooperation And at some point in the future when something has changed within Russia or reached some sort of accord with Ukraine there's a chance that science cooperation might be one of the first things to come back online But she warns some things may not come back Some Russian academics have surprised her with full throated endorsements of Vladimir Putin's war and Russia has ambitions in the warming Arctic That includes control of the northeast passage which would cut shipping time between China and Europe And exploiting newly accessible oil and mineral wealth Russia's pariah status may not bode well for international cooperation on climate says professor Rowe As the situation changes and hopefully improves for the people of Ukraine there will be some opening but I think it will certainly feel like a new chapter in Arctic cooperation and is probably a very chilly one Polar scientists are used to the cold Kim Holman says the Arctic is in danger but he knows his Russian colleagues also want to save it We hope and wish to pick up when it falls Quill Lawrence NPR news tromso Norway This is NPR news This is listeners reported WNYC today on all of it here about a new book called ancestor trouble which explores the author's family tree and raises broader questions about the field of genealogy plus a roundup of the new movies and TV shows that have recently hit the streaming services tuning.

tromso Russia barents sea cod Ukraine Holman Arctic Kim Holman Norway Norwegian polar institute international Arctic council Arctic council office Captain Paul Arctic Ocean NPR Ilana Wilson Norwegian institute of interna coast guard Brett NATO European Union
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 9 months ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Navigation ways through the Arctic Ocean is called the northern sea route They want to set up as the ice caps melt is the ice disappears They want to be able to have a thriving pork business a logistics business in the northern part of the world Well in theory they could do that on their own but establishing those kinds of ports and establishing those kinds of navigation routes requires international cooperation Insofar as logistics companies are boycotting Russia and many are starting to do so That's going to make it very very hard for Russia to put together that kind of business They're going to need cooperation for not just from the logistics sector but from governments that recognize what they're doing up there in terms of search and rescue So they are going to be very interested They have a self interest in doing this And it's also the case that they have a self interest in at least understanding better what the impacts of climate change up there are going to be And just as Canada and the United States and Norway and Iceland can't do that on their own Neither can Russia So they really will want at some point to have some say in Arctic affairs on a multilateral basis Thanks Adam That's Adam minter columnist for Bloomberg opinion Coming up on Bloomberg opinion bipartisan agreement on daylight savings time but is it a good idea That's coming up next I'm June grosso and you're listening to Bloomberg NJ.

northern sea Arctic Ocean Russia Adam minter Iceland Norway Bloomberg Canada United States Arctic grosso
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"They'll need food, ammo, and other supplies that teddy bear is carrying. Just ride the long Arctic winter ahead. For days, Bernard and his crew have been trying to find a way through the ice pack with little to show for it. He's never seen this much ice so early in the season. Bernard reaches the stern of the boat, where a cluster of crew members are gathered, looking over the back. The first mate turns and great Bernard with a grimace. Sounded like the propeller. Bernard knots. If the propeller is damaged, the ship won't be able to generate enough power to push through the ice. They'll be stranded. Unable to do anything but drift as more and more ice forms, locking them in place. But Bernard refuses to expect the worst. We won't know until we have a look. The crew members quickly rig up ropes. Bernard and the first mate, heave themselves over the side of the ship, using the ropes to climb down to the ice below. Kneeling on an ice floe, the two men peer at the propeller. It's blades are bent and twisted, crushed by the pressure of the ice. It looks bad, but not as bad as Bernard feared. He turns to the first mate. We can fix this. Yes, then let's head home. We can't give up just yet. Those men on wrangell are counting on us. Captain, look around. It's nothing but solid ice. We'll never make it. Bernard bites his lip. He knows his first mate is bright. The ice is solid. There's no path through. The longer they keep pushing forward, the less chance they'll be able to sail back. Bernard doesn't feel right, abandoning the explorers on wrangell. But he also doesn't want to endanger the lives of his crew. He nods reluctantly to the first mate. Fine. We fixed the propeller and returned to nome. The first mate lets out a sigh of relief. Bernard grabs hold of the growth and hauls himself up the side of the ship. A pit of guilt in his stomach. He hopes the men on wrangel have enough rations to get through the winter. Because now, with the Arctic Ocean frozen over, it'll be at least 9 months for another ship to reach them. Turns out, I'm much better at eating fancy food than I am at cooking it. And if that sounds like you too, then you need to check out sun basket. Sun basket delivers healthy meals, so you aren't always on the hook to shop and cook to hit your health goals. They're fresh and ready meals are a perfect hot lunch hack. You could heat and eat in minutes. And when you're looking to try your hand at cooking, you can choose from delicious recipes like pan seared salmon tikka masala over super food rainbow quinoa or honey balsamic lays chicken with warm cabbage Apple salad. Right now sun basket is offering $90 off and a free gift when you order. Go to sun basket dot com slash wondery and enter promo code wondery at checkout. That sun basket dot com slash wondery and enter promo code wondery. We get support from thumbtack. How will you ever stop your to do list from growing? You could become a magician, or you can do what I did and download thumbtack. It's the app that finds local pros for all your home projects. Hire a plumber to fix your leaky faucet or a handyman to hang your curtains. You can even hire a pro to organize your messy closet. Yep, there are people in your city who specialize in that. I actually just downloaded the thumbtack app and I could feel my apartment breathe a sigh of relief. HelloFresh paint in an AC unit that actually works. On the thumbtack app, you can compare prices, read reviews, and chat with pros directly. When you found the right person, you can book them with just a tap. All of those annoying projects will just disappear. Maybe it is a little magic. Download thumbtack and start your next project today. From wondery, I'm.

Bernard wrangel Arctic Ocean Captain Apple
"arctic ocean" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Winter morning coffee The first story told by Sara enriquez in 2019 is about a little tour bus and a long cold road I first moved to Alaska a little over 7 years ago and when I came I wanted to have an Alaskan job And I didn't really know what that meant but when I got here I found home and being a tour guide And not just any tour guide I was hanging with the big boys on the ice road up north on the hall road And I was operating a 25 passenger coach to the Arctic circle and beyond The hall road also known as the Dalton highway is the famously rough remote road that stretches over 400 miles through northern Alaska all the way up to deadhorse on the edge of the Arctic Ocean You may know it from the reality TV show ice road truckers Most of the roads traffic comes from commercial vehicles hauling supplies up to Alaska's oil fields And on this particular day it was pretty cold It was negative 40 And I had 25 passengers and I had people from all over the world on my vehicle I had doctors for Michigan I had newlyweds from Australia I had a family from Brazil and a bunch of people in between It turned around point for the tour was a rest stop about a 115 miles up the highway that marked the start of the Arctic circle Things had been a bit windy but otherwise fine up until that point But as manrique drove the last stretch to the Arctic circle wayside the wind picked up a lot So it's really kind of push it on the coach and I'm noticing how much snow is in the road But as we continue to move down the road these snow berms are growing in size As she passed them she checked her odometer and the milepost signs on the side of the road to try to keep track of where the snow burns were She wanted to map in her mind of where to be extra careful driving home in the dark Once they got to the rest stop the weather was calmer It's pretty protected there There's trees there there's outhouses there We have hot cocoa I brought it I roll out the red carpet and we have our official Arctic circle crossing in style And we're happy campers But by the time they got back on the road firstly it's dark and secondly I'm immediately hit with a white out And I'm a little bit stunned because in that area that we were in at the Arctic circle I didn't realize how protected it was And as they headed southbound down the highway the wind is no longer whistling it is howling And the wind is no longer pushing against the coach It is pitching the coach from side to side we go And I'm like okay I'm gonna put on a little movie.

Sara enriquez Alaska manrique Arctic Ocean Brazil Michigan Australia
"arctic ocean" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"I traveled the world to witness the end of winter. By Porter Fox, Porter Fox is the author of the last winter, the scientists, adventurers journeyman and mavericks trying to save the world. He's also the author of Northland of 4000 mile journey along America's forgotten border and deep the story of skiing and the future of snow. For a century and a half, melting snow and ice have been the most recognizable visual evidence of climate change. You can see it in the Arctic Ocean, where the first ice free summer in two and a half million years is predicted by 2035..

Porter Fox mavericks Northland skiing America Arctic Ocean
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Unreserved

"Brian, why is it important that youth have a voice on this delegation? The youth voices extremely important because as we proceed into the future, the youth of today will be the leaders of tomorrow, right? So from that lens, then it becomes a very important to include the contemporary youth perspective because a lot of youth are really feeling the burden and it's not really theirs to shoulder at this point of making the world sustainable long-term and making sure that the impacts of climate change are mitigated through their own actions, whatever actions they can take right now. So from that perspective, the youth voice is vital to informing the leaders of today so that the layers of tomorrow are able to better act. Now, I understand that some of the other work that you do is you're involved in youth suicide prevention. Is that right? Yes, yeah. That's a very close to home topic for me for sure. And do you think that these two very serious issues are connected? Well, of course, so for me, growing up, a key element of my childhood was being able to go ahead and explore the land. And go out on, for example, in the winter go travel down the bay on the ice for like boil ups with my friends and just be on the land to be basically with the land. And as climate change is affecting people's ability to go out and actually explore actually travel and remind themselves of the connectedness that you would have historically and still contemporarily have with the land if that connection is severed, then obviously a very vital aspect of any culture of connectedness and spirituality is this gone. Yeah. And in turn that, of course, affects the mental health, et cetera. Yeah, exactly. Is that something that you're going to be sharing at the conference? Well, absolutely, because not only does this impact youth, of course, it also impacts all Inuit. Anybody who get a source of comfort and groundedness from being connected to the land, like personally myself, I find that very empowering to be able to go out and decompress it's really cathartic process to be able to go out on the land, especially in the winter, like I said, the snowmobiles were that you can experience almost true freedom effectively. And if that is threatened, if that's taken away, then, you know, you're going to have people who feel more trapped and more restricted in life. And in a situation where you're already very far north, you're very far removed from the society you see on social media and whatnot. The more disconnected, you are, the greater the mental health risks increase. Lisa, do you agree that climate change and issues like this are very closely connected to cultural survival and that we're headed down a very dangerous path by not understanding the two are linked? Yes, I agree, absolutely. And I told you about my grandfather and why did I look up to him? Well, whenever I think of him, I think of all the knowledge that he had of the land of the marine region of animal species around us and the laws, our family laws, our kinship relations, that he promoted innovate art that he promoted. He was a wonderful sculptor, and he also encouraged his sisters and other women to continue practicing throat singing and so on. So he was an indigenous knowledge holder. And as that indigenous knowledge holder, he valued that knowledge evaluate our history. And this is what we promote at Inuit circumpolar council is the inclusion of indigenous knowledge in research in international research in agreements. For example, there is an agreement for the prevention of unregulated fisheries in the central Arctic Ocean. And there's a provision in there now, and it's new that indigenous knowledge has and will be taken into account in that agreement. And so United Nations declaration once again on the rights of indigenous peoples acknowledges the importance of indigenous knowledge as well. So when we participate in research in the Arctic, when international fora are doing research in the Arctic or researchers come to the Arctic to the research among the Inuit, then we insist that indigenous knowledge is incorporated in that research and that the research has to be useful to Inuit communities. They say, you've been fighting for any week for years, taking your voice to previous climate summit, speaking out for women, self determination, applying your expertise to the national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. How do you feel about the progress if any that's been made in your lifetime of work? I think progress is done from one generation to another previous innovate leadership has come a long way, and then there's the next generation of leadership that's happening now that wants to bring in itself determination further the Canadian government has done, I think, a lot to recognize our inherent right to self determination. And yet we have to deal with colonization still. We have to deal with things that were taken away from us. And we have to fight to get those back. Our self determination. You know, control of justice, for example, based on, you know, it lower, for example, I mean, that's going to be still a long way off because a lot of people don't understand, for example, what Inuit law is. Yes. So we're just going to say you just blew somebody's mind, Lisa. Yes. Anyway, law, what?.

Inuit circumpolar council Brian central Arctic Ocean Arctic Lisa United Nations Canadian government
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"It's all about girth right number. Two right guys. Yep number two. I'm gonna go with the atlantic ocean number three the arctic ocean. Okay and people sleep on the arctic ocean but you give it like two hundred fifty years. That's going to be a tropical paradise and the number four. I've got the indian ocean. We still haven't found that malaysian plane. Who knows that's actually there. Yup all right good. Good ranking in the oceans right got the antarctic. It's not a notional. There's no such thing while yeah now. Getting contentious studied. They came out with this study. The antarctic ocean is actually the biggest coolest ocean ever heard on. Joe rogan's podcast all right. Go ahead mr lockwood. We're gonna go with the hot shower. Oh good choice. Good choice good choice. A had it. I had it always feels. Good yelp your day around. Yeah specifically i wrote down specifically which this is i you can't take it In a specific setting here you get hot shower but the best. Hot shower is after like Cold rain you get caught in a cold rain and you get a hot shower after. That's that's the best young day on the mountain. Yeah yeah yup yup hot shower. When you're like skin is like so cold you can barely feel it and you get hot shower. You get that like stinging sensation the best or if you're like a detective that's trying to solve a big case and you just blast the hot shower and to your face and you slam. Your hand gets the wall. You just think that's an every single cop movie ever. Yep yep or if you just or if your best friend just pulled off a huge heist at the airport and you're like smacking. The wall really hard. That's great hot shower. Good one. yeah. So i'm very relatable to all of us i would have said yeah the biggest heist of all time. This is actually taken. But what about the first glass of water. The next morning after night of drinking did that works. That's fair place. Yeah that's a good choice. I'm not sure you're still drunk the night before. You had that glass water this. You're saying you're saying we four and we've picked like middle of the night you're saying like seven am seven. That's pretty close. But sure i list too. Yeah yeah that works. That works thirsty when you're actually. Yeah it plays billy and next. Who doesn't love going down the water slide going up all those same down to boca reward on the back. Yes no that is that. That's a great one. I love a good waterslide. One of my favorite activities actually is driving past a waterpark. And then just staring at the slides. As i'm driving for like three seconds too long to be driving car responsibly. Just like turning my neck and be like oh my god look at all this water slides. Yeah column okay. Good piss guys Mr lockwood all right. We're gonna go with Watermelon delicious and summer. Always good okay. Great choice great choice choice choice. Great my next one okay. So hank invited his dad to participate in this mount rushmore. I thought that was very nice. Touching father-son moment. Who doesn't like something like that. But hank also neglected to invite his mother to participate on data of right now listening to the podcast and listening to mr lockwood and hank teaming up and hank didn't even think to ask her a kind of a reverse drew brees and drew brees his daughter situation. So i asked mrs lockwood if she would like to. Contribute my mount rushmore. Since sanctum thinks that he should classic you. So she's going to be on. She's going to help me out a little bit. She gave me a cold shower on a hot day and i liked that or cold shower after workout. Something in that scenario. Where you're overheated and hitting that cold shower for a little bit is one of the most refreshing feelings that you can ever have okay so just for the record so everyone knows. I'm still doing rushmore by myself. It's the super team era. I'd just keep going up against everyone. That's fine. I will hold the sanctity of mount rushmore season. I'm your champion. I'm honest okay. What no i'm sitting you. I'm your champion of the people. I'm not saying i'm the champion. I'm saying i'm the champion of people who know mount. Rushmore is about super teams. Just about teamwork. Sometimes you know Yup okay all right. Russell live from our rushmore. I'd like to go with the honor bir. Yeah there's no. I in mount rushmore All right here. We go the monday after a big win. Water cooler water after the after team wins a big game. And you're at work and it's like actually something you wanna talk about with your co workers. Because usually it sucks. But it's like cat. Did you see the big win. That was fucking awesome. And you relive the game and you sit there and have your little moment. That's a great moment to have okay How about Let's see i'll go. I'll go lakes you know i had oceans and lakes. I'll go lakes. I love lake water. Lakes are awesome. I love rain water lakes so you don't drink the ocean though i just clarify lakes are okay. Great lakes lakes are sneaky. Dangerous stace waves. Yes h waves dude that those will fuck you up. Just rogue waves that appear on like lake superior in the middle of the night. Yeah stace waves so yeah. Lakes will be my fourth pick. I'm surprised no one's picked any brands..

mr lockwood arctic ocean hank antarctic ocean Joe rogan mount rushmore Mr lockwood atlantic ocean drew brees mrs lockwood boca billy rushmore Rushmore Russell Great lakes lakes
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Story Time

Story Time

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Story Time

"Let's see what this adventure entails nora and the normals scientific research journal day one. Well i'm not really a scientist but my grandma and keeps calling me scientists. Nora so i figure i might as well go with it. Oh yeah my name is nora. I'm currently recording this sitting at the very top of my grandma's ship neurosis my grandma and her friends actually are scientists. There oceanographers to be exact. My grandma is a marine mammal biologist. And i get to spend my holidays with her studying mammals in the arctic ocean. Grandma and her team have been studying. Nar walls nar. Walls are amazing. I didn't even know the existed until grandma told me about them like three years ago and ever since then i have been begging her to take me with her. Next time she goes on a trip. She told me if i wanted to come along. I needed to record my scientific findings in electronic journal. Just like she and the other oceanographers do so here goes. We left this morning at zero eight hundred hours that scientists speak for eight o'clock in the morning. I had strawberry jam on toast for breakfast. Actually i'm not sure if i needed to record that anyway. We're heading out to look for the nar walls. Grandma's team has been studying. Nar walls are amazing. Creatures some people call them unicorns of the c. Because they have a tusk sticking out the front of their head mostly only the males have tusk but every now and then the females will have them to the tusk can grow up to ten feet long and it has up to ten million nerve endings inside. That blew my mind. Grandma said my hand only has about twenty thousand nerve endings. That means they have about five hundred times as many nerve endings in their tusks as we do in one hand how incredible the sensitivity in their tusk means they can feel changes in the water like the temperature or even how salty the water is. This can help them find food or to protect them from predators. Grandma thinks we should find some in the next few days. So i'll check back soon with more information.

normals scientific research jo nora Grandma Nora arctic ocean electronic journal grandma
Alok Sharma: Time Running out to Stop Climate Change Catastrophe

BBC Newsday

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Alok Sharma: Time Running out to Stop Climate Change Catastrophe

"World is dangerously close to running out of time to stop climate change catastrophe. That's the warning from Alec Sharma, the UK government's climate chief, who is leading the cop 26 summit to be held in the Scottish city of Glasgow later this year. In an interview with The Observer newspaper today, Mr Sharma said, the effects of radical climate change We're already clear with floods, fires, heat waves He said A report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change due to be published tomorrow would be the starkest warning yet about what the future might hold. Well, let's You know, from Professor Andrew Shepherd, who's a glaciologist at the University of Leeds here in the UK, Um could you first professor please explain what the remit of this PC report is and what you think it might say. So I think everyone's familiar with these reports. Now we've had them for the past 30 years. Um, what this report is going to tell us is the latest changes in the Earth's climate We expect But it's also going to say that we've changed parts of our climate system for good actually, and that's surreal. Wake up call. We're going to have to live in a different environment in the future because we're not going to be able to reverse Some of the things that have happened. And we've seen so many stories recently, pointing to the possibility that some parts of the climate system are already passed. Tipping points. Oh what? What? Which are the ones that you're most concerned about? So there are quite a few. Actually, I think, um across climate science, maybe a dozen also have been identified. But there's some really obvious ones that people will have heard about retreat of the ice in the Arctic Ocean, for instance, and rapid melting and acceleration of glaciers in Antarctica and Greenland. And they might seem a long way away from people because they're at the polls. But as soon as I entered the ocean that affects sea levels,

Alec Sharma Scottish City Mr Sharma Professor Andrew Shepherd UK Intergovernmental Panel On Cli The Observer University Of Leeds Glasgow Arctic Ocean Antarctica Greenland
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Fully Automated

Fully Automated

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Fully Automated

"It's just sort of ask there a way to sort of maybe just say like the longer term point is fine. It's it's how they're getting there. That's the problem domain. It's it's a really powerful challenger superiors and i would. I suppose i suppose there are two onces. I could give. I think the the way in which the the claim that are making. The book is the planetary politics so the vision that vision of planetary politics which was put forward by anthony burke and his collaborators is that we will have planetary politics but it will look very different from what they anticipated and expected so there be you know the kinds of claims that they made were that the amazon basin or the arctic ocean should be given the status of nations in various international. Fora so in we would kind of Pay you know. Give the requisite attention to these parts of the world that are overlooked in favor of kind of male human concerns and that seems to me that seems to me kind of problematic and all sorts of ways because i mean nobody lives in the nobody lives in the arctic ocean and the amazon basin in those those countries nations and peoples. And they have. Those aren't just geographic areas. Those kind of places where people live you have all sorts of interest in aspirations that go beyond the ecological concerns of western academics. And so this is the question. I suppose you know this. Is i think the that if there is to be a planetary politics it can't get around that question and thinking in terms of geographic regions that are under environmental stress. I think is the problem so we will have a planetary politics. But as i suggest in the birds going to be one which is say competition over the warming. Arctic over competition over the sea routes that are opened up by the arctic melting competition over new sources of New natural resources that as lithium rare earth metals that will be needed for the cycle kind of green industrial revolution. New sources of four electric batteries. And what have you. And that is the way that planetary politics will be felted. Won't be felt from the vantage point of the unipolarity era. It will be felt from the vantage point of a more fractious and contested world order and for better or for worse. But i think there's no way of getting around it so if we are to have some kind of response to those challenges it will be one. That weren't that we can kind of Treat various parts of the world purely as if they're ecological units rather than places where people nations exist. People live with all sorts of aspirations and hopes. Which aren't you know purely set by. Environmental questions.

anthony burke amazon basin arctic ocean Arctic arctic
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"Could create the ping by accident in two thousand fifteen scientists from the university of california. San diego led by peter. Worcester conducted the canada basin acoustic propagation experiment or canopy from two thousand. Fifteen to two thousand. Seventeen worcester's team submerged transmitters in the arctic ocean which broadcast low frequency radio waves underwater. He hoped to learn about how the changing ocean conditions altered the way the seafloor sounded perhaps canopy distressed wildlife and inadvertently created the ping. Several canadian journalists interviewed the scientists behind the project asking if it was possible that canopy had unintentionally driven the seals out of the fury and hecklers straight worcester dismissed concerns noting that the signals they broadcast had only a maximum range of about two hundred miles. Nowhere near the distance they would need to travel to reach nunavut. He added that even if a sound wave could make it that far. They couldn't get around the many islands between canopy and the ping other accusations. Implicated the baffin land iron mines corporation as we mentioned before the windsor Was caused by factory. In the field of deep sea mining is still pretty experimental. In two thousand seventeen. Marine scientists released a study that claimed mining of any kind threatened oceanic by diversity it created pollutants kicked up clouds of sediment and destroyed natural habitats. But the boffin land iron mines corporations said they had no equipment on the bottom of the sea at all. No permits had been issued in the area seemingly confirming their statement and if the b. m. c. had been conducting an illegal mining operation surely the military survey would have picked it up the igloo. Early counters would've noticed to based on the evidence the ping probably had nothing to do with private companies which left one possibility the public sector we already discussed and ruled out military sonar drills but the armed forces us the ocean in a variety of ways perhaps the ping came from unauthorized submarine activity ended may be the precursor to an upcoming war coming up. A canadian investigator gets to the bottom of the nunavut ping episode is brought to you by casper the new casper cooling collection has everything you need to help you sleep cool all night long casper's mattresses with new snow technology hyper light sheets likely due vase and free the mattress protector or to work together to prevent overheating and keep you cool and comfortable. There wave hybrid. snow mattress. Keeps you cool for over twelve hours pulling heat away from your body for sustained. Temperature regulation a cool to the touch. Feeling much improved tomorrow casper's breathable mattress. Protector improves the coolness of the bed. Even further by allowing air to flow between your body and mattress and as always casper offers free shipping and returns. Focus on tomorrow like casper. Handled the rest explore all casper. Products mattresses sheets pillows and more at casper dot com. This episode is brought to you by the a v. Eight is the original plan powered drink the one that started it all and it says delicious as ever making choices. You can feel good about that help. You live well like using original for convenience satisfying snack one five and a half ounce can of beat original. Has only thirty. Calories has one full serving of vegetables and is a good source of vitamins. A and c. It's perfect carry on the goes a snack or to have on hand after a workout shoes. V8 for big plant power. Goodness in one small can and now back to the story. The nunavut paying allegedly drove wildlife away from the fury and hecklers straight around two thousand sixteen possible explanations for the sound have included scientific sonar devices antisocial hunting activists. Ufo's and unauthorized military submarines. Since submarines use sonar to navigate some theorists. How suggested the boats in the fury and hecklers straight. Were detecting rogue subs if true. Nobody knew where they came from. Historically russia has been notorious for its widespread submarine operations. Their subs frequently patrolled the borders of sovereign waters nearly violating north american territory. Plus the federation also had a history of attempting to claim arctic land international law states that the north pool and the region around it cannot be the property of any single nation however several countries have tried to seize neutral territory most notably canada and russia if they succeeded arctic holdings would give russia a distinct advantage in trade and for military purposes as the ice cap shrank. More waterways open between russia and canadian than ever before perhaps russia's scouted these passages to see how close they could get to north america in the event of a global war. It might sound like a wild theory. But in march two thousand twenty one of video surfaced on the internet showing russian nuclear submarines breaking through the arctic ice sheets. This proved they'd been running submarine drills in the arctic and they weren't the only ones the pin could also be a chinese sub around two thousand sixteen when the ping first appeared the chinese government outlined plans to start using the northern arctic passage to trade more efficiently with north america others have suggested american submarines may be running drills as well ultimately. It's hard to say with these subs come from. Because there's no hard evidence suggesting where they originated or even if they exist and although it has several traits in common with sonar. It's not even clear. If the paying is a sonar wave moreover the fury and hecklers straight would have limited strategic value. It does connect the northernmost arctic seas to the hudson bay. But it doesn't really lead anywhere else. The straight is also dotted with many small islands. That make it difficult. For large cargo ships to easily maneuver the region could only be so useful for.

casper worcester baffin land iron mines corpora arctic ocean Worcester russia university of california arctic canada San diego peter chinese government northern arctic north america northernmost arctic hudson bay
"arctic ocean" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Would never get there if we stopped and I can remember thinking Oh, God. Okay, Okay. Okay. I can feel my middle toe Well, Oh, how? Who needs the middle term like I can live without a middle toe? And a little toe. Well, yeah, I can live without a little toe. I can't live without a big toe. If it starts to go for that, That's it, and we were literally bargaining with bits of our body in order to make this happen. I found on the eyes that when I could think about things I missed the Children terribly, and I could probably go about 14 days. 15 days that seemed to be the limit before it affected my morale. And the girls were really good. They would give me at time with the phone and the precious batteries and I ran home and I always thought they'd miss me. Obviously. Then I'd call and he was so excited to tell me about everything they were doing and how great it was. And and they chatter and I listened. I put the phone down and I was filled with them again and I could keep going. If I had trouble with frostbite, Palm was the worst all hotels with prosperity. And after 47 days, we had a resupply plane that came in. To give us new food and fuel and on that resupply plane, Palm had to leave. Mhm. I never thought about getting on that plane. The chances of us getting there was so Slam on day 37 of the expedition Before poem left. We'd literally gone just 69 miles of the 500 Miles. We've got a few more in the next 10 days, but we still had over 300 miles to go. It was still impossible. But we weren't going to give in. And although we miss Palm when she left half of our team had gone it was now just mean Caroline. We began to use poem as our motivation will do this for poem. We'll do another hour for her and we became one driving force. We swam through open water We skied across, then eyes we added hours to our days. When I say that we were walking across an Arctic ocean, the ice moves constantly. Always against us. So some nights we would get into our frozen sleeping bags that we would have to break and as we slept, we would go backwards. Those were the tough nights. Ah,.

Caroline 15 days 500 Miles 69 miles Palm Arctic ocean over 300 miles one day 37 next 10 days half 47 days 14 days force team
"arctic ocean" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"As young as 12 can get the vaccine for NPR news. I'm Blake Farmer in Nashville. And this is NPR news. Scientists have confirmed that Arctic Sea ice is thinning rapidly more rapidly than previously thought. NPR's Rebecca Herscher reports climate change is causing ice loss to accelerate the ice on the surface of the Arctic Ocean gets thinner in the summer and thicker in the winter. As the earth heats up open water has appeared in places that used to be frozen and the remaining ice has gotten thinner. Scientists use radar to estimate that thickness, but they have to make assumptions about how much snow is sitting on top of the ice. As the amount of snow has decreased. Scientists have had to adjust their assumptions. A new study published in the journal The Cry A Sphere uses a more accurate estimate of snow cover and finds that ice thickness is decreasing extremely rapidly. It's confirmation of what people who live in the Arctic have observed firsthand. Global warming is causing an acceleration of ice loss. Rebecca Herscher NPR news much of the country in the grips of a heat wave this weekend from Montana to Minnesota. Record breaking temperatures could reach the triple digits Further east from Washington, D C to Boston Heat wave is forecast to extend into early next week. It's a sharp turnaround from last week's cold and wet Memorial Day weekend. Voters improve going to the polls this weekend. Tomorrow's runoff election for President Pence Socialists Pedro Castillo against right wing candidate Keiko Fujimori, the eldest daughter of the jailed former president.

Rebecca Herscher Keiko Fujimori Minnesota Nashville Pedro Castillo Montana The Cry A Sphere Blake Farmer Arctic Sea Arctic Ocean last week Boston Washington, D C Tomorrow NPR 12 Arctic early next week President triple digits
Will Steger's 1989 Route Across Antarctica in Gone

Climate Cast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Will Steger's 1989 Route Across Antarctica in Gone

"Tell us why now for this film well. The two young filmmakers i worked with it was their idea actually when i met him about seven years ago. They wanted to do a film. I give them for all my archives and they join me two of my expeditions. We went to antarctica either. All i knew about the film was called after. Antarctica is for the first time last month. Will your team made this four thousand mile antarctic crossing nineteen eighty nine at the time. Did you have any idea that climate change would be evolving as the crisis of our time now back in nineteen ninety. I was very much aware of of climate change. I actually taught it my classes in the late sixties. But i never thought it would happen so quickly. It was twelve years after that in ninety nine nine hundred ninety when we finished it when the larsen ice shelf broke up in two thousand and two dow was my called action. And that's it was two thousand two that a realize this is very serious and nobody is really aware of. What's what's happening. And that's critical right because those larsen ice shelf. You actually cross those during your journey right. And then now they're gone. They're gone and it took us thirty days across Both larsen abmc and now they're mostly gone in a shelf that have crossed both in the polar areas in the arctic car. I have the cynic integrated and we've lost about sixty percent of the ice on the arctic ocean in the summer. So you know it's happening so quickly. Accelerating very fast right now.

Antarctica Arctic Arctic Ocean
"arctic ocean" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Laid down on this step that could ever make a thingy o long is it considered take the measurement. Oh, yeah. No, I mean, I give it up for this study for years, even though I was getting mad about the city of wariness is new word for being s and weiner weariness, but that that to me, seems like Finally somebody is stretching that thing and you know again, why do we care or need to know it has to do the integrity of what? The nose claim of the sin out cloud thing that they correlate to get measured. What did you say? Record said that it didn't correlate right or they did. They said it did it. Did it did it did when they dress. I think the measurement of the little mint and then they did the measurement of the nose and astern, Orla. They matched really this. This was e Get him on nothing. But maybe the best selling Di e mean I mean night. This is a dub, but I had to do a lot of explaining Oh, my word. Okay. Whoa. There. Well, there that should I was going to that should be the YouTube for sure. Oh, yeah. You don't get explanations like this anywhere on the Internet or on the radio or television, for that matter. I mean, it's just a few plays. Thank goodness people are in their cars again. Yeah, once again now just show my snow cloud look at Premier Pool and spa, Our all weather pools Bridge the gap between hot tub spa and pool, visit our show room and see the Arctic Ocean Maximum therapy with basic swimming check out its multiple jet configurations for ultimate therapeutic comfort, enjoying the benefits of a pool at home year round that is this efficient and low maintenance as an Arctic spa..

YouTube Orla years Arctic Arctic Ocean
"arctic ocean" Discussed on Occupied

Occupied

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"arctic ocean" Discussed on Occupied

"We didn't leave the territory. Restate put into awesome But know our each day was at the arctic ocean different than night each before. But it's pretty special place. I can't actually even picture a coming from australia. A beach day in the arctic. Those they like to do things that i caught being for together yay. If it's it's a sunny summer day than you better hope. It's wendy because the buzzer like nothing i've ever experienced before. But yes sir you know some people swim. I have not so silent. Arctic ocean some people do but it is still a feeling of being close ally. yeah. I still cannot comprehend. I don't know. Maybe i'm just gonna very concrete view of what a beach looks like an icon. I'm going to have to google and look enough synergy often. It's robbie like a rock. Yeah clause saying ou we have some beaches at like that some beaches that are made a like broken up coral and shells and rocks and that sort of soften all like. They're not all like you see on pires cosworth stuff. That's probably actually the the. Wow not the minority but not the not all of them anyway so just to like i guess cleared up in my head like where this is gonna sound like a really dumb question but where is the arctic..

australia Arctic ocean arctic google each day arctic ocean each pires cosworth
2 killed, 1 injured in avalanche on Norwegian Arctic island

Wealth Without Risk

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

2 killed, 1 injured in avalanche on Norwegian Arctic island

"Civilian employees of the Norwegian military were killed a third one injured in an avalanche on a remote Arctic Ocean island inhabited only by soldiers in the researchers. The accident took place yesterday on Jan's million Island located 310 Miles east of Greenland. A spokesman says The employees are based on the armed forces stationed there.

Arctic Ocean Island Avalanche JAN Greenland
November's Global Temperatures Are Highest Ever, Breaking Records

The Joe Walsh Show

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

November's Global Temperatures Are Highest Ever, Breaking Records

"Europe experienced the hottest November and warmest autumn to date as temperatures elevated across the globe. According to the European Union's Copernicus climate change service. Temperatures were most elevated in Europe, Siberia and the Arctic Ocean, where sea ice was at the second lowest level ever seen. Experts say these records are consistent with long term warming trend of the global climate. Copernicus. Data shows that 2020 could be the hottest year on record as it nears temperatures equal or higher to those in 2016 the warmest year ever.

Europe Arctic Ocean European Union Siberia
Clean Slate with Todd Harrison

The Bible Says What!?

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Clean Slate with Todd Harrison

"Hello this is todd. how can you hear me. Okay i can. I can welcome back. Mr todd harrison. How you doing man. I'm doing good. How about you fantastic fantastic and all surviving staying indoors. Yeah good for you. Yeah that was blocked at netflix and amazon. Or sky man. Yeah amazon's doing real well to absolutely a generics anyway. So let's see here last time we talked. I don't even remember what we talked about. Maybe a little postles maybe a little bit of what you believe Let's just go ahead and start fresh like nothing ever happened. Because i can't remember the word of event sounds good to me. Why don't you go ahead and start off by giving giving us a brief description on why you are a christian at this point in time and how you got to it okay. Sure well. I grew up in in nominal church That was more littered surgical and then then alive and so when as a teenager. I just rejected it locked away. God was irrelevant to me I i i wouldn't say totally disbelieve. But i i can't say i believed in god can't and in fact i i did try. I tried hard to To not believe i. I went into science and university and You know as young person that has a huge effect on you because you kind of that We used to say tabula rasa. You're a blank page. So you kind of go into that. So in my particular university was was kind of radical so at some of the radicals that got kicked out of the states in the late sixties and early early seventies ended up in regina my home home university. Yes so i. i thought it was leaning to marxism. I got involved in transcendental transcendental meditation to kind deal with anxiety And i was a science majors. So i was definitely evolutionist All of those things. All of those things. And so i said to my girlfriend. One time i said. I said you know we're just we just animals. You know we live we dying and that's it it's over right. And so she just burst she just burst into tears in in cried for a while and so i decided not to bring that up again. So anyway We kind of had a long term relationship Actually a number of years five and it kind of came to a point where we had to do something about it and I entered. I went into education i entered. I did not have a good internship. I didn't know it at the time. But i'm adhd and there was no such diagnosis in those days. So so now. As i've been an educator for almost forty years but Apart from god that would never happen. But anyway. my internship. Your your You can't think linearly your executive functions are limited But you have a great imagination. So i used to start my homework about midnight. Eleven o'clock till four in the morning then go to school. So that wasn't a good pattern but anyway that's all. I got to university. But i i walked out. I went back for my last semester. And i i walked. I was there two weeks. And i said i'm done with this I was three months short of a double degree. And i just packed in and walked out and i took a job. I said i'm going to get a real job. And i took a job in a on a seismic crew. If you know what that is that's oil exploration and I was stationed in the arctic on an island in the arctic ocean called island. Yes so i kinda jumped out of the front pan into the fire and Yeah that was really interesting. Yeah so so. I flew up. I'd had a couple of friends who've done it before. And they told me what to wear. And so what the by. So i was prepared but i tell you the guy got off the plane and i saw those guys out there. The wind was blowing. It was like fifty below february. And they're out there unloading the plane. And i'm going my god. How can you work in the eight o'clock the next morning up there. It was actually. It was a good experience. I actually did two seasons but what did happen Gonna had my girlfriend got mad. Because i never discussed it with her so after five years i should have talked about it. She got mad and she moved out. She said well i'm gonna move to. Though she moved out to the west coast of vancouver island she was a nurse and she took a job nursing there so so our plan in money up north. She's gonna earn money there then. We're going to backpack europe. Because you know it's the seventy so. That's you

Mr Todd Harrison Amazon Regina My Home Home University Netflix Todd Anxiety Adhd The Arctic Ocean Arctic Vancouver Island Europe
Some Dinosaurs Probably Nested in Arctic

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 2 years ago

Some Dinosaurs Probably Nested in Arctic

"Those vicious predatory dinosaurs that tended to be fairly small as six to nine ten feet. Long snout to tail there. Certainly in the Jurassic. Park movies the things that terrorize people Anthony Fiorello a paleontologist at southern Methodist University in Dallas Texas for more than two decades. Now, Fiorello has been digging a dinosaur fossils, hundreds of miles north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska. So one of the fundamental questions about dinosaurs in Alaska. In the ancient Arctic is, did they live there all year round did they migrate? How did they get their a recent discovery sheds light on those questions this fossil that's the subject study is a baby dinosaur, the baby predatory dinosaur, and it is a baby. It's not just juvenile and given the size estimate of this thing. This probably was not far from where the nesting ground was. So this is the first physical proof. Alley some dinosaurs nested in the ancient Arctic some of the first Arctic dinosaur remains ever found were discovered back in the nineteen sixties in Svalbard, an archipelago north of mainland Norway. Since then researchers have theorized, the dinosaurs must have migrated to avoid deeply cold winters but Fiorello says this new discovery disproves that idea for you know the classic stereotype for dinosaurs is that had been. that they were living in sub tropical environments oftentimes, somewhat swampy if you look at various artwork over generations, that was quite often how these dinosaurs were reconstructed. In reality the climate north of Alaska's Brooks range seventy million years ago was similar to what we might see today in Portland, Oregon or Calgary Alberta. Certainly a place where. Things were cooler. Or who were capable of being cool at times but certainly warmer than the the Arctic today, the fossil find is a piece of jawbone with a tooth from Dromaeosaur Fiorello and colleagues unearthed it along the banks of the call. They'll river not too far from the Arctic Ocean. The bone is the first non dental evidence of that species in the far north the researchers report their discovery in the journal plus one. Of course questions remain. How did they do what they did because even with the warmer temperatures at the latitude, the thieves dinosaurs were living, which is at least seventy degrees north if not even farther nor. Do they endure long periods of light and dark, and that's where the research will go next for now Fiorello says the new discovery proves that these giant reptiles were well adapted to the highly seasonal environments of the late Cretaceous that we still experience today in the Arctic.

Dromaeosaur Fiorello Arctic Arctic Ocean Alaska Arctic Circle Jurassic Southern Methodist University Norway Dallas Texas Calgary Oregon Portland Alberta
Return home finally in sight for Arctic researchers stranded because of COVID-19

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Return home finally in sight for Arctic researchers stranded because of COVID-19

"A ship that was supposed to remain frozen in arctic ice for years taking a detour since October the German icebreaker polar stern has been drifting in the Arctic Ocean while scientists on board collect data try to better understand climate change now despite many obstacles created by the corona virus pandemic a personnel swap is about to begin as Ravenna Koenig reports scientists have been at sea since January will be released into a changed

Arctic Ocean Ravenna Koenig
Coronavirus Crisis Impacts Ice-Locked Arctic Research Expedition

NPR News Now

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Crisis Impacts Ice-Locked Arctic Research Expedition

"A year long international polar research expedition to better understand Arctic. Climate change is having to adjust some plans to the corona virus. Ravenna Canada's more. The Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the study of Arctic climate or mosaic frozen icebreaker into the central Arctic Ocean. This fall and plans to be there until September known on board. The ship has the corona virus but member of the team that was going to study the ice and atmosphere by plane tested positive for it earlier this month in Germany and the spring flights have been canceled. Expedition Coordinator Matthew shoop says the flight surveys were valuable but not essential that will be a big loss. It will But we're still going to be able to do. Some great sides personnel swapped on an off the icebreaker throughout the year with the next transfer plan for early April. Shoop says that each incoming person will be tested for the virus for NPR news. I'm Ravenna scenic.

Matthew Shoop Arctic Ocean Ravenna Scenic Ravenna Canada Multidisciplinary Drifting Obs Coordinator NPR Germany
Animal Mothers

Your Brain on Facts

08:33 min | 3 years ago

Animal Mothers

"A person could easily fill hours of airtime talking about bizarre mating habits of animals from the white spotted pufferfish that draws intricate patterns in the Sandy Ocean floor to attract a mate to the spotted hyena females. WHOSE PSEUDO PENIS which is sometimes larger than the males actual penis is also their birth canal note? Today we're going to focus on the latter two thirds of the process just station or incubation and firth even limiting the topic. There's still a lot. I won't don't get to like how certain reptiles determine the sex of their offspring with the exact temperature in their nests. The station period of animals animals is a matter of scale. The larger an animal is the longer it takes to make a new one despite the resources of the mother being large as well if all the dimensions Shinzo a given animal were doubled. That animal would now have eight times the fall you owing to the square cube rule and hence eight times the wheat of before four but the thickness of the umbilical cord through which all of the growth nutrients flow will only be four times as large so all else being equal it. It would take twice as long for the necessary nutrients to go through if you WANNA get super math nerdy about it and you're welcome to the volume and therefore wait of an animal is proportionate to the cube of the scale Cisco is proportionate to the cube root of the weight of the animal. I read it but I don't understand it. We can scale back on the maths a bit by looking at examples. Humans have station period forty weeks one week short of nine months while humans best friend has the station period of two months. For small animals like rabbits. The period is about one month and for mice about three weeks. The metal for shortest shortest station of a North American mammal goes to the possum which finishes pregnancy soup to nuts in under two weeks. This may have less to do with their size than the fact that their average life span is only about three years so replacements are needed constantly. Elephants are pregnant for a long time like really really long ninety five weeks in fact almost two years. This marathon baby building is one reason that female elephants elephants usually don't have more than four cavs in their whole lifetime. Who's got the time? A giraffe needs almost fifteen months to form. It's one hundred fifty pound founder. Sixty eight kilo baby which starts life off with a bang draft skipworth standing up so it is during air for babies to fall six feet or or two meters to the ground in the process of being worn there are exceptions to are easy to follow. Big babies means long pregnancy guidelines. Of course I one hundred injured and ten pound or fifty kilo. Hippo is ready to debut and only eight months even faster than a seven pound human baby. Black bears are pregnant for thirty weeks but they're cubs only weigh about one pound or half a kilo. One thing that this list of station periods can't take into account are pregnant pauses causes by which I mean pausing pregnancies. That's right some animals have the ability to say you know what now is not a super great time for let me to have babies. Let me just hold the embryo. And Its tracks and turn my uterus into Sifi stasis chamber while I wait for conditions to improve since it was discovered discovered in the eighteen fifties more than one hundred and thirty species of mammal have been found to have this ability. The pause called Dia pause conveniently can last anywhere between a couple of days and up to a year in most species. This happens when the embryo is still a tiny ball of less than one hundred cells. Does that has yet to attached to the uterus. Pausing pregnancy isn't the sole domain of any one class or family. It's found in certain kinds of bats bears Seals rodents deers and armadillos among others. More than a third of the species that take either during the station are found from the capital of strange nature. Australia of the twenty or so species of kangaroo and Wallaby combined there are only three that can't pas a pregnancy Mitzi in fact it's the Timbre Wallaby that can put embryos on hold for up to eleven months. There were few mechanisms at work here. Some animals most made right after giving birth. It's like a backup plan in case something happens to the newborn if nothing bad happens in. The newborn is nursing the physical taxation of lactation lactation stalls the understudy fetus once the extant offspring is weaned. The fetus begins developing again. The second way is to pause every pregnancy until the time is right usually to do with the weather for example minks mate around the start of March but put the embryos on pause until after the spring spring equinoxes when the days are getting longer in the northern hemisphere this ensures that the young are born in spring when food will be more plentiful than the temperatures more mild. Some are bitterest animals will pause pregnancies in times of drought hoping that the rain will come back to get plant life growing again. The TAMRA wallaby combines these two methods to ensure that the Joey is ready to leave the pouch in spring rather than the middle of a Hot Australian Summer Dia Pause was first identified in eighteen fifty. I four after hunters in Europe. Notice that pregnancy in Rodier seem to last a lot longer than in other types of deer since then scientists have been fascinated by this process. And it's helped us understand more about basic reproductive processes in all mammals but how the process worked at the molecular level is still a mystery mystery until recently there seemed to be no connection between which speech these use it in which didn't and there didn't seem to be a unifying mechanism for how the pregnancy was caused. Even the hormones controlling dia paws are different between Mammal groups researchers in Poland were able to pause embryos in a sheep a non dipoto species by transferring them into a mouse uterus and then back into the sheep with no apparent ill effects this indicates. It's the potential for Dia. Pause could lie in mammals including humans but I would still take my birth control pill you would. Experiments would die. Applause could do you for us is to improve our understanding of how to make and select healthy embryos for in vitro fertilization as well as to create better stem cells that could be used the target cancers the first stem cells ever isolated by scientists came from a mouse embryo in diapers whether or not the pregnancy. Let's see was paused. Once the baby or babies come out they need to eat and for mammal babies. That means milk. A mother's milk contains a concoction of nutrients France fats proteins and carbohydrates that are essential for a baby's development as well as a cocktail of protective factors to effectively supply the baby with immune hyun system until it can develop its own all mammals produce milk but they don't all produce the same milk to give you a baseline for comparison before I start start throwing out numbers cow. Milk is about three and a half percent protein and five percent carbs while human milk is about one percent protein and seven percent and carbs and both are about eight percent water. You won't find much water. In the milk of the hooded seal. Their milk is more than sixty percent. Fat Thatch more like a premium milkshake than milk. This high fat milk is crucial for the seal pups born into the freezing waters of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. It's the PUPS also only nurse for about four days having been born on floating ice an environment that is both unstable and unreliable. So the seal Momma needs to pack a lot of energy dense fat into her milk. The pups consume over sixteen pounds or seven kilograms of milk every day. Their Body weight doubles in the first week of life. Conversely in the savannahs of Africa the Black Rhino has the skim milk going only about point the two percent fat they also nursed for almost two years which is only possible within milk given how many resources lactation demands

Sandy Ocean Firth DIA Cisco Europe Founder Cubs North Atlantic Rodier Africa Joey Australia Poland Mitzi
The Ghost Ship Jenny

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

02:02 min | 3 years ago

The Ghost Ship Jenny

"If you scan the Internet you'll find numerous references to go ships. But what is a ghost ship. Exactly curious I did a little digging. It turns out that any vessel without crew or living crews considered a ghost ship. This could be the flying Dutchman or schooner caught by a rogue wave that becomes a victim at the moment. Lock down where the ship literally rolls over losing her killing the crew in the process. You might not have heard of the ship Jenny. She was found in eighteen. Eighteen forty inside the frozen region. So the drake passage. It disappeared in eighteen twenty three. Could it be that the Jenny remained in a giant ice barrier. Never crushed simply frozen for seventeen years. The last entry in the captain's log was haunting. Date may may four eighteen. Twenty three no food for seventy one days. I'm the only one left alive. The chimney was discovered by the whaling ship. Hope it was reported that the Captain Jenny was found sitting in a chair. Frozen solid the story of the discovery of the Chinese submitted to German geographical. Oh magazine the detail of the story. Explains that the crew of the hope spotted what appeared to be a ship in trouble and although as they approached it looked battered. They counted half a dozen men on the deck but when they pulled up on the starboard side. They discovered a grisly sight. All six men were frozen solid. The captain of the hope was the first board the Jenny. It was below and the captain's quarters that he came across the frozen body of the captain of the Jenny. Pen still in hand. There were reports that the captain is frozen dog and wife and the entire crew were buried at sea but there are others of that shipping error. The state of captain and the crew of the Jenny were left untouched and the only item taken was the ship's log and that the Jenny still sales the Arctic Ocean.

Captain Jenny Arctic Ocean Seventy One Days Seventeen Years
Climate Change Is Ravaging the Arctic, Report Finds

PBS NewsHour

00:27 sec | 3 years ago

Climate Change Is Ravaging the Arctic, Report Finds

"A particularly bad year for the arctic we saw the the second warmest temperatures that we've ever seen on record and those warm temperatures led to near record levels of melting of the sea ice on the Arctic Ocean and and also near record levels of melting of the glaciers on Greenland which raises sealevel so it's a really sobering report but I have to say it's not a very surprising report because this is a continuation of the trends that we've been seen happening in the arctic for quite a few decades now as climate change it's

Arctic Ocean Greenland Arctic
Climate change: Melting Arctic ice

Environment: NPR

04:39 min | 3 years ago

Climate change: Melting Arctic ice

"Arctic Sea. Ice is one one of the most dramatic indicators of the change in climate some months the ice cover on the Arctic Ocean is about half of what it was decades ago and its thickness has shrunk substantially changes in the ice may also mean a host of other changes in the Arctic system and around the globe to better understand the scientists. I just have frozen an icebreaker alongside and Arctic ice flow that they will absorb for a whole year. And that's where our reporter Ravenna chaotic. Caught up with them out on an the ice floe about five degrees from the North Pole. A bunch of scientists are setting up equipment. It's part of a project called mosaic or the multidisciplinary drifting observatory for the study of Arctic climate climate. And the primary question. They're trying to answer is what are the causes of diminishing Arctic ice and what are the consequences ocean physicists. Tim Stanton stand surrounded by boxes of tools and equipment next to a hole in the ice about fifteen miles from where the mosaics chef is frozen in. Good here dry hairdryer. Well it's a trickle. Would he he got frizzy here. That's for sure. It's about eighteen degrees Fahrenheit and the heat gun is for warming up electrical connectors actors on a science buoy. Stanton is in the middle of a grueling eight hour process to install the buoy. It'll operate independently out here throughout the year. Collecting team data from all sorts of scientific bells and whistles that hang below it in the water flux package mounts on and that's what Beige is the transport of heat. Salt Mamane plugged back in the water column. Here's why Stanton's interested in those things as more sea ice melts in the summertime. It's contributing fresher water to the top of the ocean the salty ocean water which sits lower. Because it's more dense can create a barrier that prevents the fresher water from going down if that top water is trapped near the surface surface. Stanton thinks that can absorb a lot more heat from the sun and lead to even more melting of the ice you can get these Frisch WOM- liars that with a little bit of wind comes along. Does a little bit of mixing really mounts the heck out of the is. He thinks this might play an important role in why the disappearing as fast does it is while Stanton is asking questions about things that are going on. Below the ice other scientists are looking at things going. On above it like Jesse Cremation. WHO's out on the ice testing gene? A device that collects tiny particles from the atmosphere called aerosols. Ampler to say no. We're not talking about the ones in hairspray. Aerosol balls can be dust pollen or fungi and they're the seeds that clouds need to grow and in the Arctic scientists thing that they can also come from tiny organisms in the water like bacteria. Algae less ice on the ocean could mean more aerosols getting blown from the water into the atmosphere and CD more clouds by hypothesis from open water sources. We get generation of these particles from microbes and the ocean. There's a lot that signed to still WANNA find out about clouds in the Arctic. But one thing they know is that they're important for regulating leading temperature like a thermostat depending on the season whether the clouds are over water or ice and the features of the clouds they can wind up cooling or warming the earth below slowdown that affects. How much heat can basically help melt the ice or it can actually reflect sunlight from the CIA so it has a big role in controlling? How much we we have here creaming and Stanton to among hundreds of scientists from different disciplines? Who are trying to better understand? How different parts of this changing region work how? The atmosphere interacts the CIS how the ocean interacts with the ice The ecosystem the biogeochemical processes. That's Matthew shoop an atmospheric scientist and one of the coordinators of the expedition addition. So why do scientists need to know all this. This whole project is aimed at improving our models. When shoop says models he means the computer simulation and scientists use to get estimates for things like how much the earth could warm in the next fifty years the better? You reflect reality in the simulations the better prediction you'll get but because so little is known about the Arctic system. shoop says that the predictions for how it will respond to climate. Change vary a lot. The Arctic is a place where the models agree. The least so that tells us that we're missing something improving. The models will help forecast things like when the Arctic Ocean might have. Its first ice free summer how quickly the globe is going to warm. As as a whole and how the melting greenland ice sheet will add to global sea level rise by observing. How all the little pieces of the system fit together over the next year scientists hope they it can bring that big picture into clear? Focus for N._p._R.. News I'm Ravenna. Kinik in the central Arctic Ocean.

Tim Stanton Arctic Arctic Sea Matthew Shoop North Pole Reporter Ravenna CIA Jesse Cremation Atmospheric Scientist Eighteen Degrees Fahrenheit Five Degrees Fifty Years Eight Hour
Like January in November: Much of US braces for record lows

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Like January in November: Much of US braces for record lows

"National Weather Service meteorologist Brian Jackson says brace yourself and bundle up Minnesota Iowa Wisconsin Michigan and across the plains liking including Candice thirty temperatures in the single digits it's not just the Midwest he says three hundred records could be broken all the way south to the Gulf coast there could be some locations that are called for two days in a row in the set a record will take the cold front started in Russia basis dome of cold air came from eastern Siberia across the Arctic Ocean down Alaska Yukon and while the cold air is already here the worst is yet to come I'm Julie Walker

Brian Jackson Minnesota Michigan Midwest Siberia Arctic Ocean Alaska Yukon Julie Walker National Weather Service Iowa Wisconsin Candice Gulf Russia Two Days
Searching For Solid Ice As Scientists 'Freeze In' To Study A Warming Arctic

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:34 min | 3 years ago

Searching For Solid Ice As Scientists 'Freeze In' To Study A Warming Arctic

"Arctic sea ice is one of the most dramatic indicators of the changing climate some months the ice cover on the Arctic Ocean is about half of what it was decades ago and its thickness has shrunk substantially changes in the eyes may also mean a host of other changes in the arctic system and around the globe to better understand the scientists have frozen in ice breaker alongside an arctic ice flow that they will observe for a whole year and that's where our reporter within a caning car put them out on an ice floe about five degrees from the North Pole a bunch of scientists are setting up equipment it's part of a project called mosaic with a multi disciplinary drifting observatory for the study of arctic climate and the primary question they're trying to answer is what are the causes of diminishing arctic ice and what are the consequences physicist Tim Stanton Stan surrounded by boxes of tools and equipment next to a hole in the ice about fifteen miles from where the mosaic shift is frozen and okay the good descents with Dr electrical would be cool if the gun free Z. here that's for sure it's about eighteen degrees Fahrenheit and the heat gun is for warming up electrical connectors on the science Billy Stanton is in the middle of a grueling eight hour process to install the week it'll operate independently out here throughout the year collecting data from all sorts of scientific bells and whistles that hang below it in the water the flex package mounts on here and that's what makes is the transport of heat sold my main point in the water column here's why Stanton's interested in those things has more sea ice melts in the summertime it's contributing fresher water to the top of the ocean the sole tear ocean water which sits lower because it's more dance can create a barrier that prevents the fresher water from going down if that top waters trapped near the surface Stanton thinks it can absorb a lot more heat from the sun and lead to even more melting of the ice you can get these up fresh warm line is that with a little bit of wind comes along just a little bit of mixing really mounts the heck out of the ice he thinks it's my plan important role in why this case is disappearing as fast as it is well Stanton is asking questions about things that are going on below the ice other scientists are looking at things going on above it like just a creamy and he's out on the ice testing a device the collects tiny particles from the atmosphere called air assaults well today no we're not talking about the ones and hair spray aerosols can be dust pollen or fun guy and they're the seeds that clouds need to grow and in the arctic scientists think that they can also come from tiny organisms in the water like bacteria or algae less ice on the ocean could mean more aerosoles getting blown from the water into the atmosphere and see more clouds my hypothesis is from open water sources we get generation of these particles from microbes in the ocean there's a lot that scientists still want to find out about clouds in the arctic but one thing they know is that they're important for regulating temperature kind of like a thermostat depending on the season whether the clouds are over water or ice and the features of the clouds they can wind up cool lean or warming the earth below them that affects how much he can basically help not the sea ice or you can actually reflects on life in the sea ice so as a big role in controlling how much years we had here cleaning and Stanton are two among hundreds of scientists from different disciplines we're trying to better understand how different parts of this changing region work how the atmosphere interacts with the sea ice how the ocean interacts with the sea ice the ecosystem the biogeochemical process sees that's Matthew Shipp an atmospheric scientist and one of the coordinators of the expedition so why do scientists need to know all this this whole project is aimed at improving our models Winship says models he means the computer simulation scientists use to get estimates for things like how much the earth could warm in the next fifty years the better you reflect reality in the simulations the better protection okay but because so little is known about the arctic ice system ship says the predictions for how it will respond to climate change very a lot the arctic is a place where the models agree the least so that tells us that we're missing something improving the models will help forecast things like when the Arctic Ocean might have its first ice free summer how quickly the globe is going to warm as a whole and how the melting green when I sheeple add to global sea level rise by a serving how all the little pieces of the system fit together over the next year scientists hope they can bring that big picture into clearer

Eighteen Degrees Fahrenheit Five Degrees Fifty Years Eight Hour
An Ambitious Research Expedition Is Getting Underway in the Central Arctic Ocean

Environment: NPR

03:51 min | 3 years ago

An Ambitious Research Expedition Is Getting Underway in the Central Arctic Ocean

"Go now to the central. Arctic Ocean where an ambitious research expedition is getting underway. The goal is to better understand how the Arctic is responding bonding to climate change and to do this scientists are attempting to freeze their ship into the ice and then drift across the Arctic Ocean for the next year reporter quarter revenue scenic joins us now from one of the research vessels nearby and I wanNA know Ravenna. This is the third day straight. We've been trying to get comes to work and get through to you so I'm so glad we've got you on a admittedly a little tough to hear line but welcome hi Louise so I'm not sure I've ever heard anybody in the middle of the central Arctic Ocean before or pay me picture of where you are what you can see well. We're at eighty five degrees north were way up here and we left from from Norway so we started an open water and as we went it north spotty ice kinda appeared around us where they were just cakes of ice floating around the ship but now at this point when I look at the work incomplete ice cover which absolutely blew blew me away the first time I saw you out and all the way to the horizon. It's ice. It's just straight white as if you were looking over Tundra covered with it's now it's absolutely incredible. It sounds absolutely incredible. Okay walk through this mission first of all why are scientists trying to freeze their ship into to the ice. Why can't they just drift around well. They want to observe one flow of ice and how it interacts with the atmosphere above it and the ocean below low it they're big big gaps in what they understand about the Arctic system and how it works because it's a place that's obviously hard to get to and has been not served. If not the world okay now I get it so sticking with one piece of ice for an entire year which has brought you to the challenge of trying to figure out where is perfect piece of Isis and I gather after days of searching they have found it. Yes they have founded. It's actually been pretty difficult because the ice out here in the Arctic Koshin as you may know has been getting thinner but the group that's doing the research is GonNa set up a pretty extensive research camp on the ice itself and something that requires really heavy heavy equipment so they needed to sign a peace. That's thick enough to support all that something that's a bit over a meter thick ideally so hang on a meter just over a meter thick so a little little over three feet at least then that's right okay go on but as gone warmer the ice appear has gotten thinner so scientists have been out doing helicopter surveys with these big big airborne sensors that gives them a big scale picture of ice thickness. They've also gone out onto the ice with snowmobiles they've done manual thickness measurements with drills and just kind of is giving these different surveys to try to find some ice. That's thick enough to meet their needs for research. Wow sounds like quite a process okay so they've found this perfect piece of ice. Let me turn you to the big good question. Why do all of this what exactly are scientists hoping to learn basically the Arctic is warmed over the past few decades. The Sea ice on the Arctic Ocean has changed dramatically elite dinner. There's less of it and there's some big gaps in scientists understanding of that new Arctic so they're out here. They're going to be out here for a whole year. Studying the system top top to bottom or has the really complex system that is interrelated so the interacts with the atmosphere it interacts with the ocean and changes in the skies could name changes and things like how clouds are formed or how much carbon dioxide is being absorbed by the ocean or even how the ecosystem functioning so they're trying to understand all of that and our ultimate goal and studied it is to better reflect the arctic system in climate models and that'll help them project things like how faster disappear and how warming Arctic criticize global temperatures that is revenue caney reporting for us from a research vessel in the central Arctic Ocean Ravenna. Thanks so much. Stay warm

Arctic Ocean Arctic Arctic Ocean Ravenna Arctic Koshin Ravenna Norway Tundra Reporter Louise Eighty Five Degrees Three Feet
Why Scientists Are Deliberately Encasing a Ship in Arctic Sea Ice

Environment: NPR

03:43 min | 3 years ago

Why Scientists Are Deliberately Encasing a Ship in Arctic Sea Ice

"Ships sailing through the Arctic Ocean face a risk. It's the risk that the ship will be trapped in the ice that spreads across the ocean each winter in centuries past Arctic explorers were sometimes stuck for an entire winter and some never broke free now comes word of scientists who plan to steer his ship into the Arctic and trap it in the ice on purpose that will put them in position to study how and why the Arctic is warming reporter. Ravenna caning is at the starting point and trump's in Norway around two hundred people are cycling through the German icebreaker polar stern moving massive amounts of equipment on board unpacking instruments and starting according to install and test them from the top deck. There's an excellent view of all the activity a row of snowmobiles sits on the concrete down below ready for loaded and a massive orange crane is lifting shipping containers some that will even be used as lamp space and placing them on the boat. One of the people making these preparations is matthew you shoot a scientist with the University of Colorado and the National Oceanic and atmospheric administration excited and nervous. I'm both of those things. SHOOP is a CO coordinator for this endeavor known as the Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the study of Arctic climate or mosaic. The project will study the ocean the atmosphere and the sea ice and they'll be digging into all kinds of questions about the physics biology and the chemistry of those systems. The science is extremely diverse. It's all focused on. The ice is kind of the centerpiece of it. All as the Arctic has warmed over the past few decades the sea ice on the Arctic Ocean has gotten thinner and now covers a lot less area the last time that researchers took such a comprehensive look at the Arctic Ocean system was over two decades ago back then the Arctic was a totally different landscape and the picture they captured is rapidly sadly becoming outdated whereas we have thinner ice pack that changes the way that energy transfers through the ice it changes how the ice breaks up how the ice moved around so so many different kind of new behaviors of the ice because it's taking on a new character that we really need to study the sea ice the atmosphere and the ocean are linked so changes in the ice could mean a cascade of changes in everything from how clouds are formed to how much carbon dioxide is being absorbed by the ocean to how organisms that depend on the ice are functioning gene scientists need to observe how all these things interact in the new Arctic so they can better reflect them in climate models that will lead to a better understanding of things like like how fast the Arctic Sea Ice could melt and the effect a warming Arctic could have on global temperature. Here's the catch with. These scientists are about to attempt. It's not a done deal that they'll they'll be able to pull it off. I think find my situation but it's not clear yet and I am nervous about it. Of course that's Marcus rex a scientist with Alfred Wagner Institute and the leader of the Mosaic Mission to study how the system evolves over an entire calendar year the ship will need to cozy up to one big ice flow and freeze in next to it over over the winter after that. They'll have to go where the ice takes them Z. Selection of this starting point is really the main parameters that determines how the expedition to go. It's the only degree of freedom we have. It's possible that the ice they pick could melt out too early or it could wind up taking them somewhere. They don't WanNa go like too close to Russia where they'd have to stop taking measurements adjournments or called the beaufort fire. That's a large gyro is just focusing on for many years of Clinton north of Canal. We don't want to get stuck in Ed. They have studied over a decade of satellite data to help them but they won't really know what they'll find till they get out there. The polar stern is expected to reach the edge of the sea ice within a few weeks six for N._p._R. News I'm GonNa Kinik in trump's Norway.

Arctic Ocean Scientist Arctic Norway Ravenna Donald Trump Marcus Rex Multidisciplinary Drifting Obs Reporter Coordinator University Of Colorado Alfred Wagner Institute Clinton National Oceanic Beaufort Fire Russia Two Decades
To Better Understand The Arctic, Ship Will Spend A Year Frozen Into The Ice

Morning Edition

00:20 sec | 3 years ago

To Better Understand The Arctic, Ship Will Spend A Year Frozen Into The Ice

"And scientists are embarking on a bold new plan to better understand and under study part of the warming arctic the central Arctic Ocean to do that they'll attempt to freeze an ice breaker into the ice for year ahead why scientists are big numbers about encasing their ship

Arctic Ocean
Judge strikes down Trump's offshore drilling decision

Morano in the Morning

00:24 sec | 4 years ago

Judge strikes down Trump's offshore drilling decision

"Arctic judge Sharon Gleason, says President Trump exceeded his authority when he reversed ban on offshore drilling in vast parts of the Arctic Ocean and dozens of canyons and the Atlantic Ocean that ruling Friday throughout Mr. Trump's April two thousand seventeen executive order that overturned the ban implemented by former President Obama police instead presidents have the power under federal law to remove certain lands from development, but could not revoke those

Sharon Gleason President Trump Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean Arctic Executive Barack Obama