13 Burst results for "Arab Reform Initiative"

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"N tribunal has been he's been doing in the 10 years since the main suspects were identified. To be honest, This is the question I've been asking myself since this morning. It's clear that the evidence that they decide that they're deciding the case on is something we already knew, as you mentioned years and years ago, and a lot of this evidence was actually discovered by a Lebanese security officer captain with some money. Who was assassinated in 2008, because he made the breakthrough on the telecoms data. Which seems to be the on ly really evidence in the case. So why did it take so long? Why did it cost so much? Frankly, someone in the international investigation should answer this question to the Lebanese. Just so you know, I mean for Lebanon, this was really supposed to be a major breakthrough in ending impunity. The money that Lebanon you transfer, which was 49% of the budget was equal to the entire judicial budget in the country at one point, and it is quite disappointing that this process dragged on for so long. I mean, there was pretty unique In many case, it was a challenging investigation, but more transparency was needed. I believe from the from the U. N. It's pretty much a given, isn't it that it's going to inflame tensions between Hezbollah supporters and those Opposed to the group in Lebanon. Lebanon is already very much divided. And in some ways the court today is not saying anything. New Thean Formacion They are deciding on has been in the public round for many years. And you could say that the Lebanese have already integrated dot and there's there's you know, a status quo off of division. The country Right now, in a way has moved on as well. Beyond this issue. There is still a real desire for justice. There's a real desire to end impunity. But the country is facing, as you know, with a major explosion in August 4th major new disaster, They're still demanding now. Justice for the Uh, all right. Since the high religion, But you know we've had the Syrians of political assassinations, none of which have been resolved. So there's a real desire for just this. There's a real desire to end this impunity on DH. What's clear today, unfortunately, is that the special tribunal for 11 on will not give the Lebanese their day in court. Thank you. Nadeem Hurry director of the Arab Reform Initiative will hear directly From the tribunal if there's a verdict This is WNBC. Stay tuned. There's more of the BBC news hour just ahead here on 93.9 FM. The Brian Lehrer Show is at 10 and reminder, folks today at noon, we're gonna have special afternoon coverage of this year's virtual national conventions. Matt Katz is hosting today. Starting at noon. The phones are gonna be open for you will hear the best of the DNC opening night speeches and find out what else is going on. That starts at noon today on 93.9 FM..

Lebanon Brian Lehrer telecoms officer Matt Katz Hezbollah DNC BBC Arab Reform Initiative dot director
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who does control this country to Syria control this country or the wood. There's the prime minister control. The Syrian had so much Assuring the security and stability But in political bases that is a coordination on there is a corporation between Syria and Lebanon. And the Lebanese leaders so They have influence. We don't want any Can. The most powerful individual in Lebanon is Hassan Nasrallah, the leader of Hezbollah, the country's preeminent political and military force time and again TV speeches. He's denied the accusation that his men killed her Riri. Perhaps on the orders of Hezbollah's backers, Syria and Iran. Nasrallah refused to allow the arrest off his four indicted men who otherwise would be in court to hear the verdict. To me. It's the closure. It's been a long 15 15 years. Us as a family and a Lebanese Raffi, career ease eldest son by started life in a modest flat inside in south of Beirut before his father made his billions in Saudi Arabia. He believes the demand for reforms his father would have wanted is now unstoppable. A permanent change in the way that politics and power are configured. Is there a risk that the verdict whatever it may be, will increase the divisions and tension within the country. I have never Seen the Lebanese the way in unison the way they've been now they're not gonna They're not gonna pick ISS west knife to fight each other. No, they're in unison. They want to get rid off this. Configuration wasn't for old enough is enough. The verdict, Baja says will bring justice not more strife to Lebanon. That is the optimistic view. Our Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen reporting. Finally, Truth will emerge from The Hague That was a headline of one of the anti Syrian newspapers in Lebanon this morning. It said the country was holding its breath and mold, among other questions whether the sentence would only applied to specific individuals or whether it would also apply it to the party. I Hezbollah authorities Our correspondent at the court in The Hague is Anna Hooligan. I spoke to her just before we came on air. I've just come from the courtroom. Actually, Satya, very roughly career E son is inside, along with three of the other victims relatives. The judges have said they believe that Syria and Hezbollah May have had motive is to eliminate the former prime minister, but they didn't find any evidence to link them to the assassination. That matters because it's a reminder really, that this course is pursing four individuals on trial, although they've never step foot inside this Tribunal. They've been tried in absentia. In any case. This is all about the guilt or otherwise of individuals, isn't it? Not organizations, not states. Precisely. It's an individual criminal responsibility, but That's why it's surprising. The judges even mentioned Hezbollah and cirie Syrian government because they didn't have to do that it went further than the loss of people were expecting. The timing of this. The other dimension is that it's coming to weeks after that blast that ripped through the capper, so Karuna forest cases are surging their country's close to economic collapse. There is a child that this verdict 15 years after the event will barely make a ripple in some people's lives, But some of those who are grieving, angry for stray said, still piecing together their shattered homes. What's happening here that this tribunal could be seen as a model for responsibility for those who are calling for an international investigation into who should be accountable for that blast. On the force of August. Otherwise many in Lebanon field. The truth will never be me without the international intervention, but at the same time this has taken such a long time and there are people here today, saying What actual difference will that make to our lives? I gather there's a lot of interest where you are outside the courtroom, and not just from a crowd of journalists. There is a loss of interest there being crowds of people waving Lebanese flags were expecting reaction in Lebanon, plus outside the courtroom to Satya Riri, the sun The former prime minister is here. I'm waiting to give his reaction. That was the BBC's Anna Hooligan in The Hague. And we hope to go back to her as soon as there's a firm verdict emerging from that tribunal. Nadeem Hurry is the director of the Arab Reform Initiative, an independent think tank consisting of a network of Arab research and policy institutes. And joins us Now now, team welcome. What's your view? First on why this process has taken 15 years and why it's happening in the Netherlands, not in Lebanon. The reason was, you have to go back to 2005 when this was happening, and there was a sense that no trial could take place in Lebanon, Given that all the accusation fingers were pointed towards neighbouring Syria, Thiss was why the Lebanese government at the time as for international tribunal and an international investigation, and it was felt that it could not be held in Lebanon. You know, 15 years later, I have to say the process has been a major disappointment. And in my view, a failure as well. Why'd you say that? Two things in the immediate, you know, would be accused, looking at a courtroom where there's no accused in the dock is always You know, disappointing and it cannot satisfy any desire for justice. More broadly, the special tribunal for Lebanon which has a cost with this international investigation, almost a billion dollars over 15 years, was supposed to be the first step and fighting impunity in Lebanon. Impunity that has, you know, been with us for more than 30 years, and one had to recognize that they have failed in meeting that objective. Impunity remains the norm. Those were criminals continue to be in a position of powers. And even today, While we're still waiting for the final touches of the judgment, listening to the court since this morning, it's clear that the international investigation has not been able to answer the key questions that the Lebanese were asking. Namely who ordered this killing because this was as the court recognized a political assassin, the nation and Secondly, you know who ordered and come in, dear. There will have to wait till the end. But at best, it's going to Name. Those who may have been involved operation in implementing it. And to me, this is a missed opportunity. Is it right that the main suspects were identified a decade ago, in which case what has the U. N tribunal being doing exactly since then? Afraid. We've just lost the line as things stand to Nadine, who worry who's director of the Arab Reform Initiative will see if we can get it back. But we might have to return in a few minutes time. Oh, Nadine, you're back with us. I was asking you what you thought the U..

Lebanon Hezbollah Syria Satya Riri prime minister Hassan Nasrallah Lebanon field Arab Reform Initiative director ISS Beirut Nadine Middle East Saudi Arabia Anna Hooligan Lebanese government Jeremy Bowen Iran BBC
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the warmth of other Suns, and we'll discuss her new book. Cast the origins of our discontents. And why, she argues in America has a hierarchical caste system based on race Join US reform from 9 to 11 right here. Public radio and coming upon form with Meena Kim, after Michael from 9 to 10 forum discusses a new use study that warns of an increased risk of floods in California as climate change diminishes the snow pack and leads to more extreme storms. Meena Kim, Michael Crabs, Nate Forum 9 to 11 today, right here on Kiki Wiki. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Lebanon's prime minister who took office amid accusations of misgovernment now is quitting amid accusations of Miss government. Assan Diab says he will leave as soon as lawmakers pick his replacement. He lost his job after an explosion in Beirut. Officials apparently knew for years of a dangerous stockpile of chemicals, which finally blew up. NPR's Ruth Sherlock covers Levin and joins us today from the UK I Ruth. Hey, what's the prime minister, saying as he promises to quit Well, he said he was resigning because he was heating the people's demand for change. You know, this comes after days of matter massive protests in the ruined streets of Beirut. Some of the protesters themselves have seen their homes destroyed in the explosion. And despite the resignation, though, dabs government is going to remain around for a while as a caretaker government as the parliament decides what to do next. Okay, so he's quitting, but not quite yet quitting. How are people reacting? Not well, Steve, There is enormous rage on the streets. You know. In the last few days, people have been chasing politicians down the street. A crowd threw water at the justice minister on Remember, this comes just as you know, this explosion happened just as millions have been driven into poverty by an economic collapse. Largely blamed on corruption in the squandering of state funds by the political class, So this is seen as being just too little, too late. There were clashes last night after the announcement. And basically this is because people think this might be window dressing. Lebanese people have been here before you said. You know. Last year, the government protests ousted the government caused the Cabinet to resign. But then political leaders took months to decide among themselves who would lead and installed a government that the Lebanese people didn't trust. So far, there is no talk of early elections well now and when you say economic collapse, we should mention the economic collapse in 11 and came before the pandemic. It's been a real problem for quite some time. And yet the elites are still there. Even after all this upheaval, what makes them so entrenched? You know, the political class has ruled since after the end of civil war. In the 19 nineties, a system was set up that balanced power between the countries, different warring sects, the Christians, the Sunnis, Shias and so on, and it was a way to make peace and it did kind of provide a way forward. But Nadine hurry. The executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative has worked worked on accountability issues for years, and he explains that this system essentially drove power to six main people. Chemicals oligarchs. And he says. These days the structure is less about balancing sex than it is about dividing the spoils of the state between these people here here's happened to belong to different confessions, but they come together when it suits them. They divide themselves, not never over real sectarian interests, but always over financial interests. When you realize that when you realize you're dealing with a complete kleptocracy, when you're dealing with a master like structure, the country makes sense. So, he says, You know, the Mafia has essentially taken over and placed its people in all levels of government to steer funds to itself. And so people are really frustrated because Steve they want the removal of the whole political class, not just the government, but the Parliament and the president and all these people who have controlled so much of the country for so many years and you know, essentially driven it to ruin. It's they recognized that you know, installing an independent government now and having elections in you know it could be created vacuum, which is dangerous, But they say that it's better than keeping this class which has proven that it can't this political class, which has proven that it can't bring about change. NPR's Ruth, Sherlock, Thanks Thank you. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced today that Russia is the first country to register a vaccine against the Corona virus. But there is a lot of skepticism. Here's NPR's Lucy in Kim in Moscow, President Putin was working from his home outside Moscow when he addressed his Cabinet ministers on a large teleconference screen. That's what coming years using suing you as.

Steve Inskeep NPR Levin Meena Kim Assan Diab Ruth Sherlock President Putin prime minister NPR News parliament Beirut Cabinet president Russia Suns Michael Crabs America Moscow justice minister
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"30 students at the semester continues, the virtual Children program will be expanded to include more students from across the region. According to Buechner, the tutors will be an experience source of support for students in need. Carefully screened college students and volunteers across the country will provide Kate students supplemental individualized assistance. Outside of the regular school day. This is one way we're able to take advantage of the online wonder One connection schools now have with each student. Virtual learning has put pressure on marginal I students who might be facing a learning gap due to a lack of resource is some students, including black and Latino students have troubled with attending virtual classes or completing school work. USC study, released in April showed that one and four families in L. A county lacked access a stable Internet or computer, both of which are needed to attend virtual classes for K C W I'm Daniel Trig y o And a Southern California organization dedicated to helping former inmates and gang members turned their lives around, has won. The 2020 Conrad Hilton humanitarian Prize. Homeboy Industries was founded in Lola in 1988. The 2.5 $1,000,000 prize is given to non profits that have made extraordinary contributions toward lessening human suffering. Support for NPR comes from indeed committed to helping businesses find high impact hires could make a difference by offering tools like screener questions and sponsored jobs learned. Morden d dot com slash high impact. It's 707 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Lebanon's prime minister who took office amid accusations of misgovernment now is quitting amid accusations of Miss government. Assan Diab says he will leave as soon as lawmakers pick his replacement. He lost his job after an explosion in Beirut. Officials apparently knew for years of a dangerous stockpile of chemicals, which finally blew up. NPR's Ruth Sherlock covers Levin and joins us today from the UK I Ruth. Hello. What's the prime minister, saying as he promises to quit? Well, he said he was resigning because he was heating the people's demand for change. You know, this comes after days of matter massive protests in the ruined streets of Beirut. Some of the protesters themselves have seen their homes destroyed in the explosion. On. Despite the resignation, though, Dabs government is going to remain around for a while as a caretaker government as the parliament decides what to do next. Okay, so he's quitting, but not quite yet quitting. How are people reacting? Not well, Steve. There is enormous rage on the streets. You know. In the last few days, people have been chasing politicians down the street. A crowd threw water at the justice minister. On. Remember, this comes just as you know, this explosion happened just as millions have been driven into poverty by an economic collapse, largely blamed on corruption in the squandering of state funds by the political class. So this is seen as being just too little too late. There were clashes last night after the announcement. And basically this is because because people think this might be window dressing Lebanese people have bean here before a cz you said, you know. Last year, the government protests ousted the government caused the Cabinet to resign. But then political leaders took months to decide among themselves who would lead and installed a government that the Lebanese people didn't trust. So far, there is no talk of early elections. Well now and when you say economic collapse, we should mention the economic collapse and Levin and came before the pandemic has been a real problem for quite some time. And yet the elites are still there. Even after all this upheaval. What makes them so entrenched? You know, the political class has ruled since after the end of civil war. In the 19 nineties, a system was set up that balanced power between the countries, different warring sects, the Christians, the Sunnis, Shias and so on, and it was a way to make peace and it did kind of provide a way forward. But Nadine Hurry. The executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative, has worked worked on accountability issues for years. And he explains that this system essentially drove power to six main people whom he calls oligarchs. And he says, these days the structure is less about balancing sex than it is about dividing the spoils of the state. Between these people. Here he is. Happened to belong to different confessions, but they come together when it suits them, and they divide themselves, not never over real sectarian interests. But I always over financial interests when you realize that when you realize you're dealing with a complete kleptocracy, when you're dealing with a mafia like structure, the country makes sense. So, he says, You know, the Mafia has essentially taken over and placed its people in all levels of government to steer funds to itself. And so people are really frustrated because Steve they want the removal of the whole political class, not just the government, but the Parliament and the president. And all these people who have controlled so much of the country for so many years and you know, essentially driven it to ruin its. They recognize that you know, installing an independent government now and having elections in you know, and I could be creative vacuum which is dangerous. They say that it's better than keeping this class, which has proven that it can't this political class, which has proven that it can't bring about change. NPR's Ruth, Sherlock, Thanks Thank you. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced today that Russia is the first country to register a vaccine against the Corona virus. But there is a lot of skepticism. Here's NPR's Lucy in Kim in Moscow, President Putin was working from his home outside Moscow when he addressed his Cabinet ministers on a large teleconference scream. That's what coming years using suing you as.

NPR Steve Inskeep Ruth Sherlock Beirut prime minister NPR News parliament President Putin Levin Cabinet virtual Children Buechner Russia Conrad Hilton Moscow Kate Assan Diab president USC Daniel Trig
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The next all of it. We're kicking off our miniseries about the future of work. Callie Williams Yost, founder of Flex and Strategy Group, talks about how workplaces will continue to adapt and why flexible work should be at the center of a public health and economic recovery plan. Filmmaker Muta Ali Mohamed on his documentary Yusef Hawkins Storm over Brooklyn about the 1989 murder of a black teenager by a group of white men in fencing. I'm Alison Stewart, join me for all of it weekdays at noon on top of an icy It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Lebanon's prime minister who took office amid accusations of misgovernment now is quitting amid accusations of Miss government. Assan Diab says he will leave as soon as lawmakers pick his replacement. He lost his job after an explosion in Beirut. Officials apparently knew for years of a dangerous stockpile of chemicals, which finally blew up. NPR's Ruth Sherlock covers Levin and joins us today from the UK I Ruth. Hey, what's the prime minister, saying as he promises to quit Well, he said he was resigning because he was heating the people's demand for change. You know, this comes after days of matter massive protests in the ruined streets of Beirut. Some of the protesters themselves have seen their homes destroyed in the explosion on despite the resignation, though dabs government is going to remain around for a while as a caretaker government as the parliament decides what to do next. Okay, so he's quitting, but not quite yet quitting. How are people reacting? Not well, Steve. There is enormous rage on the streets. You know. In the last few days, people have bean chasing politicians down the street. A crowd threw water at the justice minister. On. Remember, this comes just as you know, this explosion happened just as millions have been driven into poverty by an economic collapse, largely blamed on corruption in the squandering of state funds by the political class. So this is seen as being just too little too late. There were clashes last night after the announcement. And basically this is because because people think this might be window dressing Lebanese people have bean here before that, you said, you know. Last year, the government protests ousted the government caused the Cabinet to resign. But then political leaders took months to decide among themselves who would lead and installed a government that the Lebanese people didn't trust. So far, there is no talk of early elections. Well now and when you say economic collapse, we should mention the economic collapse and Levin and came before the pandemic has been a real problem for quite some time. And yet the elites are still there. Even after all this upheaval. What makes them so entrenched? You know, the political class has ruled since after the end of civil war. In the 19 nineties, a system was set up that balanced power between the countries, different warring sects, the Christians, the Sunnis, Shias and so on, And it was a way to make peace and it did kind of provide a way forward. But Nadine hurry. The executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative has worked worked on accountability issues for years, And he explains that this system essentially drove power to six main people whom he calls oligarchs. And he says, these days the structure is less about balancing sex than it is about dividing the spoils of the state between these people here here's happened to belong to different confessions. But they come together when it suits them, and they divide themselves, not never over real sectarian interests. But it always over financial interests when you realize that when you realize you're dealing with a complete kleptocracy, when you're dealing with a mafia like structure, the country makes sense. So, he says, You know, the Mafia has essentially taken over and placed its people in all levels of government to steer funds to itself. And so people are really frustrated because Steve they want the removal of the whole political class, not just the government, but the Parliament and the president. And all these people who have controlled so much of the country for so many years and you know, essentially driven it to ruin its. They recognize that you know, installing an independent government now and having elections in you know and could be creative vacuum, which is dangerous. They say that it's better than keeping this class, which has proven that it can't this political class, which has proven that it can't bring about change. NPR's Ruth, Sherlock, Thanks Thank you. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced today that Russia is the first country to register a vaccine against the Corona virus. But there is a lot of skepticism. Here's NPR's Lucy in Kim in Moscow, President Putin was working from his home outside Moscow when he addressed his Cabinet ministers on a large teleconference screen. That's what coming years using suing you, as.

Levin Steve Inskeep NPR Ruth Sherlock Beirut prime minister President Putin NPR News parliament Assan Diab Muta Ali Mohamed Cabinet Alison Stewart Callie Williams Yost president Russia Yusef Hawkins Moscow justice minister murder
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"Big Sig alerts out there this morning Starting out in our leader North found five right around Osborne always shut down due to a multi vehicle wreck there and then in Rancho Cucamonga, eastbound to 10. Right around campus right. Two lanes are blocked. It'll be sunny today. Highs in the seventies along the coast, looking for eighties downtown up to 100 in the valleys. It's 507 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Lebanon's prime minister who took office amid accusations of misgovernment now is quitting amid accusations of Miss government. Assan Diab says he will leave as soon as lawmakers pick his replacement. He lost his job after an explosion in Beirut. Officials apparently knew for years of a dangerous stockpile of chemicals, which finally blew up. NPR's Ruth Sherlock covers Levin and joins us today from the UK I Ruth. Hello. What's the prime minister, saying as he promises to quit? Well, he said he was resigning because he was heating the people's demand for change. You know, this comes after days of matter massive protests in the ruined streets of Beirut. Some of the protesters themselves have seen their homes destroyed in the explosion. And despite the resignation, though, dabs government is going to remain around for a while as a caretaker government as the parliament decides what to do next. Okay, so he's quitting, but not quite yet quitting. How are people reacting? Not well, Steve. There is enormous rage on the streets. You know. In the last few days, people have been chasing politicians down the street. A crowd threw water at the justice minister. On. Remember, this comes just as you know, this explosion happened just as millions have been driven into poverty by an economic collapse, largely blamed on corruption in the squandering of state funds by the political class. So this is seen as being just too little too late. There were clashes last night after the announcement. And basically this is because because people think this might be window dressing Lebanese people have bean here before a cz you said, you know. Last year, the government protests ousted the government caused the Cabinet to resign. But then political leaders took months to decide among themselves who would lead and installed a government that the Lebanese people didn't trust. So far, there is no talk of early elections well now and when you say economic collapse, we should mention the economic collapse in 11 and came before the pandemic. It's been a real problem for quite some time. And yet the elites are still there. Even after all this upheaval, what makes them so entrenched? You know, the political class has ruled since after the end of civil war. In the 19 nineties, a system was set up that balanced power between the countries, different warring sects, the Christians, the Sunnis, Shias and so on, and it was a way to make peace and it did kind of provide a way forward. But Nadine Hurry. The executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative, has worked worked on accountability issues for years. And he explains that this system essentially drove power to six main people whom he called oligarchs. And he says, these days the structure is less about balancing sex than it is about dividing the spoils of the state. Between these people. Here he is. Happened to belong to different confessions, but they come together when it suits them, and they divide themselves, not never over real sectarian interests, but always over financial interests. When you realize that when you realize you're dealing with a complete kleptocracy, when you're dealing with a mafia like structure, the country makes sense. So, he says, You know, the Mafia has essentially taken over and placed its people in all levels of government to steer funds to itself. And so people are really frustrated because Steve they want the removal of the whole political class, not just the government, but the Parliament and the president. And all these people who have controlled so much of the country for so many years and you know, essentially driven it to ruin its. They recognize that you know, installing an independent government now and having elections in you know, and could be created vacuum which is dangerous. They say that it's better than keeping this class, which has proven that it can't this political class, which has proven that it can't bring about change. NPR's Ruth, Sherlock, Thanks Thank you. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced today that Russia is the first country to register a vaccine against the Corona virus. But there is a lot of skepticism. Here's NPR's Lucy in Kim in Moscow, President Putin was working from his home outside Moscow when he addressed his Cabinet ministers on a large teleconference screen. That's what coming years using suing you as far as I know, he said. The world's first covert 19 vaccine was registered this morning putting was referring to a bureaucratic procedure by the Russian Health Ministry. Which registered.

Steve Inskeep Levin NPR President Putin Assan Diab Ruth Sherlock prime minister Beirut NPR News parliament Cabinet Russia Rancho Cucamonga Moscow Osborne justice minister president Nadine Hurry Noelle King
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Lebanon's prime minister who took office amid accusations of misgovernment now is quitting amid accusations of Miss government. Sandy up, says he will leave as soon as lawmakers pick his replacement. He lost his job after an explosion in Beirut officials apparently knew for years of a dangerous stockpile of chemicals, which finally blew up. NPR's Ruth Sherlock covers Levin and joins us today from the UK I Ruth. Hey, what's the prime minister, saying as he promises to quit Well, he said he was resigning because he was heating the people's demand for change. You know, this comes after days of matter massive protests in the ruined streets of Beirut. Some of the protesters themselves have seen their homes destroyed in the explosion on despite the resignation, though dabs government is going to remain around for a while as a caretaker government as the parliament decides what to do next. Okay, so he's quitting, but not quite yet quitting. How are people reacting? Not well, Steve, There is enormous rage on the streets. You know. In the last few days, people have been chasing politicians down the street. Crowd through water, the justice minister on Remember, this comes just as you know, this explosion happened just as millions have been driven into poverty by an economic collapse, largely blamed on corruption in the squandering of state funds by the political class. So this is seen as being just too little too late. There were clashes last night after the announcement. And basically this is big because people think this might be window dressing. Lebanese people have bean here before a cz you said, you know. Last year, the government protests ousted the government caused the Cabinet to resign. But then political leaders took months to decide among themselves who would lead and installed a government that the Lebanese people didn't trust. So far, there is no talk of early elections well now and when you say economic collapse, we should mention the economic collapse in 11 and came before the pandemic. It's been a real problem for quite some time. And yet the elites are still there. Even after all this upheaval, what makes them so entrenched? Well, you know, the political class has ruled since after the end of civil war. In the 19 nineties, a system was set up that balanced power between the countries, different warring sects, the Christians, the Sunnis, Shias and so on, And it was a way to make peace and it did kind of provide a way forward. But Nadine Hurry. The executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative, has worked worked on accountability issues for years. And he explains that this system essentially drove power to six main people whom he called oligarchs. And he says, these days the structure is less about balancing sex than it is about dividing the spoils of the state. Between these people. Here he is. Happened to belong to different confessions, but they come together when it suits them, and they divide themselves, not never over real sectarian interests, but always over financial interests. When you realize that when you realize you're dealing with a complete kleptocracy dealing with a mafia like structure, the country makes sense. So, he says, You know, the Mafia has essentially taken over and placed its people in all levels of government to steer funds to itself. And so people are really frustrated because Steve they want the removal of the whole political class, not just the government, but the Parliament and the president. And all these people who have controlled so much of the country for so many years and you know, essentially driven it to ruin its. They recognize that you know, installing an independent government now and having elections in you know, and could be created vacuum which is dangerous. They say that it's better than keeping this class which has proven that it can't this political class. Which has proven that it can't bring about change. NPR's Ruth, Sherlock. Thanks. Thank you. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced today that Russia is the first country to register a vaccine against the Corona virus. But there is a lot of skepticism. Here's NPR's Lucy in Kim in Moscow, President Putin was working from his home outside Moscow when he addressed his Cabinet ministers on a large teleconference screen. That's what Kamuzu suing you as far as.

Steve Inskeep Levin NPR prime minister Beirut NPR News President Putin Ruth Sherlock parliament Cabinet Russia Noelle King justice minister Moscow Lebanon president Nadine Hurry UK Kamuzu
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"Is grief and a growing fury in Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless. And at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Nadim Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch. Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? You know they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners with don't know Beirut, it happened. Very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were so really, it's an attack that's sort of the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called, you know, Sectarian cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the clientele is stick sectarian networks of what we call the Sarma, the sectarian leaders. Now, why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks, so we should say here. Of course, Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon. What has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up Tio Cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six oligarchs who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name of their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is they're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the High level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politick. It has now calculated down to every single layer of administration of our governance. So even when you go to the port of Beirut You know, the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them And why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how they get their political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen than in your view to move the country forward? The main Demand today is tohave a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exceptional situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt affair addict oral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon is someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable. Lebanon now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. Unfair er better basis, but it's clear now that this cannot happen While the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day or.

Lebanon Beirut Nadim Curie Thie Arab Reform Initiative cancer executive director official Sarma
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless and at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have. Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Madame Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? You know they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have Stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners with don't know Beirut. It happened very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were so really, it's an attack at sort of the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called you know, Secretary in Cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the client list IQ sectarian networks of what we call the Sarma sectarian leaders. Now why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks. So we should say here that of course. Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon what has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up? Teo cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six Ali guards who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name of their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is they're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the High level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politick. It has now percolated down to every single layer of administration of our government's. So even when you go to the port of Beirut, you know the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them And why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how to get there. Political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen than in your view to move the country forward? The main Demand today is tohave a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exceptional situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt Affair electoral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon is someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable. Lebanon now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. Unfair er better basis, but it's clear now that this cannot happen While the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day or us at this stage..

Lebanon Beirut Madame Curie Thie parliament cancer Arab Reform Initiative executive director Teo official Cassock Schimmel Ali Secretary
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Grief and a growing fury in Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless. And at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Nadim Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch. Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? No, they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners with don't know Beirut, it happened. Very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were so really, it's an attack that sort of at the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called you know, Secretary in Cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the client, illest IQ sectarian networks off what we call the Sarma, the sectarian leaders. Now, why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks, so we should say here. Of course, Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon. What has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up Tio Cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six oligarchs who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name ofthe their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is They're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the High level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politick. It has now circulated down to every single layer of administration of our government's so even when you go to the port of Beirut You know, the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them And why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how they get their political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen then? In your view to move the country forward. The main Demand today is tohave a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exceptional situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt affair addict oral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon A someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable. Lebanon now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. Unfair er better basis, but it's clear now that this cannot happen While the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day or us.

Lebanon Beirut Nadim Curie Thie Arab Reform Initiative cancer executive director official Sarma Cassock Schimmel Secretary
Officials resign in Lebanon in wake of deadly blast

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Officials resign in Lebanon in wake of deadly blast

"A growing fury in Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless. And at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Nadim Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch. Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? No, they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners with don't know Beirut, it happened. Very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were so really, it's an attack that sort of at the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called you know, Secretary in Cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the client, illest IQ sectarian networks off what we call the Sarma, the sectarian leaders. Now, why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks, so we should say here. Of course, Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon. What has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up Tio Cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six oligarchs who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name ofthe their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is They're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the High level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politick. It has now circulated down to every single layer of administration of our government's so even when you go to the port of Beirut You know, the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them And why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how they get their political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen then? In your view to move the country forward. The main Demand today is tohave a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exceptional situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt affair addict oral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon A someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable. Lebanon now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. Unfair er better basis, but it's clear now that this cannot happen While the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day or us

Lebanon Beirut Nadim Curie Thie Arab Reform Initiative Cancer Executive Director Official Sarma Cassock Schimmel Secretary
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A growing fury in Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless and at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have. Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Madame Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? You know they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners with don't know Beirut. It happened very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were So, really, it's an attack at sort of the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called you know, Secretary in Cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the client list IQ secretary in networks of what we call the Sarma sectarian leaders. Now, why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks, so we should stay here. Of course, Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon. What has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up Tio Cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six oligarchs who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name of their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is they're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the high level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politic. It has now circulated down to every single layer of administration of our government's. So even when you go to the port of Beirut, you know the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them and why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how they get their political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen then? In your view to move the country forward. The main Demand today is to have a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exception situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt affair addict oral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon is someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. On favor better basis, But it's clear now that this cannot happen while the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day.

Lebanon Beirut Madame Curie Thie parliament cancer secretary Arab Reform Initiative executive director official Cassock Schimmel
"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"arab reform initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"A growing fury in Lebanon as the country deals with the aftermath of a huge explosion in Beirut that has left 300,000 people homeless. And at least 160 people dead. Protests have erupted yesterday, Demonstrators staged mock hangings of top officials demanding they resigned. A few members of parliament have Meanwhile, the political elite point fingers at each other for the failure to secure the huge cache of ammonium nitrate that caused the blast. Nadim Curie is Thie, executive director of the Arab Reform Initiative team and the former head of Lebanon's human rights Watch office and his watch. Lebanon have to rebuild calamity after calamity and he joins us now to discuss what's happening. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Your grandmother lives near the port. Can you tell me how she and your other family members are doing? No, they survived. Almost miraculously, when you see the damage that happened to their building and how close they were to the explosion, they survived with minor scratches. Most of my friends and neighbors from that area everyone has a survival story. It was often a question of seconds of luck of a door that protected them from a flying glass and so forth. Most Lebanese have stories of survival over the last 23 decades, escaping bombs escaping now this explosion, But this time it really that the scale of it is shocking for listeners. We don't know Beirut it happened. Very close to the major entry point of the city. This was also the area where most of the restaurants, cafes and bars were so really, it's an attack that's sort of the heart of the city. The Lebanese have started to protest again. Government corruption They had been doing that for most of last year. What makes this kind of endemic corruption different in Lebanon? Than in other places where it might exist in Lebanon. The corruption has now become part of the A of the political system of the country. The so called you know, Secretary in Cassock Schimmel system You cannot appoint A single official. Whatever the rank is without going through the clientele is stick sectarian networks of what we call the Sarma, the sectarian leaders. Now, why is this corrupt Because that means you cannot hold a single official responsible without going through these traditional sectarian client ballistic networks, so we should say here. Of course, Ever since the Civil war in Lebanon. What has been put in place? Is that a sort of government that is set up Tio Cater to different sectarian interests in the country. Yes, This is how it officially gets described. But in practice, what we've discovered is that it's really a system that caters to six oligarchs who are corrupt. They are of different confessions. And they pretend to speak in the name ofthe their sectarian group by saying we defend this confessional group. All services for the group have to flow through us. But in practice what the Lebanese have been discovering over the years is They're not protecting anyone but their own pockets and their cronies, pockets and the system in a way, it's a bit like a cancer. It started initially, supposedly for the High level positions to ensure that all communities are represented, but almost like a cancer that is spreading through the body politick. It has now calculated down to every single layer of administration of our governance. So even when you go to the port of Beirut, you know the porters that are getting named, depend on a political leader, appointing them And why did they do that? Because this is how they keep them in line and this is how they get there. Political loyalty. It's a system of patronage, essentially. So what needs to happen than in your view to move the country forward? The main Demand today is tohave a salvation government off people that are outside off the existing political class. This would be a government that has a clear mandate to steer the ship through the economic crisis that would have the trust of the people. It would be an exceptional situation for two or three years just to stabilize the ship. And adopt affair addict oral law and have elections in two or three years, which hopefully we'll see the emergence of new political parties. I must ask you a someone who watches Lebanon A someone who is Lebanese. Are you concerned that this might be a tipping point? It is a tipping point if we do not get rid of this political class All of Lebanon's talents. Those who can leave will leave in the coming 12 months. They no longer want to live in that country because they see a state that is killing them slowly and they're not just killing them with these explosions there, killing them with the corruption, which makes the environment unlivable. Lebanon now has one of the highest cancer rates. It's killing them with the economy, the country can be rebuilt. On favor better basis, but it's clear now that this cannot happen While the current political class remains in place. I realize what we're talking about is really a fight as to who's going to stay in Lebanon. It's day or.

Lebanon Beirut Nadim Curie Thie cancer official Arab Reform Initiative executive director Sarma Cassock Schimmel Secretary