36 Burst results for "Arctic"

Fresh "Arctic" from Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:23 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh "Arctic" from Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

"Skills test reduced hiring time by 27% on average, is it indeed dot com slash credit? Take 35. W m a l traffic and weather every 10 minutes. First on the fives here, Steve Hirschorn in the headed carpet cleaning traffic center, the Beltway in Montgomery County. Pretty swell right now. The outer loop delays now, beginning near University Boulevard around to a medical emergency. That was after Georgia Avenue before Connecticut Avenue. Given plenty of room. You see the arrow boards there elsewhere on the Beltway we're doing okay. 95 in Virginia started see volume delays building now from Dale City. Up toward the Arctic went after that You're OK as you continue. Love towards Springfield at Olympic that way that we have to go west on 66 still partially blocked with construction Now from garage door repaired calm. The W M A. L start Watch seven forecast Today We're headed up to 66 degrees with some late day sunshine around 45 P. M. Tomorrow, the warmest of the week and in many ways the best.

Steve Hirschorn Dale City Georgia Avenue Connecticut Avenue 27% Virginia Springfield University Boulevard Montgomery County Today 66 Degrees First Around 45 P. M. Tomorrow Arctic Beltway Fives 35 Every 10 Minutes Olympic 95
Elon Musk Teases Tesla AI Day for Summer 2021

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

01:57 min | 3 d ago

Elon Musk Teases Tesla AI Day for Summer 2021

"Now we're here today. We're gonna be talking about some recent. Us tweets about tests a day. Looks like we may have a tentative date for when that maybe scheduled we'll talk about what to expect for that event we've also got a little bit of an update on the model s. next refresh and a couple of other stories as well. Quick look at the stock tesla today finished up nine tenths of a percent to seven hundred and thirty eight dollars five cents that did trail slightly behind the nasdaq up. One point three percent and volume really fell off today for tusla about twenty seven and a half million shares traded today versus the pretty high volumes. We had yesterday and the day prior yesterday. Of course we did have that coin based direct listing. So i know a lot of people like to take a look at what is doing what they're trading. They did sell off some tesla yesterday. That always seems to get a little bit of attention on social media but definitely a normal process for arc. Tesla's diller top holding in many funds it has risen above ten percent in some of those funds and generally when that happens arc tends to sell down a little bit and on the coin based point arctic initiate positions there across funds at about zero point seven five percent weight so selling tesla would help provide liquidity for that new position. So nothing too surprising there. I just wanted to point out because again it gets talked about. And that may have been a little bit of pressure on tussle in general yesterday as tesla had a tougher day arc. Probably not the only one to make a move like that all right with that being said let's get into ai elon. Musk caddy number of tweets yesterday about tesla and their progress in artificial intelligence. He kicked it off by noting. That quote tesla ai. Slash autopilot engine team is making excellent progress solving real world. Ai and quote he followed that up with a number of tweets some of which related to full self. Self-driving the beta button. We'll get to those in a second but he also responded to a question asking. When can we expect a day. Yulon said probably late july so first thing there anytime we have a timeline from and we got to be cautious on that he saying probably here so be a little bit more cautious. Even this is an event so it is a little bit more up to tesla when they hold this. But i would assume they wouldn't want to hold an event like this until the fd beta is broadly released.

Tesla Diller Ai Elon Arctic United States Yulon
The Underdogs Who Outraced the Nazis

Past Gas

01:37 min | Last week

The Underdogs Who Outraced the Nazis

"The year is nineteen thirty to rally racer lucy o'reilly shell her husband and co-pilot laurie fellow ralliers hector petite and shock marciniak a reporter for the parisian leisure. No have just left sundsvall in their black bugatti t four four making their way to the monte carlo rally starting line sweden blurry quickly pilots the car through the thick arctic fog cautiously aware of the four inch thick lack ice below them. Suddenly the tire chains failed to catch the body as it veers and then glides into the air about take flight before anyone in the car can even scream the bugatti snacks forcefully into a snowbank florian lucy make sure their passengers are uninjured and then address the real issue. The team needs to make it to a man before the rally is set to begin or they won't be permitted to compete. Lucy shell the five foot four norm defying rally driver. This is not a face shield. Allow her car mates to entertain long. Lucy sends hector jacques off to look for a nearby farmhouse for health. Then she and lori begin to desperately hacked the snow with their picks and shovels. It is one o'clock in the morning. Thirty below zero and they're stuck in the middle of a pine forest at least ten miles from the nearest village. Though the to realize their seemingly insurmountable odds the shells need to free their body and continue to rally as planned the show of nasty turn out to be routine for lucy riley show the sports car driving heiress though later. Put together a team of unlikely heroes to beat hitler. At one of his favourite games motor sport

Lucy O'reilly Laurie Fellow Hector Petite Marciniak Lucy Shell Hector Jacques Arctic Sweden Lucy Lori Lucy Riley
Satellite Images Show Huge Russian Military Buildup in the Arctic

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:12 min | Last week

Satellite Images Show Huge Russian Military Buildup in the Arctic

"Recent weeks have seen a significant build up of russian forces along its border with ukraine within the last day the threat has become even less physically with one. Russian officials suggesting that those troops crossed the border to defend russian sympathizing separatists in ukraine's eastern donbass region. The united states is now said to be considering sending warships into the black sea. This is not necessarily a huge deal the. Us navy seals the black sea pretty regularly so long as turkey admits them through. The dodd nells straight. However in this instance it would surely be interpreted as a hefty hint in moscow's direction on join with more on all this by mark galliotti senior associate fellow at the royal united services institute and author most recently of a short history of russia. Markle start with the big question. Do we know what. Russia's intentions towards ukraine actually are right. Now we certainly don't and to be perfectly honest. That's how moscow wants to keep it whether there's some major military offensive plan his pie unlikely but the key thing is this is very much about bringing pressure to bear on ukraine and in that respect as far as moscow's concerned the more uncertainty the better.

Ukraine Donbass Mark Galliotti Royal United Services Institut Moscow United States Navy Turkey Markle
Greenland Election Shows Divide Over Rare-Earth Metals Mine

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:21 sec | Last week

Greenland Election Shows Divide Over Rare-Earth Metals Mine

"Votes are being counted following parliamentary elections in Greenland. The results could decide the future off mining for rare earth metals on the Arctic island. The two main political parties are deeply divided on whether to grant a license to an international company to mine for uranium and other rare earth metals in the south of the

Arctic Island Greenland
Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

"Little to no ice floating along marquette bay noah reported january's total ice coverage in the great lakes to be the lowest in the last forty eight years lake superior. Ice cover briefly grew to fifty percent during our february arctic outbreak but that fleeting is vanished just as quickly with our mild march. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. And today on climate cast. What are longer term lake superior ice trends telling us about climate change in the upper midwest professor j austin researchers all things lake superior with the large lakes observatory at the university of minnesota duluth high. Welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on paul. Let's start with this past winter. What was notable with ice cover on lake superior It was a really unusual year very low ice covered starch and we had that remarkable cold air in february and we ended up with fleetingly above average ice levels superior and just as remarkably. They went away really quickly. And how does this fit with the longer term ice trends that you're seeing on lake superior and the great lakes. I expect that we're going to see Significantly lower than average ice cover this year and basically since about nineteen ninety eight. We've had a long string of relatively low ice cover on lake superior with some exceptions like like the polar vortex in twenty fourteen where we had nearly complete coverage for two months.

Marquette Bay Paul Hutton J Austin Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Great Lakes Arctic NPR Midwest Paul
Anchorage man sentenced for falsely marketing goods as made by an Alaska Native

Native America Calling

01:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Anchorage man sentenced for falsely marketing goods as made by an Alaska Native

"And anchorage man was sentenced to five years probation. After being found guilty of illegally marketing items he sold as being made by an alaskan native artists came. Nba trip crouse has more on march tenth. The us district judge also sentenced six-year-old lease krenek to pay two thousand five hundred dollars in restitution and surrender more than one hundred twenty five thousand dollars in retail products. According to a joint news. Release from the us. Fish and wildlife service and the indian arts and crafts board skunk was charged with a felony violation of the indian arts and crafts act. The law makes it illegal to fossil market products is native made. Skunk was also charged with a misdemeanor violation of the marine mammal protection. Act according to the release the charges stem from two thousand fifteen whence chronic owned the arctic treasures. Gift shop downtown anchorage. He sold a polar bear skull to an undercover agent of the us fish and wildlife service in violation of the marine mammal protection act in two thousand seventeen undercover agents. Visited skornik store again announced about carvings. Skirt told the agents that an alaskan native artists from point hope made them but the carvings were actually made by s- chronic during his probation chronic will be prohibited from working with animal products. In anchorage on trip

Krenek Indian Arts And Crafts Board Anchorage Us Fish And Wildlife Service Crouse NBA United States Skirt
A chaotic week for Brazil's President Bolsonaro

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

A chaotic week for Brazil's President Bolsonaro

"Even by his own standards brazil's president jair bolsonaro has had aka arctic with on monday. He was forced to reshuffle his cabinet after his foreign and defense ministers both quit yesterday as he purports lead once again surpassed its record daily. Covert death toll. The political crisis brought on by the pandemic also plumbed new depths today. Brazil awoke to news that the heads of the army navy and air force of all handed in their resignations in protest at boston is handling of the

Jair Bolsonaro Arctic Brazil Cabinet Army Navy Boston
What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

Short Wave

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

"Thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explorer aerial. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study and articles extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of the creatures that they studied there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. Couldn't could not have been easy going to antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to aunt hartika and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy and then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society which i am now the president of

Antarctica Ariel Waldman Nasa Hartika San Francisco Microscopically
Jet Stream Brings on Cold Snaps

Climate One

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Jet Stream Brings on Cold Snaps

"And a recent addition about changes in the jet stream that Dr Weather patterns in North America and Europe What are those changes? And what do they mean for a person who loves to play in snow or makes their living in a snow dependent economy? Well, it's a it's an area of active research. The debate is whether or not we're going to start seeing this wave yer jet stream when we see that type of whether you can end up in situations where very cold Arctic blasts can make their way much further south, and that's exactly what we had seen during the Texas freeze. While the Arctic itself was actually much warmer than average, and it could possibly mean that you end up with maybe one or two more big snowstorms or cold blasts opportunities for making snow. If you're in a region that might be having trouble making snow, but we can't count on it. It's too uncertain at this point how this is going to unfold in the future when we have this type of sticky weather, so the jet stream getting stuck in this really wavy pattern. That's also what contributes to extreme flooding events s so if you're not getting that cold blast, you could end up with a lot of rain. Because you're stuck in a trough where there's a lot of low pressure systems delivering a lot of rain, and it's just that pressure system is not moving and then likewise, anyone who's stuck in the high pressure side of that of the ridge. They get stuck in a dryer season and its perpetual so it's not great news. Either way, I think, volatilities everywhere we look

Dr Weather Arctic North America Europe Texas
Death Toll from Texas Winter Storm Rises to 111

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Death Toll from Texas Winter Storm Rises to 111

"Department of State Health Services has revised the number of Texans who died because of last month's bitter Winter Storm. W. BPI's Dennis Martin, the official death count from the Valentine's Week. Arctic blast is now 111. Itwas preliminarily pegged at 57. A week ago, Most of the victims died of hypothermia. Health officials notes often difficult to determine whether a death was related to whether or not And Dallas County's chief medical examiner examiner has has said said will will probably probably never never know know the the actual actual number. number.

Department Of State Health Ser W. Bpi Dennis Martin Winter Storm Texans Arctic Hypothermia Dallas County
OnePlus 9 Pro Phone Review

All About Android

07:36 min | 3 weeks ago

OnePlus 9 Pro Phone Review

"So there was some big Hardware news today. Maybe you heard of it. If you're fans of one plus then you probably saw that the company held a livestream this morning and then shortly after the embargoes lifted and reviews were aplenty the oneplus nine and the oneplus nine pro wrong article okay. Plus nine won't buzz nine pro on house this morning. That's does because i didn't put an article in there burks. Donald the worry about him Were announced this morning. You don't need to put an article in there. Because i have them there they are. That's right this right. Here is one plus nine in. I think they call it a matte. Black does a color. Although it's not very mad i was gonna ask. Does it have did you. Keep the protector on there. Because it looks real shiny to me is look mad at all. No it's not matt actually. It's very very shiny in fact both of these are very very shiny. So that's the nine and then a slightly larger nine pro like super glass. You know what i mean. It's like error basically But it's got a got a little kind of like haziness up the top that gets to completely cleared out the bottom but You know. I colors What's the other one is like a do. They call it an arctic green or something like that. I can't remember the name of the third color but it's kind of more similar to here. Hold on. I think i have a more similar to the oneplus. Eight pro this. I would call matt right like this is kind of like a hazy sort of not glassy reflective thing but just really disappointed by. I'm sorry i. I don't mean to be hard to please but i'm disappointed by the black and silver of it all like what is this is like some sort of ball where i'm like put on a fancy gown only wear like black or silver. Are i mean you still. You still have your color options. Vic the oneplus maper wave like whereas the vapor way. Where's the beautiful -til back sometimes. Save these things for later. You know how oneplus roles they come out with their colors in there and then a little bit later they come out with their special edition. Vapor waves now. They did last year. I'm just saying sometimes they do Bites What you will notice with the oneplus nine nine pro. If you look hard enough. And i don't know that i've got this on auto focus so i'm just gonna keep right here but Basically this little branding in the camera bump which says hostile blog. I saying that right And so basically oneplus has a has a partnership with hossa blonde. The camera company. That is a highly respected. Although we should definitely point out the fact that hasselblad was also the big camera partnership that motorola had for a moto. Maude that did not actually take very good pictures. So the question was once we started hearing kind of the news about oneplus and blah. Having a partnership. Is this a branding play. Or is the cameras hardware actually amazing here which is definitely the focus. That really seems to be the focus. This time around the oneplus eight year. You may remember at least eight pro. it it did well improving upping oneplus game when it came to the camera and it looks like with the nine. They're looking to do the same thing here. I've had these phones For about a week and a half now although. I've only really used the nine pro with any regularity. I haven't like lived with the oneplus nine Camera hardware is very similar between the two. But i've i've leaned into the camera on the nine pro. I'm actually doing a comparison for hands on tack. That will go live tomorrow between shots on the eight pro and shots on the nine pro to kinda show. You did one. Plus actually upgrade here But know feel free and show some shots. Hokey stay on this one for a second because this one kind of bothers me. This is the main rear facing camera. I don't know that anyone else would notice this. Because you don't know my daughter and my wife the way i do but their heads look stretched totally noticed that actually. It looks like your daughter's flat look like cardboard out to that. This was done with main camera. This was not the winding lens. I'm used to seeing that kind of tearing that smearing on wide angle shots. But not the main and i realized what it is because this was like within. The first couple of days of having the camera was like okay. What is that if all of my main shots are going to do. This is going to bug the heck out of me and realize what it is the main lens does not have optical image stabilization. And so if you are even moving your hand the slightest when you take these shots you end up with really Erotic images and that. I see that as a big bummer. Because it actually did kind of rear. Its ugly head to me multiple times. Where i thought i was still but it wasn't quite still enough then. I looked at the shot later. I was like okay. That's just a little too blurry for my liking. The actually end up getting better shots out of the uae than you do with the main But yeah i mean. I mean considering that it's a wide right so you get that wide effect but the i just enjoy the shots from the live more than i do the main and a lot of the shots that i took those very dark outsize store. That's that's frustrating. It out the person who uses that you know it's going to distort the images. They take that they want us to. I'm sorry usa. The angle has the optical image civilization. Yeah yeah the wide has optical image stabilization to my understanding. The main does not at main absolutely does not and yeah so i got arenas on on really yellow. Yeah maybe maybe fact. Check that for me. While i walk through a few these eligible here but yeah i know for a fact. The main does not. I'm pretty pretty confident. The why does. But i could be wrong That shot that you were just looking at that. Was low light. Low light in the back yard near dr not quite dark and it was fine like lobe light performance on some of my shots were were fine. Nothing like screaming amazing. You know what i mean. you know again low light. I don't know. I feel like that could be better right by. I don't know This those two shots are interesting because one is the rear. This is the front facing and it shows you the differences in color balanced detection between the two cameras There's just i don't know like a time and time again as i'm kind of going through and taking pictures and comparing and everything it's like the images like i'm really curious to compare between the eight pro and the nine pro because i haven't actually done the side by sides yet for tomorrow's review. I'm doing that After the show actually. But i'm really interested to compare. Because like i'm kind of guessing guessing without comparing at this point that images are relatively similar between the two and if so then what is the hasselblad partnership actually mean

Matt Burks Donald Trump Hossa Hasselblad Maude VIC Motorola UAE USA
Chinese 'polar bear hotel' opens to full bookings and criticism

Mo'Kelly

00:27 sec | Last month

Chinese 'polar bear hotel' opens to full bookings and criticism

"Hotel has come under fire for its key feature. Ah Hotel in China has been drawing criticism for its latest hotel that allows guests to state with polar bears. According to NBC News. The hotel opened this past week and supposedly gives guests the opportunity to see the bears from all 21 guest rooms. Conservationists and animal rights groups are criticizing the hotel experience with Peter telling one media outlet that bears belong in the Arctic, not

Ah Hotel Nbc News China Peter Arctic
Polar Vortex causes extreme freezing globally in February

UN News

01:29 min | Last month

Polar Vortex causes extreme freezing globally in February

"Polar vortex was responsible for the freezing conditions in the state of texas at last month. Your weather experts of said before warning of a worrying increase in global carbon dioxide levels spokesperson cleanliest from the world meteorological organization. Wmo told journalists during a regular briefing in geneva that the united states shiver through its coldest february since one thousand nine hundred nine thanks to the natural phenomenon to do with vortex. This is an area of low pressure cold air surrounding the polls. It normally keeps that the optic woman air and lower latitudes weakened this winter that meant that he called egg Sitting out the object woman by contrast went into pods of the optic minnelli's added that no less than sixty two all time. Daily called minimum temperature records were broken in the united states from february. The eleventh to this extinct. According to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration february temperatures were also well below the one thousand ninety one to twenty twenty average over much of the russian federation and north america. But they were well. Above average over parts of the arctic and from north west africa to southern europe and china the un agency also cautioned that although february was a relatively cold month. This does not negate the long-term warming trend from climate change. Cold records are becoming rarer in contrast to heat temperature records and heat waves. We expect this trend to continue. Wmo said in a statement

WMO United States Geneva Minnelli Texas North West Africa National Oceanic And Atmospher Russian Federation North America Arctic UN Europe China
President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden to travel to Houston on Friday

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:25 sec | Last month

President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden to travel to Houston on Friday

"Partisan. The president and first lady are gonna head to Texas On Friday. White House press secretary Jen Psaki says the binds will land in Houston. We'll have some meetings with local and state officials in Texas. The president will also visit a covert health center where vaccines are being distributed. The Lone Star state is starting out after being devastated by that historic winter storm, an Arctic blast The cold snap brought much of Texas to a standstill is million's had no heat, electricity or

Jen Psaki Texas White House Houston Arctic
Why Beef Isn’t Necessarily the Enemy

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:00 min | Last month

Why Beef Isn’t Necessarily the Enemy

"I want to sort of elephant room. Which is the conversation about meat. Itself is a good for you. Is it bad for. You is bad for the planet is a good for the planet is bad for the animals. Is it okay to eat animals. Because the conversation it's really emerging in many many circles is that we should become vegan or to save our health and save the planet. And you put up a very different conversation about this How how do we become to understand. That beef is the enemy and and why why is why is it not absolutely i mean. There's a series of cultural conversations. That happened after the industrialization of beef production that shifted the arctic millennials reviewed beef. You know the narrative. Well i'll repeat it. The broad brushstrokes. That story after the second world war we had a major consolidation agriculture many of the ammunition factories converted to fertilizer factories. Which made we had basically a vast infrastructure loot fertilizer factories. That were ready to go. We started to make fertilizer much much cheaper. We had a bigger industrialisation of agriculture. At the same time we had a different approach towards food security is what we call them today but the government after the second world war and around that time was very concerned about america autonomy understandably and invested in systems that ensure that we had enough corn wheat rice soy those key crops and a few others cotton sorghum tobacco that we had those introduced in volume sufficient to feed the american public in the us. The conflans those two things is an overabundance of food crops starting in the fifties that we began to understandably redivert to be feed developed. The world service's in too much food so we feed. It does something else right and the thing is to mark. It's a bunch of rational things that we did right. We are like okay. I don't wanna have another. You know victory gardens and terrifying end of the world scenario. Understand right we have all these huge factories that we need to do something else with understand. These are all rational economic. It was good. It was good intentions with bad consequences and longer term consequences. You know these are sort of short term pivots responses. I think sometimes. And i do agree with some of the broader kind of conspiracies time around big ag but the way that it's been built up i think was a normal reaction to a bunch of social and economic forces and so we ended up with though is by the fifties we were realizing we could get fatter. Beef faster feeding it. Human food right and then about ten years later diet for small planet planet was one of the first book said that hit around those but then by ten years later people started to say but wait a second. This is devastating for the environment. Right because we're basically producing resource intensive crops that are maladaptive for beef diet right And are also bad for the planet being produced at the scale for this usage and effectively we created a very unsustainable beef supply system so the way that it happened is that we pivoted how we produce beef from a natural regenerate traditional system to the modern industrial farm. Yeah and then we started to understand. I'd say they the the response to that was for many people will. We're going to be vegan now the response but just like oh my god. Look what's happening. These factory farms and then of course literature came out. That meat is bad for you as got saturated fat. We shouldn't be eating. It causes heart disease right. Yes yes. And i think a lot of they you know they the conversation around beef and how bad it is a lot of it. I agree with directionally in that confinement. Beef is really bad.

Arctic United States Heart Disease Right
Biden to travel to Texas on Friday in wake of devastating winter storm

Anna Davlantes

00:30 sec | Last month

Biden to travel to Texas on Friday in wake of devastating winter storm

"Jen Psaki, says President Biden and first lady Jill Biden. We'll look at the problems in Texas with the historic Winter Storm On Friday, the president and the first lady will travel to Houston. President will meet with local leaders to discuss the winter storm relief efforts Progress toward recovery The Lone Star state going out after being devastated by historic winter storm an Arctic blast. The cold snap brought much of Texas to a standstill is million's had no heat, electricity or safe water. Now. WGN

Jen Psaki President Biden Jill Biden Texas Houston Arctic WGN
Reykjavík's Ironclads

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Reykjavík's Ironclads

"It comes landscape. Iceland lives up to its cliche of being a land of fire and ice rugged volcanic and arctic but in reykjavik. The materials in question are less natural and highly unusual in the city centre. A lot seems to be clad in corrugated sheet metal houses large and small simpler ornate municipal buildings mansions even churches are covered in wavy iron than painted in bright colors. The core gatien's run vertically making some jonty stripes near slander. capitals eclectic colorful streetscape. Many of the houses are charmingly. Small and have sizable south facing backyards. To catch what little son might shine in. The winter locals called houses iron clouds in. it's hard to imagine reykjavik without them.

Reykjavik Gatien Iceland Arctic
Unusual Perennials With Far Reaches Farm

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:44 min | 2 months ago

Unusual Perennials With Far Reaches Farm

"I'm kind of overwhelmed at the possibilities that you have in your list But i did see one sort of like theme ish thing that really caught my eye and recently my friend can drew's and i were talking on the show about some favorite of our early native spring. Perennials were both eastern gardeners. And we both love things with surveys. Arching stems like solomon's seal and such and you have a lot of things like that i think and i don't know if that's intentional. Or if you're obsessed with that too but can we talk about some of them like the polygon items and my anthem and you've you larrea. I die spor homes and whatever. I saw a lot of these things. Tell me about plants that look like that. Let's talk about that. Yeah yeah yeah all of those that whole kind of group. I mean they're like the disarms are now you know been separated out from the into a different family than Pulling games or solomon sales but but we kinda regard them as the sort of fulfilling the same function in the garden. They have the same visual Impact and appeal really and And we're just we are just smitten by them and and and for good reason. There's fear other things that Offer that In the shade garden Solomon's seals in particular Have there's there's over. Eighty species of solomon seals and within each species and their diversity is incredible. I mean it goes from the arctic circle down to tropical rainforest in vietnam and they can be. We've actually pitched a tent on flicking them hooker. I at thirteen thousand feet in eastern bhutan and that only gets an inch or two high in that really short alpine turf whereas We've got political. Tim did in our shade garden. And it's not done reaching its full mature size and we've been as tall as fifteen feet so that's pretty awesome. Thank goodness textiles for them and it said you have thirty one. Different polygamy items. And i was like and then you had an article on the website. I'll give a link with the transcript to it about one that i think it's cinemas The species is king knee. Ainum or juan neum or something It's like a twelve footer. With orange flowers that was surprising. Yeah that's really really nice thing. It's one that had been the had been regarded as a flagging kingham. It's it's distinct in that it has leaves. That are different than what we would see on on on the east coast for example Heard the leaves are kind of following this stem and their little alternate sort of things like every other step stepped up. The leaves up the stem but in keenum who aim vietnam again Their what's called a tesla arrangement of lease or their little like spokes on a wheel in quarrels ranked up the stem. And that's that's very distinctive right. Can you ain't them You know crashing. You know if it gets like ten twelve or even like in vietnam and fifteen feet. How do you. How do you keep those upright. And they've got a clever little adaptation not the end of each leaf tip at hooks into a little hook and it will actually hold onto surrounding branchless and of shrubs and so we have going up through having going up to really thin twigged shabby dogwoods and that can kind of self trellis themselves that way.

Solomon Larrea Ainum Drew Vietnam Arctic Circle Kingham Bhutan Keenum TIM East Coast Tesla
"arctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"In the arctic so we call this in climate science positive feedback which needs acceleration of the warming in the arctic. And that's when a key drivers for arctic amplification but there's also other feedbacks there's changes in the amount of moisture in the arctic which can cause changes in cloud cover and there's so many different e bax in the arctic and i found during my grad school research. We'd known arts. Campus kitchen exists for decades in our earliest permit of climate models but the processes contributing arctic amplification. You know the relative importance of them are still really interesting scientific questions this. Is you know. we're talking with zack. Labe who is a climate scientists and arctic expert on arctic report car which were going to die right in I didn't get a sense of when i give gave my introduction. Where are you currently working yes. I just mood semi recently. I guess time goes by fast. So i defended my phd from in california in may and then i moved to colorado to start my post doc june so i'm currently in fort collins colorado state. Okay so you're a post doc at colorado state. I wanted to make sure we got that in there. Because i didn't get a chance to mention that uh in the initial injury. There are some things in life worth waiting for. Your local newscasts isn't always.

california colorado Labe colorado state june fort collins colorado state zack arctic may
"arctic" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:50 min | 4 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on 1A

"Light of late january vast frozen beautiful. So i guess what we're looking at ten is the sunsetting. What time is it just about. Two o'clock two o'clock the temperature in the arctic refuge december averages below zero but it's home to a heated debate. That goes back decades now over whether to leave the land untouched or whether to drill for oil. That fight is coming to a head in early january and its final weeks. The trump administration plans to auction off leases for drilling rights in the arctic refuge to gas and oil companies teagan hanlin as a reporter for alaska public media. She's been covering the story and she joins us now from alaska high teagan. Welcome to one a. Thanks for kindergarten extra early for this conversation. Hi thanks for having me on so in one thousand nine hundred eighty congress permanently protected about ninety percent of the arctic refuge but left one point five million acres known as the coastal plain opened to future drilling. But something happened more recently in two thousand seventeen that set the stage for the upcoming auction. What happened that year. shir sue. You're right there's been this decades long fight over whether to open the plain to oil and gas drilling and we saw dramatic shift in two thousand seventeen when a republican led congress passed the tax cuts and jobs act. Which was this massive tax bill. And it included a provision spearheaded by alaska's senator lisa murkowski to open the coastal plain in the refuge to oil and gas development and the tax act also ordered the government to hold to lee sales in the coastal plain. The first by the end of twenty twenty one. Do we have an idea yet how the cell will play out if it happened as scheduled on january sixth. Well what we know from the government is that they plan to offer all federal lands in the coastal plain in the lease sale. And they say that they will Livestream online the drilling rates auction on january six and companies will have to submit their sealed bids for the lee sale by the end of december. We invited the bureau of land management which is managing the auction to participate in this conversation. It offered us this statement and stand quote the beyond limits clearly required by law to establish an oil and gas leasing program and hold at least two miles in the coastal plain of the arctic. National wildlife refuge. We have taken a significant step in meeting our obligations by determining where and under what conditions the oil and gas development program will occur and publishing notice of the first lease l. Are science based decisions are legally compliant and based on an extensive process involving input from blm career subject matter experts and the public the blm continues to balance.

arctic teagan hanlin alaska arctic refuge shir sue senator lisa murkowski congress blm government
"arctic" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:02 min | 7 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Yeah there there are a lot of impacts One of them's very much on the local scale kind of following along with beer mentioned when we don't have ice cover, you have the open ocean you have what's called batch area where winds can kick up waves and we've seen more storms having bigger impacts because the storms are coming up over the open water and actually fed by the energy in the moisture in the in the open ocean. Now's the ice is recruited as those reach the coast those are causing arose in bigger waves or impacting the coastline and the coastal villages and coastal communities there. are seeing erosion, which is threatening the communities in those areas. So it's a very local impact but a very important one. I don't larger scale the the is white it. It's bright reflective of the sun's energy up in the Arctic in the summertime, there's twenty four hours a day light. There's a lot of energy that can potentially come in. But when the sea ice is there, it reflects off that ice flex back to space. It doesn't do anything it doesn't add energy to the system when energy it does add it goes towards melting. So the temperature still stays right around the melting point but when we lose the ice cover. The Ocean is very dark. It absorbs most of the Sun's energy over ninety percent of it versus maybe only thirty or forty percent when the ice is there. So over ninety percent of the sun's energy goes into the ocean that heats up the ocean and heats up the environment as a whole, and we see the Arctic becoming a much warmer place than it would be with. We're we're see I still present So that has a big effect and the Arctic environment in the Arctic climate, and there are even indications about implications in terms of effects on the larger more global or at least northern hemisphere weather due to the warming Arctic. In. So I wonder how things are comparing especially at the rate what you're witnessing and change. Where will we be in ten years? We'll talk about that.

Arctic
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"Just add your that list so that you can. Join. The people that are fighting for the question and for the sacred piece of land. Thank you. Of all the people we spoke to you. Think the hardest conversation. But. The one that I felt was most necessary was the first one we had with Kelvin. And some of the things that he pointed out and some of the frustrations that he expressed about having these conversations over and over and over and not quite seeing people who have those conversations with him doing much else after that point. I felt like. There was maybe this part of my brain. That I hadn't fully I don't know I guess maybe deconstructed from of. For my previous religious experience of like I'm going to go do some really good work in the world here I go and then is getting there and having this conversation with this person. Just. Knocking in the best way knocking down. Any idea that I had of myself being centered in this experience at all or us or what we are doing being centered and it was the conversation with him was tense and I feel like it needed to be and that when we were walking back after that conversation I felt the magnitude of the why behind the whole trip Hit me in a way that I don't think it had before when we were just alone with ourselves on the coastal plain that. That conversation was really moving for me as well. I just walk away. Tears is because. I, think what? The biggest thing I got out of this trip was a sense of of history and of. How. Not In a vacuum, this one thing is it's not just this one issue about this particular land with these this particular tribe. Have the sense when you spend some time in this region How long these people have been here? How intimately? Interwoven into very land itself. It's not just. This. It's like this has been happening to them now. Since white people moved into the area and said, this is our land here you can have part of it. As long as Xyz like making the move into villages. Making them change their whole way of life in the now it's just. It's so obviously the shitty thing to do. To go in there and Yeah, okay. Now, we're going to drill here. So obviously inhumane when you feel the whole picture. Yeah so it was it was a good amount of. Anger and sadness and. Feeling of the injustice of how these people have. been treated. William said something. Yesterday I think just It was just a statement that felt like it brought a lot of levity just the thought of. Claiming land is so violent. Does the idea of coming into a place that Is Not Yours in saying it's my now Lico on. Like when we were talking to Charlie. And you pointed out Mike. Saying you know I, my ancestors came to this land in this year how long have your ancestors been here and I mean hundreds of generations it's nothing short of just absolute violence us going to the Arctic village. To me highlight it how just complex and complicated? All of this just really is how kind of what you were saying Muhammad Meshed it. All is compounded the pain is, but also how compounded the legality in the politics and the the original sin it's all. It's kind of all been something that has been perpetually. Leading towards these people's dissemination, their termination, their extinction. And this is just one more fight that is showing that they're not valued that they're not loved that they're not. Seeing that they're not her that they have no real agency even when the government I guess gives them land whatever that means allows them to become a sovereign nation how Of It self is. A A step towards their own extinction because they're not even given the tools necessary to even support themselves. And their starting off in debt, they're starting off in poverty. So yeah. When we went to Kelvin tiles and he raged at us in that moment I I understood that I was like, i. I know the frustration of this and I honestly I felt it was an honor and a privilege just to even be in the situation where. I could hear someone else's pain. And he could just throw at me and I can just take. It didn't have to defend myself I. Didn't have to explain myself and have to explain my motives or motives or. Will this is going to help you and why would you know none of that? Mattered it was simply. Thank you for sharing I. Hear You I see you. I can't take any of this away. But? I can be a witness to the fact that you're here that you exist and your story matters and the pain of your people matter. That was some of my biggest takeaway and obviously like. Colonialism is. It really is like. It is royally screwed. With all of and especially in nation People who are literally fighting for their own existence. In a way that even a lot of us more in the states. Just don't quite understand. What have you been able to take away Mike? I think I was struck first by the scale of Arctic. Habitat. And the necessity of the scale that of that Habitat. Such short summers and such intense winters. There's not a lot of time..

Mike Charlie Arctic village Muhammad William
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

05:32 min | 7 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"It's our first morning in the. FREAKING freaking cold. Of An Arctic summer and I was just really curious like. What was notice what you're feeling what you've experienced? I feel an all like feel this land, this space. This time together just feels really sacred. And feels really like I feel. Centered. I feel like nothing else really matters outside of this moment. Yeah, I feel that. Same, very similar way like I very aware of how I'm D- it feels but it doesn't feel the lonely kind of empty. It feels very full I feel very present. To this specific kind of fullness. In that emptiness. If any of that make sense. Probably, make sense all of you because you're here Does vary I feel very good slept really well, last night we've been. Really, well taken care of by our guide and host. I feel. Awake and alive. I think it's weird I've been to a lot of places on our planet. And there's a certain like commonality to ecosystems like. So this is what desert are like, and this is what? You know boreal forests are like and this is what? Really. Hot Wet climates are like. But the Arctic. Tundra. It feels more like an alien planet Earth Ecosystem. Yeah. It's beautiful. It's very, it's. Never felt a place like this like just feeling absolutely. Away from all human. Civilization. Also, like not a camper. So like I didn't sleep very well. A pampered life. Has. Been in Los Angeles also. Tire. Last night, we could tell that Michael is starting to fair around the edges because he was like. Sarah hot springs nearby. Turns out. There's a lukewarm spring that's like a really hard day's high and I could see him mulling it over. He might still be considered. If we ever just we look up and he's gone we know where he wins if either of those either hot springs or slightly shorter hike no-brainer. For a luke. Warm. Hot Springs. That's kind of outdoorsy stuff. You like you just don't like camping I love the earth. I just I like. Sleeping in beds and. Using toilets showers running water. I mean one way to look at humanity is like we're the. Global. Ecosystem champion at nests building. Yeah like we're just incredible at ness building. And the Arctic is one of the few environments. So hostile to human nest building that we haven't settled here. Yeah. I mean this is like. A summer. So this is like the as pleasant as it gets here. And I think my hands about to fall off. and. The only one wearing gloves holding these microphones. I didn't I gotta work the microphone with with the Glove on. You can do anything if you believe in us, it's crazy how untouched this land is. Yeah. I. Like. You can feel there's no trails. It's all even like walking is difficult to do. And so yeah, very few humans I've ever really come here and then do they only come. To the dream, the aware that we are not supposed to be here. It it isn't for us like the specific spot and the only way that we've made it for us as bringing as close as we can get to are nesting with us. And, without any of this. Would die pretty quickly out here, and that's interesting because I've never been somewhere that remote than that aware. that. We're I mean. We're in good hands, but we're hanging on by a thread technically can go really anymore. There's no. Yeah. We've never what Dan was telling us yesterday. There's nowhere in the continental us. That is as far as we are right now from just a road. Like the lengths we had to go through to get here in the first place like to airplane rides. Me like a connecting flight tiny probably like we in a plane, the size of a sprinter van, and then a play on a little bit smaller than a Honda Civic. Tricks took slightly landing little flight those mountains though what I was. Glad. I took motion sickness medicine but it was beautiful. It was. Yeah, I had a spiritual experience because when we were going over the mountains into sunset pass I put on spirit by beyond say from the Lion King and I. I took everything with me not to put my hands up worship on the plane. Good. There wasn't a whole lot of room total..

Michael Arctic Hot Springs ness building Dan Tundra Los Angeles Honda Sarah Civic
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"This is just me. It's Gosh I guess mid or late afternoon and today we took a hike to this. I don't know what to call it other than a monument valley. It's up on top of a mountain. There's these large stone statues I. Mean Natural Rock formations that. You create statues with your imagination. and. It's really. It is wild. And accommodations for human civilization and for people have been made. And that means when you enter. Anwar as they call it. You are taking risk. And I haven't felt. At risk of any more than maybe a sprained ankle so far. But as we started to. Climb up next to this creek into the mountains up to the valley itself. At this point, only Michael and our guide Dan have continued. Jamie is. Probably, thirty feet up the mountain from me. She's reached far. She can go when she got further than I did I literally don't know how we get. From where? I am to where she is. I'm actually surprised I. made it this. With my fitness level and general clumsiness. I do not know how I'm going to. Get. down. There are several moments. I realized you know. I'm making choices. That for me probably only working one direction. So it's GONNA be adventure getting off this mountain. But. I wanted to see if I could get to the top and. I'M GONNA guess I'm about. Forty five percent of the way up. That looks less steep ahead, but the path is less clear. And I literally don't know how. To continue forward. So I'll sit and wait by the Stream. And see what nature has to tell me. Sitting on some Moss. And this gorgeous foggy. Craggy Ravine. All these. Alien Looking rock structures. Creek is flowing down from the mountains into the. Pass where we're staying. Meets up at the river down there, and then it flows out to the Arctic Ocean. Because, we're flying through all of this and as I've been walking through all of that. I just keep seeing flow everywhere. From the air you could see. All the little streams and tributaries and rivers. Flowing, through the earth like Baynes through body. And out of the earth, it's a different timescale different. Ace of perception. Then, human beings operate at, but all of these rock formations, the flow of the tectonic plates. The movement under our feet. Pushing up the, rock and the soil. Flowing? Movement. Somehow all of this movement is the same movement that. GAVE RISE TO LAVA and. Heat. Ocean life microbes. In. Single celled organisms, multiple cells. Blowing together to create larger and more complex organisms and systems and ecosystems. And then humans and all of the systems within humans and all of the microbes within humans and all of the. Cooperation between. Air and Sutton. And Earth. The keep humans living breathing talking. And tweeting. It's all just the same flow. Some movement out of God's self. Into God's self. And that's why when I look at this river, I'm not looking at other. It's just the flow noticing the flow. The same flow that. Pushes, this water. That is here in this moment down these rocks which are here at this moment. Down into that river, which is here at this moment. The same. Flow. The CAST, the light. Into these eyeballs that are here at this moment. Through these stories and my brain. This moment. Utilizing all of the blood vessels that are flowing through this body. Like, rivers through the earth. The flow witnessing itself. Speaking to itself. Putting it into words to enjoy itself. Listening to podcast. To enjoy herself. Beautiful Flow. I. Hope you're enjoying this moment. Here being all of this. From, here. It's breathtaking..

Jamie Creek Arctic Ocean Craggy Ravine Anwar Baynes Michael Sutton CAST Dan
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

02:56 min | 7 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"Spend most of my time. strumming guitars and talking and microphones. You know I'm pretty much helpless if a button POPs on a dress shirt. So now I needed to learn how to use bear spray to defend myself in the Arctic Circle. Autumn Miso. Think shaming average just sitting mental synchronicity. Synchronicity this is science Mike and Jamie Lee finch. It's five thirty three. AM WE'RE ALREADY AT LAX? and. I'm feeling remarkably not nervous about our trip. But I'm trying to find. Some hope. That I'll see something on this trip. That gives me hope or gives me a good story to tell everyone. About what's possible with the Arctic climate change because right now. To be honest I'm really really cynical and hopeless. How are you feeling? Tired. and. Ready to be somewhere extremely quiet for a few days. And ready to be very quiet while there. And learn. Signed that same hope that you're looking for find it from. The Earth can find it from. People will be an accident. There not spent some coffee. We can do. All right fine. They're better people than me. Just walked off the plane here in. Fairbanks. Different world up here in Los Angeles. Love more trees. The where case where I get off an airport and the airfields more pleasant. Than La. Nice the Alaskan summer. Playing William. Don't sound good but. This is this is reality podcast. Than flying? For. Eight hours today actors you came from NYC. JFK and now I'M IN INC Turn. AIRBAG Fairbanks Alaska second. largest city. Jamie I watch the biggest little fire and sobbed like four times. This good good progress. Going through all of our gear, making sure everybody has everything you need to stay. More,.

Los Angeles Arctic Circle Jamie Lee finch Fairbanks Jamie I Arctic Alaska Mike NYC
"arctic" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

03:15 min | 10 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay, so we're still shy of the Rubicon, but we're hurdling towards it. We may be close to tipping the Arctic Sea ice. I don't think we've reached tipping point for cranial and I don't think we've reached tipping point yet for permafrost. We may be beginning very close on the Amazon rainforest and part of that is the fact that there's such intense pressure via deforestation now. That that adds to the pressure from droughts and so on, but I think that the real concern is that if we don't get our own greenhouse gas emissions down. Very fast, basically net zero by twenty, forty, twenty, fifty, twenty forty. We're just really increasing the risk that we're going to tip these other big. Features assistant likes the permafrost likes agreement she and when that starts going.

Arctic Sea Amazon
"arctic" Discussed on Earth Rangers

Earth Rangers

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"arctic" Discussed on Earth Rangers

"That must be nice. Okay, what is one thing that you wish? People knew about Arctic. Foxes. What's really great? About Arctic Fox? Is Their territory -ality so Fox's will travel their territories. Imitating territorial calls, so it's really really impressive when you're there on their field, and you hear fucks is calling from everywhere around you and it's really fun to see them. Travel and call at the same time. That sounds mysterious D to hear all these different animals talking to each other over distances. That sounds so cool. Yeah so. When there's no win, we can hear their call from a great distance, so it's really fun to hear them I'm not sure if they talk to each other or really aimed. They're called. Their neighbor, but usually at night we hear we hear Fox's from different territories calling. And what are they sound like? Are they like wolves or no? It's actually a really different from Wolfe I can try to imitate one. It sounds like I. Really funny. That's cool well. Thank you so much for talking to me about them. They are incredible animals, and your work is really important and so cool. You're welcoming with pleasure for me to. Version. By. Earth Rangers. Well! Okay, that was amazing. If would've been so cool to join her in her adventures in the Arctic. You know all this talk about the Arctic. Has Me wondering which animal is better adapted to the chilly north, the Arctic Fox or the Arctic Hare? Hm I think it's time for an ultimate showdown. Condition. In, this ultimate showdown we're GONNA look at three different features in three rounds and see how the Arctic Fox and the Arctic Hare measure up. First feature. Camouflage Police Lens in better. We know the, Arctic. Fox changes its coat with the seasons in warmer weather. It's Brown to blend in with the Tundra in the winter. It's bright white to match the snow, but how about the Arctic air? It might surprise you to find out that it does be exact same thing. In the wintertime, the Arctic Hare has a white coat in the summer. It's more grey Brown to match it surroundings this round in tie. Round who? Next up how coping with the Colt? Which of these creatures is better equipped to deal with all that snow. Well we know the Arctic foxes coat gets very thick in the winter months. In fact, it actually has the warmest code of all the Arctic creatures. It also has super furry paws. Keep steady on snowy services. But how about the Arctic Hare? Well, it also has a thick winter coat, and it has strong backbeat that act like snowshoes and prevent it from sinking into the snow. Their frenzied have caused that helped them did to the chauffeur food mostly Moss and Lichens in the winter. But because of its extra worm code the Arctic Fox wins this one by knows. Fine all round. Finally which creature can move fast as? Well, it turns out that the Arctic. Fox can reach speeds of thirty kilometers per hour, not bad. But. That's only half as fast as an Arctic. Hare can run. It reaches speeds of sixty kilometers per hour. This round has a clear winner. The Arctic Hare. Who? Let's sure was a close ultimate showdown with Rangers both the Arctic Fox and Arctic. Hare are really well suited to life in the frosty north..

Arctic Fox Arctic Hare Arctic Earth Rangers Rangers Brown
"arctic" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"arctic" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"For that adventure travel writer. Christopher Solomon's our guest right now on travel with Rick Steves says he takes us on his camping. Trip took experience the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge before any oil drilling began so Chris won the travel journalist of the year award in two thousand eighteen from the Society of American and travel writers. Christmas website. Is Chris. Sullivan Dot net. We also have an extra from today's interview about Arctic Permafrost. And the moment Chris knew for sure sure that his trip was worth all the effort. You'll find it with today's show notes. At Rick Steves Dot Com Slash Radio Chris Confusing to me. Just what is is the proper term to call this wildlife refuge. Can you just tell me the politics of of the name game here it. You know it's interesting you mention that Rick because I think this this place has been so contentious that even the name is something. People can't even agree upon so just to give you an example the proper name of the places. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in the energy industry generally referred to it as an war which is an acronym for for that title on it is now referred to exclusively lucidly especially by the environmental community as the Arctic refuge or the refuge that is to underscore its value as the premier wildlife. Life Refuge is the largest refuge in the United States and not to diminish I think by By reducing it to an acronym dot to diminish its importance politics antics even in what you call it. Okay so Chris tell us about the actual trip. Sure so I think I think from Fairbanks back to fairbanks is about attended attended trip about nine days out in the Bush as they say and it required a couple different Bush plane flights to get out there so we flew from fairbanks to Arctic village. which is a glitch and village? I was able to talk to some locals there on the south side of the refuge. Then we flew across the brooks range onto the north side of the Brooks range and then we floated for the next several days down the Hula Hula River which is one of many rivers that drain the north side of the brooks range toward the Arctic Ocean. Miles was the float. I believe. Sixty five River miles sixty five miles so just again to remind people. This is a vast natural refuge the size of South Carolina with no roads. And there's a town on the on the south with end I guess and then you flew over that to the flat area north of the mountain range. And then you you rafted for sixty five. Miles tells us about the boats. The company the guide the people. You were traveling with it so I went with Arctic wild which is just a few companies that specializes in travel in the High Arctic Very reputable so Company we took like around fourteen foot large rubber inflatable rafts. And there were ten of us in all a few guides and the rest kind of Adventurous people and kind of the rhythm of the days is we would paddle. We would get up and if it was a moving day we would break camp and paddle for for several hours and get to camp and set up camp and then we might allay over for a day and we would Would maybe have have dinner. And then one of the most amazing in part about being up there is that it's it's light twenty four hours a day and so that you can just throw away your watch. Time has no meaning up there in in late June and so oh we would maybe paddle when we wanted to. We would eat when we were hungry. We went on Hikes at eleven o'clock at night until two in the morning and then we would maybe have a snack and we would get up but eleven in the morning again and then maybe go for another hike and so it was really amazing to get on some more get in touch with more natural pulse of life for for. We're about a week didn't you. And your article call that Arctic time or or something yes. The Guy told us at the beginning that we were going to do this. Every once in a while. You know Someone I wanna say what time is it and the and the guide just say you know the time is right now. It's right now. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with adventure. Travel writer Christopher. Solomon we we have links to Chris's website and recent articles by Chris with today's show notes. Had Rick Steves DOT com slash radio. So your guides. How did they contribute to the actually teach you about the flora and fauna to teach you about the the issues are what was their agenda as teachers or were they just helping you make the trip safely? Yeah the guides really amazing young guys enthusiastic Guys incredibly well informed about the flora and fauna and very good paddling instructors a lot of experience experience around bears and other wildlife they knew a fair bit about The current events. But you know they know they have to deal with a lot of different kinds of people so they didn't weigh in on the politics of you know some of the stuff we've talked about but extremely well versed in a lot of the natural history of the area so they could answer almost any question and they got a lot of odd questions from US city city five. That was it comfortable. Was it safe Did you eat well. You know how I would describe this kind of trip for an experienced against outdoors person. Who is up for a good time in the outdoors but who is I guess I would say is game for anything because you can have seventy five degrees in the Arctic in June or you can have twenty-five degrees and snowing and so you have to go with that kind of High Hi spiritedness in mind. You traveled a long way. Spend a lot of money spent a lot of time. Tell me what you learned. What did you take away from? It was it worth the trouble double. Oh it definitely was worth the trouble. I mean I just wanted a sense of the feeling and value of a place like this. Yes that I could take away the show. I understood it when I when I saw that acronym again and when the Arctic refuge and I knew I I knew what it meant in some visceral way and to sit at the front of your tent with a cup of coffee and have a thousand Caribou stream past did you. I understand what that place means a little more now a lot more now after ten days there. I think I've spent more time there than some of those Alaskan politicians. Now no not that. It's that much time I've spent there but I think I understand it a little better. You wrote this someone whispered is sacred and they said that pretty well and quite a remarkable impactful moment when somebody just arrives beaches the raft steps out. It's silent when you're surrounded by nature it's like nature fortissimo. This is sacred so Chris. I'm spending my life in the lower forty-eight you've you've experienced a reality in the far reaches of Alaska expanded me just a little bit about the majesty of the nature you saw up there and how that might even have anything to do with me. I think that's a good question because I think again. These places can seem so abstract rick. You Might See a Tundra Swan on up there in the summer. And it's up there for a few weeks to find its mate and lay eggs and have checks and then get the heck out of there and that Tundra Swan is going to go back to the Chesapeake Bay and people will see it and wonder at it this winter or maybe a Mallard is going to do the same thing and head back. And maybe be a hunter's Corey in Arkansas. And there's thousands of their stories. I mean we'll see. I think it was buff breasted sandpipers that will go to Uruguay or there's the bar tailed godwit. which is another little bird? I learned about all these birds. It it will fly seven thousand miles the longest overseas he's migration in the world. It will go to the Yukon Delta and then fly all the way to New Zealand without stopping. I mean he's just he's just kind of moved moved about these stories and they all they all come up to the High Arctic which has sort of been called in a sort of this whole areas. Sort of been called Heathrow at the edge of the world for birds. So it's like a springboard for all that vitality beyond what we can probably normally appreciate all these animals that we take for granted when we see them outside our windows I mean they. They rely on these places way way out of our view. Christopher Solomon thanks so much for your adventure and for sharing the articles in the New York Times called exploring a timeless wilderness before the drilling begins. Thanks so much travel with Rick. Steves Caesar's produced by Tim. TAP is a Kaplan woolmer and Casimiro Hall. Had Rick Steve Europe Edmonds Washington. Our website is managed by Andrew. Wakeling and Nicole. Oh we get promotional support from Sheila. Grew up our theme. Music is by Jerry Frank. Rick produces updated walking tours too. Many of Europe's most popular destinations. And you'll find the latest ones in Rick's audio Europe. Traveling look forward at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. We'll look for you next week with more travel. With Rick Steves each year. Rick Steves tour guides take thousands of free spirited travelers on the scoreboard toys through Europe. One small group time this year you can choose from more than I'm forty different vacations in Europe's best destinations from Ireland to Greece and practically everywhere in between begin your next trip at Rick. STEVES DOT COM..

Rick Steves Rick Chris Arctic National Wildlife Refug Christopher Solomon Arctic writer Arctic Ocean Europe United States Rick Steve Europe High Arctic Miles Steves Caesar Hula Hula River Fairbanks South Carolina
"arctic" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"arctic" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Is at wasteland or is it pristine Christopher Sullivan suggests that nine days in the middle of some of the most remote wilderness in America might change the way you look at the world. He joined a small river rafting expedition into Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to see it for himself that's the land that's been debated for decades over starting or preventing oil exploration and and drilling and how it'll affect the wildlife and the native villagers. Who depend on it? Chris tells us what the journey showed him next on travel with. Rick Steves Eski Nice it the most embassy nicer cutting matter. Mulugeta weakest is akin high steamed from San Sebastian. Coming from the bus country to the world. With Rick Steves New York United Donosti. NBC News Is Cutting Down Moon. Do that Rick Steves Akin who stands to gain the most and who uses the most if oil drilling is allowed inside the borders of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in the northeast corner of Alaska last June travel writer. Christopher Solomon spent nine days on a guided river expedition through the Arctic refuge it started in the interior of Alaska and ended up on the shores way in the north in the Arctic Ocean. He writes in a feature article that ran the New York Times that he wanted to see the refuge. Before the proposed drilling plans of the trump administration would get under way in fact. The articles called exploring a timeless wilderness before the drilling beget. Chris joins US now on travel. With Rick Steves to report on what he learned Chris. Thanks for coming back on great to be here. Thanks for having me. so you describe this place which is the size of South Carolina with no roads as something nearly forgotten like some package. That's freezer burn the back of the national icebox. I just love that. Why did you spend nine days exploring something so remote well? I am a freelance writer. Who is both a travel writer at times and who who switches hats and who's also an environmental writer and I frequently have written about places that are well off the beaten track? Both it does travel writer but sometimes as environmental writer in the Arctic refuge is rather dramatic example of this. It's someplace that few people end up getting too but is in the headlines and has been in the headlines for decades and frankly I wreck I get tired of of writing about these places that that are just up you know a scrolling the headline on across the TV screen enter so abstract that. They'd really don't mean anything to me or to other people. I wanted to see this place for myself. I wanted to understand more. What was it steak and so interesting because I'll go to a country to humanize it to get to know the people that live there but you can kind of in an environmental sense humanize humanize a place apart from humans? I mean just the reality of the place the nature of the place as a travel writer and a person who cares about the environment you can go there and bring home a maybe a better appreciation that we can learn from your experience. How would you describe the land that that you explored? What what is this? Arctic refuge. Judge I mean just to give you a few broad outlines. The Arctic refuge itself is the size of South Carolina and the place I was particularly interested in and is the coastal plain which is to say the area between the Brooks Range and the Beaufort Sea. Which is people would think of more as sort of the Arctic Ocean though the water or at the top of the world in that place is about the size of Delaware and that's the area that different sides have ward over for year decades? About whether or not it should be drilled for oil. That's what the headlines have been about in the last two years. Congress passed a law to open it up to potential drilling so most of this area's mountainous uninhabitable not very welcoming interior. But there's this flat coastal area than Yeah Yeah and so just to be more specific you have the very rugged brooks range which is up to nine thousand feet and then it drops down and gently leans towards salt water like the bays of an old pool table and it's it. It is marshy and touchy just kind of hooked and very flat. I mean to the point the I kind of waters as it tries to take in the immensity of the flatness. In Your New York Times article you wrote what lives here grows low. No because I mean between the intensity of the seasons in the coldness oldness and the winds. It's completely treeless. I guess I should say like in you got moss the edges and in short a very short season of intense hence flowers. I'd never been to a landscape like it and I've had the good fortune to travel all over the place but north of the mountains north of the Arctic circle it is a almost a surreal landscape. A flat treeless often marshy Some people would say well. It's a wasteland but it no has a beauty that's particular alert. I would say so you wrote that. It has a brief Frenetic Arctic summer. An explosion of wildlife. Is that when you were there. Yes the summer is both one of the more hospitable SPITAK times to go if you time it around the So you're not there and all the mosquitoes are hatching. But then the Caribou or on the move there the predators that are following the Caribou. Oh you know whether it's Wolverine or or Grizzly bears two hundred some odd. Different species of birds are known to Live and mate in the coastal plain of the refuge a millions and millions of birds shore. Birds Geese owls that place comes alive for for a few months and then can hunker down in the wintertime. When you're more likely to maybe see if you polar bears this is travel with Rick? Steves we're talking with Christopher. Solomon we're talking about his adventure through Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife the refuge this is what's called Anwar this is what's threatened by drilling from the oil industry and the question that that we need to decide as a nation is is. Do we want the money or want to save the environment and I WanNa talk more about the experience but it is an issue isn't it. Now what is the issue who wants what and why why so at heart. There has been a long battle over whether we can realit- responsibly. And get that oil out from under this place or whether this displaces too wild and too precious drill so from a pragmatic point of view. Let's say sure I care about the environment. There's just money to be made and this. It's huge I mean what's a few little roads and the drilling stand GonNa do to mess up the environment. Can we have our cake and eat it too. Well and I think that has been the Standpoint of of I would say so many Alaskans some Alaskans and most pretty much all of the Alaskan political delegation for decades. They literally have said. This is a wasteland. This place is is not valuable and the oil industry says it can be done responsibly. Does the oil industry really care or are they just trying to talk themselves into it. I I guess. I can't say whether they actually care or not. I think they believe it can be done responsibly. The estimates really vary on. How much oil is there? The average amount according to an old estimate is there's a years worth of oil consumption for the United States under that coastal plain. In other words it might be an oil pipe dream. Well Yeah I mean it could be violent this virgin corner of of our hemisphere and just get a disappointing hall. It could be a real bust and and I think the larger question that a lot of people asking whether it's Democrats or environmentalists is like. What are we willing to gamble at a time when the question really is should we be you keeping stuff in the ground to stem the very worst of global climate change and do we really WANNA be drilling place like this when we're trying to wean ourselves helps from fossil fuels anyway and the irony is Alaska is facing some of the most dramatic effects already of climate change. Them villages are being moved because they're being flooded flooded Permafrost is melting. We're seeing all sorts of new changes tics moving north all sorts of change in in Alaska. But Alaska. I mean to put it bluntly is heroin addicted oil. I was just in Houston and They were talking about how nobody goes outside anymore. In the summer. Everything is there's these vast asked commercial zones underground you know and I said why is there not more concerned about climate change. You guys are taking the brunt of it. I'm not here in Seattle. And they said all of the fossil fuel industry pays for our culture. Everything that we do is connected to the money that we get from the fossil fuel industry and you just mentioned the same thing about Alaska Alaska. It's an interesting quandary. Isn't this addiction to that. Frankly that revenue. Yeah I mean Alaska particularly fascinating that way and you know some of the native groups up there including the one village on the north side of the Brooks range in a refuge called Cakovec would stand to benefit from a financially from for more energy development there so the town the villages kind of split and even as they could potentially be harmed by by energy development so if you think about who would benefit benefit local indigenous people would would have some benefits some some of them would Some of them would be harmed. How would they be well? There's a there's a village on the south side The glitch in people's and they are adamantly against this there on the south side of the Brooks range because they they have relied on the Cariboo that travel through the area for thousands of years. Oh in a small industrial initiative could redirect the migration routes and so there. There are a lot of worries by Caribou. Scientists and others that energy development will in the Arctic refuge will affect Caribou. I mean this is their buffet line. That walks past the village every year and has for thousands of ears. And so the glitch and people stand to gain nothing from energy development and only stand to lose and so they are adamantly against it whereas this other village and these these other people. It's much more divisive. And would you say the ALASKAN delegation to Congress just sees it as good for the economy their for their in favor of drilling. Yeah they're all three of the members of the delegation are pro are pro drilling in economic. It's an economic issue and they see it as being able to raise the boats of indigenous peoples general make a case.

Alaska Rick Steves Arctic writer Arctic National Wildlife Refug Arctic Ocean Brooks Range Chris Christopher Solomon South Carolina Congress Alaska Alaska San Sebastian NBC News
"arctic" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"arctic" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Warming temperatures in the Arctic mean transportation routes for cargo ships are slowly opening up that is something. Shipping companies are watching very closely but there are very few ports roads or railway links in the polar region. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a town two hundred fifty miles above the Arctic circle to meet a man trying to change that. And there you see this is the peninsula. It's called terminus about more than ten kilometers. Rafael looks out across a foggy. augie harbor towards a strip of rocky land jutting out from the Coast hearing cure keenness. He's the mayor of this town of three thousand people. In the far northeast Corner Noor of Norway close to the Russian border. Rafael Sen says cure keenness is known for its views of the northern lights. And for the hurt grooten. A popular wheeler coastal steamer. That meanders from here to Norway's fjords down to the southern town of Baragan very nice view especially in the summer when you have midnight sun is going down in the horizon. You can see the subtle four hours. There is no sun on this bleak frigid day. Most people looking out over this desolate solit- harbor would only see gray Arctic waters and ice but mayor Rafael Sen sees opportunity. This peninsula has the possibility to be a huge Arctic Elson wants to build a deep water port warming temperatures mean more cargo ships will be plowing the Arctic sea route between in Europe and Asia. Raphael says the goal right past Kirkenes. He also wants to build a rail line to neighboring Finland to move the cargo from the ships ships into Western Europe Solo Plan. Is that if you go ten trains from us every day and We should have about one million containers align would need buy in from the Norwegian government but Oslo has nixed the idea. A steady founder simply wouldn't be enough cargo to warrant the cost that's done little to dampen Rafaelson's enthusiasm born and bred and kickin this the balding square-shouldered bear is a diehard booster of his town so he started looking elsewhere for investors promoted it a lot in China and has been here to look at the possibility. They're interesting to see if this is possible. Rafael has visited China several times to meet with government officials and businessmen. His municipality signed a friendship agreement with the Chinese city of Harbin this year the annual winter festival was called Kirkenes. The world's northernmost China town the town was for stupid with Red Red Lanterns and the Chinese ambassador paid a visit but Rafael says not. Everyone in town was happy. With the festival's theme people agree now listening. That should not be Chinese. But it's engage people that's that's a Rafael since hopes to create a logistical hub has backing from some businessmen in the area area but Thomas Nielsen who covers Arctic issues for the independent Barents Observer. An online newspaper says he doesn't see cure knish as being the new Singapore thing apart from Norway is one of the biggest shipping nations in the world and not even ownership incompetent so looking to her kid. ICUS to invest in harbours Mark Line tain an associate professor of political science at Norway's University of Trump's. Oh doesn't think Rafaelson's plan is to far fetched. He says China has identified. The Arctic is an area of growing economic importance and wants to create a so-called polar silk road by developing shipping lanes investment vestment opportunities across the Arctic China has really starting to open to the possibility of expanded shipping throughout the Arctic. And it really shows that China wants to be taken seriously as an Arctic player. China is already sailing ships through Arctic waters. Rafael believes. It's only a matter of time before it want to be involved in a logistical hub. Jackie Northam N._p._R.. News Kickin us..

Rafael Sen Arctic China Norway Jackie Northam Arctic China gray Arctic Kirkenes Rafaelson Rafael Thomas Nielsen NPR Raphael Europe Oslo Norwegian government Finland Harbin solit Baragan
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

28:21 min | 1 year ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"So often through lack of mindfulness unwilling to share ourselves next few days at least iron room totally can raise rates oh mm-hmm you were podcast called literature it's and we do like radio shows we have a lot of listeners that are interested issues of justice and Science and I have a radio show and we're we're trying to organize young people into acting Your Cat Lai and the sacred lands of the refuge the bottom line is I don't have to do this I need to do this because we've done it so many times. This is old get dispenser interviews and nobody tried to help so my point of view from the day own said do this the pay pay the people of their services because you guys go and make money out of this I wanNA wear mother somehow and we know that idiots up here we've been dealing with this with President Harsh lot of our people Hollywood Robert Grid for our John Did were they open here we're not we're not just it pushover but we have to believe that every one of you one of us says we didn't even invite you people over here you just interbike your soul and then within three Hundred Years just destroyed it might be deadlier kits you guys should it better over how many billion years stopped creed are Sung in our Sunday created are I in a earth created North America which created us as a people from North America and we we were doing pretty damn good job tonight tip fourteen ninety two people that Were New York Chapin their hit each other hit oh and Bernie shoulder life and if you pray different way they'll kill you for that so these people were scared in came over in a native help them the second year the first year the old bite by bill because they don't know how it wanted a land okay yeah the land they brought in Samoa Parks people from from Europe and distort all it went all the way up here as far as the Caribou before fourteen ninety two there were two hundred thousand of Caribou along the Canada and Alaska and a couple of billion of phone calls and Salmon the old there and you destroyed in three hundred within three hundred years we're run you probably be the same but then you get these shirt and white people who is superior who thinks that we are that educated or anything like that to create a society where we could live what happened when you found out about that tax spill what what have you guys been doing to bring about resistance to idea of oil extraction we've been fighting terrorism as fourteen ninety two were pretty damn good at it as surviving and it's people bother your time like do never received anything back if you could just give me a one jet displace lift ball so many of US modern Americans perhaps especially white Americans don't have a super deep sense of our lineage in history most of us are part of families who have only been in this country for a few generations or less and here's somebody like Calvin speak about what you guys did can be confusing or even off putting for some of US might say you know I didn't take your land and white fragility. I'd say that my ancestors did but I didn't let me give you a little analogy here and and imagine that you and your family have been living in a home for twenty years or these two decades you've really made herself the walls are covered in your family pictures and there's markers in the closet on the wall the children growing through the years you've built up so many stories and memories through the years in this House then at some point invaders move in without permission can kill almost everyone in your family day after day more of the family of the killers moved into your house taking what they want painting over the height etchings walls tearing down the family photos and just generally destroying the allows how would you feel about these other visitors how would you feel about any of the individuals who were associated with them even if it wasn't a specific individuals who did the killing or the painting or vandalism why don't you still feel a little bit like Oh get the fuck out of our home on the timescale for how long could Chin people have been living there and their home as compared to how long the white people have been coming around and vandalizing destroying and killing I mean it's all comparatively recent history and for somebody like Calvin who actually does have a deep sense of heritage and edge culture. It's all still happening colonialism is still happening you may not be in the form of smallpox ridden blankets anymore but it's still coming at them in the form of tax bills missionaries and and yes even podcasters like me trying to come and tell their story for them and I may not have been the listen to snatch children away from their parents myself or hit those children in the head with a stick when they speak their own native language in their English boarding school mm-hmm but I wasn't born there I'm an outsider who came barging in with my microphone inexpensive Rei camping gear and high minded idealism that I learned in the United States of America the country that claimed the land that Kelvin's people have lived on for three hundred centuries as our own and if you think of how recently we did that to them in terms of that house analogy before just to let that time line of how recent is history is sink in a little bit if you lived in that house for twenty years do you know recently and that same ratio of time your house became the official property of the Invaders Aka the United States okay two weeks ago Chin all of this just happened and it's still happening and still question invited us into their homes you were kind to us they told us their stories we lost our culture our way of life and that's what happened to us my mom's sister base and most of my people died from starvation are I visit is French people for shopping and their heads just only for high price for it was high price then and that's all they're here for nothing else and when they did that they came with police in it's a strict night liquid streak might and what they do is they laze bait on that trump and any animal each homered fire there he and all and the a strict might is very caustic and you can't if it cut your skin get trumbull from it affects the nervous system and so they use those big upper Golo and our people that they don't even know the name for my mom used to call malice young ship don't go over the Derby I don't see nothing dirty about it Komo and hair that's a cap in Los trapper state and I didn't know what he don't touch nothing don't eat the berries don't go near you know that kind of the woman's name is Sarah and she was our guide and host through the village not only did she share her home in her stories with us but she gave us a first hand experience of the strength of her and her family and our people oh hard they fought over the years fought for their children for their culture for the slammed the earth all the decades that they've fought politically in the United States birth for big oil to not come into this specific plot of Land it's been going on for decades and until now they've managed to hold the back with this tax bill colonialism has reared its ugly head again direct violent way and his threat running not only the ecosystem and the animals and the life that depend on it but also the beautiful people be most severely affected you know read now the federal government's GonNa try to go for all in in the coastal plain this is whereas brother Gideon area where where animal used for breeding Kevin Ground for you're paying terrible hurt also geese gut deputy know thousand thousand keys goes up there in this some of them fly as far as from South America to mess up there or would wreck dot porcupine cable hurt calving ground is dry gear right there where they wanna grow in a Kelly what animals are one of their wild in any kind of disturbance since would would hurt that hurt all my life I live off the land this is Charlie Hunt fish trap all my life right now we got a big major threat to wildlife out there care we days sensitive just like other animal it's certain time of year is when they're most sensitive and that's when they have their young and where the Wanna where they have their young where they want to drill for oil yeah I look at where they used migrate and the people that used to live off curable they're not there no more what's going to happen with this this to the same thing's going to happen there one day they're getting up and leave they want nothing more to do with it you know like I said during that time of year that's when they're most sensitive I don't know if you've got a chance to see trails while you were up there the trails take care we'll go through those trails they've been going through them for thousands of years in the same trails that they're going through right now and that good that goes to show oh you how how many years that they've been migrating up there to have their young the last time not F- flew up there and I see those trails it is I can't even imagine I try to imagine how many millions of care went through those trails or thousands of years that's what they want to continue to do you know and they develop they develop oil up there and big oil rigs and drilling rigs and stuff like that that's going to change they go somewhere else we don't see them no more with the idea that in just a few hundred years tens of thousands of years could be disruptive is founding it is it is you know evil yeah they Like I I was saying you know you look at the beauty of this place I was taught that when you go on the would you respect the animals the water and the land that's the way I was raised and they say that they have technology to do things right but at the same time they're still major oil spills happen well where's all the technology that talking about you look at the you look at the Dakota pipeline what happened last year yeah that's a big disaster there yeah do with water temperature yeah so you yeah it's part of our life right here living off the land is lifestyle we live you know you look at these people here they're healthy you know everything that we eat pretty much it's natural you look at Obesity now you look at diabetes.

North America US Calvin John Did Alaska President vandalism Europe Samoa Parks Bernie New York Salmon Canada twenty years three hundred centuries three Hundred Years three hundred years billion years hundred years
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

15:27 min | 1 year ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"Up next to this creek into the mountains up to the valley itself at this point only mike hole in our guide Dan have continued Jamie is probably thirty feet up the mountain from me she's reached as far as she can go what she further than I did I literally don't know how we get from where I am to where she is I'm actually surprised I made it this far with my fitness level well in general clumsiness I do not know how I'm going to get down there are several moments I realized you know I'm making choices that for me probably only work in one direction so it's GonNa require adventure getting off this mountain but I wanted to see if I could get to the top and and I'm GonNa Guess I'm about forty five percent of the way up that looks less steep ADB path is less clear and I literally don't know how to continue forward so I'll sit and wait by this stream and see what nature has to tell me I'm sitting on some moss this gorgeous foggy craggy ravine all these alien looking rock structures creek is flowing down from the mountains into the password staying meets up at the river down there and then it flows out the Arctic Ocean because we were flying through all this and as I've been walking through all of that I just keep seeing floor everywhere on the air you could see all the little streams and tributaries and rivers flowing through the earth like veins through body and out of the earth it's a different timescale different ace of perception than human beings operate at but all of these rock formations the flow of the tectonic plates the movement under our feet pushing up the rock and the soil flowing movement. Somehow all of this movement is the same movement that gave rise the lava and heat ocean life microbes in single celled organisms multiple cells flowing together to create larger and more complex organisms and systems it's an ecosystems and humans and all of the systems within humans and all of the micros within humans and all of the operation between air and Sun and earth the keep humans living and anything talking and tweeting it's all just the same flow movement out of it's self into God's self and that's why when I look at this river I'm not looking at other it's just the flow noticing the flow the same flow that pushes this swatter that is here in this moment down these rocks which are here at this moment down into that river which is here at this moment it's the same flow the cast the light into these eyeballs that are here at this moment through these stories and my brain this moment utilizing all of the blood vessels that are flowing through this body like rivers through the earth the flow witnessing itself speaking to itself putting it into words to enjoy it so L. Listening to podcast to enjoy herself beautiful flow I hope you're enjoying this moment here being all of this from here breathtaking speaking to the water earlier and I think that the two chief they don't need us built in with them and we would not be here any capacity this water was not willing to share themselves and then feeling slightly grieved for the fact that we are windfall and I've made a promise to continue remind ingrate fall and reverend it's hard to explain just on an audio visual but here here and you could see you know hugh could feel anything but wonder guided to them in grief so it's our first morning in the freaking freaking cold of an Arctic summer and I was just really curious like what everyone's notice what you're feeling what you've experienced I feel an awe like I feel this land this space this time together just feels really sacred and feels really centered I feel like nothing else really matters outside of this moment yeah I feel that I'm very similar way like very aware of how I'm D- it feels but it doesn't feel the lonely kind of empty it feels very full I feel very present to this specific kind of fullness in that emptiness if any of that make sense probably make sense to all of you because you're here house of ill just very I feel very good slept really well last night we've been really well taken care of by our guide and host I feel awake and alive I think it's weird I've been to a lot of places on our planet and there's certain like commonality to ecosystems like so this is what desert or like and this is what you know boreal forests are like and this is what really hot wet climates are like but the Arctic Tundra it feels more like an alien planet on Earth Ecosystem it's beautiful it's very it's a never felt a place like this like just feeling absolutely away from all human civilization I'm also like not a camper so I didn't sleep very well pampered life has been lost tired last night we could tell that Michael starting to fair around the edges because he was like Sarah hot springs nearby and it turns out there's warm springs that's like a really hard day's high and I could see him mulling it over yeah he might still be considering if we ever just we look up and he's gone where he wins if either of those if it was either hot springs or slightly shorter hike it'd be a no brainer for a lukewarm a little hot springs that's kind of outdoorsy stuff you like you just don't like camping I love the earth I just I like sleeping in beds and using toilets showers running water I mean one way to look at humanity is like we're the global ecosystem champion it nest building yeah like we're just incredible at nest building and the Arctic is one of the few environments so hostile to humanness building that we haven't settled here yeah I mean this is like an a summer so this is like the as pleasant as it gets here and I think my hands about the fall on the only one wearing gloves holding these microphones I didn't they could work the microphone with the glove on anything if you believe in us it's crazy how untouched this land is yeah you can feel there's no trails it's all an even like walking is difficult to do and so yeah very few humans have ever really come here and then and do certain times dreamily aware that we are not supposed to be here it it isn't for us like this specific spot and the only way that we've made it for us as bringing as close as we can get to our nesting with us and without any of this we would die pretty quickly out here and that's interesting because I've never been somewhere that remote where had been that aware that we're I mean we're in good hands but we're hanging on by a thread technically we can go really there's no yeah we've never what Dan was telling us yesterday there's nowhere in the continental us that is as far as we are right now from just owed like the lengths we had to go through to get here in the first place like to airplane rides connecting flight tiny play me like we were in a plane the size of sprinter van and then a play on a little bit smaller than a Honda civic six took slightly landing and that little flight over his mountains though what I was glad I motion sickness medicine but it was beautiful yeah I had a spiritual experience because when we were going over the mountains into sunset pass I put on spirit by beyond say from the Lion King and I took everything with me not to put my hand in worship on the plane it was like just so majestic this land is majestic this energy is majestic I feel like I'm just my body soaking it all in silence is amazing just wait that is gold yeah air planes overhead birds you don't just this expansive pass this valley with no sound mazing that might be one of my favorite parts yeah I'm just aware how much noise we live in it doesn't matter where you live when you're in a rural part of America you still hear noise even if you're in the deep south you hugh your crickets like this is the most you here is when it gets a little windy and that's it north and talk to us I was Gonna say how are you GonNa are you GonNa do you're birding out here I have seen several words you sit still and choir are trained for twenty minutes and annual a bird will find view and because I I don't know if that bird yesterday I had seen people before I don't think so the way came up at us was it definitely check us out yeah you all decided to hike around the Elton and I was like wow such fools because they're gonNA have to walk all that to again William Wisely chose to sat and content wait nature yes wisely and we were in the nature contemplated you I mean I keep having moments like that where you're saying how like I don't think this bird has ever seen in humans before I keep having moments where I'm seeing like we saw that wolf at a district yesterday or like this yellow flower and tick poppy and I keep thinking about the fact that it's likely that what we are looking at no humans have ever seen before that feels really sacred to me this around this feels really sacred to yeah wage just descending on us again assist it's actually coming down on us right now as I know because I've gone from being comfortable freezing look at the I mean just in the last five minutes it's just in June let's Thursday morning and I'm sitting in my tent are playing out will get here between twenty five minutes and fifty five minutes from now if all goes well we're going to pack up and leave the wild and head into Arctic village and Arctic village. is a village and is a little more human civilization like the true wild we've been in but still won't have things like cell phone service or plumbing and I'm really looking forward to learning from the glitch in people how climate change has been impact in their way of life and really what oil exploration does to their way of subsistence living with a little sadness we say goodbye to sunset past spend our home for the last few days but I'm really looking forward to hearing what they have to tell us that can help us conceptualize the experiences take care.

Arctic Ocean mike hole structures creek Jamie Dan twenty five minutes fifty five minutes forty five percent twenty minutes five minutes thirty feet
"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

19:22 min | 1 year ago

"arctic" Discussed on The Liturgists

"How is climate change related to spirituality these are the kind of questions that hosts and friends and Jane joyner and Marianne hit explore defy got down the kitchen turn on the light cla gear out here on the table and I was pretty excited last night about this trip woke up and I was like what the Hell like the wilderness what L. feels insane right now the Arctic uh-huh Welcome to the literature podcasts everybody my name is Michael Gungor this summer got invited to go to the Arctic refuge during Alaska to do a podcast about the threat of cultural genocide and climate change to this sacred area it's been one of the last great untouched pieces of wilderness on earth and I was excited about it when I first heard about it but the morning of as you could hear in my voice it feeling apprehensive this place we're going way off the grid historically been a real wilderness Dan I'm a fan of things like beds and running water and indoor plumbing I spend most of my time strumming a guitar ars and talking and microphones you know I'm pretty much helpless if a button pops on a dress shirt so now I needed to learn how to use resprayed to defend myself in the Arctic Circle Outta my zone anything shaming averages sitting mental synchronicity synchronicity this is science Mike and Jamie Lee finch it's five thirty three am we're already lax and I'm feeling remarkably not nervous about our trip but I'm trying to find some hope that I'll see something on this trip that gives me hope or gives me a good story razer tell everyone about what's possible with the Arctic climate change because right now to be honest I'm really really cynical at hopeless. they are you feeling tired and ready to be Somewhere extremely quiet for a few days and ready to be very quiet while there and learn shine that same hope that you're looking for find it from the earth and find it from people will be financed and that split some copy that we can do all right fine they're better people than me in my watch off the plane here in banks different world up here in Los Angeles a little bit lot more trees the ware case where I get off an airport from the airfields more pleasant than La Catechal nice the Alaskan summer they play William sound good but this is this is reality League podcast than flying for eight hours today because you came from NYC yeah JFK and now I'm in INC incursion Fairbanks Alaska largest Jamie watch the farm and sobbed like four times affront to going through all of our gear making sure everybody everyone needs to stay more that's Dan he's the guy tasked with keeping US city slickers alive in the Arctic wilderness the one really get darker bridal maybe in the very middle of the night the sort of work Dan and his colleague Michael From the Wilderness Society lay out for us as much as they can about what our trip is going to be like it hasn't out there you'll notice past hostile the arctic refuge is remote extreme namely remote we are on our own it's going to be light almost the whole time other than a couple of hours of dusk in the middle of the night it's probably going to be cold we're going to need five layers of clothing we're going to pack it all in waterproof bags we're going to have to poop in the ground Oh and no deodorant why one specific dangers out there we should talk about is prisoners grizzly apears untested after going through the survival stuff that we need to go through in pulls out a giant map and begins to talk to us more about why we are actually there Michael touchdown it just the size and scale of Alaska but it's it's a big state Dan tells us about Alaska about how big it is about how new it is to the United States I mean Alaska only became a state in nineteen fifty nine and you could probably guess there were people living there already when we decided to make our state and people have been living there quite a long time actually the question tribe which is the people that we would eventually be meeting had being on that land for about thirty thousand years yeah you heard that right thirty thousand years take that in for a second Alaska as a state is sixty years old The United States of America is less than two hundred and fifty years old the first Europeans to arrive in North America least first for whom there is solid evidence or norse who added here about a thousand years ago she's was born about two thousand years ago in Plato's about twenty five Hundred Years I mean if you've ever been to a place like Athens or Rome and seen the ancient ruins you get the feeling that two three four thousand years was a long time ago thirty thousand years the channon other native and indigenous groups of people have lived in what we now call northern Alaska living off of and with the land in harmony and then white people came with them diseases poisons violence a mass genocide that resulted in the obliteration of so many lives and so much of these people's lifestyle L. and culture we forced them to move into villages taking away their children sending them to English boarding schools so much of their culture and heritage was systematically whitewashed and destroyed yet the kitchen and many other indigenous people groups have fought hard and managed to survive somehow many of the innuendo native populations still live off the land in a way that tapie hard for a lot of us live in places with public services and infrastructure to understand in the Arctic village which is a place we would eventually be visiting people still get about eighty percent of their nutrition from wild game in the area they have to again there are no roads up there anything they would buy has to be flown in specifically for them a gallon of milk us something like ten dollars and they're poor they need the land because of colonization and climate change the land taking a real beating and just as they are in some of their most dire straits that they've ever been in as a people with the oppressive boot of white realism on their necks. President trump went ahead and inserted into his tax bill a provision that would allow oil companies to move into question people's could land and drill for oil and action that would absolutely devastate and already severely oppressed and hurting people and do untold damage to some of the last unspoiled wilderness in America so it's Monday morning it's Gosh I don't know just before six am got up early and took a shower knowing it would be my last for a few days and now as I'm getting ready I'm faced with the question can I wear deodorant. They told us we can't take deodorant because it will attract bears so does that mean I can't wear deodorant today to be better safe than sorry I probably shouldn't but while I'm gone stink really bad it's funny how we care about such little things is six fifteen and in the morning in Fairbanks Alaska this has been up for a lot longer than they have and today we're all going to be eating into some very tiny planes flying about four five hours north to the coastal plain we all make camp where you will stay for the next three days without a lot of things but mainly without deodorant so it's GonNa get interesting flying over northern Alaska and a little prop plane is a unique experience you know I mean most of us have seen land that is less populated than places like Los Angeles poke most of us have not seen anything like the vast expanse of land up near the Arctic Circle Alaska to fly a for hours without seeing any power lines roads cars houses I mean just miles and miles of untouched land in every direction from the plane it's a pretty spectacular on the way in I just sat quietly I mean as quiet as it is and one of those little planes we just sat there looking out the windows the human landscape of raw earth blow us absorbing the majesty of me the earth our forests and streams the lakes the mountains valleys Resort over raging rivers and breathtaking waterfalls and the flow of color and texture on the surface of the planet as it has evolved naturally for millions and millions of years whereas a true wonder to behold and even saw a couple of grizzly bears just before we landed on the Tundra in the middle of absolutely nowhere as far as human being things are concerned anyway we come to discover that it wasn't actually nowhere so profoundly sacred and ancient place I got to tell you that feeling when that plane landed and then we took our stuff out and then the plane just rolled away and flew off uh-huh it was like surreal a feeling of being absolutely alone was really Aww this audio from video on my phone what you're not seeing as Jamie and I dancing around like fools right now she's now running spinning around like a five year old her arms outstretched it's pretty great humans have turned planet earth into something that would barely be recognizable to most humans through history somehow with our class brains and opposable thumbs we turned meadows and streams into freeways and strip malls and don't get me wrong I love human civilization uh aside from the modern luxuries and conveniences that we have made there's also art architecture music philosophy science spirituality all sorts of incredible innovations that make life on planet earth such a magical place but we ought not play down the meadows news and the streams earth isn't just some treasure chest pull out materials from for our inventions our invations it is our very foundation for life she's not our possession she is our home you her master we are her children her part of her and frankly we're lucky to be mm-hmm I mean life is fragile exist within a sliver of possibility comparatively paper thin layer of atmosphere here on the surface of brilliant blue gem suspended and a vast ocean space and most of the time that Earth has been here we wins have not been and standing there in that humorless expanse of mothers untouched territory one could not help but feel very connected to her and dependent on her we really are you you may tent we just built after being dropped off by a tiny little four past injure plane I can't describe how quiet it is out here and it's enormous I think I've definitely an in places that have felt big before but this feels genuinely enormous like thought I knew what that word meant before coming here and now I feel like I have a greater understanding and appreciation for the idea of enormity it's huge and it is quiet and is beautiful flying anywhere flying over these mountains and through the over the Tundra as gorgeous glacial water. I'm assuming I don't know maybe I should ask someone because it was a real really vibrant and light blue eyes comes up staring her whole trip up here we are remote this the furthest away I've ever been from people and I will laugh it this is just me gosh I guess mid or late afternoon and today we took a hike to this I don't know what to call it other that a monument valley it's up on top of a mountain and there's these large stone statues I mean natural rock formations that you create a statute with your imagination and it's really high it is wild and accommodations for human civilization and for people have been made and that means when you enter and Mars they call it you are taking risk I haven't felt at risk of any more than maybe a sprained ankle so far but as we started to climb.

President Jane joyner America trump Marianne thirty thousand years two three four thousand years twenty five Hundred Years two thousand years four five hours eighty percent thousand years eight hours fifty years sixty years ten dollars three days five year
"arctic" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"arctic" Discussed on Science for the People

"That they did adopt in official language act in it was adopted at a time when the end of ET included Nunavut, so we also have languages from these stern Arctic that are recognized official languages. So just an example of that. We we've been involved in two projects which where we've done worked with people on terminology development to come up with language in their language traditional language that reflect energy related terms that we use and we did that with a plea chill language and also with the Nubia looked and language. So the clean show language. The plea chill region would be between great slave and bear lake. If you're looking on a map, and the Nubia looked in language would be people who live around enu Vic like before see Arctic sea and north or violence and also smother communities can it into Ving into the Arctic Cup Arca play goal. So they're the last one we did was the new vehicle language, and so that's the part of Inuktitut. The language of circum polar language, it's quite interesting because people from Greenland through to Alaska, this is what we were told by the elders. They're they can communicate with one another even though they have fairly different languages. But generally, they can talk from when it the other. So the purpose of this workshop, and we use this model for both also with clean chill language. So the elders are kind of like the walking dictionaries if he will the language they generally have grown up in their language, and or very strong and knowledgeable and younger period. People rather do to you know, colonization education, it's cetera. So they may not have as strong of a routine in the language sort of depends. So with both these workshops we worked with. People work in theory of language, and the community's name identified the people the language people who are knowledgeable about their language of this. We also have people who've been trained interpreter translator in the north because because of the importance of the language in importance of to Munich ation across witches Sawyer able to pull on people like that together into the workshop, and we had a visual on of the different terms that we use it that we wanted to develop language with and it's kinda fascinating. So there's some terminology that is already there or old terms people have that are still relevant useful. And he's languages are very would be kinda supple. Guess would be the word where it's quite fascinating. 'cause I don't speak those. Languages, but watching the process, and how people come up, and it's they're working in a group, and, you know, small groups, and then it come together in the larger group it goes through what they came up with discuss that nears this moment when everybody's like odd sit slow it was a lot of fun and a lot of learning and what it does an upper of things one. There's a term that can be used. So if you're an meeting presentation where you have interpreters, they have words that they can use to interpret the discussion into their language. It also is interesting because everybody in that workshop learns about those technologies because they have to really get it to be able to. Create a term that reflects whatever that is in the process of terminology development. So for for this workshop, we started in English, and then we will go into a language the say, the new via looked in language, and so then that turns so the term is come up with and then that term is interpreted back into English to see if it retains the meanings throughout the process. Let's kind of the final thing and flick assay they the people in the workshop there's a lot of learning there, and they become knowledgeable of the concepts in the ideas in terms health fit together. So it has a lot of benefit also for kids and developing school materials and things like that. So these words get. Into quite a bit. They have their own path..

Nubia Sawyer official stern Arctic Arctic sea Greenland Nunavut Inuktitut Alaska enu Vic Ving Munich
"arctic" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"arctic" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"Nomads episode to seventy nine murder in the Arctic podcast. You're about to listen to includes cursing and talking about who Hawes please be advised. Woke another pursuit of atheists. Nomads? I am destined and in a little bit of the interviewing Lawrence millman about his recent book at the end of the world true story of murder in the Arctic as publicist reached out to me about getting him on the show. They sent me out a copy of the book, and I. Arrived in perfect timing for me to be able to read at the cabin during the summer. And as I was reading it was like, no, I definitely need to get this guy on the shows is an amazing story. It's one that. It's a piece of history of religion going as horribly wrong as possible that could so easily be completely lost to history. And its recent like, the last survivors are reaching the end of their lives at this point. This is the type of history that it needs to be out there people need to know about it. One. Unfortunate thing is Lawrence is anti technologies. So this interview is conducted over the phone and telephones are not the best for sound quality. I have cleaned it up a little bit. And greatly reduced the amount of static. But it's a phone call. There aren't that many frequencies for me to work with? Yeah. And it's been at this point probably around two hundred and seventy episodes since we've we've done an interview over the phone, and it will be ca- very easily be that long before I'm willing to to on again. But it was worth it. And this is an episode is worth listening to enjoy. And we're now joined by Lawrence millman is the author of at the end of the world a true story of murder in the Arctic. It is a fascinating and wonderful read. I highly recommend it Lawrence. Welcome..

Lawrence millman murder Arctic Hawes Lawrence