35 Burst results for "Archer"

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:44 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"Big, big thanks to Ajay archer, and of course, thanks to you for listening. You can find out more about Ajay and his work through the links in the show notes as provision path dot com. Revision path is brought to you by lunch. A multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta, Georgia. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me, Maurice cherry, with engineering and editing by RJ basilio. Our intro voice-over is by music man Dre, with intro and outro music by yellow speaker. Transcripts are provided by brevity and wit. This episode of revision path is also brought to you by hover. Building your online brand has never been more important, and that begins with your domain name. Show the online community who you are and what you're passionate about with hover. With over 400 plus domain extensions to choose from, including all the classics and fun niche extensions. Hover is the only domain provider I use and trust. Go to hover dot com forward slash revision path and get 10% off your first purchase. So what did you think of the interview? Better yet, what do you think about the podcast overall? You know, we'd love to hear from you so please don't be a stranger. Hit us up on social media. We're on Twitter. We're on Instagram. Just search for revision path all one word. Or you can leave us a rating and review on Apple podcasts on Amazon music or on Spotify. The more people you tell about the show, the bigger we become, and the further we could extend our reach to talk to black designers developers, artists, and other digital creators from all over the world. As always, thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time. Thank you.

Ajay archer Maurice cherry RJ basilio Ajay Atlanta Georgia Instagram Spotify Twitter Amazon Apple
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:41 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"To try to fix for. I don't think we've met up in a couple of years now, even though melody is also one of unused short runners, by the way. Oh. I mean, you should probably interview her off the record, but she's one of one of the more influential designers, not just in our space, but in terms of the contemporary art world in the Caribbean as well. Okay. I mean, it's pretty clear to me that you like to stay busy. Like you're doing a lot between the studio, the app, and other things like, what are you doing for you? What are you doing for self care with all of this? Unfortunately, I used to party really hard when I was younger. So I would say like maybe between 17 and 25, I was just piles of drugs just lots of booze. I'm saying that because I'm saying I like all of those things I'm all kind of boring to me. What I do now for fun is I have an orchid collection, so I take care of about a hundred plus orchids at my apartment. Wow, I can't believe I said that out loud. I do a lot of baking and cooking. I'm a such a Saturday stay at home guy. I am mister yoga Dana Saturday morning. I am definitely I try my best to just enjoy the life that I have built for myself because I think that there is so much in the work that I'm doing now that can be in a way I'm busy I don't know if I've ever been and if I don't make sure to separate myself, my whole life can be about to work that I'm doing and I think that there was a period of time when I was really comfortable with that with making my life about what I'm doing. But I think that no one want to make my life about how much I'm enjoying my life. And I do enjoy my life in making new work that I'm doing. So there's that. But that's just part of my enjoyment. So I take care of my plants. I have a beautiful dog. His name is Baxter. And I spent as much time with him as I can. But yeah, I'm trying new fried chicken recipes. I'm trying new bread recipes. Okay. I wish I would say that I'm like, you know, skating or going surfing and stuff, but I'm not. I am a busted water. I live in a Caribbean, but I'll go look at the beach. But I just feel like, yeah, a lot of what I'm doing for myself right now is stepping away from work being my everything. Because it was my everything for a serious period of time. And I think that a lot of my substance abuse was driven by mitigating against that. So we could take up of my life, I'm just doing some drugs, so I can make it through. And now we can take another life. I need this weekend. Do you have a dream project or something that you would love to do one day? I think that if I think about dream projects, I think about a lot of my current drive is around the Caribbean and facilitating entrepreneurship and development in the Caribbean using the software that we made, but also the methodologies that we develop. So if I think of dream project, we are currently right now working with the government to turn it on to be cool to help with the same farming project. We're trying to scale it across the nation. But we're also working with them on building software tools for financial inclusion. In my opinion, being able to help people on the ground and that kind of way from this space that I'm in, it couldn't get more dreamy than that. Who are some of the mentors that have really kind of helped you out throughout your career? Definitely Garrett and Kane's and Alex mills from above group, huge influences. I think that they were the first people to kind of teach me that. You can stand up for design and people won't hit you as much as you think. Jonathan Ross, who is a American typeface designer, has been one of my rocks and one of the most encouraging designers that I've ever met. He was the first person that I sent my work who didn't just tell me something patronizing. So I would share with people other people are like, oh, this is amazing. But he was the first person to be like, hey, got your font. Here's a PDF with all of the mistakes. It's at a better way to which I think it was one of the best things for my career as a designer because I think that there is a lot of white guilt that can get in the way of productivity when it comes to giving people feedback on their work, especially. Like, you see a young black guy making type and was like, well, I don't want to break a spurt, but actually kind of I was far more concerned in positive feedback than I was in validation. And he was really good. I think he saw that, and he was really good at that. And I think I feel the same way what Evan's talking, who is designer who works for daughter studio. And has also made the merry weather font, which is pretty popular on the Internet. But I think that those two typefaces and the submarine really influential to me. There's also harness farmer and used fun rossum, who are Jim and Dutch type designers, respectively, and just work in programming really changed my outlook on whether or not programming had a place in my design practice and harnesses outlook on typeface design really kind of helped me and still helps me not when I'm making work remind myself that it's as good as you want it to be and you can make it better but the reality is that some of the decisions that you make will have to be personal ones. And I think that in a world that has so much rigidity like typeface design those two people who are, I would say typeface designers with a very strong traditional sense of output, the ethos that they've been making that work with has been radical and I am really inspired by that. Where did you see yourself in the next like 5 years? Like what do you want like the next chapter of your legacy to be? I think that in 5 years I hope that on use infrastructure is more pervasive in the Caribbean and we're helping facilitate even more lives being built and transformed. I'm hoping that for my type design practice that I'm able to find even more time to draw on even more time to produce and I'm hoping that by in 5 years my first form of dollar studio would have done relatively well because it would have been all for a few years. But I think that what I want for myself, I mean, this is not just in 5 years, but also in 5 years. I would like to work that I'm making to see its potential through in terms of the impact that it can make in other people's lives. Well, just to kind of wrap things up here, where can our audience find out more information about you and your work and everything online? My best place to find me online is on Twitter, but I also have a website at a G design. The key studio has a website. It's an queue dot studio to check that out for sure, especially if you're interested in tech in the Caribbean. And we have the uncle marketplace, which is Q app, which is what we use to help small businesses right now. If you can get on any of those platforms and you can't find me, then I just didn't want to be found. All right, sounds good. RJ archer, I want to thank you just so much for coming on the show. Like I said, this has been a long time coming. I really wanted to have you on the show for a while. And you didn't disappoint. I mean, I think, first of all, just hearing about your work ethic and how you've built on cue, I think, is super inspiring, particularly kind of in this weird flux state we've all been in since the beginning of 2020, but I think also just the fact that you are someone who looked and sort of found a void in the market or avoid in the world and you've actively worked to kind of use your skills and your talents to kind of fix that. I think that's something that all of us can kind of walk away from learning just about you, but also just about the best ways that we can use the skills that we have to create a more equitable world. So thank you so much for coming on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you, Marie. I'm really grateful as well for your patients and waiting as long as you have to get me on, but also I feel like the kind of work that you're doing is really

Caribbean Alex mills Dana Baxter Jonathan Ross Garrett Kane rossum Evan RJ archer Jim Twitter Marie
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:13 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"Good luck. She's like, good luck with that Cooper. That's it. But yeah, we're good friends now. And unfortunately, publishing with them. But yeah, a lot of the experience for me was jarring because I had to acknowledge where black people were any type design spectrum. But I also had to acknowledge. You know that kind of gentle Eurasia of your experiences that can happen when you're in white dominated spaces. It is not active thing. It isn't like there's no malice. But there's just a kind of a casual not understanding not relating to the circumstances that can feel really targeted after enough time. That was how I would probably summarize my experience. I would summarize my experience as one that was really fulfilling in terms of how much I got to learn, but one that was also in a way a little traumatizing in terms of how much I learned about the rest of it. So not me drawing partly python part might be understanding weight space part, but just the cultural implication and who is making typhon who's making type for whom and where the type come from type the whole type design is the thing that facilitated commerce in the 1516 17th century, that means slavery. You know what I mean? And so I think about that. And it's like, okay, I'm also learning type in the Dutch fashion from people who learned Dutch style type design, which would have also been exploding in terms of its theoretical output as an offshoot of the Dutch benefit from slavery because I think that one of the greatest markets of a society's progress is if they started drawing type of art. You can tell a society's appetite for conquest when they start printing their own letters. Because you need the printer on letters to take over a space. And I feel like those things are the things that really, I think I could have learned a lot about drawing type on the Internet, but I could never have learned about types place in the world and cultural context. If I didn't go to a school because part of the curriculum was also learning about types history. So there was a lecture called software search key. And he was exceptional in terms of his understanding of type and the evolution of type. Obviously, the European context. But I learned so much about how because you go to enough history classes and you realize, okay, we're not talking about black people ever, that make you kind of ask other questions around why we're not talking about what black people. So for me type of Google's culture shocking, but it was also really necessary because I learned a lot theoretically. They were making type. But I also was able to make amazing connections. I mean, harness who was my lecturer is one of my favorite people in the world. I was also able to from that lecture or from that education experience, get in touch with people like my mentor, DJI, or my mental ebb and those were the entry points to get into a lot of where my life is right now what type. So I'm not mad at it, but it was really traumatizing. Yikes. I hate to hear that. I mean, but it sounds like you were able to at least extract some good things from it, you know? Yeah, I mean, good traumatizing is weird. But what I mean is by doing that it was not traumatizing because anybody was out to get me or anything like that. I think it was traumatizing because they've been building this curriculum. I don't mean just type of I mean white people have been building type design curriculum for a hundred years now. And this idea of, hey, you know black people use language too, like that question didn't come up. And I think that that's not the fault of the school. That's the fault of the society that we're in. And in a way, the education system can only ever be a strong reflection of the society that you're in. And I think that you can learn a lot about the society and the culture around type design by being part of a dedication system. So knowing all of this and I guess also the fact that you really pull a lot of inspiration from the Caribbean as a whole, like how do you bring all of this to your work? Well, I mean, I think that a lot of the work now for me is I think that I've given up on making beautiful typefaces. And I don't mean aesthetically beautiful. I mean, the idea of a static lipid. And I think that there are things that I think that there are things that the dominant culture has taught us that type design needs to have. We need to have super tight joins. And a lot of the trend in this is kind of left my palate in terms of what I want to make. I want to make work that is so deeply accessible and utilitarian and basic because we're not in a space where if we're supporting pan African Latin languages that we have expressionism. The languages that support the support is not what you would call the most white bread boring vanilla Ariel Helvetica type things and that's because most of the time you've needed supporters now this is because you're releasing it on an OS or you're releasing a ton of like there's like this context where you almost have to support everybody and that's when it gets done. But it's not getting done by the commercial types of the world or the shop types of the world. And again, that's not a hit up against either Christian or Lucas who run commercial on Shopify respectively. But that is a reflection of the industry that burn. Let's talk about design objectives. That's something that you founded cofounded. I should say with one of our past guests, a real Chandler who we had on a couple of months back. Talk to me about that. Started off as it was this plan that we had while I was working out above group. So I was working on a book by the time and myself and another designer to whom I'm not related, but I'm good friends with named Melanie archer. We started design objective because there was this same idea of not being a very in nature and culture and we're not having a very neutral and culture around design was there. So we didn't feel facilitated within the designers were encouraged to do anything other than make ads. And I think that for all of us, it was the same kind of deep desire to affect the positive change. So first design objector was helping designers be better but not necessarily from the perspective of giving them lessons about just doubt or about color competition because you can kind of make your way through that. But we wanted to give designers empowerment to so we wanted to show you how to make a contract. Here's how negotiation group should work. This is how you should probably price your work. So a lot of the efforts that we were putting in were around empowering designers to do their jobs better. Unfortunately, the pandemic kind of pushed because so much of these analytics was meeting oriented and kind of socially kind of rooted. We lost a lot of our traction during the pandemic. And I think since then we've released a slowdown the operation. For as much as we're still doing things to connect design to people, I think that for each of us individually, we are we've kind of moved past design objective as a nonprofit that we will find that we were running ourselves and moving that a future evolution of that that can probably be in the same space that we started it in terms of supporting people and allowing them to really improve their practices and not again not from the perspective of the aesthetics of the way they think is carbon people are very creative and very talented. But I think that there was there has been a culture of designers not being respected and then does not respecting themselves that we start to design objectives

Eurasia Cooper Melanie archer Google Caribbean Lucas Chandler
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:09 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"Yes, I have done my own thing for better or worse. But I think as far as the pros, I can really settle on the biggest pro being, this idea of working on what you want to work on is huge because if you can work out what you want to work on and you can get paid doing it, adding your paid enough to pay your bills and buy some per second weekend. In my world, that's the literal bestial life can be. So for me, the pros are my biggest pro is that I get to live a purpose driven life. And that doesn't mean that my work is my life, but that does mean that if I am going to be spending 8 to ten hours a day doing something that it doesn't feel like I'm just doing something to help someone else achieve some random goal around money. So in terms of like, I think that I can make up way bigger impact with things by myself. Because the obvious cons. Financial security, huge. Until recently, now I'm fine. Until recently, I was tricky. I think also in these spaces that I live in, there is a particular challenge of going on your own when you look like I do, even though most of the people from Trinidad black are the standard descent. I think that the challenge comes with a believability. So I walk into the room, I have free form dreadlocks. I don't want to socks. I walk into the room and I'm like, hey guys, this is the design. And while I was saying that, I know I need to fight against all of the perceptions that are coming with me in the room. And the career that I was able to establish for myself in these states was the thing that helped me to kind of get past that here. Because when I tell people, oh, Google is one of my clients. There's a lot of shit that gets smoothed over. You know what I mean? A lot of skepticism that leaves you room. They're like, oh, okay, cool. We thought you were a fraud, because you said Google says fine. And I think that for me, the biggest one of the biggest cons is that idea of, for me, I mean, I'm seeing specifically, if you are a sole trader block entrepreneur, doing the things that I do in Trinidad, one of the cons is definitely going to be walking around and through that pervasive gout that your potential plans and payers will have of you just because they are in a way programmed out. You want to doubt your capacity to do things. I think that that's one of the huge challenges. But if you're just trying to do this is just having the best product in the room, but screaming, please, somebody listen to me, you know, and just invisibility just because of where I'm from and what I look like. That again, I'm being really care about, is way less now than it was back then. But I think that you're a young black boy in the Caribbean and you want to start to design business one of your biggest challenges is going to be credibility. And how do you get people convinced of your talent? Because it's not going to be on how good your layouts are. There's going to be anything else. I feel that. I mean, that respectability politics kind of thing is so pervasive. I mean, it's something I've had to deal with also. I mean, I'm a big dark skinned black dude with an Afro from the south. Right. I walk in the most places, you know, especially with some of the places that I've spoken at and some of the places I've done work for and everything. And I know how unassuming I come off, and I sort of play into that a little bit like I'm not like I went to some more house college. And so morehouse has its own sort of reputation of like suit and tie and you're this, well, red, well traveled, person, blah, blah, blah, this kind of stuff, that I sort of actively buck against. Like, I'm not a suit and tie wearing kind of person at all. And so I come up in most spaces, and I tend to be pretty unassuming. And I sort of play into that a little bit because I like people to kind of be surprised. Like, oh wow. But I know what you mean about sort of having to fight against that because oftentimes those receptions will come from people who look just like you. Yeah, it's mostly to be honest, like most of the middle management as people do not like me at middle management. So I need to get through. But I think that a lot of people who look like me are really one thing to hire and make connections and relationships with a white man with an accent. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I am not like I don't provide them the opportunity for growth that they're looking for. Because you can't grow unless you have connections with white businessmen. Man, that's got heavy. No, no, that's real. That's real. That's real. I want to shift a little bit and talk kind of more a little bit about your type design work. We touched on a little bit earlier, but in 2017 you were part of the type at Cooper design program. Tell me how that experience was. It was wild, right? Because I didn't know I was going to get in. And I sent my application and then I got in and then I had to take a loon because I didn't know how I was going to pay for it, and I got in. And I remember really clearly. I'm saying all of this because I remember on my first day, I got into class and I got in there and they were like three white kids and I got into the class. And none of them said anything to me. And then another white kid came into the class. And then a couple Asian kids came to the class. And at some point in time, we were getting close to 9 o'clock and I had to acknowledge, okay. It's not going to be another black people here. And that's fine. That's okay. Don't drop out. It's fine. And please wear black people are minority. That's okay, right? And then my professor at the time whose name is hannes farmer, one of my biggest influences as a designer. Came into the room and he looked at me and I knew he looked at me with this look of huh. All right. I looked until the same look of, okay, this is what we're going to do, huh? And for me, a lot of it was on one hand being in a classroom of people who were from a space and I'm seeing a space not necessarily America, but they're all from what I would say in larger, more cosmopolitan spaces that actually have some history around tech design or some understanding or unpack design or some kind of typographic history. Here I am from the Caribbean where we don't have any of that. And I'm, I think that for me, my type of journey academically. It was a struggle because I just wasn't as cool good as a lot of my peers. But I was a hard worker. So moving through the program for me was really fulfilling because I would basically go to class, I'll spend 12 hours a day at a coupon and I would go to my city, Brooklyn, Airbnb, and spend three hours drawing again. And I think that one of the things that I had to leave with was I kept waiting for the experience that will help me validate my blackness inside of all of that. And that never happened. And I had to acknowledge that the reason that it didn't happen and wasn't going to happen was because I was getting ready to work in a space where there weren't any other black people because it was only when I was at the coupe. And then I asked, wait, what the fuck are we black? What are black guys? Where are the black women? Where's somebody black at? And they had to be like, okay, sorry to break this to you, but we have one guy. Don't got it. That's it. That's the whole industry black people is Josh dad. And I don't know how much you know about Josh, but he's a massive recruiter. So yes. While I was a type of Cooper, I'm emailing Josh, and Josh is obviously not fucking replied. I'm only laughing because I have tried to get Josh on the show for a while. And I think his one of his white business partners stepped in and put just put the stop sign down like stop messaging us. And I was like, okay. Yeah, that sounds about right. So all of their credit that's Josh's instruction and Josh's desire, but that as soon as currently run by a white woman, her name is Joyce. I mean, great. She's one of Josh's best friend, but that's the person who sold me the probably, yes, she told me the same thing. We're friends though. I love her. So I could say that. I emailed and I was like, hey, what's so much milk in my fucking eyes? Like, hey, I'm really hoping I can get to these Josh daughters. You're like, listen, she's

Trinidad Google Caribbean morehouse hannes farmer Josh Brooklyn America Cooper Joyce
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:24 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"At? It wasn't, there was not about group at first above group was my dream agency. I have applied to work on both groups like 6 times. Oh, wow. Oh, yeah. For me, being in the Caribbean and being a lover of design and seeing that scene that I put out for me was massively influential because above group was, it was founded by these two men, Alex mills, and Gareth Jenkins, both who were Trinidad. Well, both side trinidadian roots but weren't necessarily squarely based on Trinidad, but they were Internet out during their book era. And something that really stood out to me was this I don't like this term, but it's the best one that I have right now, but this kind of internationalized approach to making design, which felt like it could stand up anywhere in the world. And for me, I was so inspired by that kind of work that I told myself, I'm going to make work like this, or I'm going to I'm going to make this for a company, or I'm going to make this on my own, or I'm going to starve to death. You know what I mean? And I think that after school, a lot of the work was struggling, but struggling not necessarily because of any reason other than not wanting to produce what felt to me like the kind of road to mechanical output that people are like, I think Internet ad, we have a culture of advertising as our big thing. So that's what designers make most of their money doing. But the advertising culture engine and that has kind of really flattened expression. And I think that for me, looking at that kind of work was always really demoralizing. So I was telling myself I don't want to work with these people. While also needed to make a living. So my employment history has been shaky at best. I think I maybe was employed for my longest tent. My longest job lasted like 8 months. Everything else was like freelance in the middle of that, but I worked out a few agencies and I was, I think I would say that unhappy is a good way to describe how I felt. Just because I'm unhappy not necessarily because I mean the bosses are assholes, but bosses could be assholes everywhere. But it was more so I know that I'm not doing what I want to do. You know what I mean? I'm getting up. I'm making this outlook for these people, but I know that at the end of the day, this isn't how I want to. I don't want to be known for this. I don't want this to be what I'm carrying through in the future. So it was always in the back of my head and then after many attempts. I got I actually just got a job offer from above group. And above group was the first time that I was able to work as part of a team and make the kind of work that I wanted to make. And I worked on a bunch of groups, I would say maybe a year or a little bit less than a year. But it was the most formative job experience that I had had because here I was on a team of people attempting to make world class work with world class in my opinion intentions and objectives. And eventually the company designed as a business internal that is hard to do. And it's hard to make sustainable. And at some point in time, they had to realize that, hey, this isn't going to work and they have to shutter their doors. And one above who closed down for me, it was really demoralizing because yeah, I know I could be like, I could have my own freelance career and stuff like that. But I think that what I learned from above group is one, how much you can do with people as opposed to just yourself. But also, I kind of learned how much I enjoyed being part of a thing. And it's only now that I'm able to look at the empty studio and kind of reflect on how much of the studio experience that I'm having, I took away from above group. I know exactly what you mean about working at a place and feeling like you know that you're and maybe I'm saying this wrong, but like you kind of feel like the work that you can do is better than this. Like I'm better than this place. In terms of the kind of work that you know that you can do, but you're still stuck in this like, I know what you mean. I know exactly what you mean. Yeah, and I feel like it's also like, and I don't say for a place of ego either. It's almost from a place of desperate frustration. It's like, guys, why don't we care about our clients? Those kinds of things are like those were always questions that remain so unanswered that it was hard to feel comfortable in a space where I shouldn't feel more concerned about my clients than my boss did. You know what I mean? And it felt like a lot of the time they work was this act of compromise. I'm not an active compromise because we have to get it out or because the client is on a deadline. It's always like the compromise comes from, well, we don't want to have another conversation with our client. And I was always in my head. Like, well, okay, clients actually hire us to be the experts. They hiring us because they need somebody to tell them when they are fanciful ideas might not work. And I think that the culture that we've had in China that around business in general and around the customer is always right quote unquote just didn't allow for that kind of thinking. So when I wasn't about group, it was the first time that I heard my boss say, yeah, it's all our client. It could go fuck themselves, do they ask us to do some bullshit? Yeah. And for me, that was huge because I didn't even know we had that kind of power. In Trinidad, you know, I knew we had no power elsewhere and it was nice to look at that designers elsewhere. But at home, it was really, it was wild for me to see that. So now even at the studio, we are probably one of the few studios that tells plans, hey, we're not sure that your business model is really aligned to what we can with that we're trying to make. Yeah. It's a more gentle way of saying that. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I think that they may have not been able to, you know? Yeah. I know for me, I mean, I'm not gonna lie, there was some ego in it. I was working at AT&T, I was essentially a production designer, just kind of working on an assembly line with a team of other designers just cranking out these boring websites for small businesses. And I just knew that I was better than this. I was like, I can do better than this. And it sort of pained me how the other designers who I worked with. A lot of them who happened to be black designers were just sort of okay with this very sort of, to me, it felt like this is boring pedestrian station in life. I'm like, you like this? You like, you like these 15 minute lunch breaks, and then we have to go back to work for 6 hours. Don't you want better for yourself to this? And for me, for me, it was a 100% ego. I get what you're saying about kind of, you know, especially with an agency, you would think that agencies would hopefully be more, I guess, appreciative of clients, and maybe, I mean, it sounds like this was kind of your first agency type experience, so maybe that's kind of why it was so jarring. Well, I've had a few agency experience, and I think that one of the realities in Trinidad is that we have what you would call franchise ad agencies. So a local business interest would get into our partnership, but let's see such. And they would bring us actually to Trinidad. But the only parts of the search is actually branded using on the name. So there's nothing that's going to be reflected in terms of the work ethos or the creativity and like that. That industry of design being production is way more and I think maybe just how they built the industry in front of that. I think it's way more about getting the work done so that we can get a new client in than it is about making work that gets us our next client. So a lot of these agencies have ten year 15 year relationships with cloud. And yes, they're making underwhelming work every year, but underwhelming work at an utter understandable and expected budget. So it's not going to be a huge problem for the client. And I think that I was always really wary of ending up in that trap because I felt like the reason that those companies were successful is that same kind of post colonial shame away from. So we'll work with asahi and saatchi because they can guarantee that it won't be shipped because it says Sasha and saatchi in their name. Okay. But that doesn't necessarily mean that the work is going to be good. It just means that there's an implied kind of confidence. And I think that I knew that interested that we may have white people are minority here, but there's still the powerful group. So I was never under this illusion that I could start my own company and just run it on the name of it. You know, it would have to be about to work. Yeah. I mean, it kind of sounds like you've always done your own thing, whether it's on cue, whether it's your earlier or entrepreneurial ventures that you kind of touched on, like for you, what have been some of the pros and cons of working

Trinidad Alex mills Gareth Jenkins Caribbean China asahi saatchi AT Sasha
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:53 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"Just because of how white it is. You know, even as you say that that reminds me of some conversations I've had over the years on revision path with other type designers. I think one of the first type designers I had on was episode 24, I was this young guy named Kevin carranza out of Nairobi, who had designed the typeface called charvet. I don't know if he kept it up. I remember when he designed and I remember he got a good bit of like international news for it. I don't recall if he had kept it up because he really was, I mean, one when I was talking to him, he was like 21. He was like, I was just kind of messing around and made this typeface and it wasn't like it wasn't really I guess for a utility. He kind of just did it to see if he could do it. But also I think he was leaning more into like doing fine art. So I don't know if Kevin is still even doing typeface design. You said episode 24? Yeah. I have to check that out. Yeah. The other person and I haven't had him on the show yet, I would love to, but it's got me thinking about the work of sake madiq up out of Zimbabwe. He's a huge influence, but yeah. Yeah, his book African alphabets, which took me forever to try to find. Is such a, it is. It's because it's out of print and everything, but it's such a great work in terms of just the anthropological just meaning of like showing what African alphabets are and how different that is from what we would know as like Roman alphabets or something. Yeah, one of my first type design projects and the product that I gave my TED Talk on was a surinamese language that he had actually documented in his book. And if he hadn't documented that, I would have found it. Yeah. So you kind of talked a little bit about growing up. Tell me more about kind of your origin story. Like you were born and raised in Trinidad? Yeah, I was born in front of that. I grew up with my dad alone and I think I had like a relatively traditional growing up experience, which is that my father wanted me to be something I'm not an artist. And what that means is that I think I was quite good at all of these things in school. But I was just really unfulfilled. So I was a good student, but a bad teenager, if that makes any sense. And I think that by the time I was ready to graduate, also what Americans would call high school. By that time, I was, I was so determined to do my own thing that I had kind of I already decided this was going to be tough but I'll do it. When I got out of school, I had kind of walked away from our engineering path that I was focusing on. And I decided to be a bartender. And while I was a bartender, I was also making software. I had learned a few programming languages in school. And my first job was actually as a software developer. And while I was making software, I kind of learned, you know, I like making these layouts for these interfaces a lot. And I started getting into interface design. And this would have been old school. This is like pre cloud premature. I realized I quite like that. And then I realized, oh, wow. I was working on a website one day, and it needed a logo. And I just told the client, you know what? Let me just take a stab at that for you buds. And I did. And as soon as I was done, I was like, oh my fucking God, I love this shit. It's to be a graphic designer. Essentially, so I got out of software and became a graphic designer. And I think that I basically got into software, became a graphic designer. I was freelancing for a couple of years and then decided to go to school at the university of China. Because I wanted to get better. And I did okay slash grid in school, but I was living with a parent who just didn't understand a lot around why anybody would want to do design, which he would call art. And in his head, it's like, I don't want my child to be an artist. They solve. So there was a relatively unsupportive environment at home, then. And during that, I decided, well, I want to be a designer. And I don't want to have to quit studying design. So I'm just going to move out. And I moved out. And studying and living on my own was a difficult thing to navigate. So I just decided I would just start working. And I was always working while I was in school, just because I had a culture of getting clad with before. And so, I mean, going to the university of Trinidad and you're studying and working at the same time. Did you end up finishing up or no? I didn't graduate. I got into the program and dropped out almost at the end twice. Twice. Yeah, the first time was really just because I didn't have a choice. And then the second time was because I went to school to finish my associates. And my lecturer at the time was like, hey, G, happy you want to be in school? Love that for you. But you kind of working to where you already are. Not necessarily in terms of my skill, but in terms of professionally. And a lot of these schools in China are not there to help you get a job far less than they are to actually educate. And I think that it just felt like a right time for me to kind of get out on my own and I started looking at the agency after which I was fired. I was ready to see a couple of months off. But yeah, that was where I got my start. I basically that was one 87. That was really going to do this for the rest of my life. It was when I dropped out of school the second time. I decided, well, I could do a bunch of things I could probably go learn how to do math or something. But I think that for me, it was way more important than I am. At the time that I do something that was kind of passionate driven. And all of the things around my life had kind of coalesced around me doing design for a living. And it was the first time that I did something. And yes, it paid my bills, but it was also the first time that I was able to do something and look at the effects of it, and look at the effects that it had on other people and be like, this is a good thing that I'm doing. And I feel like that feeling has been, in a way, what I've been chasing, or chasing is the wrong thing because it implies more satisfaction than there is. But I do think that what I've been doing is working to what wicking, working in pursuit of my understanding of the fact that design can actually positively affect people's lives. And if you know that it can, then let it and the only way to let it is the beauty design. Yeah. And I would say that your point, you know, if you were already working, I mean, why stay in school and I'm not saying this for people listening as like, you should drop out. But based on the environment that you said you were in, if you were already kind of working, it's like, what is the degree really helping you for at this point? You're already making a living. That was it. I was paying my rent, but I was paying my rent on various sleeping because I was like have a career where I'm on the laptop and I'm building identities and then I'm going to school. And I'm having to cut out P stops. Right. It was like, I feel like I'm getting prepared for the thing I'm doing, you know? Yeah. So what was your early career like? You mentioned this agency was that above group

Kevin carranza charvet TED Talk university of China Nairobi university of Trinidad Zimbabwe Trinidad Kevin China
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:04 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"And what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host, Maurice cherry. Hello everybody and welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host, Maurice cherry. Just want to remind you all again about the tenth collective you probably heard me talk about it for the past several weeks. One of the reasons I'm talking about it aside from the fact that we're trying to get new members into the tenth collective is that tech and design companies have been laying off people left and right. I swear every week, pretty much every day for the past few weeks. I've heard of some company laying people off. And so the tenth collective is not why we started it because of these layoffs, we really started it because we want to help black designers looking for work to get paired up with companies that are looking to hire them. So if you're a black designer listening to this and you may have been affected by some of these recent layoffs and you're looking for your next opportunity, consider this a formal invitation to join the tenth collective. It's a really great resource whether you're looking for work or not. So if you have a job, then apply anyway. Because what happens is you'll end up getting connected with companies that are interested in talking to you and then you can decide whether or not you want to talk to them. You can hide your profile from certain companies or you can just be anonymous altogether. Currently we've got roughly about 30 people in the collective looking to really raise that number so we can get more folks matched up. So head on over to the tenth collective dot com to join or you can check out the link in the show notes. This episode of revision path is brought to you by hover. Building your online brands has never been more important, and that begins with your domain name. Shelve the online community who you are and what you're passionate about with hover. With over 400 plus domain extensions to choose from, including all the classics and fun niche extensions. Hover is the only domain provider I use and trust. So what are you waiting for? Go to hover dot com forward slash revision path and get 10% off your first purchase. Now for this week's interview, I'm talking with Ajay archer, a multidisciplinary design director, and the founder of un cue and uncus studio. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. My name is a J osha. I am a designer and entrepreneur currently based in Trinidad. My work extends in a few different branches. One of them is in making typefaces. So I work on type this design, but primarily with a focus on type based design, to support the cultures and spaces of the post colonial slash new world. And the global south. And I also am an entrepreneur in my home country of Trinidad, where I run a design company called on cue where we help small businesses, our online, and we also have a studio called the Anki studio where we help other startups and institutions such as government bodies and large corporate entities build their own digital products to kind of move towards trying to ask the transformation. I believe your type design was how I first heard about you like years and years ago. How's the summer been going for you so far? In the type design world. So I just enjoy. Just in general, yeah, just in general. It's been good for me. I started off. I mean, I think it would have been probably in the start of the American summer at Facebook. So I did a talk for matter matters, open arts team. So I gave a talk as part of their visionary series, and that was really good. But I think that that kind of kicked off my summer, and then I also gave another talk at a conference called the IO festival in Minneapolis. And those have been really good. I've been really enjoying this particular summer because I've been so kind of faced down in dealing with unused stuff, especially because it's Trinidad was so locked down for as long as it was. This summer feels like this summer that I'm becoming an international person again. Oh, nice. So with that in mind, what's coming up for you for the next few months? Right now we have which is my startup at home. We are working. Pretty hard on growing. So we've just started working on connecting a lot of our local population with our local farmers. So we have a massive food in portville and Trinidad, which is wild because we're a tropical country that can grow fruits or year round. But we have a massive challenge with people on the ground and trying out purchasing produce from people who are making it Internet ad. And we have recently built in an addition to our software that allows local farmers to connect with the general public. So we are currently helping people sell vegetables and helping farmers direct more organic produce to their shoppers and that for me has been my huge kick. It's not as great as writing a master python script or anything, but I think that I've been really appreciating recently, especially with uncle how much technology can help people on the ground. So that's been what I've been mostly excited about. I've been working on that and I've been working on a new typeface project with that in studio. Oh, nice. Can you talk about sort of that typeface project? Sure. I recently got recent anymore. A few years ago, I started working on a typeface that was based on an inspired by the writing styles that same to be kind of pervasive across post colonial spaces. So there was this kind of energy that sign painting and post colonial spaces came with that I was trying to see if I could capture into a typeface. And when I say post colonial spaces, I'm not just talking about the Caribbean, but I'm also talking about Postgres spaces like Ghana and Nigeria and India. And the kind of really ferocious energy that a lot of those sign painting designs have come with have been really inspiring to me for a lot of years. I've been obsessed with signed beans in Trinidad and then beyond Trinidad for a lot of my life. And I think that the project that I'm working on with our studio right now is trying to distill that hand painted sign energy into something that we could use for text, which has been a really interesting challenging but also really interesting challenge, but also really fulfilling. I've been really enjoying it. I'm working with dotted studios designer ebb and soccer. On creating it, but it's been really nice. It's also frankly nice to be building work for a studio that was founded by a black typeface designer of whom there are so few. That's true. That's true. I mean, I know that you're kind of known as Trinidad's first typeface designer. Yeah, I mean, I'm not even sure that I'm, I think that there was a typist I was designed before me in Trinidad. I think that what I meant was that I am trying to that's technical designer who was doing it for a living. But I think that even the idea of being the first for me is a lot less important than it is, the idea of being somebody who is making things that are culturally specific. Yeah. I do think that there is a there is a distance between who is making the work and who is the work for. And I think that who is the work for is always a more interesting question, but who is making the work tends to be the question we ask? Yeah. Which is something that I'm navigating because I think that as a black person who is making type in the world, there is, I feel like that's yes, that some momentous occasion, because up to 20 years ago, black people were not making type. But I also think that the reality is that it's far more about for whom the type that I'm making is than it is what I look like, because to be Frank, if there were a white man who were making typefaces that was inspired by post colonial creativity, I would be as excited. But I do think that that's also because a lot of the work that I'm making right now. I am hoping that it does well commercially, but it's not that it's not that it's not commercial consumption, but for example, really type based up where that we're working on at that studio, that type is has a language support that is relatively rare among the type world. So it supports every single African tribal

Maurice cherry Trinidad Ajay archer portville un Minneapolis Facebook Ghana Nigeria Caribbean India soccer Frank
"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:39 min | Last week

"archer" Discussed on Revision Path

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring but can't find diverse talented candidates? Then you're in luck because we just upgraded our job board and we're here to help you out. Head on over to provision path dot com slash jobs, where you can browse job listings, post your own jobs, and sign up for email updates when new job listings are posted. This week on the job board, glean is looking for a product designer in Manhattan in New York City. Is looking for a talented and versatile senior 3D designer in either Brooklyn, New York, or Los Angeles, California. Posting to our job board starts at just $99, way less than many other design job boards. And for an additional fee, you can have your listing advertised here on the podcast and reach tens of thousands of listeners. Make sure to head over to revision path dot com slash jobs for more information on these listings and others. And while you're there, click on the talent tab at the top of the page and check out our new initiative with state of black design for companies and job seekers. It's called the tenth collective. It's free to become a member, and you'll get warm introductions to companies that are looking to hire. Get started with us and expand your job search today. Revision path dot com forward slash jobs. You're listening to the revision path podcast. A weekly showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers and web developers through in depth interviews you'll learn about their work, their goals

Daily Mail: Hunter Biden Met With Now-Sanctioned Russian Oligarch

Mark Levin

01:04 min | 3 months ago

Daily Mail: Hunter Biden Met With Now-Sanctioned Russian Oligarch

"With a breaking story from the daily mail Russian oligarch with close ties to Putin met with Hunter Biden in Moscow Over potential investment deal before meeting twice more in New York and D.C. and is now sanctioned by the UK but not the United States He got all that Emails obtained by daily mail dot com reveal Hunter Biden had courted Vladimir Say that ten times fast A Russian oligarch with close ties to the billionaire owns a company which has reportedly supplied Putin's forces with drones used for deadly bombings in Ukraine He was sanctioned by the UK and Australia this month but he remains unsanctioned by the Biden administration The president's son and is now jail business partner Devin archer sort of investment from the billionaire in Rosemont reality in 2012 and 2013 You've heard that company come up multiple times In the

Hunter Biden Putin Moscow D.C. UK Vladimir Biden Administration New York United States Devin Archer Ukraine Australia Rosemont
Biden Wrote College Rec Letters for Kids of Chinese Exec Tied to Hunter

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:38 min | 4 months ago

Biden Wrote College Rec Letters for Kids of Chinese Exec Tied to Hunter

"Turns out there's now a piece of smoking gun evidence that ties Joe and Hunter Biden very closely together in the Biden racket. And it is an email that reveals that Joe Biden wrote a letter of recommendation for a crooked Chinese businessman who was, in partnership with Hunter Biden. So this was a political favor directly extended by Joe Biden. President Biden wasn't the president then, but it was vice president. And this is the same Joe Biden who said, I don't know anything about my son's business deal. I don't have any involvement in any of that. It's nothing to do with me, and this has been the left's mantra now. Now that they can deny the laptop, they are taking refuge in the idea well, Joe didn't know anything about it. Well, let's look at what happened here. Turns out, in 2017, vice president Ben vice President Biden wrote this letter of recommendation for a guy named Jonathan Lee ally. And this guy Lee is the head the CEO of a big company, which was in a joint venture with Biden's Hunter Biden's company, which was called Rosemont, Seneca. Hunter Biden, in fact, had a 10% stake in the Chinese guy Lee's company. And this guy Lee sends a note to Hunter Biden and his business associates, which is Devin archer and Jim bolger, and this is what Lee writes. He goes, gentlemen, please find the attached resume of my son, chrisley. He's applying to the following colleges for this year, and he lists Brown university Cornell University and New York University. And then he attaches, quote, an updated version of his son's CV. Now, what's interesting is to kind of follow this trail. Hunter Biden's associate James Bulger responds with, and he's responding now internally to hunter and Devin archer, he goes quote let's see how we can be helpful here to Chris. In other words, what can we do for this kid? And then a few weeks later, Eric schwinn, who is the president of Rosemont, Seneca. This is the Hunter Biden company. He replies to Lee. And he says, Jonathan, this is Jonathan Lee. Hunter asked me to send you a copy of the recommendation letter that he asked his father to write on behalf of Christopher for Brown university. So what we have here is confirmation that Joe Biden went ahead and as his son asked, wrote the letter for this guy and submitted it to Brown university.

Hunter Biden Joe Biden President Biden LEE Devin Archer Biden Vice President Ben Vice Presid Jonathan Lee Ally JOE Jim Bolger Chrisley Rosemont Brown University Cornell Unive Seneca James Bulger Eric Schwinn New York University Hunter Jonathan Lee
DOJ Investigating Hunter Biden for Foreign Lobbying Violations

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 5 months ago

DOJ Investigating Hunter Biden for Foreign Lobbying Violations

"Another story that has come out from the Washington examiner and it shows that Hunter Biden is under current federal investigation for foreign lobbying. Same sort of thing that we've been alleging for quite some time. That Hunter Biden is being investigated now by the Department of Justice for lobbying fellow on behalf of fellow countries and lobbying our own government. Wonder how many people would have wanted to know that before they voted for Biden? Hunter Biden is being investigated in his business partner Devon archer has now been indicted, isn't it? Doesn't it beg the question of whether or not your own current government is bought when it comes to making decisions with Ukraine or China? This is incredibly frustrating for me. Because we as Trump supporters, we as conservatives, we followed the rules. We did what was right. Through our different efforts at turning point action or through my own personal advocacy efforts, not of that of turning point USA, we worked hard, we were motivating crowds. We were organizing people to try to vote for Donald Trump. All the while there was a broader conspiracy at play and why you say oh Charlie, come on, it's not a conspiracy. They admitted it, there's a story in Time Magazine that said, the secret history of the shadow campaign that won the 2020 election. That's the definition of a conspiracy, by the way.

Hunter Biden Devon Archer Department Of Justice Biden Washington Ukraine Donald Trump China USA Charlie Time Magazine
Rep. Jim Clyburn: Now, Working People Have a Tough Time to Vote

Mark Levin

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Rep. Jim Clyburn: Now, Working People Have a Tough Time to Vote

"No election is on Tuesday We know why elections have been put on Tuesday Working people have to go through some people I thought it was the constitution And for states working people Let me ask you a question Archer's second tire to people like this who make it sound like it's so hard to vote that people are really prevented from voting Now we've been told that people of color have a more difficult time to vote elderly have a more difficult time to vote Millennials have a more difficult time to vote Poor people have a more difficult time to vote And now we're told working people have a more difficult time to work All you have to do is what the Democrats

Archer
A highlight from 12 LESSONS LEARNED  JANUARY No. 1

Anna Jelen The Time Expert Podcast

01:59 min | 8 months ago

A highlight from 12 LESSONS LEARNED JANUARY No. 1

"Hi, I'm Anna and I know that 2021 soon will be history. Another year that has brought us well, let's say a lot. But when I look up to the sky, I see the sun the moon the stars. And it looks as if they are still where they should be. And I think that is good news. When the year slowly comes to an end, I like to take a moment to look back on it. And then I see that many things I thought were important turned out not to be. And other experiences that had no intention of personal development or such were full of them or became big lessons. The school of life never stops teaching me. How about if we time travel together through the year and I will share what I've learned this year from people, failure, sports, or from the ice cold kinky winter bath. Today, we begin with lesson number one. Which is about friendship. And I learned in January this year. It was the month I lost one of my best Friends, and it made me write about friendship. Let me share this. We come and we go and in between we live life and there we meet many people. Some archers passing by, some stay longer. They become companions. And one day, someone might even say to you, I'm there for you. What an exceptional thing to say. I'm there for you. There is one advantage of friendship that there are people out there who would catch you

Anna's Podcast Time Management Personal Growth Time To Change Personal Development Anna Jelen Philosophy Time Expert Time 12 Lessons Friendship Anna
Everything We Know About the Dirty Money Hunter Biden Received

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:43 min | 8 months ago

Everything We Know About the Dirty Money Hunter Biden Received

"Way. Miranda, there is a increasing amount of chatter about the Russia Ukrainian issue. And it begs the question any time this kind of surfaces, what capital flows existed or exist between the Ukrainian government or the Ukrainian power structure and Hunter Biden? What do we know as far as money that Hunter Biden received from Ukrainian oligarchs, gas companies, and even Russian, as well? Please explain. Well, there's less money coming from Russia and Ukraine that's evident on the laptop and in the bob linsky material than there is from China. But what we know is that, first of all, that Hunter Biden was being paid $83,000 a month by the corrupt Ukrainian energy company, burisma during his father's vice presidency. And after Joe Biden's term ended, his pay for sitting on the board of burisma was cut in half and we also know that there was we actually know this from the Johnson grassley report that $3.5 million was funneled into the bank account of an associate or business partner, Devon archer of Hunter Biden, by Elena bacher, who is the Russia's richest woman. The wife now we know of the corrupt former Moscow Amir. And we also know that Hunter Biden met Elena batter just a few weeks after that money hit the bank account. He met her in como at village, which is a gaunt beautiful mansion hotel luxury hotel on the shore of Lake como, which is a haunt of corrupt oligarchs from around the world. And we also know that he was doing the bidding of the Ukrainian owners of burisma in terms of the owner Michael is logistic was in trouble because he had been the former energy minister of the Russia aligned Ukrainian government that was ousted by the maiden revolution with the help of the United States. And he was under investigation by Interpol by the British and in conjunction with the FBI. And they had frozen his bank accounts in London with millions of dollars in it. And in Ukraine, the chief prosecutor was also investigating him for

Hunter Biden Burisma Russia Ukrainian Government Bob Linsky Johnson Grassley Devon Archer Elena Bacher Miranda Moscow Amir Joe Biden China Elena Lake Como Como Michael United States FBI
Paramount Plus Making 'Fatal Attraction' Reboot With Lizzy Caplan

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Paramount Plus Making 'Fatal Attraction' Reboot With Lizzy Caplan

"Today. On the Patreon show, I talked about the fact that the movie fatal attraction, the paramount network is going to make a series based on the movie fatal attraction, and it's going to start Lizzy Caplan in the Glenn Close roll, I'm happy about that because I really couldn't find one thing that was attractive about when close and why a man would leave a beautiful woman like Ann archer to go and have sex with Glenn Close. She looked awful in my book. I think Lizzie cap was cute. I can see that

Glenn Close Lizzy Caplan Ann Archer Lizzie
 Iraqi PM survives assassination attempt, ramping up tensions

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Iraqi PM survives assassination attempt, ramping up tensions

"Security was tightened around Baghdad ultra failed assassination attempts on Iraqi prime minister Mostafa kind to me at least two one trains targeted the residents of Iraq's prime minister in the heavily fortified green zone in Baghdad several of his security personnel were injured in an attack which has significantly ramped up tensions archer Ron backs militias refused to accept last month's parliamentary election results yeah I'm kind to me was on home despite corruption TV looking calm with a bandage on his left hand's cavity rockets in trying to tax third bill time lines and build a pizza the

Prime Minister Mostafa Baghdad Archer Ron Iraq
Conservative Commentator Ben Shapiro on His New Book:  'The Authoritarian Moment'

Newt's World

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Conservative Commentator Ben Shapiro on His New Book: 'The Authoritarian Moment'

"In his new book yet. Thawra -tarian moment ben. Shapiro examines the real authoritarian threat to america. Is supposedly antifascist loved youth archer and loftus aggressively insistent that everyone must bend as values. Demanding submission informative. The left is obsessed with putting people in categories and changing you nature. Everyone who opposes it must be destroyed. Shapiro looks at everything. From pop culture. The frankfurt school social media to the founding fathers to explain the origins of our turn to tyranny. And why so. Many seem blind to the authoritarian moment lays bare the intolerance and rigidity creeping into all american ideology and prescribes the solution to end emir. Authoritarianism threatens our future here to talk more about the themes in his book. I'm really pleased to welcome my guest. Then shapiro is editor in chief of the daily wire host of ben shapiro. Show his latest book authoritarian moment. How the left weaponized. America's institutions against assent is a new york times bestseller and is available. Now ben thank you for joining us really appreciate it. You've done so many different things. What prompted you to write the new book. And i think over the course of the last year watching as not just social media mobs went after people but as corporations started to reflect the winds of the social media. Mobs will watching as the public health. Establishments started to reflect politics rather than actual public health guidance. Watching as the media went out of its way to continue to promulgate falsehoods in the name of particular political points of view. It was deeply

Shapiro Loftus The Daily Wire BEN Ben Shapiro Archer America New York Times
Díaz, Rays Tie Team Record With 6 HRs, Romp Past Twins 11-4

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Díaz, Rays Tie Team Record With 6 HRs, Romp Past Twins 11-4

"The rays are seven and a half games ahead of the Yankees after Tampa Bay won for the eleventh time in thirteen games and eleven to four routed Minnesota yandy Diaz hit one of Tampa bay's franchise record tying six home runs and drove in four Jordan Luplow Manuel Margot Rainier Rosa Reina Nelson Cruz and Brandon Lau also went deep for the rays the early run support help Chris archer get his first win since June twenty nineteen just the fact that our our guys put up that many runs that early no I just felt like I could challenge hitters archer tossed a season high seventy eight pitches while allowing four runs over five innings Jorge Polanco was three for four with a two run Homer for Minnesota I'm Dave Ferrie

Yandy Diaz Tampa Bay Rays Manuel Margot Rainier Rosa Rei Brandon Lau Chris Archer Yankees Minnesota Jordan Archer Jorge Polanco Homer Dave Ferrie
Rays Rout White Sox 9-0, Take 2 of 3 in Series; Archer Hurt

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Rays Rout White Sox 9-0, Take 2 of 3 in Series; Archer Hurt

"On some medicine Francisco Mejia each drove in three and five Tampa Bay rays pitchers combined to throw seven eight shutout blanking the Chicago White Sox nine nothing meadows give Tampa Bay the lead with an RBI single in the first offered although Lopez on his bases clearing double in the sixth offers a Ruiz doubled the lead from three nothing to six nothing Chris archer came off the injured list to make his first start since April tenth but left after just two innings did hip tightness I thought it was just smart smart is to just you know take a little breather leave it to innings and you know with these upcoming off days I should help space things out to where I can be all right you know towards day six or seven Tampa Bay is now an American league best twenty nine games over five hundred on the season Steve Kearney St Petersburg

Francisco Mejia Chris Archer Tampa Bay Rays Chicago White Sox Tampa Bay Ruiz Lopez Steve Kearney St Petersburg
"archer" Discussed on Pardon My Sarcasm! with Ashley D & Fuze B

Pardon My Sarcasm! with Ashley D & Fuze B

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"archer" Discussed on Pardon My Sarcasm! with Ashley D & Fuze B

"The sold fifteen. I'm ashley day archer. Making i like it So actually quick question yes. I was actually looking at Flyway lenny kravitz even worse looking for phone conversations right when you get married. I shouldn't you've been married. retie happen. Married three hundred homes which means you been divorced three times working on a map. It didn't necessarily mean that. But yes well at least twice us you recite your vows as a partner says for better or for worse does for worse include inclusion number one. I will write my own house. And what i put in. There is up to what i wanna put in there. So i'm not very traditional I'm sure have some variation of version of that I'm very nontraditional. So i would probably rewrite the whole thing and not use any of the words but i do believe your point for better or worse. I think that encompasses everything so person. Cheats does not breaking evolve for better or worse are think i think it really all depends on the person you know at how much they can tolerate or withstand or or or You except that. I think that's probably the best word for it. And if you're somebody that Needs absolute loyalty. Maybe it doesn't include cheating for better for worse right There are other people. That probably will have kind. Your hearts are less calluses on their hearts of. If i'm a real almost serial cheater and i get married. That's the worst part you to deal with. Serial killer serial killer she'll sear cereal shell right and you are gonna do serial killer. I mean yes that takes it to a different level Somebody who better for worse but if it's kind of abuse now you're talking about abuse over and over and over breaking my heart and i say no we ricky Yeah some in ninth getting into an abusive situation. You give them up the pass on one time when they if somebody wants to give him a pass. I don't know like you said it kind of depends are. It doesn't matter in on the you see their cheated cheap. You was to difference on chater right. But i'm asking the one time affair. Would you would to look at all. I'm obey the public defender. He slept with someone else. That's the divorced -tuation. Yeah it's still situational. Archer is she cheat. You know. I think for me if i was very i and forgive and forget maybe the first one. But when's asserts became an ongoing thing that's like you know what maybe this isn't working so don't wanna share my way with someone else. I am actually a point. My life where. I've never been married. Never had kids at age. Thirty two and You know. I feel like i have a lot more freedom than a lot of my friends here too matter so i'm not exactly sure if i'm all up for right now in my life. A contractual agreement that says with someone just that one person that one person for better hours. If i get married i i would certainly hope that that would be one of those things that we not knowing wants to walk into encounter something like that you know if you wanna be with them. Many people lying in married right. Well we've talked about before that my third husband was a serial cheater But i i knew about it beforehand. that he had cheated on his wife for twenty years they were married for twenty one years and they're and they he admitted on her with you know no but he was open and honest about it and he of course. Oh that won't happen here blah blah blah and then when it started to happen immediately afterward together immediately He would deny and like the girls would call me and tell me about situations and about exactly what happen. Like he did this to my this and then i would confront him and he'd be like oh well she says crazy. Everybody was crazy. Accept him i was you know and then then i caught and then i had pictures and then i had this. I had thought and that was literally dropping him off at airports just for him to be meeting somebody else. It was constant where his uber is uber. To the has that's different but so you will dropping them sneaky leg so so it became abusive the because there is a very narcissistic he was making me feel. I've crazy so then. I'd go home and i think i'm crazy. He's a he's gas lighting was bad he was the best was. The best still has probably. But you wanna go through. Until i realize like what am i doing. I'm so much better than these lies. And and these falsehoods in living like this complete I don't know it was. It was a strange that is different than have somebody. I promise you the next time. I get married. 'cause i will get married again. I'm gonna much please. I'm in a much better place than i ever was. A hundred thousand percent mentally healthy physically healthy everything healthy and i'm looking forward to the you know exploring that.

chater lenny kravitz archer ashley ricky Archer
"archer" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"archer" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Further gets in the drag of the shaft drops. Now you have to why you can't. I have neighbor fine artificial mediums. that worked. Well it's because you're shooting that era through a blood in animal through a blood suffused environment which lubricates slick blood is. You had blood on your hands. Try to hold your knife handle when you're getting an animal and it. It actually has a lubricating effect and which is another reason. Do our testing within thirty minutes putting the animal down. Not only four changing. The tissue mortis but blood will start to coagulate. You no longer have a bleed when you shoot them. When they're fresh put down. You still have some blood coming out of the teachers. Get into a guy sent in this thing about how he was in. He has a cadaver lab or was in a cadaver lab human cadaver lab pump beef blood through cadavers. To keep them. I don't know freshened up. You could apply that you guys starts right. He's lab guy. Talked me their stuff temp so they. They use sue vidh blood enroll through cadavers tabloids. He's making over. Yeah i did transfer knowledge right there. If the rifleman's paradox doesn't work out then yellow pat net number. You know okay number. Six air mass. The physical era wait. That's a real simple one from physics is longer it takes to stop period and as all it also gain more energy from your boat. I don't care what kind of shoe if you put a heavier air on there is going to have to be big. But it's going to have an increase in kinetic energy transfer which is the proper use kinetic energy not what air does from the bowl into the air because all of the noise and the sound of the vibration you get with allied era era. You go to the morgue diminishes now. I haven't gone all. I've gone up to about sixteen hundred grain airs and is still showing that you still seeing a small kinetic energy gain as you go to the heavier errors. Out of any given boat compound re curves long does doesn't matter works with all level and that era mass is going to carry this additional force that it has received from the bow. And while we're doing with all of these factors is trying to maximize the conservation of this force. The era has derived from the bow to be able to apply it to the animal when it hits because this is the this is what really matters is the terminal ballistics in connecticut energy tells you how hard something he hit. It doesn't tell you the forward motion of it. it doesn't connecticut. He doesn't have a direction. Sound is kinetic energy vibration. The shaft is the wiggling shop. The resistance against the air the paradox. These are all part of kinetic energy. They have nothing to do with penetration because penetrations directional force. And that's what you get with. Momentum momentum does have direction and momentum has to be met by equal force of resistance before it stops so the more momentum you can put into that air which is mass times velocity not velocity squared And not all of the momentum's forced penetration concern works out equal the more of that momentum that is invested in the mass of the era the more outcome penetration. You're going to have because the mass of the air is not going to change. The velocity is going to decrease his penetrates but a significant portion of that momentum is invested in the weight of the air and that weight of the air is going to carry all the way to stops so even as slows down. it's still carrying more momentum right up to then and that's why a bowling ball cares a lot more momentum than baseball was next one. Yeah now if you talk connecticut here she's one of my things off on because there are places did replied canadian as a standard for hunting animals and it is not applicable. I'm sorry does not apply to take a baseball pitcher. They're getting a major league baseball pitcher pitch ninety six miles an hour with softball. If you look at the laws were they apply to cape buffalo. That's legal okay. buffalo with. That's enough kinetic energy. They don't penetrate worth a damn on cape buffalo. It'll make him real mad probably founded in the ground. All i got. You're saying you're saying that kinetic energy on apply league. Pitcher could take a baseball and get the right amount of connecticut enough. He's legal. he's yeah he's legal it and that's one of the things. The industry is applied for years because that have speed sell. They pushed connecticut energy. Because okay we get this era going faster. We've got more kinetic energy. Wow and okay you need this. Mount kinetic energy. Now look at all the things where you can see on the internet where they tell you you need. This much kinetic energy to mount an elk and this much front the deer this much the black bear me one that tells you is that launch connecticut energy or kinetic energy impact. Nobody ever says now. In our study we track the momentum and the kinetic energy at impact as well as it launch. The impact counts. And that's one thing that heavier error is going to carry out. There is that increased momentum. you need. And that's why airways important next factor seven wherever seven now is the age.

connecticut baseball cape buffalo bowling softball buffalo Pitcher
"archer" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"archer" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"All to the shot was on a very long range shot. It's all been small game. Barmen shooting varma calling that kind of stuff where they might not here but we were going to do more. I've done a little bit of research looking at error noise and you can't quite down. Arrow lot by different types of fleshing. And we've worked out a fleshing we call an eight fleshing very small triangular shape it only worked with very high ethical sierras. The higher you got the f. o. C. you now have a long. We're steering arm on the air. So it does not take much fleshing to overcome the wind shear the broadhead smile you bare shaft tuned if it's perfectly bear shafting and then you put your broadhead on there. The only flights you need is enough to overcome the wind shear under all wind conditions. So i tune that fleshing just like a wooden anything else that i put the broadhead that this error is going to be used with. And then i see how small i can go in that fleshy before i get unstable flight. Go back up slightly. We actually use a thing called the turbie later which is a little pinstripe thing that goes around in front of the feathers about a quarter of an inch. Feathers do work better than veins because they've got higher drag and wider gives us higher z. The turbulence disrupts the ladder flow down the air shaft was creates increased pressure just like would on an airplane. I used turbo turbochargers on airplanes to whistle. Increase the pressure on the smaller flaky. And that has a much lower sound of so. We're going to do a lot more research for that. That's coming up because you think they're responding to the sound of the approaching aero too. I know to take a big fletch and shoot a rabbit at about eighty yards watching perk up and move for the arrogance. They're just here's a coming bear. So you have got sound too dissimilar from dive on. that's very similar and so big flashing. When i first started hunting starting researching. I use really. Large feathers are realized that at close range. I had to get my hair out of paradox to give the penetration up because i could shoot animals at eighteen twenty yards a lot more penetration than if i shot him. Seven or eight yards. That's the paradox. The era is flexing. archer's paradox. let me give it a shot and then you can correct me but basically as that your bow string starts to push your arrow. The arrow doesn't immediately start moving. It first flexes your arrow. Does this as it's coming out of your boat like it bends in a sideways argon arc and then as it leaves it the other direction and then the other direction and eventually it straightens out and then fire's completely straight but the paradox is that it's not that you'd think the closer it is the better well. The original paradox course weren't center shot bose. Was that in order to hit the target. It has to bend around the bow. It has to be pointed at the target. That's not a paradox. Well it is. It's paradoxes what they don't point at it to be able to hit. There's the pair where the paradoxes. I really close better. No no actually the fact that on on racial bowl that we know and some of those. I use have no chef for that reason. Let me use lighter air shafts. When i was trying to get an early and the air is pointed off this. Shoot out there. The rifleman's paradox would be that if you're shooting at something at point blank range you'd have to account for the fact that you're crosshairs inch and a half higher than your most saint-julien an inch and a half that's right. You'd have the line of sight and the but we're accessing somewhere out there. They're going to cross cross again. Dubbed the rifleman's paradox bugging because a lot of people don't know archer's paradox. Well shot flicks. Oh yeah and you get it again only impact because it does again now now is hit the front of the air has slowed down the back air still trying to push it forward now. One of the things we found with the higher. Foc's is that they come out of paradox when you shoot much faster because it's lighter the back end and when you hits the animal most of the weight is up front. You got a very stiff forward lever arm and the back of the shaft is very like and because it's very light it doesn't pushes heart. It doesn't flex as much in his stops flexing much faster. So that helps you get increased penetration because when that's flexing going through wound channel you having to push tissue every time it bans and goes through a bone sailing. He's trying to push against that mound and that slows at now. Now there's a couple of things you can do to see that really easy. You can take a dow rod long four five foot one drill your hold aboard and put it in there and get a rubber ball put the overall way at the back end and pulled over the side and watch you like a metronome takes forever to stop move it down about halfway which sure little more than halfway like most aras are. No you can go a long time. Put it right down against the board. Ingles put the different stops.

varma archer julien Ingles
Why You Think You're Right -- Even if You're Wrong

TED Talks Daily

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Why You Think You're Right -- Even if You're Wrong

"So i'd like you to imagine for a moment that you are a soldier in the heat of battle. Maybe you're a roman foot soldier or a medieval archer or maybe you're zulu warrior regardless of your time and place. There's some things that are constant. your adrenaline is elevated. And your actions are stemming from these deeply ingrained reflexes reflects his rooted in a need to protect yourself and your side and to defeat the enemy. So now i'd like you to imagine playing a very different role that of the scout so the scouts job is not to attack or defend. The scouts job is to understand. The scout is the one going out. Mapping the terrain identifying potential obstacles and the scout may hope to learn that. Say there's a bridge in a convenient location across the river. But above all the scott wants to know what's really there as accurately as possible and in a real actual army both the soldier in the scouter essential but you can also think of each of these roles as a mindset a metaphor for how all of us process information and ideas in our daily lives. And what. I'm going to argue today. Is that having good judgments making accurate predictions. Making good decisions is mostly about which mindset. You're in so. I'm going to take you back to nineteenth century france where innocuous looking piece of paper launched one of the biggest political scandals in history. It was discovered in eighteen. Ninety four by officers in the french general staff and it was torn up in a wastepaper basket but when they piece it back together they discovered that someone in their ranks had been selling military secrets to germany so they launched a big investigation and there are suspicions quickly converged on albert dreyfuss.

Scott France Germany Albert Dreyfuss
Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

UN News

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

"Hundreds of thousands of people but likely need assistance in eastern democratic republic of congo or. Drc has people in goma continue to flee the threat of further eruptions by mount iago you and humanitarian said on friday. The first eruption on the twenty second of may killed over thirty people and the gohmert volcanological observatory has warned that the risk of a new explosion israel the un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs or archer said it reported strong tremors on thursday one of the measuring four point nine on the richter scale along with large traffic jams. Gomer with some four hundred thousand people potentially on the move. The un children's fund unicef warned that two hundred and eighty thousand youngsters may need help. The un agency said that many of those to go in the first wave headed to nearby sake which is an area prone to cholera outbreaks and where at least nineteen suspected. Cases have been recorded in. The last. two weeks needs already high in this part of the country. North kivu where more than two million people are internally displaced and three and ten severely food insecure

DRC Gohmert Volcanological Observa Un Office For The Coordination Goma Un Children's Fund Unicef Gomer Archer Israel UN Cholera North Kivu
Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

UN News

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

"Hundreds of thousands of people would likely need assistance in eastern democratic republic of the congo or drc as people in goma continue to flee the threat of further eruptions by mount nyiragongo un humanitarian said the first eruption on the twenty second of may killed over thirty people and the gohmert volcanological observatory has warned that the risk of a new rupture is israel. The un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs or archer said on friday. It reported strong tremors on thursday one of them measuring four point nine on the richter scale along with large traffic jams out of goma with some four hundred thousand people potentially on the move you in children's fund unicef one third. Two hundred eighty youngsters may need help. The agency said that many of those who left game in the first wave headed to nearby sake which is an area produce cholera outbreaks where at least nineteen suspected cases have been recorded in. The last two weeks needs already high in this part of the country. North kivu where more than two million are already internally displaced and three and ten are severely food insecure

DRC Mount Nyiragongo Goma Gohmert Volcanological Observa Un Office For The Coordination UN Archer Israel Unicef Cholera North Kivu
Interview With Airshow Pilot Cecilia Aragon

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Airshow Pilot Cecilia Aragon

"So my guest. Today is cecelia hourigan. She is a professor at the university of washington. A former member of the us aerobatic came has is a researcher with over two hundred publications in data science. Human computer interactions visual analytics. She's the recipient of the presidential early career for science and engineers scientists and engineers and she's written three books and was a ceo of a company that was acquired within three years of its founding. Wow this is really cool cecilia. It's great having you with us. Thank you so much george. It's really exciting to be here so now tell us how you got your start in a so you have to realize that as a child i was incredibly fearful and timid. I was the last person anybody would have thought that i would become a pilot. I used to be scared of ladders. But then one when i was about in my mid twenties a colleague of mine at work said. How'd you like to go for a ride in a small plane and my first thought was. Oh no that's not the sort of thing i would ever do. It's too scary. And i don't want to risk death but then i remember thinking in that moment insane. No to a lot of things. I've been letting my to your rule me i think now is the time to change. And so i said yes and my friend took me up in a piper archer out of oakland california and i still remember taking off over the san francisco bay and seeing how beautiful it. The sun was glittering on the bay. Like a million gold coins and he even let me handle the controls. It was the most wonderful experience i ever had. And when we got back down on the crown. I signed up for flying lessons.

Cecelia Hourigan University Of Washington Cecilia George United States Oakland San Francisco Bay California
Northeast Nigeria Violence Forces 65,000 to Flee, Humanitarians Targeted

UN News

01:17 min | 1 year ago

Northeast Nigeria Violence Forces 65,000 to Flee, Humanitarians Targeted

"A spate of clashes involving government security forces and insurgent groups in northeast. Nigeria has caused mass displacement and threatened humanitarian assistance armed. Groups have also gone from house to house in the search for aid workers. Un agencies said on friday in total sixty five thousand nigerians are on the move following attacks by armed groups on damasec town in northeast. nigeria's bola state which left eight people dead. According to u n refugee agency. Unhcr jens locker from the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs. Archer said that. There had been several reported incidents in the town since sunday. The eleventh of april where aid assistance is a lifeline or she also continues to receive very worrying reports of clashes between insurgent groups. And the nigerian opt forces in damasec in borno state and non-state armed groups are targeting humanitarian assets and facilities and reason the also conducting house to house searches reportedly looking for civilians identified as aid workers according to archer the attacks will affect support to nearly nine thousand internally displaced people and seventy six thousand in the host community he receiving humanitarian assistance and protection. If the attacks continue it will be impossible to deliver aid to people who desperately need it. Mr locker said

Nigeria Unhcr Jens Office For The Coordination Of Borno UN Archer Mr Locker
Virginia's Largest School System Makes Plans for the Future

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Virginia's Largest School System Makes Plans for the Future

"Teenagers become eligible for the vaccine. Younger Children are still waiting for a vaccine to be safely approved for them. But Virginia's largest school system is still making some plans for the future, and we are very excited about the vaccine development around opportunities to vaccinate Archer. Aldrin. Fairfax County Superintendent Scott Bray. Brand says the school system is already planning ways to get shots in the Children's arms with the Fairfax Health Department visor this month, has already asked for emergency approval for vaccine used for kids between 12 and 16. I think this will be one of the final game changers for our students and families to return and feel safe about returning for in person instruction effects counting plans to return to five days a week of in person instruction this fall River and also said they were looking at different covert. Testing methods for next school year. Look, look, er

Superintendent Scott Bray Fairfax Health Department Aldrin Fairfax County Archer Virginia Brand
Jessica Walter, 'Arrested Development' and 'Archer' star, dies at 80

Kentuckiana's Saturday Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Jessica Walter, 'Arrested Development' and 'Archer' star, dies at 80

"Emmy winning actress Jessica Walter. Perhaps best known for her role is Lucille Bluth, in Arrested Development, has died at the age of 80. The actress was introduced to a new generation of fans for her Emmy nominated portrayal of the Boozy Bluth and Matriarch Lucille, of course in Fox is arrested development. And I didn't realize this until I heard her voice. She voiced Malory Archer in the show Marcher. She did not know that I'll be in the hospital bar. Uhh! You know, there isn't a hospital bar. Mother thistles. Why people hate

Jessica Walter Lucille Bluth Emmy Boozy Bluth Matriarch Lucille Malory Archer FOX
"archer" Discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

Riders Lounge Podcast

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"archer" Discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

"Because i've done a few big ones Back hundred percent where you could possibly haw sought it on a debt landa Land advise on things and just rotter concern grew really yeah Of even saying saying god through three sixties to iraq land Comeback little bit little bit crooked and just out of luck. It's it's pretty incredible highlight works so it's definitely an conference. I could actually like you. Make me wanna go rodney. Because like i only brealey. Like i never really did macho with whips until like the last couple of years at all your auden and always really into my thought. I was jared mcneil. I thought all upside down. And you know and i thought i was doing turn downs tile awake but that ada Because although i think. If i if i'm coming in forty five degrees this is gonna hurt but sarah's like sounds like there's a bit of confidence building probably wouldn't be good gonna dote again another thing. Which which these awesome about them to is each rod. You can ride the thing all day and sometimes if you if you have a big session readings in the dirt. Linda towards the be a little bit soul. You know you your arms your legs or your back just because you paying us being smashing it'll whereas on the tell me about it another thing you really israel you know. It was really awesome. The bag land. You can kate manning in because she started smooth suspension. As i said it's bailing compressing walk at the lander is taking everything so you can have a massive eroding that in in hate and everything and you just feel fond towards the end of the day. So that's another thing which is really cool. I'm sure you could draw them. Five is away and you just be. He'd be swayed so that's definitely a cool thing. Well do you reckon. They've got the durability to be ridden five days a week every week. Full us on in like eight. I'm anxious at travis house He has bagged jumped Big square airbag. That you practicing doing a think he. I think he's addy's he's was the first one..

forty five degrees hundred percent Linda jared mcneil each rod five days a week eight Five first one israel kate iraq land sarah three sixties last couple of years travis
"archer" Discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

Riders Lounge Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"archer" Discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

"I must say it's it's very fun. And really i found to be. Maybe because it's a new trick in all that sort of stuff. But i found it to be really cool because you know as you sort of flight the first around you get that good snap through the handle bosnia in october. It's cool because you're able to you know you're upset hawaiian you gonna looking at saying where you're going you can kind of spot you landing in as you go to get back to. The pigs is one thing i've found. We helped me on the second one was as i finished the co-diver soda pulled pulled on the handlebars up to my chest. Strap the muscle the blackout. A little bit in doing that. I was able to help my fate so to find the full pegs in. Ns soon as i did that. I just talked into the block. And then Spun the next one round. Was i spoke landing again so definitely. There's definitely a little bit more. That guys into that trick with the extra backflip. There's a few extra techniques that you go to do that I think all in all it felt pretty cool. I was i was excited down that it worked out so well because i sorta had visions of just not getting that clause for a little while and so excited to bring it around that I'm definitely candid. Cape may be tried to get the cold over a little bit bigger or even maybe be. Hang onto it for the long haul dakota. I've be Halfway through the second rotation as well. So that's a couple a work on that would be unbelievable to see go through into the second rotation because that doesn't you don't see too often high like i guess with the nar double back easy you can see the guys holding through and it's thought to go into that second rotation bought weeks. What another quote. I've is being done yet. So i think dumb. It's still gone of while. I'm still experimenting with we've had the So i think the possibility to hang onto the treat forbid long into the second sleep. I think it's definitely Definitely possible to show. I think next time. I get a chance to get rod and signed it all on that. That'd be something got work on. Definitely.

second rotation october second sleep first second one one thing double one round hawaiian
"archer" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

The Relaxed Dog

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"archer" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

"That's what I did. I was like my dogs fast and we'd gloves fetch. He'll love fly ball and it's like the exact opposite because it's essentially dead retrieve you're never tossing the ball the ball's just connected to the box it's a, it's a dead ball and box so but. Me being like. Fetch up libel. We started the class with my little dog and quickly found out that Cooper had some sensitivities environmental sensitivity, some internal insecurities, most of us have been worked through but it caught the bug I was super into it and I wanted to see how archer would handle it. So I signed up for class and he took to it immediately in fact I remember. I don't even think I did wallwork with him so that there's a series of things that you need to do to make sure that you don't injure your dog when training for the box and one of those things especially for big dogs is like a big wall you do Wallwork I you lean it at thirty degrees, twenty degrees whatever, and then you just kinda go up up up until it's flat against the wall and it's like this big two or three foot by five foot wall and you get them jumping and and rebounding off the wallace highest possible, and that's how. We usually do bigger dogs, US kind of layer it up into that, and then you go back down and you lean it up against the five blocks in you do it all over again and I didn't do any of that with him. I was like I wonder if you'll do this and I just borrowed a box because it was doing homework for my other little dog and I just put him on the box and he did it and I was like OK, guess we're going to do a class with you and that's what made me do a class with him. We need to fix his box turn because that was not the right way to introduce it. So we had we had to do a lot of fixing mistake. But we like he was into it and. It just kind of kicked off from there. It took cooper my little one a lot longer to get into fly ball than it did for Archer But yeah, we've been doing fly ball..

archer big dogs Cooper US
"archer" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

The Relaxed Dog

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"archer" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

"They're one who was kind of being held for some people that knew that they wanted the dog but we're in the process of finding a location in which they could have the dog I guess an apartment building that wasn't pit bull friendly. So he was. So somewhat of a long term, foster four to six months, and then a puppy puppy from a litter that they had rescued that ended up being. I WANNA. Say just not quite right in the head. So that was an interesting. Thing to work through to He just We ended up finding another foster for them, and then the two girls took him in for a while But that was it I kind of broke off with them and I didn't foster for them anymore after that once I adopted archer on because it just ended up being. A little too much three, three foster extreme of my own plus still boarding dogs so Yeah, there wasn't much too much of a turnover like I reached a point like I I gotta take a break. INS May not be a part of this for a little while and how was out shaw with allies, dogs sort of like in close proximity all the time and the. Yeah, you's fine I mean even to this day he still he's pretty neutral elbow he will play with dogs are like he plays with Cooper and he would play with Amos who is one of the the pit bulls that I was also fostering for them and like he played with this other dog aggressive dog or dog reactive dog that I have been working with for really long time SWEETPEA got along really really well so he does play with dogs. He's not like so neutral to the point that he's just like neidl out like you or I don't care it like he will play with dogs. The older he gets he has more of a like according process like you won't play with them unless you really trust them. It took him two years to really play with my dog fiber And in understand five as a puppy, and then then five with adolescents where he was maturing and going through hormonal changes and he's like I, I'm GonNA fight you But then once that settled down at Lake now they've kind of play. I got watch them because terriers go crazy but they play now. So he's pretty dog savvy like I. He's the little like if he doesn't know the dog, he could be a little lake stiff and I think sometimes that all off put a dog, they're like what's your problem and he's like I don't know a my problem is and he's just kind of like heckled and stiff for a second but I've never had a problem in terms of him. You know typical pips stuff right but I've never actually had a major concern with him and other dogs. So and define that there's been any sort of difference in arches behavior when you're going for walks and things depending on the different places that you've lived. Yeah like when we lived in Hollister, there were sheep and like other prey animals there. So you know some of that would blake tick up in the field, but could easily override that with play. And he handles like when we lived in Oakland, we used to go on some hikes..

Amos Cooper Hollister shaw blake Oakland
"archer" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

The Relaxed Dog

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"archer" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

"Crazy and then like trying to tamp it down or cap it off but just toggle between. You're playing the game. Now now you're not playing the game right and dot really kind of also changed everything for me to again getting in sports and I credit him for that too I don't think I would have. I'm just kind of going I'm just blathering on now but like this is kind of like the process that it took an turning me into a different kind of trainer who's interested in sports and now going in a direction of. Thinking about trying to start an intro to fly ball classes up here where I live now and enter the barn hunt that kind of stuff like I did. I learned from somebody else how to teach barn hunt classes Eventually I want to become a barn hunt judge and it's all because of him and taking a working line dog and. Sort of modulating some of his arousal 's and teaching in a different way and it just kind of opened up a whole new career path within dog training that I probably wouldn't have had access to it wasn't for that came into my life. So Oh, get onto of the things you just mentioned he. Just got back a little bit to. Give us a very basic understanding of Archer and how you were introduced. When you say food chimes be some people would be going. What's that throw food and he just gets it but if you can give us at, that's a small sort of. Understanding of how to went into that area. Sure I'm trying to think how because I visually show you but visual is not always the best in podcast formula formula, a formula or format So Food Chase Games for me is kind of like the same way that people would call it a lower like. So you lower your dog into city place the food in your hand you can lawyer dog into a set by moving the food over their head..

Archer
"archer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"archer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A picture of himself and he said do I look like archer and then someone responded under in which church that is very me if you were born after the nineties reference yeah that's that's very very good now Sierra Leone is nation has faced tremendous challenges over the past few decades to say the least it's been rocked by civil war and it was one of the countries hit hardest by the abode outbreak in two thousand fourteen today it remains one of the poorest countries in the world the two thousand and eighteen you and human development index ranked a hundred eighty one out of a hundred and eighty nine countries but despite all this when it comes to technology Sierra Leone is a place of real innovation as we are going to hear from our panelists and actually across West Africa emerging technologies are being used in some really fascinating and creative ways to tackle big nasty complex problems and not something that one of our listeners Nikki has been wondering about hi cried science I am the key from Oxford my question is what role can technology play in helping low income countries crazy inequality gap thanks Nikki so I want to hear from all of you actually about an area of technology the you'll particularly excited about in terms of how it's being used to close the inequality gap chica coming over the fence yes I'm very particular and passionate about this technology that's going to actually move with Africa closer to what we have in the developed world so we have studied and looking out problems that this particular to us and how we can tackle those problems using robots making him more about that later on definitely and Edmund how about you one example for that I have some experience in is use of drones for scoping urban environments and then at that school being can be use to develop the projects like building a roll of building a bridge or school and in the documents so you can attract the funding to get that done and finally David and I did that the others choose their own examples but I wanted to ask you actually about something specific because your dressing income inequality Hey in stereo and partly with this new digital identity system can you tell us a bit more about that show the greeters inequalities we have is around ten down any quality and then but in a row the inequality and we can use technology often because it that it doesn't matter where you I can be in the village of the city technology can unify us but more specifically in time south of financial inclusion for example one of the things that the government of Sierra Leone has been and Dustin and working closely with time as on are working to use a blockchain to expand financial inclusion in financial access so we are making about one million people who could prove the identity to potentially be able to use a blockchain so that they can have banks and financial institutions new with their customer right new with the I verified with the and extend financial services to them can you explain simply in a few words what looks chain is and how it's used to create this kind of digital out and see if people do you think about blockchain it's a set of blocks that are connected in the chain each block is increased Seth and that block has information from the previous blocks such that you cannot destroy aids you cannot undo what has been done because it's encrypted and and how do you think that having this kind of digital ID system is gonna help Sierra Leoneans and also help help the country as an economy as a whole financial inclusion in Sierra Leone is very low somewhere around between seventeen to twenty percent and what this does and.

archer