17 Burst results for "Arch Foundation"

"arch foundation" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

06:58 min | Last month

"arch foundation" Discussed on The Big Story

"It is the fire extinguisher on the wall. And so look we've got the perfect example of what happened down south of the border when you've got somebody who will push and push and push against norms who push against conventions who says if it's not written down it's law that i can just do it you know. We've we've had that for the last four years yet. We don't really have that in canada and the thing is about the the crown is it. It is the ultimate bulwark against that. Because if push comes to shove if if a politician If a government leader is doing something against the norms against the laws then it is. The responsibility is the duty of the governor. General of left tenant governors talking on advice for all their experts and they would absolutely get advice to say. I'm sorry you cannot do that because of this this this this and this it's not their business to be involved in politics. It's not their business to take sides. But they simply are responsible for the institution. And that's the reason why you have when you have the state opening. Parliament the governor general. The lieutenant governor's get the big fancy chair and the political leader gets the small little chair beside they are temporary. The crown lives forever and it's that bulwark. And so when you talk about what the advantages and it can be. It's almost implicit when you look at the most liberal. I'm talking small. l liberal. The most socio economically equal of countries. And there's always inequality but the ones that are the most equa- the ones that are the democratic and there's rankings of them around the world the one thing you'll notice about the top ten is that the vast majority are monarchy's they're all monarchy's and that's because the monarchy provides is the top is an end. It's the swedish monarchy has absolutely no power the power completely been taken away from it but that doesn't matter because politicians no you can you can push. You can push your agenda so far and then there's a pushback and i think that's one of those weird things that that an inherited position can actually bizarrely be the counteract against politicians. Because of course they don't have any political agenda. What their what. Their role is is their role is safeguarding. The nation safeguarding. The state is leaving it to in a better state for the next generation. So what's next Not necessarily maybe for canada's future With the royal family but for the long arc of this story is the next major event. Whatever happens when the queen eventually passes. I think that is probably the next major event. I mean i think the event the wrong kind of dreading is that philip has been in hospital or On four weeks now and shows. He's ninety-nine he'll be one hundred in june they were planning a big event. he's retired. He's made it clear he doesn't want a lot of fuss. He's not a guy who likes a lot of fuss but they were. Everyone was expected to gather including harry. Now make it. Of course is pregnant. She's expecting her second child around there. A girl so i was doubtful. She would be back in in britain june but they were all expected together. Gather and now. There's that sense of Yes it's the passing of the guard on its philip. It's the queen. You're kind of looking at the calendars and making that tick. That's the biggest thing. I think if you talk more immediately. It's in the summer time. A statue up. Diana that was commissioned by the two brothers prince william and prince. Harry is expected to be unveiled in. London is got delayed because of the pandemic has everything everything has been but that is going to be an incredibly awkward situation because of course the brothers really aren't talking to each other that you know harry set. They're on different paths up. But harry also just spent two hours talking to millions of people criticizing the family criticizing the tuition for which william is devoting his life to a life of public service. And so that's going to be a little awkward but you know what we've all had those awkward family gatherings and you know what you just do. It is not about you. It's about somebody else and you kinda suck it up smile on your face and you do it. It also might be. It might be a turning point you know. Maybe the turning point is you know is when harry and meghan daughter is born but the ramifications obviously for sussex is what are they going to go from here They're trying to spin up their foundation. The arch foundation. They've got deals with netflixing spotify with there's been one podcast but really nothing else. And so where do they go from here. And there's this great coach in the atlantic magazine and it said problem for harry and meghan is beef with house of windsor. Is currently the most interesting thing about them. And i think in many ways that is true and is up too damn to now show the world what they can do not just what. They thought at their lives as oils patricia. Thank you so much for taking the time to explain this to us as wonky as it gets sometimes jordan. Thank you and i always say to everyone. It's one of those topics that you can start off very light and fluffy or conservative quite serious or quite emotional yet when you peel through the layers the royal onion it impacts almost every part of not just not just britain at every part of canada with you know it or not and i think the thing is most people. Don't patricia treble of maclean's magazine. That was the big story for more from us. Head to the big story. Podcasts dot ca. If you haven't taken our survey please do. We're going to send out those tote bags soon. I know you want one. You can also talk to us on twitter at the big story f. Pin tell me please how much you don't care about the royal family. I've never seen those tweets. You can also write to us by via big story. Podcast all one word at our cia dot rogers dot com and as always you can follow us. Subscribe for free. Whatever they happened to call it these days in your favorite podcast player. That is apple or google or stitcher or spotify or pocket or overcast. I could go on but we're there. Thanks for listening. I'm jordan heath rowlings. We'll talk tomorrow..

Harry Diana meghan tomorrow william apple twitter second child two hours canada ninety-nine two brothers four weeks google spotify harry cia one podcast jordan heath rowlings London
"arch foundation" Discussed on News O'Clock

News O'Clock

07:29 min | Last month

"arch foundation" Discussed on News O'Clock

"Casey rackham an ex staffer welcome to buzzfeed daily. And hasty before we get into this. I have to ask. Are you a fan of death. Punk and in today's news mean anything to you. I thought that they were splitting up. And i was like. Oh this is really sad. This is like high school and college rolled into one for eight stay lasted so long together. They're so good. I didn't never thought they would have to break up because they haven't been producing anything lately. So i just i was like what's the be suspect but i can throw a dear friend. Who's a huge fan. He sent me a picture of him on our old roof when we were roommates. Daft punk leather jacket on as memories. He goes he goes. Oh my god that just made me cry for more. I was like. Why are you crying of this picture. And i saw the news is the name of a song to talk about smart. Everybody really irony there so just everyone go. Listen to some bath. Punky feel good today. All right we need to start with kim and kanye officially filing for divorce. The couple who had been married for six years had been on rocky terms for a while and january. It was reported. The pair was effectively. Done minus the actual documentation is the one who submitted the papers for divorce. On february nineteenth has requested joint legal and physical custody their kids inside it quote irreconcilable differences as the reason for the split according to a source who spoke to e. Kim held off on filing for divorce. Because she wants to make sure she's making the right decision for the kids in. Oh i feel like a while ago. This news bite of you know broke the internet or rocked it but you know it has been such a long time coming. It's been a very public situation watching both cognac kim separately and together and so like i do see why it took so long because i know her wanting to make sure it was the right decision and i'm sure they made it because it is the right decision for sure and you know what i think about a lot with. Their situation is that it's a good reminder that celebrities are humans that deer with the complexities in the complications and the contradictions of what humanity brings forth. And you know. They've been going through their own ups and downs. Kanye west is dealing with some real tall things that we should not make jokes about and we should only hope that he's getting support where he can get support but you know just because they're famous enrich doesn't mean life is perfect in means that you can make any marriage work so i hope this is the best option for everyone involved and can't wait to see what the tv version of this looks like. Meanwhile ahead of the golden globes. Which will happen this coming sunday. A new investigation from la times is exposing the problems inside the hollywood foreign press association one shocking but not surprising in the least revelation included there are currently no black members of the h f. Pa in addition to the lack of diversity inside the h f pa. The organization's ethics have been called into question. This is because the organization allows its members to receive lavish perks from studios at networks whose projects come up for awards. One of these perks included a jump. Get in france which might explain all of the head-scratching nominations heavily in paris received. I'm done i'm over. I saw a different tweeting angrily about this yesterday. 'cause she's like we've always done this. I'm so glad this is out there but like no shit. Michaela cole was freezed out because there were no mean there are no black people. We have to be specific third. No black people. There are people of color but there were no black people why insight blackness radiates here and gets a baguette in paris. Both i'm just glad that after your entire last week bringing up at miliion. Parris lily collins every single day that it has come to fruition. So casey it is my birthday month. It is priced season and it is also black history month which means my powers are at their watch out and coming to fruition. That was your beetlejuice moment. Isn't he said. Willie called three times and here. We are one hundred percent before going to bed before i start my bath bomb. I go lily collins collins collins and i'm trying to bring justice mechanical so anyway you guys know my secrets all right moving on. It's time to talk about the royal family while everything we might know about them is from the crown or in my case people magazine because my mom got it every week while i was growing up some serious drama going on in real life from the announcement of a second child to the official separation of harry and meghan from the family to their impending interview with oprah. Yeah there's some big stuff happening with the royals to explain everything going on in royal land. We've brought in buzzfeed news senior reporter in royal family expert ellie hall. She's written extensively on this topic and writes bus royal family newsletter. Thank you so much joining us today. It's my pleasure. Thank you for having me. Of course of course all so listeners. Who might not understand the drama going on in the royal family. There was some big on. Friday in buckingham palace announced. Meghan and harry had officially broken with the royal family. Sounds like a huge headline. But wasn't this what we'd always expected. La can break this down for us of course so last year harry and meghan shocked the world when they said they wanted to step back from the royal family. When they did this in january twenty twenty they proposed a sort of half in half out idea of royalty where they would be able to work and earn a living. Because when you're a royal your public servant you can't really do that. It would stop requiring taxpayer funds because all of the royals are funded from like this one pot of money that comes from united kingdom taxpayers. And they want be able to live in In north america too in canada because megan's from meghan from california and then eventually as soon as like everything down they just whilst all that and said no. We're gonna be in america. Thank you but basically what the queens said last year was. You can't have it both ways if you're a royal year public servant you're not making any money and you are following the rules and if you're not then i'm sorry you're out so this friday. What the queen did was she said. All right you're out. you can't come back. you can't be a working royal anymore but you kind of knew. This was coming so last year when the queen announced the deal she said to harry and meghan like no. You are not allowed to do both things. You can't use the word royal. Petty is that like they can't use. They can't use the word royal anything. They couldn't use their sussex royal brand like they use the word world in any of their ads. they're screwed or like they mentioned on spotify row so lawsuits. The queen can sue them if that is petty. Ah that's so they're not. They're not allowed to use it because it's taking advantage of the royal name. Okay so if they don't call themselves royals this means they can do anything under the sun down. What does the future look like now. so harry. Megan signed multimillion dollar deals was net flicks and spotify to create content. They're of following the obama model. Where they're going to set up these big production companies and make social justice work. They also have a foundation on an actually just donated a bunch of money texas relief. It's called the arch foundation last year. Harry and meghan said that they were leaving. The queen said cool. You're going to have a one year review period. Like you have a year to try this out of a year to live in america to try out making these deals but you can come back at the end of it last week. News broke harry and meghan or sitting down for an interview with oprah on march senate. It's going to be ninety minutes. It's going to be mostly about megan and it's going to be talking about why they left. Megan talking about what her experience in the royal family was like so that announcement came out late sunday night.

harry meghan Harry Casey rackham ellie hall canada Meghan six years Michaela cole california one year kim january kanye Kanye west america oprah ninety minutes Willie north america
"arch foundation" Discussed on The HeirPod

The HeirPod

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on The HeirPod

"It's. <Speech_Male> Generally <Speech_Male> about how society can <Speech_Male> went together to revamp <Speech_Male> the digital world <Speech_Male> something <Speech_Male> that the arch foundation <Speech_Male> that Harry <Speech_Male> and Meghan launching <Speech_Male> either at the end <Speech_Male> of this year or the beginning <Speech_Male> of next year <Speech_Male> will really focus <Speech_Male> on creating <Speech_Male> healthy <Speech_Male> positive humane, <Speech_Male> digital <Speech_Male> communities, <Speech_Male> online <Speech_Male> foreign wellbeing <Speech_Male> of the future <Speech_Male> of. <Speech_Male> The end of the <Speech_Male> session, she shed a <Speech_Male> quote from the artist <Speech_Male> Georgia O'Keefe <Speech_Male> <hes> kind of. <Speech_Male> Sort of <Speech_Male> referring to <Speech_Male> Geraldo experiences <Speech_Male> of being a <Speech_Male> public figure existing <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> his very strange. <Speech_Male> Social Media <Speech_Male> Age. <Speech_Male> She said <Speech_Male> that she had the course up <Speech_Male> in her room many <Speech_Male> moons ago but <Speech_Male> she says, it resonates <Speech_Male> her with her now <Speech_Male> more than ever. <Speech_Male> When you see the <Speech_Male> vitriol annoys <Speech_Male> that's out there in <Speech_Male> the world and the <Speech_Male> is I've already <Speech_Male> settled it for <Speech_Male> myself. So <Speech_Male> flattery increases <Speech_Male> and go down <Speech_Male> the same drain <Speech_Male> and I <Speech_Male> am quite free. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> One. <Speech_Male> One of remember <Speech_Male> I think when when <Speech_Male> we made <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> up some <Speech_Female> kind of yes. Good advice <Speech_Female> for everyone. You <Speech_Female> know you'll. You'll have people <Speech_Female> that love you and people that <Speech_Female> hate you whether it be in <Speech_Female> real life around social media, <Speech_Female> but it's the end <Speech_Female> of the day. It's kind of how <Speech_Female> you <SpeakerChange> settled <Silence> it with yourself. <Speech_Male> Exactly. <Speech_Male> How do you? <Speech_Male> What's what would you <Speech_Male> consider your relationship <Speech_Male> with the <Speech_Male> digital space <Speech_Male> like you <Speech_Male> able to <Speech_Male> keep it separate from <Speech_Male> your own life or is it <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> of part <Speech_Female> of it? <Speech_Female> Well, I would <Speech_Female> say I feel very <Speech_Female> grateful that I did not <Speech_Female> have social media when <Silence> I was a teenager. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Because I. Think <Speech_Female> you're not fully developed <Speech_Female> yet and <Speech_Female> you haven't learned <Speech_Female> enough about yourself <Speech_Female> to sort of <Speech_Female> processed those kinds <Speech_Female> of things I feel <Speech_Female> for like kids <Speech_Female> growing up these days with <Speech_Female> instagram and twitter <Speech_Female> and and <Speech_Female> dog and everything I mean, that's <Speech_Female> just a lot to <Speech_Female> grow up with <Speech_Female> It's much easier <Speech_Female> hopefully as an adult <Speech_Female> and kind of <Speech_Female> always remember <Silence> slur that quote actually <Speech_Female> that you <Speech_Female> know at the end of the day, it <Speech_Female> comes down to who you are as <Speech_Female> a person and <Speech_Female> how you feel about <Speech_Female> yourself and <Speech_Female> if you're confident <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> how you're living then <Speech_Female> hopefully you can ignore <Speech_Female> the rest now <Speech_Female> honestly sometimes easier <Speech_Female> said than done. Let's <Speech_Female> be real not. <Speech_Female> Sometimes. <Speech_Female> Words can hurt <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> you know if you <Speech_Female> reminding yourself, <Speech_Female> it's not what about <Speech_Female> people are typing <Speech_Female> online it's about the kind <Speech_Female> of life you live hopefully <Silence> that <SpeakerChange> makes a difference. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think will not. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Go from <SpeakerChange> there. What <Speech_Male> great words <Silence> I? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Miss, the days of my <Speech_Male> space, <SpeakerChange> it was a <Speech_Music_Female> more innocent <Speech_Female> Aleka. I've made <Speech_Female> your six is that <Speech_Female> there were Intersex <Speech_Male> was six friends or <Speech_Male> something we you <Speech_Male> could was actually a hack <Speech_Male> though I had you <Speech_Male> could change it to add more <Speech_Music_Male> because. <Speech_Music_Female> Stressful. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> was. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You remember, everyone had <Speech_Male> sort of the same friends. <Speech_Male> There was always <Speech_Male> the same few <Silence> famous sort of. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Social Media. <Speech_Female> Tom <Speech_Female> Right Tom, <Speech_Female> the Creator <SpeakerChange> thome <Speech_Female> was the <Speech_Female> going off on a tangent <Speech_Female> at the end of the show. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Know, <Speech_Female> how we <SpeakerChange> got on <Silence> Miso as. <Speech_Male> Well. <Speech_Male> Okay. Back <Speech_Male> to the day you <Speech_Male> guys WANNA reach out <Speech_Male> to us. You can find <Speech_Male> Maggie Maggie <Speech_Male> Rulli <Speech_Male> on twitter and myself <Speech_Male> at Scotty <Speech_Male> being just use <Speech_Male> the Hashtag the <Speech_Male> airport for any messages <Speech_Male> related to the <Speech_Male> show. So <Speech_Male> we can find them <Speech_Male> easily. <Speech_Male> Thank you again to everyone <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

arch foundation Geraldo Georgia Maggie Maggie twitter Meghan Harry Aleka thome Tom
"arch foundation" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:57 min | 7 months ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Global in nature and we're at a time of a lot of nationalism and I wonder if you find yourself in a position where you think you can straddle a lot of different countries responses. Well, there's no doubt that only cooperation will get us out of this thing. The science of the vaccine will be done in many countries, the regulatory review, the manufacturing, this global hopefully people look at that and they say, okay for other things like climate change or stopping future pandemics that we need to put an even stronger framework of cooperation in place you have been quoted as saying you think that. will end the pandemic sooner. An richer countries right that that that twenty twenty two day is the sort of global exactly twenty, twenty, one if. The vaccines work as well as we expect, you know there's approval of the number of them by early next year and there's no glitches in the manufacturing in these partnerships. Rich countries the number. So really start to drop in twenty, twenty one and largely not be a problem to get the rest of the world, which is where most people live and most the suffering is. It's very unlikely. We could get that done before the end of twenty twenty, two vaccine's are you know in in some ways I mean, that's that's the big gun if you will. But what do you think you know the tech industry I think had this kind of like. Start stop approach to the pandemic like this is a problem we should jump in on with contact tracing APPs or various other types of. Initiatives. But. What do you think is lies between here and a vaccine the phase three trials. Are, underway. Or will start for these most promising constructs within the next few months and. To get lots of people to sign up for those trials ironically, they have to be in locations where there's lots of cases because that's what shows the difference between the placebo recipients on the. Vaccine recipients is that there were lots of cases in the placebo arm and not in the vaccine arm of the trial. And these are the world's best vaccine companies working together to make this happen that's the private sector in a no politician is. Pulling out test tubes and doing anything. Arch Foundation has a lot of those private sector people because we worked in the high volume low price vaccine area. To Save..

twenty twenty Arch Foundation
"arch foundation" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

Dead Celebrity

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

"With complex issues of gift estate entrusted taxation. Jackie also has a strong background in international state planning factor compliance and pre immigration tax. Planning thanks for joining us. Jackie Dave Bahir subjective. Today's episode is Albert C. Barnes Barnes was an American businessman best known for his massively valuable collection that he devoted most of his life to curate the nine hundred piece collection which was worth some twenty five billion dollars featured one hundred eighty-one in-laws sixty nine says on sixty matisses. Forty four Picassos and fourteen Medaglia Ottis to just give a few highlights. Barnes intensely disliked the elite Air quotes of the art world and negated his life to providing education to less fortunate. You defied convention by grouping is our peace based on aesthetics philosophical reasons instead of artists are period Andrea. Matisse said the foundation is the only place to see Harken America Dr Barnes never had children but he took great care to plan for his legacy in one thousand nine hundred eighty two created a title. Trust agreement call the trust indenture. This trust established the Barnes Foundation a charitable organization to manage his art gallery as an educational institution in Lower Merion Pennsylvania. And if that name sounds familiar. That's because it's where Kobe Bryant is cool his lengthen. These documents that was not be sold moved placed on tour or even rearranged within the gallery itself. He wanted used primarily for education but open for the public on a very limited basis. He restricted how it could be viewed when only one day a week usually and how much could be charged to see the restrictions also made it very difficult for the board of to keep the foundation profitable or at least that's what they climbed so little by little a filed corpse-eating asking for permission to change the trust. Provisions Trustees engaged in expensive litigation in court arguing that the terms of Dr Barnes's trust impossible because of the great costs needed to maintain the collection and the final blow. Came in two thousand four when a judge ruled that the Barnes Foundation which now supported by three wealthy and elite Charles Foundations and the Pennsylvania attorney general can move the entire collection to the museum district or Downtime Philadelphia right next door to the Philadelphia Museum of art for context of House offices. Barnes had once said the Philadelphia Museum of art is a house of artistic and intellectual prostitution so safe to say probably not what he wanted. So how could he wishes have been so blatantly disregarded or because of a doctrine of deviation which is a legal principle that allows court effectively rewrite a charitable trust if the purpose becomes impossible to maintain without changes. The trustees argued that there was no financially viable way to keep the art of the building. Dr Bars created for the collection could only be maintained. You'd by permitting the move and I'm sure. The allure of creating a huge tourist attraction by relocating at twenty five billion dollar Philadelphia certainly offered no motivation at all. Now there's more twisters to this story which inspired the excellent documentary the auto steel. And we're not gonNA cover them here. Our focus was just how surprisingly easy. It is to have estate planning documents and wills in particular modified overturned. So Jackie how worried should clients be about how close to the letter? Their estate putting documents will be enforced after they're gone if someone just leaves a will and everything's going outright to their beneficiaries. I think that clients can essentially rest assured as long as they've picked a a trustworthy executor that their wishes are going to be carried out. Same thing with a shorter term trust for beneficiaries. For example. You might leave your child or a younger person Entrust to a certain age. I think that you can probably guarantee who the trustee is going to be or who the trustee and potential successor will be so that you can have pretty good control over these dispositions link where clients do have to worry is especially in this area with long-term charitable dispositions. You have certain people that you're going to put in charge right after your death. Almost a hundred years later you might have an entirely different board running the organization. Different Trustees of a trust and then your vision can start to go awry if you haven't done some really careful planning. What's the difference in this situation between the will and trust and what those different instruments are supposed to do and of what they can do? They can be quite similar documents depending on the type of woman type of trust here we. In the case of Barnes we would have a a well with which essentially disposes of your estate at your death and then we have this trust which established his foundation ultimately to hold this art and carry on this educational mission. This charitable mission rather than necessarily run art museum so that's very different and also obviously Your estate isn't going to last forever. The idea is to administer an estate and have it wrapped up within a year or a few years. This other plan in which the arch foundation was held was mental last. Ideally in perpetuity are as long as possible. And I think that we should talk a little bit more about the doctrine of deviation to and how that's brought us to where we are today in terms of how have you made your wishes known to your fiduciaries how major wishes known your executor if you have a will and how have you made your wishes known to trustees if you have a trust or how we made wishes known to Charitable Corporation. That's going to continue beyond your debt. Obviously some methods making your wishes known or not going to be ultimately legally enforceable when they applied the doctrine of deviation to barnes they essentially were trying to anticipate how could most closely meet. Barnes is desired end. When circumstances changed so I think that something. That's it's important to talk to clients about is what's your ultimate goal and get that in writing. Even if it's not legally enforceable I think if Barnes have been consulted on this and someone had said well it's down to this re they're gonNA move your entire collection right next door to the Philadelphia. Museum are moving out of the suburban setting that you chose change. The way to the artwork is presented from what you designed to something that's perhaps and more accommodating to the General Public. Would you rather have moved? And your vision changed in that way or would you rather sell. Certain pieces certainly arguable. That might have said sell certain pieces or we might have come up with a different way to raise funds to keep the off foundation operating as it was one of the difficulties. When you're dealing with these plans that are intended to last in perpetuity. Right is that that's impossible along the way and you have to anticipate not just through the various scenarios that could occur over the ensuing rest of time but also the legal changes that are and all that stuff is just impossible for an estate plan to like completely for. See it in any way how good you are all. That's kind of why it's best to sort of building at certain points. Some safe spots here where where things can transfer or where where things can change a little bit in some flexibility. Because you know the only fact that you know is that things will change. You have no idea what the changes are going to be necessarily. Yeah in hindsight is twenty twenty but I think that if I were assisting with creating this plan I might ask those questions. If you're endowment runs low in years what changes would you be most okay with if changes had to be made because we never know even if someone gets a hundred million dollar endowment today the market crash could be invested in something that seems really safe at suddenly becomes unsafe or sometimes organizations are even victim of produce aries? Obviously we don't see that very often but it does happen. So how are we going to necessarily plan for all contingencies? That can happen there including running out of money to keep the operation going until depicted the night honestly in this situation despite what I just said. It's kind of the most obvious question right pure album. Barnes's stay planner and he's putting all these rules saying people can come in once a week and it can only be X. People at once and you can only charge this or it's just simple math. Look at and be like well. Rent costs this much to say like a house. It's going to work out. And would Albert Barnes of preferred to allow more people in at a time or preferred to have partnered perhaps with the city of Philadelphia or even with Philadelphia Museum of art to transport people easily from Philadelphia to Marion in that suburb where he was located rather than have the artwork moved. I think people describe Albert Barnes being someone who got what he wanted and who might not have been particularly open to hearing different perspectives. But I think that this is the kind of thing where if someone brought in this concept for an estate plan. You'd have to push back if the individual wasn't willing to sort of look at the different contingencies and plan for them and I think that you know now we have the example of Albert Barnes if someone doesn't WanNa plan for different contingencies. We can say okay but if these unforeseen things happen we want to know. We most like your opinion on what should happen because that can be instructive for how changes should be made. And if you don't provide it you're leaving it up to the court and you're leaving it up to whoever might be in charge of these assets or your plan to one hundred years after death. And that's probably someone who has no personal connection with you concede the Barnes case the smallest possible genuine to the most closely adhering to your wishes can be nowhere near what his wishes clearly would have been right out in. My last possible thing you to do was hurt. His Art to go to this autumn quote elites in the Philadelphia Museum. It's also possible. That was the best way to do it now. You know it's sort of a a weird situation. Where even sometimes the closest possible best solution can be the last thing that person would want if they haven't specified right exactly. I mean he might have wanted everything to be sold and wound down if it got to this point. But we'll never know because obviously it wasn't anticipated the endowment would deplete to the point that they were in grave financial trouble but these are the kind of questions that we need to think of as a state planners. And that's why we why we study things that's why we read case law. People might not have been as aware of these problems back in nineteen twenty two or back. No one this estate plan was initially created but we have the benefit of an extra hundred or so years of history to guide us in making a state clowns. Obviously don't think that most of our listeners have clients with twenty five billion dollars collections. That they're gonNA have to worry about this about unless you do. In which case awesome. Why the Hell you listening to me? You know. I think this concept of what porn was doing this idea of dead hand control and sort of the risks inherent in that and the natural idea that sort of the natural tendency toward of powerful people to want to do that is something that can be instructive for all advisors regardless whether working on estate planning on vacuum. I'm just talking about the dead hand a little bit with that. Mean a good way to phrase it. It's essentially trying to control beyond your death. What happens to your assets as we discussed at the beginning of this podcast? It works best for a shorter amount of time in the longer. It's been since your death the harder it can be. For example sometimes clients will want a particular financial firm or financial advisor to be working on their assets. That usually works fine. If it's just going to be your estate but if you have perhaps a lengthy trust and you might not even think you have a lengthy trust. You mentioned that most listeners probably don't have huge art collections to dispose of. But if you have younger people in your life either. Children Nieces and nephews. Whoever even the children of family friends? Who might be inheriting from you? You have to anticipate that if these kids are three years old today you might be putting something in your estate plan that has assets in them for trust until they're thirty five forty so that's going to be a fairly lengthy amount of time and if you're restricting to certain financial advisers. We don't know what could happen with that. For example people retire financial firms emerge and go under and it might not be clear what to do in those situations so I do try to draft with a certain amount of flexibility to.

Albert C. Barnes Barnes Philadelphia Barnes Foundation Philadelphia Museum Albert Barnes Barnes trustee Jackie Dave Bahir Medaglia Ottis Kobe Bryant Andrea run art museum Picassos Matisse Lower Merion Pennsylvania arch foundation General Public Pennsylvania Dr Bars
"arch foundation" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Three-year-old Filly by distorted humor millionaire graded stakes winner. Alternation stands at Pin Oak Stone. I'm speaking with Joe Brown. Nicholson of Nicholson Insurance Agency. Joe Can you explain how the claims process works knock on wood? I haven't experienced a claim recently and hope I never will but what happens when Mike. After we were notified by the insured of an accident or event we will submit a claim report to the company giving basic details of the claim a claims representative will then contact the insured to walk them through the claim settlement process. Most claims are settled promptly efficiently and to the complete satisfaction of the insured. Well that sounds fair. Basically the Insurance Bank insurance policy which has promised to pay in the event of a covered claim it also provides peace of mind absent of acclaim. That's the way it works. Thanks Joe for all your equine. General Insurance needs call. Nicholson Insurance Agency at eight. Five nine two two four seven eight. Oh you gotTa Know Joe. Airdrie Stud is proud to announce the arrival of grade one winning millionaire preservationists the exceptionally talented son of Arch Foundation Mares courtly Deion Manatt on the top and bottom of his blue-blooded pedigree on the racetrack. He was one of two thousand nineteen best taking the grade one Woodward at Saratoga and historic suburban at Belmont Park preservationists has won the suburban. My four and a half lakes over Catholic boy than Pablo preservationists another exciting addition to the Airdrie Stud stallion roster think about it. The Florida thoroughbred industry is celebrating seventy five years. The Florida thoroughbred breeders and Owners Association. And what a successful seventy five. It has been Florida breads have won nineteen triple crown fifty two national championships along the way. Making one hundred seventy racehorse. Millionaires plus sixty six eclipse award with to Florida Breads Imperial Hint and world of trouble receiving eclipse award. Nominations twenty twenty the F. D. B. O. A. Celebrating seventy five years joined Florida for the next twenty five. This is trainer Chad Brown. And you're listening to the horse racing radio network. You're.

Joe Brown Nicholson Insurance Agency Florida Nicholson Pin Oak Stone Insurance Bank General Insurance Chad Brown Arch Foundation Mares Deion Manatt representative Belmont Park Mike Saratoga Pablo F. D. B. O. A. Owners Association
"arch foundation" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"You know something you're always working on Nice. Yeah so there's an article that came out on city news by Lindsey Done. Who has been a guest of mine on a on the podcast number one so she wrote an article title is is Toronto. Actually a music city. There's so this article talks about a lot of stuff and I Maybe we'll put this on the show notes a link to this in the In the show notes. So here's here's some stuff some stats. Eighty percent of artists. Do not believe they can make a living wage. Fifty percents is all in Toronto. Yeah I guess so. Yes Charter Arch Foundation. They did this study. Fifty of artists make less than thirty thousand a year. Seventy three percent of China artists have thought about leaving the city. Nearly one in five artists have been renovated I see what they did their renovated more thirty music videos of closed in Toronto over the past ten years. What's what are. What are your thoughts about Toronto? Because Rob Ford. A few years ago was Rob Ford. Was it John? Tory sort of declared music city. Yeah Music City. What are your thoughts on Toronto's city it's it's I love number one. I Love Toronto. I love the city. I grew up listening to advance in Toronto this city. I love to see no. Yeah Yeah I've a love hate relationship with the city. He Yeah and I. I grew up when the clubs were vibrant. You know when when music you know. Queen Street was hopping Ultrasound in the horseshoe And Cameron House X Rays X Ray. Yeah it's just an incredible. Because he's namesake they have a horseshoe but the other ones are all well. Some of its was incredible The scene then it then there. Is this big change to kind of dance clubs. There's never been a full recovery from move from live music dance clubs to live music again in Toronto. And it's the problem for touring musicians is. There's just so much in Toronto on any given night there's a million things going on lots and you can't. Yes if you're trying to make money on the road. Most Artists Skip Toronto. You'll make more money playing in smaller towns around Toronto than you do coming into coming here. So it's it's very difficult and to live here too on top of that. It's made so many artists moved to Montreal. It's still a little more affordable now. Hamilton it's yeah again. I'm blown away all the time by bands. That had quite a lot of success. That are still to this day struggling financially and they went through good areas of selling records and playing shows and stuff. Now Yeah the you basically know it's can you sell enough merch and a in your ticket. Price is high enough to sustain everything you've got going on but it's No it's a totally different environment Very hard asks for sure. What are you? What are you listening to us? Here's me let me let me get rid of that frog. Would you listen? I'm always listening to besides this podcast. Yes besides I'm all over the map. It's a Tom. Waits is a staple that never goes away. A my biggest influences. I think I've always been tom waits. Bob Dylan Steve Earle. As a writer I listened to a ton I is more as far as more current bands the National Isla. You know I loved everything. The nationals doing wilco. Incredible live and I. I love all the music Wilko's doing. I'm still a huge fan of the Canadian music. Skydivers just put out a new record bets. The band price more than any other band live in my life You know the work that Hey Rosetta. I know the recently broke up in Tim Lakers Fan. Yeah Yeah Tim Baker's doing solo stuff winter sleep from the east coast. But but I mean yeah I could go on and on and on. There's so much I love listen to. It's pretty diverse again. I can say as somebody who has sat with you more than a few nights at the cottage or kill bear or camping when you pick up the guitar and plates. It's a lot of that stuff it's as we were all just singing along and yeah it yourself for yourself and John and it's just a celebration of a lot of Canadian music but a lot of music but a lot of Canadians absolutely. Yeah and they can't go without saying spirit of the West and tragically hip and northern pikes. I mean I. It's the music I I grew up on you to You know as a teenager was spray. The biggest influence on me. That was the first band I I guess. It was kind of CAP. Really captivated by was when rattle and hum came out in eighty eight and watching them as a live band and what they could do on stage. It made me say I WANNA I WANNA get up and I wanted to do yeah. That's awesome Steve. I know you and greg away back. You guys are good buddies but you have been very kind to us. Giving us a A home here. I don't know when you're going to. Kosovo but renovated renovate but thank you gotTA podcast. Thank you for hosting us here. Yes thank you for everything that you and radical road brewery. Do not just us but for the community here. I know a coworker of mine. Who lives around here in? Her sister lives around here. This is one of their goto spots when they go bar hopping on a Friday or Saturday. They love coming here and thank you for for sitting down chanting. Really actually thank you very much. Lots of fun..

Toronto Rob Ford Bob Dylan Steve Earle John Tim Baker Lindsey Charter Arch Foundation Montreal Tory Kosovo China Hamilton tom writer National Isla greg
"arch foundation" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"To raise those dropped her in for an allowance optional claiming they claim out of there and now look at what she's done she's made so much money and if you're the you know the owner of this and then you go to seller look at the The clean air preservationists the exceptionally talented son of Arch Foundation Mares courtly deion monopoly on the top and bottom of his blue blooded pedigree on the racetrack he was one consignors horses of Racing Age and Broodmare prospects they're consignment at the basic tip the night of star sale includes five individual great one winners five time grade one winner horses his recent top performers include graded stakes winners his two year olds commanded prices up to seven hundred thousand dollars outstanding value outstanding results blame standing at Claiborne farm one book one session one.

Arch Foundation Mares Claiborne farm seven hundred thousand dollars two year
"arch foundation" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Trump issues before so now or my will house the things I've worked on my whole life Biden points to is experienced for bullet it's winning is the Democrats in Montana I'm a pro choice pro union populist Democrat the one three elections in a red state both candidates also sharpened criticism of the president's rhetoric in the aftermath of a suspected hate influence to mash shooting in el Paso at the Iowa state fair jerit helper fox news at least there are no gigantic banners all over the place that the Intel Joe Biden what stage you know he's not getting confused on this one it says Iowa state fair just but everywhere so he knew where it was yesterday finding a vacation rental in the big easy if that's ever been on your short list it's about to get a lot harder apparently his fox's Steve Rappaport the New Orleans city council unanimously approving restrictions for short term vacation rentals from Airbnb and similar services the measure bands renting out entire homes in residential areas but allows owners to rent out part of the residences that they occupy short term rentals are also off limits in most of the French Quarter the council taking action after residents complain short term rentals are driving out full time residents driving up prices and undermining the character of historic neighborhoods Airbnb in a statement saying the plan will hurt property owners who rely on those rentals for income Steve Rappaport fox news Google is adding the tool that will help you save some money on some flights the tool will show you the price history of certain flights and then let you know if they believe the price of the flight will go up or has likely gotten as low as possible now this is in addition to the current tool that compares current fares to typical fears for a particular route also Google now adding a price guaranteed to if they're new tool predicts a particular itinerary won't decrease the price and it drops the going to refund you the difference how about that however this price guarantee is only for flights booked between August thirteenth in September the second so it's a very very short window and the flight has to be completed by November twenty fourth two thousand and nineteen but still Google will actually pay if your flight gets cheaper but there's a little bit of a catch there you likely know somebody who's perpetually thirty nine years old right and it turns out that well that's not just denial it's actually helping the person feel younger university of Virginia researchers found once we passed the age of twenty five twenty five we start to think of ourselves as younger than we actually are medical express reports that this discrepancy grows as we get older but that's not necessarily a bad thing they know that it turns out that this phenomenon may have rather important implications people with the younger subjective H. are less likely to suffer from diabetes suffer from hypertension depression or heart problems and also dimension another study found that those who thought they were younger than their actual age at a lower death rate than those who felt their own age or older so there you go why you should actually lie to yourself about your age apparently there's some positive stuff Cuba Gooding junior case is going to go to trial after all according to the paperwork the judge in this case Phyllis chew rejected his petition to dismiss the misdemeanor charges against him because he didn't quote set forth compelling factors to warrant dismissal in the interest of justice that's what the judge had to say so for forcibly touching and third degree sexual abuse that's what he's going to go to court for show as we told you before Cuba Gooding junior was in a bar when a woman claimed that he put his hand on her breast and squeezed is denying those those claims Gooding claim that the woman in question has various mental issues and that his character in history we in favor of dismissal but Cuba Gooding junior is gonna trials guns self a court date okay there could be life on the moon apparently during this is Simon in from fox news with this story that sounds like it's something right out of a nineteen fifties sci fi movies on morning run yes it's a bit of a mind and this one and I can't do anything conclusive but I've been speaking to an American futurist who has told me that it is in his words highly likely that a colony of tiny animals called tardigrades which he sent into space early this year have survived the journey that this the man called neighbor Spivak he is the co founder of a group called the arch foundation is based in California and he arranged for these animals they are microscopically small about point zero zero zero three of an inch long he sent a few thousand of these up I'm on an Israeli space mission Ellie at this yeah this is what he's kind of doing at the moment the trident hitches writes on anybody's sending a mission into space and this is an unmanned Israeli spacecraft went up into the mid day this year and it all went wrong the spacecraft crashed in April and so never Spivak said that he's been with the team of scientists the next few months trying to calculate whether these animals may have survived the crash now for those who are unfamiliar with Todd a great I confess I was until yesterday they can go about this he is without food or water they can survive an extraordinarily hot and cold temperatures they look like so that they like my get to date legs and with to be a mild they really unusual creatures but they're about the most resilient life form that we know of on and because they're so small they were able to be send that on to the meeting said there's your answer it is highly likely according to this man there are now several thousand tardigrades kicking back on the moon they probably won't be able to do much that they kind of shrivel up if they don't get food and water the potentially they could survive that for millions and millions of years and eventually be Rhianna may take it another atmosphere men bizarre okay Sam one from fox news the this is Gimme some sleepless nights Simon how telly I hope they I hope they stay one twenty fifth of an inch and they stay on the moon all right Hey you never out they are run that's probably one not far from you know Simon stopping alright Simon known from fox news thanks and have a great weekend this is radio nine twenty one oh four seven daily rewind with Ron Saint Pierre senior care services I'm Jim Gately already newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM here's what's happening Providence police officer expect to be okay after he was struck by a bullet in his protective vest late Friday afternoon that's what a police sources telling WPRI TV police confirm a suspect is in custody after swat team members surrounded a home on Douglas Avenue with their guns drawn face to the Newport help bridge rehabilitation project.

Montana Biden thirty nine years one twenty fifth
"arch foundation" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"The tech me. M- ride home is daily news podcast drops every day at five PM eastern standard time. It's got all the day's tech news headlines, but also context and conversation around what happened each day in the world of tech the show post every single day with weekend bonus interview episodes. This is silicon valley's water cooler podcast. It's how you stay in the know if you care about technology, so search your podcast app for right home. And subscribe to the tech meme ride home podcast. Three two one. We have ignition and liftoff. Hello and welcome back to the space news pod. Your daily source for space science and tech news. Now, did you know that there's an Israeli mood Lander that hid just inserted itself into lunar orbit today and next week that Lander will attempt to touch down on the surface of the moon. And if this landing in successful, it'll be the first ever private vehicle to land on the moon this space craft known as Beverly sheet is built in operated by the Israeli nonprofit space. I am in February twenty first Barasheet launch to space on a SpaceX falcon nine rocket, and it deployed the Lander in orbit around era. And since then the spacecraft has been igniting, its engines and getting itself. Ready to insert itself into the orbit of the moon and since its launch its traveled more than three point four million miles through space, and it's gone around about twelve orbits. It's also taking pictures of the earth. And now that it's in the moon orbit. It'll be around three hundred ten to sixty two hundred miles above the lunar surface and Barasheet won't be in orbit for very long. It's going to be there for about a week has gonna ignites engines a few more times to maintain that orbit and get itself into the descending orbit which will be hundred twenty four miles above lunar surface in on April eleventh, this Lander space, I l will be kin and significsan to take it self out of moons orbit in land on the surface. This maneuver today was soup. Important if they didn't get this, right? They would have bought possibly overshot the moon. They would have missed the moon's orbit, and they may have even left the earth moon system altogether. And that would have ended the mission that would have been it. And there's no way to get this vehicle back at that point. It would have just been gone lost in space forever. And you know, as far as I'm concerned this mission is success so far because it's the first private Lander. That's tried. This has gotten this far. So space L pulls this off, then it'll be the first ever record breaking ground breaking brand new thing that's happening in about a week. So stay tuned. That's gonna be awesome. So on the eleventh that's going to happen. And I make sure that you guys know all about that. Because it's pretty -portant. And I want to make an effort to let you guys know as soon as. A happens. I'm going to try to post in episode of the podcast as soon as it happened. So stay tuned on the eleventh for something groundbreaking. But another cool thing about this Lander. Breaking history right now because the only three countries that have gotten into lunar orbit are the US Russia and China and they've successfully landed vehicles intact on the moon as well. So it's it's pretty amazing that a private company has done this and they've had an overall budget of about ninety million dollars. But two million of that came from the Israel government in the rest came from private investors who believed in this project, and all of this came from the x prize foundation, the lunar x prize foundation. So ghoul had us thing awhile ago that they they gave up on. And it was they were going to give some money to a private a private person or a core group of people corporation or whatever that could land something a lunar Rover or lunar Lander on the moon surface. Well, that's defunct. That's gone. The x prize foundation though, has stepped up to the plate. And they said they would give the Israeli nonprofit a one million dollar award. If they pulled this off. So if it touches down on the surface of the moon in one piece doesn't break up doesn't blow up doesn't crash. Well, it's a million dollars towards does not profit which means they can do more research, and they can land more things on the moon in when it gets to the moon when it finally does touchdown while it's going to be taking photos, and it's also going to take it selfie. So it's gonna take a selfie of itself in it's going to send that data back to earth. So we can all rejoice and all enjoy this amazing spectacle that's going to happen. But it has science involved too. It's not just a glamorous thing going on. It has an instrument that will measure the magnetic field in the area of the landing site in his target touchdown site is in a spa. Hot known as the sea of serenity, which is supposed to have magnetic anomalies. According to space, I l and it's not going to keep all that data for itself is going to share the magnetic information with NASA. And what NASA did in return? They said he thanks for the data. We're going to give you a mirror. So they have a special laser reflector that they put on Barasheet and made it easier for space, I yell to detect the vehicle when it's in space, and that's also plans to help. I'll communicate with the ship and it will confirm its presence on the moon after landing using NASA, sewn lunar reconnaissance orbiter, and there's also a special very very cool thing on this Lander. It's sort of let's say a time capsule of our of our era here. There's mini disc. It's from the arch foundation. It's the lunar library on the ladder. And. It's made of nickel there's tiny nickel discs. That have thousands and thousands of pages of texts images and the foundation decided to include numerous pages from Wikipedia as well as PDF's from books. So knowledge is being spread to the lunar surface in this should have an impact on future missions. We come in peace. That's one of our it's one of our statements rape. When we go to another planet when we put another body in the cosmos, we come in peace in we come to share information. So if somebody does find this sometime this will be there for billions of years because it's made out of nickel nickel dozen road. And space doesn't erode on you know, because on the lunar surface because it can stand up to radiation from a son because there's a lot more radiation on the moon than there is here on earth because there's no atmosphere really to protect it is much as it's protected down here on earth. So all that information that's up there. Millions of things won't be protected for billions of years long after the human race on earth is totally gone forgotten. So it's kind of you know, the first human started writing. That's when history began that's what we could tell stories throughout the jahns. And with this arch foundation set of tiny nickel discs of that will continue on the moon. So on the eleventh make sure to tune in. I'm gonna have as much information as they possibly can about the landing, and I'll keep you in the know. But until then I want to say thank you so much to everybody who's contributed to the patriot patriotic dot com slash space news podcast with your generous support. I'm able to afford upgrades to the studio. I have some sound dampening stuff that I just bought and some more as coming in tomorrow. So it's going straight back into the podcast. So thank you so much. Also, thank you, tour advertisers. Thank you to everyone. Who just listens? Like, you're amazing. Thank you, a really does make a difference. And also if I can ask a favor could you please go to itunes and rate and review the podcast if you'd like to make sure write it down that's super important to get really positive for us. So thank you so much for all of your effort there guys and.

NASA Barasheet arch foundation Lander SpaceX US Israel government rape Wikipedia Russia China ninety million dollars one million dollar million dollars
"arch foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Honestly, they're trying to start all that up. Moreno valley culture arts foundation is the website right there. And we are joined by Richard Archer senior. Thank you so much for being here today. My pleasure. So you're the president and CEO of a couple of things Ranna valley culture arch foundation and you're the director of vanguard art gallery. And you got a lot on your plate. He loved the arts. Now, why were a lot of hats, which counts for the hairline? That's how it happens. So why did you decide to do something like this? Well, the thing is is that. Had the growing up. All right. Being a baby, boomer. My dad was war to that. And so we're the fathers of most of the kids that I went to school with on top of it. We grew up in a neighborhood that was right by the Quonset. Naval air station. So there are a lot of active military that lived in the neighborhood along with people who were civilians, but we're working at the naval air station. And so no matter what where you went. There was always the fathers that would be at the barbecue. Or what have you? But it was always talking about Mr Walter was hell cat pilot award to flying on the loss and talking about playing on the deck of the walls. Pitch black. You still? Remember, there's absolutely absolutely my uncle. Bob was navy test pilot during the war and stayed in the navy right through until nineteen fifty two. But my dad's case I mean, he's now ninety one but is extremely proud of his navy service. And when I talked to him he's in Florida. But when I talked to him on the phone why he's always reminiscing about, you know, being on his destroyer minesweeper, and he can rattle off all the number. In general, and that he was crew members with where they were and what they were doing, and such so, but this is something that was very very important to he has to be so proud of you, and I love the year. Yeah. I love the appreciation for the military has stayed with you and you wanted to do this. And what a neat way for them to be able to make our show it through what you're doing. I think that's such a nice contribution. I think the important thing here is that. There are all sorts of museums and such around that, you know, have something to do with veterans, but always looking in terms of the military aspect in terms of combat and all that. And that's that's that's fantastic. That there is that being done out there. But what we're doing is. We're looking more in terms of the the heart and soul the veteran actually giving them looking towards their humanity. Because of the fact that people don't think of veterans in terms of their creative artsy, necessarily, right? So I mean, there are certainly plenty of examples of. The millet. Veterans power when they were in active military where they are in combat where they were doing renderings of one type or another. But there's also the whole aspect of once they are out of service what they chose to do as far as their life. And one of the things that's been amazing in terms of doing this upcoming exhibition is that a number of the veterans. I've talked to first of all there's a large number of women veterans. So come forward matter of fact, you just recently interviewed Paula cap, and Paula would certain sisters exact dot org. She is remarkable. And. Speaking with her was really. Catalyst for me in terms of rethinking this whole process. But what she talked about was therapeutic aspects how dealing with post traumatic stress and also in terms of her military's sexual trauma that how important art therapy was in terms of her recovery process. So that really gave me a lot of. Pause for thought, but you know, then to hurt from some other veterans also in terms of you know, I had a gentleman yesterday who is a Vietnam vet bring core. He's a visual artist. But he also suppo- it and all his poetry all has to do with post traumatic stress. So it's it's. That I think is something that a lot of people don't take into consideration. And I think by doing this now. It gives a completely different perspective as to the soul the veteran. Oh, yeah. For sure I can't wait to look into their souls and see some of the pieces. I think you've sent us some pictures that we're going to show, but what do you how do you envision this will exhibition looking like this at your gallery right there? That's the Ellery art gallery. Talking to Richard Archer senior. That's in California, though. The photo that you're showing right now is an example of we just recently did a six different school districts. Or school? The school district said participated in exhibition at the gallery, we had over one hundred different students that were exhibiting their artwork and it went from elementary right through to to high school. So is that we're always looking at any opportunity that we can to interface with young people, but you've got a lot on your plate. Besides just rang the gallery, and your marina valley culture arts foundation, you're giving back to children and veterans. That's very generous of you. So this this upcoming exhibition authored, July when does it start starts July one till I want make sense. Right through the thirtieth and on the twenty first of July. We're having a reception which starts at four o'clock and runs through until six. But with that why the veteran artists that will be exhibiting. We'll be there. Be a fantastic opportunity for people come out to see the exhibition, but also to direct to talk directly to the artists themselves in a very unique perspective about the inspiration for the pieces that are there just about where you're areas where people aren't necessarily familiar with California. Okay. We're located Marino valley who which is right next door to riverside. And we're right up to sixty highway so just sort of over and down a little bit from LA have that right? Whoa. We're roughly about an hour's drive from from Los Angeles. There we go. So get your tickets now come see it, right? There's no tickets. So but were contributions are welcome. Oh, absolutely. We're a nonprofit. So of course, get your plane ticket. You're trying ticket and come on down. Right. So we're going to look for that. And we can also find the information. We just saw your Facebook page how to glimpse of that. And and your your website as well. Right. And you are taking some entries still. I understand you have some calls today. And you're gonna try to get. I mean, this is the the incredible thing is that one call I received today was from a gentleman whose award to veteran. All right. And so I mean that blew me away. But to me that's phenomenal. Because now what is happening is the artwork? That's there spams for war to current day. So I mean, that's that's absolutely fabulous. Couldn't ask for anything more. No, no, absolutely. Not boy, he's gonna get you his his items what he's a would cover. So he's got a piece that he did quite some time ago a suspect that he may not be as active with this art at this point. But, but nevertheless, I'm really anxious to see the work. We need to see him represent about. How many people in far? Well, we started off with about seven. But I think we're going to be at least at nine and possibly more. Okay. Goes on the way here. I got a phone call from somebody that want to know they could bring their father in law's working. We'll hear more about that. And also you're trying to build a culture arts center to house. So I'm gonna ask you about that we're going to hold you over for one more segment. Okay. Talking Richard Archer? We'll be right back after this on.

Richard Archer president and CEO Naval air station Los Angeles California Moreno valley Paula cap Ranna valley navy arch foundation Facebook Ellery art gallery Mr Walter director marina valley Florida Bob Marino valley Vietnam riverside
"arch foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"They're trying to start all that up. Marino. Valley culture arts foundation is the website right there. And we are joined by Richard Archer senior. Thank you so much for being here today. So you're the president and CEO of a couple of things Rowena valley culture arch foundation, and you're the director of vanguard, art galleries. He's got a lot on your plate. But he loved the arts while we're a lot of hats, which counts for the hairline. That's how it happens. So why did you decide to do something like this? Well, the thing is is that. Have the growing up? All right. Being a baby, boomer. My dad was war to that. And so we're the fathers of most of the kids that I went to school with on top of it. We grew up in a neighborhood that was right by the Quonset naval air station. So there are a lot of active military that lived in the neighborhood along with people who were civilians were working at the naval air station. And so no matter what where you went through was always the fathers that would be at the barbecue. Or what have you? But it was always talking about. Like, Mr Walter was hell cat pilot war to flying on the loss and talking about planning on the deck of the waas. Pitch black, and you still remember, there's they're absolutely absolutely. My uncle Bob was a navy test pilot during the war in stayed in the navy rights until nineteen fifty two. But my dad's case I mean, he's found ninety one but he is extremely proud of his navy service. And when I talked to him he's in Florida. But what I talked to mama phone why he's always reminiscing about, you know, being on his destroyer minesweeper, and he can rattle off all the number names. The general and that he was crew members with where they were and what they were doing and such. I mean, so, but this is something that was very very important to he has to be so proud of you, and I love the year. Yeah. I love the appreciation for the military has has stayed with you and you wanted to do this. And what a neat way for them to be able to make our and show it through what you're doing. I think that's a nice contribution. I think the important thing here is that. There are all sorts of museums and such around that you have something to do with veterans. But it's always looking in terms of the military aspect and terms of combat and all that. And that's that's that's fantastic. There is that being done out there. But what? As far as what we're doing is. We're looking more in terms of the the heart and soul the veterans actually giving them looking towards their humanity. Because of the fact that, you know, people don't think of veterans in terms of their creative. Think of them as artsy necessarily, right? So I mean, there are certainly plenty of examples of. The millet. Veterans power when they were in active military where they are in combat and where they were doing rendering some one type or another. But there's also certainly the whole aspect of once they are out of service what they chose to do as far as their life. And one of the things that's been amazing in terms of doing this upcoming. Is that a number of the veterans? I've talked to first of all there is a large number of women veterans. Come forward. Matter of fact, you just recently interviewed Paula and Paula was and sisters exact dot org. And she is remarkable. And. Speaking with her was really. Catalyst for me in terms of rethinking this whole process. But what she talked about was therapeutic aspects how dealing with post traumatic stress and also in terms of her military sexual trauma that how important art therapy was in terms of the full recovery process. So that really gave me a lot of. Pause for thought. But then to hear it from some other veterans also in terms of you know, I had a gentleman yesterday who is at Phnom bring core. He's a visual artists, but he also support and all his poetry all has to do with post traumatic stress. So, you know, it's it's. I think it was something that a lot of people don't take into consideration. And I think by doing this now it was a completely different perspective as to the soul of the veteran. Oh, yeah. For sure I can't wait to look into their souls and see some of the pieces. I think you've sent us some pictures that we're going to show, but what do you how do you envision this will 'exhibition looking like there's at your gallery right there. That's the Ellery. Art gallery. Talking to Richard Archer senior that's in California. Photo that you're showing right now is an example of we just recently did a six different school districts or school the school district that participated in an exhibition at the gallery, we had over one hundred different students that were exhibiting their artwork and it went from elementary right through to to high school. So that we're always looking at any opportunity that we can to interface with young people you've got a lot on your plate. Besides just trying the gallery, and you're marina valley culture arts foundation. You're getting back to children in veterans. That's very generous of you. So this this upcoming exhibition author July when does it start starts July one to make sense? It runs right through the thirtieth. And on the twenty first of July. We're having a reception which starts at four o'clock and runs through until six. But with that why the veteran artists that will be exhibiting. We'll be there so via fantastic opportunity for people come out to see the exhibition, but also to talk directly to the the artists themselves in the Bill get a unique perspective about the inspiration for the pieces that are there just about where your areas where people who aren't necessarily familiar with California. Okay. We're located Moreno valley who which is right next door to riverside. And we're right up to sixty highway so just sort of over and down a little bit from LA. Don't have that. Right. Well, we're roughly a hours drive from from Los Angeles. Yeah. There we go. So get your tickets now income seeing it, right? There's no tickets. So, but we're contributions are welcome. Oh, absolutely. We're a nonprofit. So of course, get your plane ticket. You're trying ticket and come on down. Right. So we're gonna look for that. And we can also find the information. We just saw your Facebook page how to glimpse of that. And your your website as well. Right. And you are taking some entries still. I understand you have some calls today. You're going to try to get. See I mean, this is the incredible thing is that one call I received today was from a gentleman whose award to veteran. All right. And so I mean that blew me away. But to me that's phenomenal. Because now what is happening is the artwork? That's there spans for war too. So I mean, that's that's absolutely fabulous. Couldn't ask for anything more. No, no, absolutely. Not boy. So he's gonna get you his his items what he's a wood Carver. So he's got a piece that he did quite some time ago a suspect that he may not be as active with his art at this point. But, but nevertheless, I'm really anxious to see the work. Several the need to see him represent about. How many people are involved so far? Well, we started off with about seven. But I think we're going to be at least at nine and possibly more. Okay. Because I'm like a on the way here. I got a phone call from somebody that wanna know they could bring their father and most worship. We'll hear more about that. And also you're trying to build a culture arts center to house out there. So I'm gonna ask you about that we're going to hold you over for one more segment, not at all. Okay. Talking about Richard Archer.

Richard Archer president and CEO Los Angeles California Quonset naval air station Paula naval air station Marino military sexual trauma arch foundation Rowena valley Facebook Mr Walter director Bob marina valley Florida Moreno valley riverside
"arch foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:43 min | 2 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome back a California art gallery is hosting a salute our veterans and what better time than into lie around July fourth. It's an exhibition running all the way through July. It is the American veterans cultural arts center or the vanguard art gallery. Honestly, they're trying to start all that up. Moreno valley culture arts foundation is the website right there. And we are joined by Richard Archer senior. Thank you so much for being here today. So you are in the president and CEO of a couple of things Ranna valley culture arch foundation. And you're the director of vanguard, art galleries. You got a lot on your plate. You love the arts new while we're a lot of hats, which counts for the hairline. That's how it happens. So why did you decide to do something like this? Well, the thing is is that. I've had the growing up being a baby, boomer. My dad was war to that. And so we're the fathers of most of the kids that I went to school with on top of it. We grew up in a neighborhood that was right by the Quonset naval air station. So there lot of active military that lived in the neighborhood along with people who were civilians working at the naval air station. And so no matter what. And where you went. There was always the fathers were the the barbecue. Or what have you? But it was always talking about like, Mr Walter was a hell cat pilot than war to flying on the loss and talking about laying on the deck of the walls. Pitch-black still remember, there's absolutely absolutely my uncle. Bob was navy test pilot during the war and stayed in the navy right through until nineteen fifty two. But in my dad's case, I mean, he's now ninety one, but he is extremely proud of his navy service. And when I talked to him he's in Florida. But when I talked to mama phone why he's always reminiscing about, you know, being on his destroyer minesweeper, and he can rattle off all the number. The journal that he was crew members were they were and what they were doing and such. I mean, so, but this is something that was very very important to he has to be so proud of you, and I love the year. Yeah. I love the appreciation for the military has has stayed with you and you wanted to do this. And what a neat way for them to be able to make our ears. I think that's such a nice contribution. I think the important thing here is that. There are all sorts of museums and such around that have something to do with veterans. But it's always looking in terms of the military aspect in terms of combat and all that. And that's that's fantastic. There is that being done out there. But. What? As far as what we're doing is. We're looking more in terms of the the heart and soul the veteran actually giving them looking towards their humanity. Because of the fact that people don't take of veterans in terms of their creative them as artsy, necessarily, right? So I mean, there are certainly plenty of examples of. The. Oh, veterans are when they were in active military where they are in combat and where they were doing rendering some one type or another. But there's also the whole aspect of once they are out of service what they chose to do as far as their life. And then one of the things that's been amazing in terms of doing this upcoming exhibition is. That a number of the veterans. I've talked to first of all there is a large number of women veterans. Come forward. Matter of fact, you just recently interviewed Pollock up and Paula would certain sisters exact dot org. She is remarkable. And. Speaking with her was really. Catalyst for me in terms of thinking this whole process, but what she talked about was the therapeutic aspects how doing with post traumatic stress and also in terms of her military's sexual trauma that how important art therapy was in terms of her recovery process. So that really gave me a lot of. Pause for thought, but you know, then to hurt from some other veterans also in terms of you know, I had a gentleman yesterday who is a Vietnam vet bring core. He's a visual artist. But he also poet and all his poetry all has to do with post traumatic stress. So, you know, it's it's. But I think this is something that a lot of people don't take into consideration. And I think by doing this now it gives a completely different perspective as to the soul the veteran. Oh, yeah. For sure I can't wait to look into their souls and see some of the pieces. I think you've sent us some pictures that we're going to show. What you how do you envision this will exhibition looking like this at your gallery right there? That's the Ellery. Art gallery. Talking to Richard Archer senior that's in California. The photo that you're showing right now is an example of we just recently. Did it a six different school districts or school the school district that participated in an exhibition at the gallery, we had over one hundred different students that were exhibiting their artwork and it went from elementary right through to high school? So putting is that we're always looking at any opportunity that we can to interface with young people, but you've got a lot on your plate. Besides just wearing the gallery, and you're marina valley arts foundation. You're giving back to children and veterans. That's very generous of you. So this this coming exhibition authored July when does it start? Starts July one till I want make sense it runs right through the thirtieth. And on the twenty first of July. We're having a reception which starts at four o'clock and runs through until six. But with that why the veteran artists that will be exhibiting. We'll be there will be a fantastic opportunity for people come out to see the exhibition, but also to talk directly to the artists themselves and to be able to get a unique perspective about the inspiration for the pieces that are there just about where you're areas where people aren't necessarily familiar with California. Okay. We're located Marino valley who which is right next door to riverside. And we're right up to sixty highway. Okay. So just sort of over and down a little bit from LA. Don't have that. Right. Well, we're roughly about an hour's drive from from Los Angeles. Yeah. There we go. So get your tickets now income seeing it, right? There's no tickets. So, but we're contributions are welcome. Oh, absolutely. We're a nonprofit. So of course, get your plane ticket your train ticket and come on down. Right. So we're going to look for that. And we can also find the information. We just saw your Facebook page how to glimpse of that. And your your website as well. Right. And you are taking some entries still. I understand you have some calls today. And you're gonna try to get him. You'll see I mean, this is the the incredible thing is that one call I received today was from a gentleman whose award to veteran. Right. And so I mean that blew me away. But to me that's phenomenal. Because now what is path is the artwork? That's there spams for war to current day. So I mean, that's that's absolutely fabulous. Couldn't ask for anything more. No, no, absolutely. Not boy. So he's gonna get you his his items what he's a wood Carver. So he's got a piece that he did quite some time ago a suspect that he may not be as active with this art at this point. But, but nevertheless, I'm really anxious to see the work. We need to see him rep. Present about how many people so far we started off with about seven. But I think we're going to be at least at nine possibly more. Okay. Because I'm like a on the way here. I got a phone call from somebody that wanna know they could bring their father Moore's work. We'll hear more about that. And also you're trying to build a culture art center to house. So I'm gonna ask you about that we're gonna hold you over for one. More segment you mind, not at all. Okay. Talking Richard will be right back after this.

Richard Archer president and CEO California Los Angeles Quonset naval air station Moreno valley naval air station Ranna valley director navy arch foundation marina valley arts foundation Facebook Mr Walter Florida Bob Marino valley Moore Vietnam riverside
"arch foundation" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on KOMO

"It's a battle literally pitting one southern state against another abc's linda lopez with that story peaches grow in georgia everywhere you look that's why most people know georgia is officially the peach state but south carolina is trying to poach that title it state department of agriculture has gone on twitter to note that south carolina actually produces three times more peaches than its neighbor to the south that georgia's fuzz to stand on end the state replying their peaches are three times sweeter south carolina's response was quintessentially southern tweeting to georgia bless your heart linda lopez abc news they staged a do over friday and saint louis marking the end of a three hundred and eighty million dollar renovation to the famous gateway arch the first ribbon cutting included only white people here's abc's scott goldberg there were black people involved in the ceremony for the renovated saint louis arch like cardinals legend ozzie smith day but this video produced by the arch foundation and every other picture snapped shows when it came time to cut the ribbon the twenty or so people participating were all white state representative bruce franks says that picture doesn't represent saint louis which is forty eight percent black that's not how you bring people together so he organized the do over the park foundation apologized for the first ribbon cutting acknowledging its lack of diversity scott goldberg abc news marvel comics artists steve did go died on june twentyninth he was ninety this is abc news komo aaa traffic every ten minutes on the fours tacoma getting severe side wins on the narrows bridge and some construction in tacoma as well roadwork i five southbound near the porta tacoma road also when lacey we have some construction i five southbound near carpenter road to martin wade no collisions or blockers speeds pretty much at the legal limits wherever you're driving your next report.

arch foundation martin wade steve state representative ozzie smith saint louis arch department of agriculture tacoma bruce franks abc cardinals scott goldberg saint louis south carolina twitter georgia linda lopez eighty million dollar forty eight percent ten minutes
"arch foundation" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on KTRH

"And addicts reservoirs audrey morton newsradio seven forty ktar h well there's good news about a missing fort bend county man the sheriff's office says sixty year old william thomas wong missing from his richmond area home since monday has been found and taken to a hospital for evaluation how will the trade war effect us farmers depends on whom you ask neil romania says his livelihood is at stake as well as his fellow farmers need to protect our business and we need to not be held hostage by other countries in companies wondering how he's going to sell the soybeans usually exports to china economist robert scott says that isn't the real worry facing us agriculture us dollar is rising in value and that makes us exports especially of commodity products like soybeans under increasing downward price pressure and he says that's nothing new daria albinger abc news ktar news time is two oh four a do over today in saint louis they're staging a second ribbon cutting at the gateway arch marking the end of a three hundred eighty million dollar renovation the first ribbon cutting in the nineteen sixties included only white people there were black people involved in the ceremony for the renovated saint louis arch like cardinals legend ozzie smith but this video produced by the arch foundation and every other picture snaps shows when it came time to cut the ribbon the twenty or so people participating we're all white state representative bruce franks says that picture doesn't represent saint louis which is forty eight percent black that's not how you bring people together so he organized the do over the park foundation apologized for the first ribbon cutting acknowledging its lack of diversity scott goldberg abc news acclaimed singer songwriter elvis costello says he's battling aggressive cancer elvis costello not a man out of time though he writes on his website that he had surgery for what he calls a very aggressive cancer that's the bad news the good news is that as doctor said the surgery was success now he needs to recover that means he's canceling his remaining tour dates in europe castillo doesn't say what kind of cancer but hinted by advising men to talk to their doctors if they have any concerns andy says he has a new album coming october first jason nathanson abc news hollywood astros and white socks go at it again at minute maid pregame is at six o'clock that'll be on sports talk seven ninety on wall street a good day so far the dow is up one hundred forty two twenty four thousand four ninety seven nasdaq is the star of the show up one hundred two points s and p five hundred up.

hollywood jason nathanson andy europe elvis costello state representative saint louis arch china richmond fort bend william thomas wong astros castillo bruce franks arch foundation ozzie smith cardinals saint louis robert scott
"arch foundation" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Your property without incident please call us at the pipkin detective agency at one eight seven seven seven three zero three five three two one again at eight seven seven seven three zero three five three two or contact us on the web at pipkin detective agency dot com may came when the sunshine tomorrow is not just another day this is karen mason for guard to tell you an incorporated a lot can happen overnight mother nature pests disease regulations and labor can change quickly trees and vines don't work on an eight to five work schedule and there's no rewind in farming won miss spray can be devastating and resetting the clock won't erase the damage gars pest control advisors are experts at timing treating and designing programs that will return quality fruit and great yields they work hard to avoid disasters and our experts at designing programs that make growers profitable grow with gar for the best water nutrition regulatory and crop carry advice and products at eight hundred six nine six six one zero eight and online at gti pros dot com guard inc big on service at eight hundred six nine six six one eight how drum heart the lively arch foundation presents japan's most exciting tyco from troop ever drum towel saturday may fifth that's royan their percussive roars their power and charisma says barrages child rum heart drum towel will castle you with their rep taking taiko drumming amazing costumes precision choreography and spellbinding display of martial arts towel durham heart it will leave you welcome to the mini morning news show where we are so excited about chick fil a's chicken minis for breakfast that we've many fight the news.

lively arch foundation japan tyco pipkin dot com karen mason
"arch foundation" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"arch foundation" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Mcandrew staying up late click baas allergy dot com baas allergy dot com and you will find that location nearest you with no problem the olive pollinates i it's very high so make sure you get in touch with the baas allergy asthma inside a centers and again they're open seven days a week and that includes late night and early morning appointments as well dr buys spelled z tile it's not real easy to drop everything when you're cow drum heart the lively arch foundation presents japan's most exciting tyco trump group ever drum towel saturday may fifth at royan their percussion roars their power and charisma barrages child heart drum towel will castle you with their rep taking taiko drumming amazing costumes precision choreography and spellbinding display of martial arts foul jerem heart it will leave you much this is christina masan it's spring.

Mcandrew lively arch foundation japan tyco christina masan seven days