24 Burst results for "April Callaghan"

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

06:56 min | Last month

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we wear. We are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary and april callaghan dress listeners. Get excited because today we are going shopping. And because you know we love. All things sustainable. We are actually going vintage shopping. Just outside of paris at the famed and fabled and much beloved lay poofs flea market which according to many sources is the largest antique market in the entire world lay encompasses seven hector's or more than seventeen acres with seventeen hundred individual vendors and we went and saw them all. No so. I wish we did. I know what you might be thinking. This place is huge in its size. Might make a little more sense when you learn. That lee is actually a collection of fourteen individual markets. Each with their own specialties. In terms of the types of items for sale so nationally we just had to go here on our recent dressed fashion history tour of paris. yes Have to say casts a visiting with something that has been on my bucket list for the last twenty years of and for whatever reasons the last couple of times i've been to paris my plans just didn't line up to make to the flea market because it's only open on the weekends saturday and sunday. Although i will say that i do believe that there are certain higher and vendors in a couple of different specific markets that hold additional hours for professional decorators and other fellow dealers etc but now having been there not one not two but three times in august the twenty twenty one. Well let's just say it did not disappoint. Yeah and after. Say i had never even heard of it until you brought it up as a must stop on our fashion fashion-industry tour so i was in for a real treat. It was pretty incredible and even going multiple times. We are only able to explore a handful of the markets and even then we only scratched the surface because so many of the shops we visited were closed for august. But we still saw so much. We'll definitely be going back. And maybe we'll get a chance to check out the several other markets that we missed in this labyrinth of cover shops located just outside of paris and the nearby northern suburb of song. Won- yes and. I'm glad you brought this up cast. The flea market isn't located in paris proper because this actually has to do with a larger history of the buying and selling of used goods and this area of salt lon became really well known as a market for used items starting in the eighteen seventies but history of the second hand. Trade is much older than that in paris. Going back centuries before the eighteen seventies and we've mentioned it many times before on the show listeners. You know historically speaking clothing was considered mature valuable. Sometimes some of the most valuable things a person might own. You know unlike today when clothing is considered disposable by many people so historically because of the intrinsic value of clothing garments oftentimes went onto have second third or fourth lives beyond their original. Where in the past. It was far more common that a garment that was new to you was not actually knew at all in historically. Most women knew how to so after all and often fashion clothing for themselves and their families and they will do this from new links of kloss but more often than not these garments. After they were made were handed down within families there are passed onto friends etc. Once the original where no longer had used for them and the ultra wealthy might be the only segment of the population to never know what it was like to wear a prewar piece of clothing. Although their close austin became secondhand when no longer fashionable they were passed on to say. They're ladies in waiting. The personal maids ballots or other household staff clothing. Also found its way into the hands of a new where by means of being sold via the secondhand market yes and traders of used clothing have historically gone by a few different names fritters aka frippery which is a word. We see more often. Now biff irs chiffon yeas and rag in bone men include just to kind of few slang terms for traders Clothing and you know prior to the nineteen sixties when it was the hippies that made it well you know cool to issue capitalist structures inherent to the fashion system and they were wearing vintage clothing because of this they made it well hip. You know hippies yeah get it. The basically you know before the nineteen sixties. The dealing of us close came with a bit of stigma. And it's really easy to see why after reading descriptions from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries about some of the sanitary conditions in areas where it used clothing was sold haiching being an entirely different matter at this time. Sometimes even bathing came with. Its own stigma. But all these used garments especially the ones that were sold at lower price points had likely had several previous owners and had accumulated you know all of these body oils and fluids and stains and soiling not to mention perhaps fleas in also bedbugs. And this is where the term fleamarket comes from and lay pufus translates to the fleas and french. And can i just say. I never even remotely related flea markets with actual sleaze. I just assumed it was some sort of other relationship between the word flee but the fact that it actually relates to fleas is interesting because it's such a common part of our vernacular today. It's super interesting. So needless to say the sale of secondhand clothing could be a bit of an unsavory and quite frankly dishonest business. Some dealers went so far to attempt to repair holes not with patches or men's but with a quick fix of sap or tar which clearly would not hold up for much longer them getting these items sold and out the door so during the eighteenth century certain covered passageways paris also sites where used garments of dubious quality were sold and this had a couple of benefits of course protection from the weather but also these passageways could be dark and dim and this aided in concealing the poor conditions of the garments. The flippers hawk. And i also would just want to say that. These covered passageways are. It's super interesting topic. In and of themselves they were basically early shopping malls or cades. There were at one point over one hundred fifty in paris. I think by the eighteen fifties and today only a couple remain including the Shwe zeal which we happen to stumble across when visiting the oldest haberdashery impairs ultra-modern located on another.

paris cassidy zachary april callaghan lee austin
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:22 min | Last month

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more just the history of fashion as a production of iheartradio Over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Who is dressed the history of fashion. A podcast for explore. The who. what when of why we wear. We are fascist orients and your hosts april callaghan and cassidy zachary so today dress listeners. The root the pay appears as just any other store line street so you have the hustle and bustle of presient life. Which animates the street. We you know honking horns jackhammers. Various types of construction work totally The presence of cardi as black marble facade is really one of the last remaining hints at a bygone era when the street was heralded as one of the sheikh. If not these she gets streets in the world so what women war on the sidewalks of the retailer pay was newsworthy as what could be purchased in its shops. It was all reported in detail and fashion magazines across europe and america in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and at this time the retail pay was the fashion street. I mean it was the fantasy of every aspiring fashion sta and also the reality of the uber wealthy and the elite from around the globe. So it was this international shopping destination of the glitterati of society from the demimondaine. All the way up to royalty from all around the world and the street itself was so legendary that had actually inspired perfumes. Plays and also imitations because this is quite interesting. Cast madison avenue in new york. Historically has kind of like especially kind of when it emerged as elite shopping destination in the us it was referred to as the new rubella pay in the nineteen twenties right and in one thousand nine hundred thousand. Five article by vogue magazine called the riddle. Pay quote the street of a thousand luxuries. The most luxurious the most complete shopping street in all the world within these limits are centered. The reasons that send the feet of every chic american woman who comes to paris flying to the root of the pay first last and many times in between end quote and april. It's not lost on us. That almost one hundred years after this article was written you and i were in fact to american women. Yes we actually dressed listeners. As you will recall from last week's a recap. We made the riddler pay the first stop on our recent fashion history tour of paris so we are so excited to share with. You are walking tour in hopes that you can imagine what it would have been like to shop. Once one of the most covetable shopping destinations in the world. Yes and even if you are in paris on your own you could take this podcast with you and this is our audio company. Meant to our tour of the pay. So we're gonna actually begin our tour on the opposite end of the plastic dome. So the end of the rule of pay that's closest to the palais gonyea the paris opera house. If you're standing in that direction near looking down the road you'll pay what you're going to see at. The end is the plastic dome which was just round plaza. And what we want to talk about here is the fact that that round plaza which now houses a column the statue on top. Actually that site was originally the home for church prior to the nineteenth century and in eighteen. O six napoleon bonaparte had that church demolished to make way for this new street into the loss fontham where he had erected a giant column crown with his statue not the same column in statue than it is today. But let's just say you know. Obviously it goes without saying that that when this statue was there during his reign the regional pay was actually called the rue napoleon and it was only after that he was finally deposed in eighteen. Fifteen that the street was given its new name for which it would earn world renown as a fashion destination as the russillo. Pay out on. Before i forget little fashion history facts here that person. Napoleon had demolished while apparently it also held the remains of one of fashion histories. Icons the madame de pompadour. And we're not exactly sure what happened to her remains and maybe one of our french colleagues out. There might and lightness. They might know and we'd love to hear yes absolutely so by eighteen. twenty two. The travel guide gallon. yanni's paris guide or strangers companion through the french metropolis. Described the riddle of pay as quote the center of the fashionable part of the city and quote. But at this time it was occupied by furnished hotels offices of physicians and surgeons and really the only fashioned purveyors of dress were to boot and shoemakers a few jewelers and a perfumer or perfume. Yea said this at all changed by the time the first stop on our tour opened its doors at twenty one. Rusillo pay an eighteen seventy one and while the coach house we are about to talk about opening eighteen seventy one. It really was only the latest incarnation of a family business. The history of which extends all the way back to eighteen sixteen when a family opened a lingerie which at this time meant linen undergarments. They opened this laundry and linens at business so dressed listeners will give you a couple of seconds but do you have any guests it dun dun dun dun dun dun. I love that you did the sound effects on the show. Because i can't sing but you can. And that is something that address start might know that you have been the singer to front woman of a few bands in your time. Oh my gosh. I mean yeah another lifetime. Does okay dress listeners. If you happen to guest. Jacques do say you'll be correct but if you did not guess jock please do not in any way shape or firm feel bad because do say today is is as you know outside of maybe people who are professionals in this field kind of a lesser known haute couture compared to like worth. But we do have to say this. Did you say house was one of the leading bella hawk. Could we're houses of the era and do say himself is perhaps today actually more famous for his illustrious art collection which included post impressionist and cuba's artists as compared to his career as a fashion designer so his collection included one of the most famous works of art of all time. Day mozelle davin yom which. Apparently he bought directly from so out of.

cassidy zachary paris vogue magazine cardi palais gonyea callaghan napoleon bonaparte paris opera house america europe Rusillo new york yanni Yea Jacques cuba mozelle davin
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"In the world we all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to address the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we where we are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy's accuracy and april callaghan so cast on this very gloomy day here in new york city where we are currently in the middle of a hurricane. I have one question for you and that is what exactly do you think that one wears to visit the bora goff's well considering. I have absolutely no clue what said borough goes is. I think you're going to have to enlighten me. Well you are perfectly correct because there are very few people know what that is. And i will explain by saying this. Twas brig and the slow vetoes did geyer and gamble in the wave. All mmc worthy borogovo and the mom wrath out grade. Beware the jabber walk. My son the jaws at bite in the closet. Catch beware the jab jab bird and shun the from us bunder snatch so okay. That is probably the only poem that i actually know by heart. But i think that some of our listeners will probably recognized that as lewis carroll's nonsensical masterpiece poem jabber walkie which actually features prominently as a plot point and one of the most beloved children's novels of all time through the looking glass. That's right dressed listeners. Today is not only about alice's adventures in wonderland but it's specifically about alice's fashion adventures in wonderland. Which of course we love. We are so pleased to welcome back. Not one but two pass dress guests. Lucie clayton and dr benjamin wild of the uk podcast dress fancy which quote explores the popularity valence and power fancy dress in quote or what. We might call a costume here in the us. Yes we will also hear from a couple of surprise guest who worked on the recent exhibition at the victorian albert museum in london. Which is entitled alice. Curiouser and curiouser. That exhibition was actually the spark that led to this. Podcast cleberation of dressed. Times dress fancy as we're going to speak about. Today's some of the most iconic looks of wonderland how they themselves have actually inspired fashion history. So been an lucy and is always such a treat to have you welcome back to the show fan and lucy. Welcome back to. The show is really lovely to be here again. Yes and i just want to say. Lucy this is your second time joining us and then this is actually your third time joining us which i do believe that i am not mistaken. Might just make you dress most frequent. I need like a badger cash for that. I feel like a veteran. Yeah yeah yeah so. I don't know. I don't know if you watch saturday night. Live but they always tell us they just five timers club. I was kind of feeling like we need like three timers.

bora goff alice callaghan cassidy geyer Lucie clayton dr benjamin hurricane lewis carroll victorian albert museum new york city wonderland uk london us Lucy
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:53 min | 2 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Is the production of iheartradio billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dress the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we where we are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary and april callaghan so cast. I know that..

cassidy zachary april callaghan
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"So we got together to do a podcast to relive the show as so many of you have listened to drama queens on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. That's not sta you hear the true story of a pilot who smuggled drugs for some of the world's most dangerous druglords don sporty style tells the tale in his own words behind the bars of a federal prison speaking on a smuggled cell phone fifty salt old. I listen to transport. Easter on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Trust the history of fashion production of iheartradio Cover seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to stressed the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we wear. We are fashion historians and your hosts april callaghan and cassidy zachary address listeners. We start today's episode with a love story of epic olympic proportions and origins in fact without the nineteen forty eight olympics. One of fashion's most beloved brands quite possibly. It would not exist april. Let's just say. The olympic flame was not the only flame lit at the nineteen forty eight olympics. Today's story actually begins in nineteen forty when the. Us olympic committee published their report for the games of the twelfth olympiad. Gone were the glowing reviews and praise of hitler and the nazi regime's nineteen thirty six olympics. And god were the olympics with the outbreak of world. War two this basically ensured that the next summer games originally meant to be held in helsinki finland were indefinitely postponed in so reads. The us olympic. Committee's report from that year quote. The united states was ready but the world itself was not. It is the fervent hope of the committee that the turmoil into which the universe has been tossed will subside soon so that the olympic ideals of brotherhood among men may emerge triumphant. May the olympic flame never die and made the olympic ideal soon again prevail as an indication of mankind's return to sanity so the olympics would not return until nineteen forty eight when they opened in london the international olympic committee referred to hereafter as the i o c had made some noticeable changes in the worst wake. The olympic salute long and opening ceremonies staple was gone because apparently it was too similar to the nazi salute. Although not related at all. But i'm you know other elements did remain well. It originated at the so-called nazi olympics of nineteen thirty six. The ioc decided to keep the olympic torch lighting ceremony and the relay as symbolic gesture and the so called relay of peace conducted through war. Torn europe became a really touching emblem of goodwill between nations. The lemon games offered an opportunity to boost morale and exhibit much needed international solidarity after the brutalities of world war so former adversaries who thought an opposite sides of the battlefield now athletic competitors four thousand one hundred and four athletes from fifty. Nine countries competed in one hundred and thirty six events in these games and that included to talion world. War two veterans and track and field team mates by the name of giorgio and a tapio. What's particularly cool about these. Two is not only were they stellar athletes. They were active where designers and following world war two. They went into business together creating wool tracksuits which they and their fellow olympic teammates wore these nineteen forty eight games. A tapio even made it all the way to the finals in the four by four hundred meter hurdle race at wembley stadium but his team did not play say didn't finish there was no reason given but we have to wonder if it was perhaps that he got a little too distracted by the good luck his future wife who was in a sixteen year old student by the name of rosetta gel meany and she was in the stands so apparently she noticed him as well because zita later called it an interview with nbc news. Quote our students seats. Were right near the changing rooms. At wembley stadium. I saw him. He looked like he was twenty one. I found out later that he was twenty seven. He had an extraordinary running style. Well octavio in. His teammates also noticed zita and her friends invited them to lunch. And can we say the rest is actually not just history. But it's fashion history because how many of your listeners out there have heard of knitwear brand called miss sony. I love the story. So much that massoni. I mean talk about an olympic match made in fashion heaven or maybe a fashion match made an olympic heaven either way the couple was married in nineteen fifty three and they set up a workshop together continuing the production of tracksuits until they moved onto the production of their now signature knitwear. The couple showed their first network collection in milan. In nineteen fifty eight and soon after rose to international success from the nineteen sixties onward and the duo really built this family empire selling their now signature brightly colored knitwear designs with their three kids taking over control of the business in the nineteen nineties. Yes and we will get to the nineteen ninety s soon enough dressed listeners. But in the meantime we still have a lot of laughs to swim over these next two episodes before we can get to our ultimate finish. Line the twenty twenty twenty one tokyo olympics so please forgive us while we hit fast forward on the remote. Yeah because did we mention that. The nineteen forty eight games were the first to be televised and broadcast around the world to people's homes so today's episode will conclude with nineteen sixty olympics held in mexico city and in order to get there. Let's quickly hit some of the highlights from the three olympic games. We'll be rock climbing cycling in vaulting by with great speed at the nineteen fifty to helsinki olympics. American olympic diver. Sammy lee was the first man to win back to back gold medals for the us when he took home the gold for the ten meter platform for the second olympics in a row he had previously won the gold at the nineteen forty eight olympics where he had also become the first asian american man to win. An olympic gold medal and lease achievements are incredible. When you learned that as a kid he honed his skills and a soft sand pit behind his diving coaches in the back yard. Amazing and reason for this was because segregation in american men. That lee was only allowed to swim at his neighborhood. Pool once a week on quote unquote in our national day. But obviously he persevered. Training are rather diving his way through sand to go.

olympic olympics tapio cassidy zachary Us olympic committee international olympic committe apple callaghan wembley stadium zita rosetta gel meany helsinki massoni finland us giorgio nbc news octavio london
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:27 min | 3 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"People in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to address the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what win of why we wear we are fashion historians and your host cast zachary and april callaghan so casts for more than two hundred and fifty episodes. Our show opener. I know right are. Schopenhauer has always referred to the some seven billion of us. Human set currently inhabit this planet. And if we keep making the show well into the future well we're gonna have to update that stat. No right okay. So don't mind me. If i future trip a little bit here but one project bottle that i looked at recently of human population growth predicts that by twenty fifty. The world's population could potentially swelled to ten billion people only. Yeah i know so within our lifetimes we might just see the citizenry of planet. Earth grow by something like forty percent and of course this begs the question while our planet be able to provide all of the life sustaining resources necessary. Historically many of these resources have been derived as we all know from animals that have served as both a major source of food and clothing for humans. The sixty billion land animals on the earth today would need to increase to a hundred billion april to support the population growth to ten billion humans. And as we have discussed before the show large scale industrial farming practices of livestock are a source of man made greenhouse gas emissions nearly fifteen percent. The connection is clear. Eating less mean or as i advocate. No meat at all and using less animal derived products for clothing can help lower greenhouse gas emission and have an incredibly positive impact on our planet in more ways than one. Yes so what are some of the alternatives in terms of clothing production. Well for the last hundred years or so. Man made synthetic fibers rose to prominence as a cheaper alternative to natural fibres like cotton or linen. But slow your roll people because synthetic textiles containing acrylic polyester nylon and spandex. Well did you know that these fibers are actually derived from petrolia and this clearly is not the answer either so it kind of goes without saying that the extraction of these resources by big oil and gas well they have also wreaked havoc on the planet. It is little wonder than today's guests. Spouses the quote need to transition away from both animal derived and fossil derived materials and chemicals that are co produced along the petrochemical supply chain and quotes today. We are so pleased to be joined by. Andreas forgacs the founder of modern meadow..

april callaghan Schopenhauer zachary petrolia Andreas forgacs
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:57 min | 4 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dressed the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when a why we where we are fashion historians and your hosts april callaghan and cassidy zachary dressed listeners. While american dress listeners. I should say. I waitress a bet that many of you have learned the same version of us history. That i did in grade school. That april did in grade school. A people have been learning for a very long time and it usually begins with the familiar song in fourteen ninety. Two columbus sailed the ocean blue well. Christopher columbus is of course the famed italian explorer credited with quote unquote discovering america. I of course used discovering. Ironically as we should all know by now that he did not discover anything million of people had inhabited the land now known as the quote unquote america for thousands upon thousands of years before columbus and explores after him. Clean them in the name of the spanish monarchs queen isabella. The i and king ferdinand the second. In the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries yes in columbus first made landfall in present day bahamas on the island of hani the indigenous homeland of the taino people from there. He traveled to modern day. Cuba and the island of hispaniola which today is comprised with the dominican republic and haiti and into the eastern coast of central america and the northern tip of south america and columbus's voyages were instrumental in laying the literal foundation for spain subsequent centuries long colonisation and occupation of south central and north america. The colonizers brought many things with them including spanish culture religion and dress but also devastatingly disease and the effects of colonization that still resonate in all of these countries to this very day. You know we're seeing a lot of this evidence. Presently by the continued protests against the columbus monuments present in these countries and also the very celebration of columbus day and as our listeners. Know i am of course interested in the relationship between fashion and colonialism. And i am studying it in relationship. To the history of my home state new mexico with grapples. With a very long spanish and the anglo american colonial pass it extends back five hundred years so not a not a short period by any means and the clothes body. Is this incredibly potent site for. The studies of the ways in which identities were negotiated within the colonial context and especially as they relate to the intersections of gender race and class. The spanish colonial world itself a subject right for interrogation on these topics which is why we are so pleased to welcome. Today's guests to the show and that is fashion story. Laura beltran rubio whose research explores the construction of identity through fashion in europe and latin america with an emphasis on the early modern spanish world. Laura is a doctoral candidate. At the college of william and mary in williamsburg virginia and her dissertation explores the adoption and adaptation of european fashions. They're fusion with local indigenous elements of dress and their representation in portraits and pictures which were produced in the viceroy of new granada. Which was the representative of. Spain's south american empire and she joins us today for part one of our two part episode during which we discuss her research on. Spain's imperia delay moda or empire of fashion. Laura a warm welcome to dress laura. Welcome to dressed. It's such a pleasure to have you here with us today. High custody thank you. It's a pleasure for me to be here. I have been listening to learning from dress for a very long time. So it's really an honor being here. I've been following your work and research for some time to so. I'm excited to connect and learn more about what you are researching and your work focused on fashion and self fashioning the eighteenth century spanish american colonial territory of new granada modern day colombia ecuador panama and been his walea. But before we dive into this rich topic. I'd love if you could. I kind of set the scene for our listeners. When did the spanish. I come to the continent now known as south america it was certainly not known as south america prior to the spanish. And who and what did they find their. That made them want to stay. So the spanish invasion of south america was actually one of the very first colonial enterprises in what we now know the americas and this it's actually wear some of the first europeans to come here In this history of colonialism the sunnier arrived in what is now venezuela panama colombia at the turn of the sixteenth century so very early on and the founded and named there for cities during their first explorations but many of them were later abandoned. They came in founded a city than found a better place for their citizens so they left and it wasn't until fifteen fifteen that kumana the first sort of permanent city was founded in the territory of present day venice. This was the first city that was found in what they first called the rafi which is in a super super simplified version of the story. What became the vice royalty of new granada and they also founded other eating present. Day colombia was very important. Gold idea. atlantic what billion that. One was founded in fifteen thirteen. But that one was later abandoned the actual lice royalty of the new granada which is the territory or the colony that i studied wasn't created until the eighteenth century and its history super complicated and probably takes more than just a few minutes to talk about or lane. It clear me but it was created as a result of what are called the borbon reforms which came about with the new monarchy in spain. The habsburgs used to rule the spanish empire until the end of the seventeenth century and at the beginning of the eighteenth century. The borbon the same french for Came to claim against the spanish crown. These reforms they were a sort of reaction of empire that was basically disintegrating they were trying to reclaim the empire and reorganized the empire so these reforms included song that were more social some that were more political and some even economic or with economic intentions and so the vice royalty of you granato was product of all of this. It was officially founded in seventeen seventeen and it was later dissolved because they decided that it was too expensive and too complicated and in the seventeen thirty it was founded again and this time it was kind of permanent and the vice royalty of were not existed until it became independent from the spanish empire in the nineteenth century. Spanish empire was quite vast. I mean they founded these colonies that you're talking about Around the same time they were also up. Cortez was in mexico. Moving up north into what is present day new mexico texas although southern united states territories so it was incredibly vast and just curious how similar the south american colonies were two other spanish colonial enterprises. For instance an like mexico. Cortez came they subjugated the indigenous populations. They enslave them as labourers and then they just started really looking for the nation's resources. I'm just curious if you can talk a.

Christopher columbus Laura mexico Cuba europe nineteenth century april callaghan eighteenth century laura cassidy zachary williamsburg kumana north america Today latin america two venezuela first spain southern united states
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:24 min | 4 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Was over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to address the history of fashion. A podcast explores the who what went of why we where we are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary and april callaghan so cast in a nineteen seventy-three dr willie morrow who we will discuss a bit further in this episode wrote in his book. Four hundred years without a comb. He said quote hair in other words is the basic natural symbol of the things. People are watts. Become the social cultural significance of hairstyles should not be underestimated. Yes dr morrow who has been called the greatest barber the world has ever seen in quote was speaking specifically about black hair. Which is the subject of today's episode. We are so pleased to have dr topeka allenton and dr joseph underwood join us. Today to discuss their upcoming exhibition textures. The history and art of black hair which will open an early september. Twenty twenty one. The kent state university museum the exhibition. Which is the largest exhibition to date on black hair features two hundred and fifty objects and work from more than fifty artists. Wow yeah so at kent state doctor. Ellington serves as an associate professor of design and also the interim assistant dean for the college of arts and her areas of study include african art and folklore a focus that dr just happens to share as an assistant professor of history and he studies artists from the african continent and also the diaspora doctors ellington. And underwood we are so happy. You are joining us today. Welcome actress ellington. Underwood a very warm welcome to dress. I'm so excited to talk to you today. Excited to be here. Thank you thank you for the invitation april and we are just like so delighted that you both agreed to chat with us about your exhibition the history and art of black hair and dr ellington. I'm hoping that i can ask you the first question because the subject of black hair has been the focus of your academic career for two decades. Now which is amazing and it was born out of personal experiences which you detail in the introduction to the exhibition catalogue. So i'm hoping that you might share with our listeners. How your as you say hair. Traumas kind of led you to this amazing path of academic study. You know being a heuristic researcher is really interesting. Place be especially when you're studying culture and so throughout my life as a black female especially being a black female has brown skin of kiki hair. I'm always and people like me have always been on the outside of what beauty is supposed to look like in so you know going through things such as putting chemicals on my hair in order to try to assimilate into white society. Sang beauty is so my hair straight mirrors in other chemicals Ultra texture of are like you know black people's here like i've lost my hair On two occasions. My hair's falling out because of the harsh chemicals. I been and call Ugly you know. Because of the fact that i have kinky hair hair which some people call them quote nappy here. I even you know been faced with difficulties and in my work When i was a young person. I went to work for an amusement park. And this particular amusement park a list of all of the Hairstyles not allowed to be worn in. In the amusement park. In all of those hairstyles were black. Hair style and at that particular time i was wearing one of those black hair styles so basic when they were telling me that i had to assimilate in order to come to work basically all employees mute. Salak all american. You know whatever that means is so it was. It was difficult you know. Those kinds of traumas Stayed with you when it will shape the kind of person you become. Yeah and so. How did you begin studying this. As like you're you're kind of like specialty as an academic. It's always been something really close to me in big personal to me. You know on actor therefore appear trauma of working at the park and not being accepted in regards to the way that i was wearing my hair i was just curious to know why is society so against black beating. Why is the science You know how has this disdain for black people white beauty and so. That's that's how i got started. You know there was not back then. When i first started there were not many scholars that were doing work about like here. It's become more popular nowadays but it's There was a handful of that. Was doing that work and i just wanted to learn more about me. I wanted to learn more about culture and there was no other topic that was going to be as close to me. Is something like that. So as i think that like as cultural historians a lot of our personal passions end up getting played out into what it is that we actually what direction we take as cultural history because we want to figure stuff out. Yeah so dr underwood. You are an art historian. Can you tell us about when you dr ellington. I met and began working together and perhaps a little bit about the concept behind the exhibition. Sure so. I began working against state about four years ago. I have a career. Studying specifically african and postcolonial arcs away. That artists have helped shaped national identities in the post colony the way in the museum world or the material world how africa it gets represented or misrepresented so when i got introduced myself at the orientation for new faculty i talked about some of mine. Museum experiences and curatorial projects and dr ellen. D- dashed over match made in heaven. He said i had this idea for years. Would this be of any interest to you and you. This is like day one of work as agile something for next week. That's it so we've worked on this for about four years and The concept behind exhibition is that there is not one way to tell the story of black hair let it is so multifaceted and and complicated and long as we'll talk about it spans millennia aspect any particular geography cultural history and so we just wanted to offer a few different lenses through not only the art world kind of a white cube gallery look at black hair art but also material cultural history which really comes out of dr ellington's research and expertise so this is one of the first exhibitions that blended kind of high and low the fine arts and the vernacular mall together. I mean we've got over two hundred objects spanning millennia. So it's it's a lot to chew on but we're just offering a few perspectives on history and we'll get into this later but that's one of the things that i really loved about the show that it is like this whole entire world of types of as you've noted this is an enormous topic with hundreds of years of history behind it so i think maybe if we could i talk about the significance of hair and africa before european colonization in the fifteenth century. And you know to say here in africa and we've talked about us on show on the show before that just say in africa feels very reductive. Because it's an entire continent you know. Now africa's fifty plus countries but the the quote unquote map of the african continent. Looked very different four hundred years ago. Some hoping maybe one of you can tell us a little bit about how pan. African society was structured before.

april callaghan cassidy zachary ellington Today dr joseph underwood fifty plus countries fifteenth century four hundred years ago april Ellington early september two hundred hundreds of years africa first question today two occasions next week two decades dr ellington
"april callaghan" Discussed on Pants On Fire

Pants On Fire

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Pants On Fire

"If there's anything we've learned this past year is that we have no idea what the future will look like for kids but we have a pretty good idea. Tech will only grow and employers will be clamoring for stem skills. More than ever. So how can you prepare your child for tomorrow. We'll making sure they have the fun. They deserve today. Well how about ide- tech i. Detect is the world's number one stem program for kids and teens ages seven to seventeen founded in silicon valley available to you. Read at your home. The instructors are tech rockstars dedicated to helping your child develop skills and coating. Ai game design in three d. modeling using tools. They genuinely love and might already be using every day like my kids. Like roadblocks in minecraft with id techs online private lessons. You set your own flexible schedule for one on one instruction and you could even bring a sibling or a friend along for free. Get your child excited for the future. And equip them with tools to thrive when they get their visit. I detect dot com slash. Big fib today to reserve your child's spot and be sure to enter promo code big fib to receive one hundred dollars off. Id techs virtual tech camps. That's code big at id. Tech dot com slash. Big fib for one hundred dollars off. I detect dot com slash. Big fib code big fib. It isn't easy to find out who you really are and unlock incredible. Powers bobby wonder is going through a big change and needs friends like you to help him save the town of flu. Greville voiced by community star. Danny pudi bobby wonder will take you on weekly adventures. As he battles his nemesis mighty manila and indulges alien sidekick grab stack search for. Bobby wonder wherever you get your podcasts and visit go kid dot com for more information. That's go kid. Go dot com. It's time for the shorts on fire around when our experts have to answer as many questions as they can before. Time runs out experts to answer all the questions. You will have to be brief. Okay so elena. let's start with zane. You can ask zane your shorts on fire questions. Now what do you call. Underwear england chance. Although one of my favorites slang terms use trolleys. What kind of. I knew looks like shorts. Worn by professional fighters boxers which underwear brand began in nineteen in the nineteen. Hundreds and shamrock. Knitting loom factor. Men used to wear a core. Sex country is working on a kind of bacteria outfield underwear action off along space missions. That's me. I'm working on now. I believe that's russia. Were the matching underwear undershirts. That looked like comic book characters. Like wonder woman and spider man unders a ten year. Old jack singer broke the world record wearing the most pairs of underwear at the same time. How did you wear. I have no idea honestly at that time. Okay all right. We are going to reset the timer. Aren't we lisa was on my schedule. The do thank you so much. Elena you can ask cassidy your shorts on fire questions now. Worth pants is short. For what kind of underwear pantaloons men and boys shirts were worn underwear until when predominantly prior to the twentieth century. Men's and shirts were considered underwear because they weren't really seen outside of their suits. What do people do more often in the eighteen. Hundreds take back or change their well. Actually the eighteen hundreds when people actually started to get modern indoor plumbing but prior to that changing your underwear was used in of taking a bath when taking about what's considered bad for your health for hundreds of years don't ever take about it's really about russia. Teeth sucks belong in the underwear category. Yes box absolutely our underwear. Because they're worn under your clothing. How often do you doctor say we should change our. That's an interesting question. I don't know but in our modern times i would say it's every day you know what i'm listening to some doctors that this time. You should definitely listen to the doctor. Very good it's decision time. Elena must consider more than just the age old question boxers or briefs and consider all the facs she's heard today elena who is our big fibber. That's feel they were both very convincing. I have to say so. Go with her. I think the biggest favor is saying. Why do you think sein- is our big feber first of all 'cause all a lot of in these questions were hard what. I knew a few of them from researching. And i didn't know any of the things i think i would know. Underwear company called happy dog. Okay interesting logic. So we'll the actual underwear expert. Please tell us who you are supposed westerville myself. You may okay. Hi alita cassidy no. I'm a fashion historian. An ipod her. That is correct cassidy. Zachary is a fashion and dress historian and the other half of the team behind the iheartradio. Podcast dressed the history of fashion which she co hosts and creates with april callaghan welcomed by the way. Thank you for coming cassidy. Thank you for having me rate job. Elena it's time to debrief cassidy which baxter share that we're truly unmentionable. I mean zane actually i. i didn't know if elena was gonna pick me sane knew his stuff i mean. Everything's aim sideways. As far as i know it's true the only thing. Of course. I think the happy dog elena set very good. Okay saying what cheeky lies. Did you town that. Obviously tire backstories ally. I'd never i never went to. Mit wristy no happy dog company. Yeah i have never worked with isaac mizrahi. He is a signer ever worked with. What were some of the other ones to people should wear under Trolleys nickname for for underwear in england Fruit of the loom is not the brand that started a rock knitting bills. Hanes pain and then Men did use to wear corsets. Although i will say although boyfriend who is a costume designer wanted me to have it noted that while men did i in fact we're of course it was not nearly as common and was not last too long. Okay fair but they did which is interesting. I wouldn't have known that but it. It was true. In fact that russia is working on a bacteria that will eat old underwear astronauts on long space missions. Something that elena needs to know about. If we're going to go to space you did. Oh my i tell you wanna work. I wanna work at nasa whole thing and lisa spread. I see she loves eating underwear to really russia. You're listening you should talk to percy. That's exactly what. I don't.

alita april callaghan isaac mizrahi one hundred dollars Elena Zachary Danny pudi bobby happy dog tomorrow hundreds of years sane today Go dot com Id techs minecraft lisa iheartradio seventeen both eighteen
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:33 min | 5 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Pal thank you so much for joining us today on dressed discuss your really amazing book. Fashion under fascism beyond the black shirt so before we delve into some of these fashioned aspects of our discussion today. I'm hoping that you might give some context for our listeners. About broadly speaking. what exactly is fascism. Thank you a bill for guy inviting me to this conversation. Delighted to be here with you So to responsive question. Fascism rules than ideology authoritarian ideology in movement. I started in italy in nineteen fifteen sold. The war was an important component. That had a great impact on the formation of this fast. She's at of combat. This was the beginning get Ninety nine teen. Mussolini was of course the head of fascism became the dude shape so he founded the national fascist party so started initially but then spread all over europe the end in the united states. Actually we need to remember that so it was a became. A talented now regime are despotic. Nationalism racism in realism These were kind of key words of back weekend. Del the enjoy the while we discuss the new multifaceted in complexity of fascism in order to contextualize this we need to understand. Also the situation in italy at the time because in the beginning of the twentieth century italy a went through great sons formations in terms of modernisation industrial puddles at the same time. A huge immigration The great period from second half of nineteen send in the beginning. Many talents came to the united states. Actually one of the countries of the immigration There was a lot of poverty in the south too big divide between north and south so the north was leading industrialized. Italy was a concentrated who's unified as a nation state only in eighteen sixty started the process of unification they went unrest from mma workers in union sir movement in the feminists the feminist movement. Also italy had a lot of this sub rallies political address strikes especially in the north industrialized a north. So then we also had the same time we think of nineteen o nine of the first manifesto of future is a full. We had that at the beginning of the twentieth century was quite amazing. In terms of contrast political undress

april today cassidy Francois gendre one french about twenty years ago callaghan
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"And your hosts cassidy's accurate in april callaghan cast today. I am thrilled that we get to talk about one of my favorite things and dressed history. And that is the intersection of fashion. And extreme politics or extreme political events in particular Some of my interests lie in how fashion reacts during periods of war. And this is something that. I my interest about twenty years ago or so when i was reading the book on the french revolution which is called the gilded youth of thermidor which was written by a french scholar. Francois gendre wrong and in.

april today cassidy Francois gendre one french about twenty years ago callaghan
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"With over seven billion people in the world, , we all have one thing in common every day we all get dressed welcome to dressed the history of fashion a podcast we explore the WHO, , what win of why we see where we are fashion stories and your hosts cast Zachary and April Callaghan. . So casts are very regular. . Listeners will remember that a few weeks back. . We had a very fun episode on floor. . Which is, of , course, , the Victorian language and symbolism of flowers, , and at the very tail end of that episode I kind of teased that we would. . Cover the rose in an upcoming episode, , and while that episode is now it is today and not only is it today is also now two episodes because there is so so so much to say on this topic. . Yes, , and not as wide today we are so pleased to announce that we are being joined by Amy Della. . Hey, , the author of the newly released the rose in fashion ravishing and. Also . she is a CO curator of an upcoming exhibition at the museum fit which will export this very same topic. . Yes and a her co curator on this project is our lovely friend colleen. . Hill who has yet to join us on dressed but she will do so soon, , colleen, , I hate to Pester my friends who are like, , I'm working on my phd right now and also working full time. . She will join us but. . The exhibition itself was actually slated to open this past September. . Well, , you know pandemic twenty, , twenty everything's been postponed. . So <hes> we very much look forward to seeing this exhibition when it does open in the future absolutely, , and this exhibition has been in the works for quite some time and it's been an international effort. . Of course, , the museum at sat is in New York City while Professor Della. Hey . is in London. . She is the root, , Stein Hopkins Chair of dress history and curatorship at the College of fashion where she KOTEREC's with Judith. . Clark and for so many years amy worked as a curator at the Victoria. . Albert. . Museum in London, , of course, , which has one of the most significant. . Fashion and textile collections worldwide amy, we , are so pleased to welcome you to trust amy I'd like to start today I by asking how you came to the field of fashion studies. . This is actually something that I've been asking a lot of our guests recently and it's always so interesting and you know I'm always delighted to hear some of our favorite scholars quote unquote origin stories. . Well, , I, , didn't really know I wanted to do <hes> I grew up in Brighton on the south of England and was interested in sort of those big punk scene than a big growth. . The new romantic scene I was always interested in dress I always love textiles by ozone you I didn't want work. . In elite fashion and setting in the fashion industry. . Founded course that my mother found course at Brighton out gold and it was a good design history and it was the second year had been established. . And whilst I've been excessively universities elsewhere in the country, , I stayed in my hometown partly because Brian was brilliant place to grow up. . But because there was at coast from by Lou Taylor on this fashion. . And the minute I read about that I thought. . That's the course me. . And actually doing lose unit and meeting Lou changed my life because I had an indifferent early education. . And I've never been inspired and Lou totally totally inspired me. . So I did the design history coast always chose lose options. . I'm a first coast I remember intensely was looking at fashion characteristic lieu of all levels from eighteen fifty to one, , thousand, , nine, , hundred. . So to me, , undeniably, , the most desirable seminar choice was to choose. . And look amazing the buses and crinoline gowns in. . Paris. . But it was a question of your shot at first I was shot. . So I ended up with the conditions of working class. . Taylor's in London's east end instead of the. . Account tell you I was devastated. . Anyway. . At the end of the session, lose , both drizzle and within five minutes of talking to her. . I was inspired and I think he changed the whole course of my interest because from that point tone low have come back to us from that point on minded was in what can Klaus history in everyday lives in the reality of fresheners opposed to fashions miss. . So I did my degrade thesis in one, , thousand, nine, , , hundred, , eighty, , four. . On the influence of Hollywood on cheap levels of ready to and fashion in the nineteenth in America. .

Lou Taylor Brighton Amy Della London College of fashion Britain colleen Vienna Zachary New York City Paris Stein Hopkins Chair April Callaghan Brighton Wet BBC Victoria England Guardian Hill
Interview with Amy de la Haye

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:00 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Amy de la Haye

"With over seven billion people in the world, we all have one thing in common every day we all get dressed welcome to dressed the history of fashion a podcast we explore the WHO, what win of why we see where we are fashion stories and your hosts cast Zachary and April Callaghan. So casts are very regular. Listeners will remember that a few weeks back. We had a very fun episode on floor. Which is, of course, the Victorian language and symbolism of flowers, and at the very tail end of that episode I kind of teased that we would. Cover the rose in an upcoming episode, and while that episode is now it is today and not only is it today is also now two episodes because there is so so so much to say on this topic. Yes, and not as wide today we are so pleased to announce that we are being joined by Amy Della. Hey, the author of the newly released the rose in fashion ravishing and. Also she is a CO curator of an upcoming exhibition at the museum fit which will export this very same topic. Yes and a her co curator on this project is our lovely friend colleen. Hill who has yet to join us on dressed but she will do so soon, colleen, I hate to Pester my friends who are like, I'm working on my phd right now and also working full time. She will join us but. The exhibition itself was actually slated to open this past September. Well, you know pandemic twenty, twenty everything's been postponed. So we very much look forward to seeing this exhibition when it does open in the future absolutely, and this exhibition has been in the works for quite some time and it's been an international effort. Of course, the museum at sat is in New York City while Professor Della. Hey is in London. She is the root, Stein Hopkins Chair of dress history and curatorship at the College of fashion where she KOTEREC's with Judith. Clark and for so many years amy worked as a curator at the Victoria. Albert. Museum in London, of course, which has one of the most significant. Fashion and textile collections worldwide amy, we are so pleased to welcome you to trust amy I'd like to start today I by asking how you came to the field of fashion studies. This is actually something that I've been asking a lot of our guests recently and it's always so interesting and you know I'm always delighted to hear some of our favorite scholars quote unquote origin stories. Well, I, didn't really know I wanted to do I grew up in Brighton on the south of England and was interested in sort of those big punk scene than a big growth. The new romantic scene I was always interested in dress I always love textiles by ozone you I didn't want work. In elite fashion and setting in the fashion industry. Founded course that my mother found course at Brighton out gold and it was a good design history and it was the second year had been established. And whilst I've been excessively universities elsewhere in the country, I stayed in my hometown partly because Brian was brilliant place to grow up. But because there was at coast from by Lou Taylor on this fashion. And the minute I read about that I thought. That's the course me. And actually doing lose unit and meeting Lou changed my life because I had an indifferent early education. And I've never been inspired and Lou totally totally inspired me. So I did the design history coast always chose lose options. I'm a first coast I remember intensely was looking at fashion characteristic lieu of all levels from eighteen fifty to one, thousand, nine, hundred. So to me, undeniably, the most desirable seminar choice was to choose. And look amazing the buses and crinoline gowns in. Paris. But it was a question of your shot at first I was shot. So I ended up with the conditions of working class. Taylor's in London's east end instead of the. Account tell you I was devastated. Anyway. At the end of the session, lose both drizzle and within five minutes of talking to her. I was inspired and I think he changed the whole course of my interest because from that point tone low have come back to us from that point on minded was in what can Klaus history in everyday lives in the reality of fresheners opposed to fashions miss. So I did my degrade thesis in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four. On the influence of Hollywood on cheap levels of ready to and fashion in the nineteenth in America.

Lou Taylor Amy Della College Of Fashion London Brighton Colleen Zachary April Callaghan New York City Stein Hopkins Chair Hill England Paris Victoria Hollywood Clark America Brian Professor
"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"One of our most recent episode was about the history of nurse uniforms and we talked about how the nurse's cap is very specific symbolism and how the wearing of the cap really started to die out in the late seventy s moving into the eighties but we got an email that. I'd like to talk about from listener. Bath Case Bolt. Who SAYS ONO? No CAPS did not quite disappear as quickly as one thought because Beth is a registered nurse and she writes I was in the nursing program at Alderson broaddus college now university in Philippi West Virginia from nineteen eighty four to nineteen eighty eight. She says we wore navy. Blue dresses with stiff white cotton aprons complete with bibs or navy pants with a small style. Top with white pin tucked front and caller. She says the uniform double knit and they didn't necessarily change their uniform colors in the four years but what did change the color of the stripes on their caps. A and I thought that was really interesting. And she goes on to say that from nineteen ninety three to nineteen ninety-six. She says I taught an L. P. N. program at Danville Community College and Daniel Virginia and our students wore yellow dresses with white aprons. The male students were black pants with a yellow and blue shirt. They receive their caps in their second year. Instructors wore full whites including hose if you didn't wear pants. Nurses always wear white hose and the caps were required of everyone except for the male students. So you are correct. There is no alternative for men with cap so I thought that was really interesting that well into the nineteen ninety s nursing institutions of education. There were still wearing the cap requiring it to wear the cap in so many of you sent us so many fantastic images of yourself and your nursing uniforms over the years that that was really cool. I can't remember which listener in particular. But she sent us a picture of herself in the sixties with her many quote unquote mini skirt uniform. That was really need to share those with Marissa. Because we talked about that. Like how short did it get in the nineteen sixties? So thank you. We'll share those with her. Yeah and I actually asked talked to my mom too. Because my mom was a nurse in nursing school in the nineteen seventies but. She's at her school that the cap was just for pure ceremony. They had to wear it at the candle lighting ceremony when they graduated but that was it. She said we hated caps. But my mom was also a little bit of abroad burning hippie. Sorry mom very much so in response to our prom episode P- listeners. Eileen Chatterton and Jordan Brady Bolt wrote to us to tell us about the prom and homecoming tradition in Texas. Which had never heard of. Have you heard about? Oh yeah because I actually grew up in Texas when I was in middle school so it the homecoming was a huge deal even even in middle school not just high school if you have one if you didn't have one that day of homecoming you're kind of like. Oh No. I'm so embarrassed sized from people who even have more than one where and they're huge. They're like these giant clusters of flowers like of ribbons and bells and everything hanging off over them. So sometimes you maybe your parents would buy one. Sometimes your grandparents would buy you want and then maybe your boyfriend would buy one so sometimes girls were wandering around wearing like two or three of these. Jain corsage is but That was something that your your date would bring to you. Input on your wrist. Yeah but this is something you would wear all day at school. Oh interesting very

CAPS SUPREMES Miss Mary Doritos bobby bones Halsey Miss Julia Iheartradio Valedictorians Santa Fe US April Callaghan University of Southern Mississ Linda Leonard Australia Washington Danville Community College Detroit W. MC Kelly
"april callaghan" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"This podcast will reaffirm your faith in love committed is back for season two with bestselling author in award winning journalist. Joe Piazza committed is the conversation. You've always wanted to have about marriage in love, but we're afraid to start the truth is that love isn't always patient and kind sometimes love is messy. Sometimes love is wonderful in confusing and magical and infuriating often in the same day. These are the extraordinary stories of ordinary couples talking about how they navigate the good, the bad the terrifying. The wonderful and the life changing if you love this American life and modern love you'll adore committed. It doesn't matter if you're married divorced single. Or celebrate these stories will renew your faith in love and and other human beings season. Two of committed starts on April. Eleventh episodes are released weekly on Wednesdays. Listen and subscribe on apple podcasts. The iheartradio. App or wherever you get your podcasts. This day in history. Class is a production of iheartradio. Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day today is April twenty fifth twenty nineteen. Day was April twenty fifth nineteen fifty three. Scientists James Watson and Francis Crick announce their discovery of the structure of DNA in an article in the journal nature the article titled molecular structure of nuclear acids, a structure for deoxyribonucleic acid began with the following statement. We wished to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribonucleic acid DNA. This stucture has novel features which are of considerable biological interest. Nature. Also published shorter article by MAURICE Wilkins, and Rosalind Franklin who had contributed to the discovery in that fame issue after Watson and Crick article. In nineteen sixty to Watson Crick and Wilkins received the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery, but Franklin who died in nineteen fifty eight did not receive widespread recognition for her contributions. The discovery was a watershed moment in the history of science, but it was one that became mired in controversy. The nineteen fifty three discovery of DNA structure came after decades of research, a Swiss chemist named Friedrich mecer identified DNA or what he called nuclear in. As a distinct molecule in eighteen sixty nine and nineteen forty four Oswald Avery and his colleagues published a paper showing how genes are composed of DNA among other observations about DNA structure, Austrian biochemist Irwin target found out that adding and thiamine always appeared in equal amounts as did site Assine and guanosine other early nineteen fifty. Thanks to the work of scientists like feebis Levin. Researchers new that DNA was made of nucleotides each of which contains a base a molecule of sugar in molecule of phosphorous acid. The sugar was deoxyribonucleic in the fort nitrogenous bases were at an Guan inside a scene thiamine. But researchers did not know exactly what DNA looks like or how it was copied. In early nineteen fifty three chemist Linus Pauling proposed an accurate model of DNA that showed it as a three stranded helix at the time Watson and Crick were working at the university of Cambridge MAURICE Wilkins, Rosalind Franklin and graduate student. Raymond Gosling were at King's College London using x Ray diffraction to study BNA. Franklin was experienced in expert crystallography a technique that scientists used to determine the structure of crystals when the crystallized form of a molecule is exposed to x rays. The x Ray diffraction informa- pattern that scientists can use to understand the molecule structure Franklin and Gosling took an x Ray diffraction photograph of DNA molecule known as photo fifty one that looked like an ex in reveal the molecules helix structure Wilkins who spent time at Kevin dish laboratory at Cambridge. With creek ended up showing photo fifty one to Watson Watson and Crick thrilled with photo fifty one and worry telling what beat them to the punch propose a new model for DNA structure Watson and Crick did not do any of their own experiments instead they relied on drawing conclusions from existing data including photo fifty one the pair used data. They got from an informal report. Franklin gave to scientists max. Peru at Cambridge even though they didn't ask Franklin for permission to interpret the data. Ironically, hauling had advanced the method of model building that made Watson Crick's discovery possible Watson and Crick shifted around cardboard cutouts of the molecules and with the help of chemistry Donahue, eventually figured out the structure of DNA. On February twenty eighth nineteen fifty three Watson and Crick determined that DNA was a double stranded anti parallel, right handed helix. They found that the outside of the helix is made up of sugar phosphate backbones, and the inside is made up of hydrogen bonded, pairs of the nitrogenous bases on April twenty fifth the journal nature. Published Watson and Crick findings followed by articles from Franklin and Wilkins in the paper, Watson and Crick described. The structure of DNA creeks wife odeal create its Matic drawings. The DNA double helix that accompany the text the discovery fueled a ton of scientific advancement from DNA fingerprinting to genetic engineering Franklin died of cancer in nineteen fifty eight four years before Watson Crick and Wilkins were awarded the Nobel prize. Nobel prizes are not awarded posthumously. Watson published a book on the discovery of DNA structure in nineteen sixty eight. I'm Jeff coat, and hopefully, you know, a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If he likes to learn more about Rosalind Franklin listened to the episode of stuff you missed in history class called Rosalind Franklin DNA's dark lady, we'd love it. If you left us a comment on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook at t the I h z podcast. We'll see you tomorrow. For more podcasts from my heart radio the iheartradio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hey, guys, today's episode of this day in history class is brought to you by dressed the history of fashion there over seven billion people in the world, but we all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed, join a fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy's Acharya twice a week as they explored the who what when and why of what we wear fashion history is about more than just pretty close. This is a podcast for fashion and non fashioned lovers alike. And that's because this show shines a light on why the clothes we wear matter. You can find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever else you get your podcasts.

Watson Watson Watson Crick Rosalind Franklin Crick MAURICE Wilkins Rosalind Franklin DNA Francis Crick Nobel prize James Watson apple Watson Cambridge Joe Piazza thiamine Franklin Oswald Avery April Callaghan Linus Pauling Raymond Gosling Friedrich mecer
Could California Get an Autobahn?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Could California Get an Autobahn?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here. Germany is known for several awesome things including veer brats. And of course, the autobahn bundles Audubon as it's known in Germany is really just if federal highway system there, but to visitors the allure of the autobahn is the speed limit or lack of one cars can top two hundred forty kilometers per hour during normal conditions on this famed freeway that's about one hundred fifty miles per hour. And now, a California legislator is proposing. A Bill that could make the state home to what is being called the American autobahn John Morlock, the Republican state Senator from Orange County introduced state Bill three nineteen in February of two thousand nineteen to relieve traffic congestion along interstate five and state route ninety nine according to the proposed plan both roadways would get new lanes. One northbound and one southbound drivers in the new lanes would not have to abide by a speed limit though, the existing sixty five miles per hour. Limit would remain in effect in the. The existing lanes that's about one hundred and five kilometers per hour. The idea also could provide an alternative California's controversial long-delayed and possibly canceled high speed rail project the proposal comes on the heels of California governor Gavin Newsom announcement that the bullet train as planned is too expensive at an estimated cost of seventy seven billion dollars and would take too long to build. There are no official cost estimates for the Audubon Bill, but in February Senator Morlock told the Los Angeles Times it could cost about three billion dollars. He also said the money would come from the states cap and trade program which requires companies to offset pollution by purchasing credits. If plans move forward the American auto Bahn would be constructed along major freeways with Bela Bach area, which is about eighty miles or one hundred twenty nine kilometers north of Los Angeles at the southern point in Sacramento or Stockton. At the northern end that means theoretically vehicles travelling north at one hundred miles per hour. In the unrestricted lane could make the trip from Sacramento. Tila Beck in about three hours coin that Dr takes over four hours well over depending on traffic. Aside from improving drive times for those along that route the authors of the Bill claim it would also help reduce congestion, which would in turn decrease greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles stuck idling for that reason. The Bill specifies that funding should come from California's greenhouse gas reduction fund which regularly supports transportation and transit projects that reduce pollution. Critics point out. However, the missions go up at high speeds, so encouraging people to drive faster means there wouldn't be any net reduction in pollution, in fact, Bill maga- Vern a spokesperson for the coalition for clean air told SF gate that the net reduction in emissions theory is ridiculous. In addition to the pollution, concerns. Critics are also worried about the risks. To drivers Maureen vocal a spokeswoman for the national safety council told USA today that numerous studies demonstrate that Wednesday's raised speed limits. They can expect an increase in traffic fatalities statistics from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration show that in two thousand seventeen speeding was a factor. In twenty six percent of all traffic fatalities that accounts for nearly ten thousand deaths. Several states across the US have increased speed limits. For instance, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Wyoming allow drivers to travel eighty miles per hour on certain highways and Texas allows eighty-five miles per hour along a specific stretch of state highway one thirty that's up to about one hundred and thirty seven kilometers per hour. However, the current maximum speed limit in California is still seventy miles per hour about one hundred thirteen kilometers per hour. With some stretches along the proposed Audubon. Route a little bit lower. Californian's shouldn't get too excited. Though, yet the Bill has a long way before ever becoming law and may never get there. If it passes the vote in the states house and Senate it must then be approved by governor Newsom. For contrast Germany's autobahn covers seven thousand five hundred miles. That's about twelve thousand kilometers, and there are some sections with speed limits. New drivers in Germany are actually trained on the autobahn to learn how to handle the high speeds and the country's licensing process. A lot more difficult time consuming and expensive than it is in the United States if California's autobahn gets approved this three hundred some mile stretch of road might only be a start to a larger system. Today's episode was written by cherise three wit and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more in this in lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

California United States Germany Senator Morlock Bill Maga- Vern Capital One Bill Sacramento Gavin Newsom Audubon Los Angeles Times Lauren Bogle Cassidy Zachary Tila Beck Bela Bach Orange County Tyler Clang Los Angeles
"april callaghan" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

"I am a fan of the politics. I hate politics. I know and I love him at least political person you'll ever meet about lease political person. But you're up there. What are you searching for? You're looking for something in the computer, none of Brodie's at the controls. If you could tell you can't tell Janice smoothie shit today on the show. So here's a pulse. So whatever political party your into or whatever type of politician, you're into you may have rules in your mind. Like, oh, you know what I found out? They did drugs. They're out or I found out that they were anti woman in the seventies. And they're out. So I'm watching. Particular person who's running for president in the past week. I'm not going to get into it. Obviously there are democrat. 'cause there's only one Republican at this point who might be running for president so far. And in their rally twice. They said I could care less about something. We know it's I couldn't care. Right. So that person I vote for them. They could be the best candidate. I can't vote for them. I can't have it. I can't vote for someone to be in the White House. That says I could care less because they don't mean that if I can't trust them with the English language. I can't trust them with our government and our taxes discuss times to you know, the way that you hire interns, disqualify that hire the best interns, great inter off of a grammatical center. You discount people? Errors what we talking about? Like if you should run for the highest office and represent our country. I don't want you flying to Japan and the translator translates, I could care less and the Japanese president says who I think he means I couldn't careless. So he's out that particular candidate is out. Yes. It's a he. All right, there you go. That's it. That's those are my spills that that and the breakfast club a hell of a spiel, man. All right. We I was like, oh, I got plenty of plenty of stuff. You got a lot of stuff. But last week I read a list I got a longer list from last week. We're just getting started. We got the reason I played Neil, Patrick, Harris clip. Is it you're at a party? Yes, at Neil, Patrick Harris was at yes, I was and we'll talk about that coming up next, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary, we are fashioned historians and together, we host dressed the history of fashion a podcast. We explore the who what why we.

president Patrick Harris Neil Brodie Janice White House April Callaghan Japan Cassidy Zachary
"april callaghan" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"So tell all your friends and their conspiracy theories that our Levine's alive, and well, and I did say Hello to her. And I looked at her face to face Bobby says, so it's true because I'm matter. That's amazing. So you Big Apple being fan. Oh, yeah. Huge ever got. Well, you should feel good. And know that it's not some girl, Melissa. It's levin. I appreciate that. All right. All right. See you later. Yeah. That was fun. I got to be a lot of people on dancing with stars the Boyce man, hit me that was really cool. The Jabba walkies took a picture of the blue Mander the dancers you see them without their masks. No. But I talk though, that's cool stood next to them as okay, you guys. Good. Then I guess we are. He's buddy. Like the palace guards in England or they don't they don't look as you guys. You guys crazy and they're like, no, we're normal folk. Is that a paint on them or like a rubber suit both? So it's a rubber all like forehead. And then it's paint. We. They have hair. Okay. The suit over at but they're not bald. No. So weird like go home every night. Or like if you're a kid your dad is like a blue, man. Yeah. But there's super talented to draw on so Eddie and I played in Boston. We we actually put a library card. That's coming out soon and called man in the miracle giving you ever heard this on a heaven. Do you want here? Yeah. It's only like two minutes long. This is from our live record. That's coming out the raging idiots in Boston here, go. So I went on the show called dancing with the stars. Nobody expected me to win except you guys. In his home. We wrote this song it's called man in the mirror bowl. So I hope you like it. And I hope you hear a little bit about yourself in this because I wrote this song for you guys. The young boy the he couldn't. Dream to the ballroom. Glittery man. Dance to the round. The rock game. Bird. Maybe one day would get that. Call. Can he be the man in the mirror ball? One. I got a call my phone. Do you own a days? Marty show. Amana red head. Her name was Sean. She was dance partner. But nothing rhymes. Dumb true band. Maybe the man in the mirror ball. Other FOX drawn. Learn john. Believe they're still alive. I learned Tango learned a wall. The judges thought I was on bad salts. But I want you guys. Confetti all the other dancer said what the hell? Good done it without you. Bob came the man in the mirror ball. I love that. It's sort of. It's a love song. It's like, it's thank you. To the to the people. And so yeah, I felt that. Really put us out yet. We recorded the whole record in Boston until here. Jesus knows. We got a whole way. It's time for the good news. So in Des Moines, Iowa this apartment fire broke out in the middle of the night. Residents were freaking out trying to get their children out safely and Lieutenant Rick Thomas of the demont fire department. And if you other firefighters, they yelled up at the parents on the third story of the apartments and said just drop your kids down to us. We. Like, they they were like instructing parents to toss them noon towards story. Your kids. But they said, we got you. I know and it's like the fire departments and you trust them. And it definitely looks like a scary scene. But the children were all fine. And no injuries were reported in the fire. So yeah, good for them. That'd be a copy for a parent. Cops firefighters catch kids tossed from third floor of. I love that. That's what's all about right there. That was telling me something good. This is April Callaghan and Cassidy's accurately. We are fashion.

Boston Mander partner Levine levin Bobby Melissa Apple Sean England Des Moines Bob Eddie Amana April Callaghan Iowa Marty demont fire department FOX Rick Thomas
What Can Earth's Deserts Teach Us About Martian Life?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 2 years ago

What Can Earth's Deserts Teach Us About Martian Life?

"Hey brain stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here when it comes to searching for microbes on Mars, sending robotic Rover to the most arid environment on earth is a fine place to start as described in a study recently published in the journal frontiers in microbiology a team of researchers explored the extreme environment of Chile's Atacama desert. They wanted to develop strategies that future robotic explorers could use to seek out the hiding places of Marchin microbes in two thousand twenty both NASA and the European Space Agency will launch their first life hunting Rovers to the red planet. The Mars twenty twenty and Exo Mars Rover missions respectively. So mission managers will need to know where to look the other comma desert is about as extreme as it gets for life to eke out an existence not only is the region bone-dry. The core of the desert doesn't get any rainfall for decades at a time, but because of its elevation it also receives high levels of damaging all tra-, violet radiation. Plus, the soil is extremely salty these. Factors should make the Atacama desert toxic for life. But according to team leader Stephane pointing a professor at Yale and u s college in Singapore, some of the bacteria just below the surface quote survive right at the limit of bid ability, and this is very good news for the prospect of finding microbes on Mars pointing team deployed an autonomous Rover mounted drill and sampling device in the Atacama desert to see if it could extract soil samples containing microbes down to a depth of eighty centimeters. That's a little over two and a half feet as a comparison samples were also dug up by hand through DNA sequencing, the researchers found that the bacterial life in the samples from both methods were similar confirming that these hardy bacteria exist, and the autonomous extraction method was successful this test run Shore's up hope that if similarly hardy microbes also thrived just below the Martian surface, a robot could find them, however, finding microbial bio signatures on Mars could be very challenging for remotely operated. Mars rover. The researchers found that the subsurface. Population of bacteria were extremely patchy correlating with increased salt levels that restricted the availability of water appointing put it this way, the patchy nature of the colonization just the Rover would be faced with a needle in haystack scenario in the search for Martian bacteria. Previous studies have described the BIC witness population of relatively unremarkable photosynthetic bacteria. The populate the surface of the desert in Chile, these microorganisms that get their energy from sunlight things start to get a lot more interesting and indeed more alien just below the surface pointing said we saw that with increasing depth that the bacterial community became dominated by 'Bacterial that can thrive in extremely salty and alkaline soils. They in turn were replaced adepts down to eighty centimeters by a single specific group of bacteria that survive by metabolising methane. These specialized microbes have been found before in deep mineshafts and other subterranean environments, but they've never been seen beneath the surface of an arid desert pointing said the communities of bacteria that we discovered were remarkably lacking in complexity and this likely reflects the extreme stress under which they develop. Finding highly specialized microbes that can thrive in the extremely dry salty and alkaline Mars lake soils in the comma desert suggest methane utilizing bacteria could also thrive on the red planet. Elevated levels of methane have been observed on Mars by various spacecraft over the years most recently measures made by Nasr's curiosity Rover, and that's a big deal, unearth, biological and geological processes generate methane and intern microbes can metabolize methane for energy. The discovery of methane in the Martian atmosphere. Could mean there's some kind of active biology going on under ground to confirm this. We need microbe seeking missions that will drill below the surface. And now we have a strategy to track them down should microbial life on Mars. It would undoubtedly be the most significant scientific discovery in human history. But in the proud human tradition of naming new things, what would we call our newly discovered? Marsh neighbors, would we just copy the system of how we name life honor pointing said the way we assign Latin names too. S real bacteria is based on their evolutionary relationship tweets other. And we measure that using their genetic code the naming of Martian bacteria would require a completely new set of Latin names at the highest level if Martian bacteria were a completely separate nary lineage that is they evolved from a different common ancestor to earth bacteria in a second Genesis event. Granted if we find the genetic code of Mars life to be similar to earth life. It could be that life was transferred from earth to Mars in the ancient past via a massive impact a mechanism known as panspermia. But if we find a truly novel genetic code that emerged on Mars, the implications for understanding of life would be profound pointing said if we find truly native Marsh and bacteria, I would love to name one and call it. Planeta desert him superstars, which translates in Latin to survivor on the desert planet. Today's episode was written by Ian, O'Neill and produced by Tyler claim for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other hearty, topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Hey brain stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery Minnie's Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Cassidy Zachary Atacama April Callaghan Mars Lake Chile Minnesota Apple Marchin Lauren Vogel Testif Yale Nasa Singapore Shore Team Leader European Space Agency Planeta Stephane Nasr
"april callaghan" Discussed on Hysteria 51

Hysteria 51

14:10 min | 2 years ago

"april callaghan" Discussed on Hysteria 51

"And. We'll prob- it. What we need to send probes right? Am one one really cool idea. It's called the von Neumann probe because there was a guy named von Neumann that came up with the idea, the general idea is you build a device out of materials that are readily available and easily accessible out in space. So like, let's say you're in the cloud. You know, you you land on comet, and you've got these materials and one robot lands there replicates robot probe replicates itself into than those to do it again in orders of magnitude later, you've got thousands of probes on their way to alpha centauri. And that's how they think that they could actually get the and yet some of the robot stay behind as way stations to get the information. And here's what's really cool like Johnson. It's going to take you know, we're not going to third of the speed of light. But these probes when you think it prob-, I think you think these things from Star Wars Star Trek, they could be the size of a few atoms. And it's a lot easier to shoot that. Through space something small because his nanotechnology one hundred years. You know, that's not going to be anything slot easier. We can we can shoot a couple of atoms up to almost the speed of light here on earth with our our atom smashers. You know, sounds like to me a virus? It sounds like virus spreading throughout the cosmos. That's exactly what it was like that is humanity just virus spreading throughout the entire hand. We really want to do that guy. It's funny because it's true. Also, we could map again bring it back to the early. We could map a brain. Right. And and attach that to probe it management system. It's a I if we're going to be one hundred years to do it. We're going to have to have a artificial intelligence to be running the whole thing. I mean, it's got to be able to think on its feet. It's got to be able to do those things in hopefully hundred years. We're going to be close home safely close to for the episode. We do with you. You're talking about the connect dome taking the connect dome and put it in a laser. And shooting at wherever we wanted to go maybe not one hundred years, but certainly a thousand if we if we collectively managed to keep it together. I am trying so hard not to be Downer. This is actually credibly inspiring conversation because what what your introducing me to hear a lot of our listeners. Probably already know this listening now is stuff that is very close to inevitable on some level. Right. Assuming there's not, you know, then exist events trying to break when we come back what our bodies can it be like, what are we going to be able to do? What's the changes? Are we going to be crispy saying what that means? Hobby felt always be smelt. I'll be ripped who we come back with more stereotypically one. This is April Callaghan and Cassidy's accurately. We are fashion historians and together, we host dressed the history of fashion a podcast where we explore the who what when why we wear this season we travel throughout history and around the world to bring you more of the fascinating stories from behind the clothes. We all wear we traveled to central Asia. To learn all about the resist dyeing technique known as e Kat and to Paris to learn all about the legacy of Christian your from curator, Florence Mueller's. In addition to going behind the scenes on the most highly anticipated fashion exhibitions of the year, we will export the histories of a whole host of topics from gender bending to plus size, fashion and clothing choices of colts. Yep. You'll just have to tune in every Tuesday and Thursday to learn all about why what we wear matters so listening subscribe at apple podcasts or an iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. John. How could you improve me in the next letter? I know that the answer is very slim to none hold on limousine lot, my laptop because I've got a running file going. He sketches me in his free time. Like, what am I French girls? Well, you know, if we're going to improve humanity, we're going to have to do it with genetics. We we're kind of skipping AI here. But we actually did an episode lehai not that long ago. We're going to assume it doesn't kill us. All so, you know, I it's a, but rewriting human genetics is going to be necessary for so many different reasons. I think the first reason goes back to what you were saying before Ben if we're going to make it to some of these places we're going to need to physically alter the way our bodies work, like just handling radiation in space simple as that not lose bone density. When you're in space too long or make our bones denser to where that loss is not as big of that one astronaut who's the twin? And now his DNA is separate from his brother just because he spent so much time and space, and the thing that that really calls into stuff already work. We people already working with his crisper, which is blows my mind that you can just go. You know, what I want? Youtube video and I got a syringe I'm going to try to alter my DNA. I saw people are doing this up. But hopefully in a hundred years from now, we will be able to people always worry about like designer babies, but you can make sure that your baby won't have any of the birth defects. I saw Gatica, but they also might be able to say, well, I want blue is. Okay. So we can do that. Then that gets into the whole thing of if you mess with too much, then everyone is almost very similar and you got similar genes. And then you're susceptible to viruses and the NFL, right? Exactly. Every bananas a clone. Every banana is exactly the same. And then if you get a strain that hurts it guess what there's no more bananas. So guys, let's go around the room. Ben will start with you on human genetics specifically as it relates to crisper because that's the most advanced technology that we have right now. What are some of your thoughts on the use of it? Good bad. How it could improve or how it could destroy our society as it stands. Currently in twenty nineteen is not prepare. Paired to make the best use of this level of power over genetic code. We also don't understand I would urge caution because we don't understand how the interrelated system of DNA works. When you when you fiddle with one part? So to your example, Brent blue eyes may lead to someone having some other Wild Thing right at no. I have a tail now you're like, oh well that. Okay. That happens. Good note. Everybody everyone's got that. Right. What was the game that everyone played for about five minutes online where everyone had their own avatar, and they built their own movie houses, and it was just a big wave Adams? No like, it was just a big time. But it was it was all online for a while there people were selling their avatar for a hundred grand. It was west or ever. Yes. Everquest not not ever. It was it was just like people like there was no objective to the game people. It just got online. The anyway, it doesn't matter. The point is in this game in this online game nation right in let us know. It was the, you know, it's a humanoid. But it looks like a chicken, and it's like, well, that's my avatar. You know? I see. Yeah. That's that's the second life. Yes. Saying you got there still send your emails in? Stop listening right back up. So without without like over overbearing my point here. It's also inevitable. That's the problem. This this sort of stuff is like Pandora's jar. You know, what I mean, there's never there has never been a situation in the entirety of civilization. So far as we know again, right in where in someone discovered technology of this magnitude and the entire species agreed to not mess with it. Right. Going to Harrity are messing Chinese guy who who edited that baby. And is now missing I believe in presumed healthy and then find somewhere. Shelley miscarriage. Matt. Yeah. Well, I moved to minds here. The the first one of yours has been uploaded. First one is that I I don't. Sorry, mind, not clone. I got excited. It's hard for me to imagine that we would keep our flesh and bone bodies for very much longer. Nez a species. I think we're going to upgrade ourselves to something. A little more sturdy something a little more able to travel the stars because we're going to have to in a way and move our consciousnesses as we can into some kind of robotics. What whatever that is something made out of a harder substance. So like the idea of crisper changing, the the bacon bodies. I don't I don't know. Like, I don't see I don't see being viable for very long. It's it's almost like a VHS like crisper editing. This version of humans is a VHS is going to be for just a tiny bit of time until we can did you think that like fifty years from now thirty years from now people are severing their own arms. So they can get better arms. Let mean, certainly, certainly if an. Accident occurs. Or you know, I mean onto terrible happen yet on purpose. I think feasibly. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, especially if you're looking at sports or some something that will that will give you an edge in its allowed in whatever commission or bike Witter commissioned in I agree with that completely. I think that as time goes by with what he's talking about, you know, and like nanotechnology in commuting in. We we we map our neurons and were able to use these limbs the same way. Yeah. Why wouldn't you want to be the best that you can be and I can live in space longer? I can do, you know more be argued that we're doing the early part of that. Now, what's a pacemaker, right? Other than a physical dog. Then you look at some of the pace of mayor and go, oh my God superman, if you look at someone and they had like a robotic arm, and maybe in fifty years hundred years, it's not gonna be you're just not going to think twice about it. Well, this guy was missing legs not by his own zone volition. But it went back to that. What was it in the Olympics? Guy had the two blade legs. Bladerunner? Oscar Pretorious yet. Yes. On to murder his wife. Yes. Shoot through the door that she coming to get me. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Also claimed that it sparked this debate. Which is I think what we're what we're talking about. Now, which is at some point prosthetics will be it's. Advantage. And that's so funny to say this guy who had no legs had an unfair advantage over people with lakes because he was the blade runner in. I agree. I think that we will be we'll fell as we could talk about this for hours more. But I think we are running out of time nation. It's the thoughts of these fine gentlemen from stuff. They don't want you to know fine, gentlemen. It is not the thoughts of conspiracy bought they can't handle that level of. But we want to know what you think how can they tell us what they think they can log into Facebook and search hysteria nation. That is our Facebook group where we talk about all the episodes. You can also go to Facebook dot com slash hysteria. Fifty one pod you can find this episode. They're all of our past episodes. You want to hop on hop on Twitter at hysteria. Fifty one pod patriot. John Tova patriot in your favorite level. I if you go at patriot, and you can get all kinds of crazy stuff for as little as a dollar anything from. We will send you. Stickers extra episodes of up all night, which is where we just sit and ramble Brent releases his favorite in the lead their favorite level. I'm just getting through the things that you can pay for thirty dollars. You can pay to sniff jungle for you cannot do that. That is not a real thing. Real because you write it on the internet does not make it true. No matter what your research suggests sprint. I beg to differ and people are willing to put their money where their noses. This isn't the eighties. Other though, forget you can leave the voicemail seven seven three six six nine seven two seven seven again that's seven seven three six six nine seven two seven seven and this week. We're not gonna play any because we've got these fine gentlemen to entertain us guys. Thank you so much for being on the show. We really appreciate the time. Glad to see if you're one of the fire into my eyes. Okay. If you're one of the five people that don't listen to stuff, they don't want you to know find it on all the major pod. Catchers guys any other things you'd like to plug right now. I know any met your your hosting monster season two. What else do you wanna talk about anything? Don't worry about that. Listen to more history fifty one and a out stuff in what you know, if you haven't yet. Agreed. Agreed. A we always had John on a previous episode of stuff. They don't want you to know. So you can see him class up our show in that episode as well as our upcoming episode on the future of humanity in one thousand years with several Asterix, gentlemen. Thank you so much. Thank you for having us. Absolutely. And don't forget that you're gonna find us on their episode of humanity in a thousand years, which is releasing into day to day ASO. It's two days. If you so many listened the day this dropped if you listened like more than two days after this dropped it's already released. You are you are in. Luck you're in for a treat swift. That said hi been Brent, I met they call me. Ben, I've been John. He's been conspiracy about stay woke meet sex. Over.

John Tova patriot Ben Brent Facebook von Neumann Asia Johnson Youtube Paris NFL Hobby apple Gatica Twitter Guy e Kat April Callaghan Harrity
Why Is NASA Going Back to the Moon?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Why Is NASA Going Back to the Moon?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listerine ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here. Nasa has announced that selected a dozen payloads of scientific equipment that it plans to fly to the moon on private commercial rockets and Landers the missions planned for later in two thousand nineteen are an early step toward achieving the space. Agency's overarching goal to send astronauts backed the moon via commercial space craft in twenty Twenty-eight necessary renewed focus on the moon reflects a late 2017 policy shift by the Trump administration which decided that these space agencies should return to the moon, which was last visited by Paolo seventeen astronauts back in December of nineteen seventy two. Previously. The Obama administration had abandoned a planned lunar mission, partly because of cost in favor of focusing upon going to Mars in the twenty thirties. We spoke with Steve Clark the deputy associate administrator for exploration in Nasr's science mission. Directorate he explained that the missions flown by commercial lunar payload services will include a mixture of scientific instruments and technology demonstrations, he said we want to fly a mixture as much as we can. So they collectively can provide data to the science community and to the folks who are designing the next human Lander the scientific instruments sent to the moon will be Clark said trying to characterize lunar surface looking for hydrogen molecules and actual traces of water or water ice in the soil and looking for various other elements there on the lunar surface. But those studies will do more than just add to our knowledge of earth's natural satellite. Nasa administrator, Jim Bryden Stein said in a press release. We know they're volatile is at the polls on the moon. Dan, and quite frankly that water ice could represent rocket fuel. If we have the capacity to generate rocket fuel from the surface of the moon and get them into orbit around the moon. We could use that to build a fuelling depot. On the technology side. One payload will include solar energy technology to attempt to advance the engineering of solar cells, hopefully, making the more efficient that open space missions that are dependent upon solar energy, but the work will have applications back on earth as well. Other technology being tested involves entry descent and landing systems, which will help improve the design of future lunar Landers, including the human Lander that eventually will take astronauts to lunar surface again necessary long range plan also calls for building a lunar orbital station in the twenty twenties which will serve as a platform. Both poor observing the lunar surface and staging manned exploration missions haven't instruments on the lunar surface as well as in orbit around the moon. We'll give humanity to new valuable vantage points from which to explore the moon and beyond unlike the Apollo program, the commercial space industry will be heavily involved in the effort. Transporting astronauts to the orbital station end down to the surface the agency. He already has announced plans to work with space companies to develop reusable lunar Landers those spacecraft could shuttle back and forth between the lunar orbital platform and the surface of the moon. We also spoke by E mail with Dale Scranton, the executive vice president of the national space Sidey, which is a nonprofit group whose goal is to promote a spacefaring civilization. He said that they support Nasr's strategy, quote, the fundamental advantage of a lunar orbital system in these support of lunar exploration and development is that it can be a gas station where reusable lunar Landers dock and are refueled NASA recently announced human land, a reference design, which features to reasonable components. The ascent stage and space tug along with a tanker to bring fuel to the lunar orbital station are constructive, but partial step in this direction at this point scrammed says that putting boots on the moon in the near future. No longer should be viewed as a desirable goal in itself. But rather as a means to further a larger plan of space colonization? He said humans on the moon should grow organically out of what we are doing on the moon not appear as a stunt and imitation of Apollo a to potential goals for lunar return include mining oxygen to fuel future Mars trips and building a radio telescope on the dark side of the moon to take advantage of the unique radio quiet on the side of the moon phases away from earth. Both of these goals will almost certainly include humans on the lunar surface. But boots are not the primary goal. We will certainly keep you in the loop. As more news comes to light. Today's episode was written by Patrick Jake, Hyder and produced by Tyler clang iheartmedia, and how stuff works for more on this. Unless of other topics that more than scratched the surface. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Nasa Steve Clark Cassidy Zachary Lauren Vogel Landers Nasa Administrator Nasr Obama Administration Paolo Jim Bryden Stein Associate Administrator April Callaghan Minnesota DAN
How Has the HANS Device Improved Car Racing?

BrainStuff

04:32 min | 2 years ago

How Has the HANS Device Improved Car Racing?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listen ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here in the early days of car racing. Even a minor accident could be fatal. For example, Patrick Jack mart was killed at mid Ohio in one thousand nine hundred one after a head on collision with a Bank his car was left relatively unscathed. But Jack Martin ended up with a skull fracture caused severe brain damage lucky for other racers to of Jack marts friends stepped in and created a safety device that has changed the sport of car racing forever. Those friends were Jim downing and Jack marts brother-in-law Dr Bob Hubbard the two decided to combine Downing's knowledge of racing and Hubbard's expertise in engineering and skull anatomy to develop new safety gear to try to prevent deaths like Jack marks from happening. Again, these simple and effective invention. They created became known as the Hans device short for head and neck support. The Hans device isn't like a car airbag, which inflates a cushion to stop the driver in case of a collision. Instead, the Hans device pro. Actively uses a raised collar and two tethers to secure the driver's head. In other words, it's a shoulder collar that attached to both the car seats safety harness and the driver's helmet in the event of a crash. It keeps the racers head and neck properly aligned with the torso preventing the type of excess force that would otherwise result in serious or fatal neck and head injuries. But it took years for the Hans device to become a financial success. And unfortunately, it took the death of a high profile racer for NASCAR to take notice. When Dale Earnhardt senior was killed in two thousand one in a crash similar to Jack marts at the Daytona International Speedway the race and community including NASCAR finally took the Hans device seriously. Now, most recent organizations require the use of a Hans device for all drivers. The Hans device is specifically designed to prevent Basler skull. Fractures, those injuries are caused when a car suddenly decelerate s- in earnhardt's fatal crash Daytona. For instance, NASCAR determined. That he hit the wall going one hundred and sixty miles per hour. That's two hundred and fifty seven kilometers per hour and slowed by somewhere between forty two to forty four miles per hour about sixty seven to seventy kilometers per hour in just eighty milliseconds. This sudden deceleration is known as the delta v literally the change in velocity. A while. It's difficult to provide exact statistics on how many lives have been saved by the Hans device. We do know this NASCAR where certified hands are mandatory did not have one single driver fatality in the decade after earnhardt's death. Whereas there were one hundred twenty six deaths from crashes on drag strips and short tracks where hints devices are not required and hands estimates that of those one hundred twenty six deaths as many as twenty seven percent that's thirty four driver deaths could have been prevented by using the device, and no driver in an IndyCar or an any of nascar's major series has been killed by Basler skull fracture since it required. The use of the device. This episode was written by trees three wit and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Hey brain stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Nascar Dale Earnhardt Jack Marts Patrick Jack Mart Hans Jack Martin Jim Downing Cassidy Zachary Dr Bob Hubbard Daytona Ohio April Callaghan Daytona International Speedway Testif Minnesota Tyler Clang Indycar Apple
Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

BrainStuff

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Bam here. It's amazing. What you can find. If you shine a flashlight into your backyard trees, a biologist in Wisconsin have made a rather startling discovery that way in part startling because it apparently hadn't been recorded until now three different species of flying. Squirrels specifically southern northern and Humboldt flying squirrel, which are found across North America and into Central America sport light Brown for that when spotlighted with ultra-violet illumination lights up a hot bubblegum pink the phenomenon occurs on both the top and bottom services of the flying. Squirrels though, it's the underside of a flying. Squirrels carriage, including the flaps of skin that spread out when the squirrel glides from tree to tree really glows Jonathan Martin a biologist at Northland college in Ashland. Wisconsin made the discovery in the forest one evening just by shining a UV flashlight into the tree canopy he was looking for lichens, which are certain type. Of frogs and flora that light up in UV light. That's when he heard the church of a southern flying, squirrel as the squirrel glided by he shined the flashlight on it. And he saw a flash of fuchsia. Martin and his colleagues soon found themselves examining the skins of flying. Squirrels at the science museum of Minnesota. And the field museum in Chicago. They took photos of the skins under visible, light and ultra violet light all but one specimen of the gliders glowed pink that has been variously compared to bubble gum dayglo and lycra from the nineteen eighty s there is also the study republished in the January twenty third twenty nineteen issue of the journal of Malecki, the pink is caused the researchers say by the furs fluorescence, which is what happens when light is absorbed in one wavelength and emitted in another you may remember an episode. We did about how scorpions fluorescent bright green and ultraviolet light some birds also have this trait some fish too few mammals do though flying. Squirrels are nocturnal and are most active at dusk and dawn, no other squirrels in North America are known to possess this ability to floor s including tree squirrels like the eastern gray though, there are over. Two hundred and fifty squirrel species around the world and to be fair. The researchers have not yet tested other species for the next question is what purpose could this fluorescent serve. Humans can't see ultraviolet wavelengths except under special lighting, but other animals can one theory suggests the pink is used to confuse als, which as it turns out also have undersides that Flores a similar pink ELS prey on flying. Squirrels among other mammals, perhaps the squirrels evolved to mimic als. So as not to be eaten by them another theory, which is already being challenged is that the pink attracts potential mates a flying. Squirrels have mating seasons. But their flamboyant fluorescence is available for viewing year round. Anyway, it's not even clear that squirrels can see in UV wavelengths. Ultimately, the researchers point out that age old impetus of science, this is proof of how much we don't know and still need to learn the study concluded the ecological significance of this. Trait warrants further investigation. Today's episode was written by Jimmy Allen and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet has to works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Wisconsin Jonathan Martin Cassidy Zachary Science Museum Of Minnesota Lauren Vogel Journal Of Malecki Field Museum Humboldt North America April Callaghan Ashland Minnesota Chicago Jimmy Allen Flores Northland College Apple Tyler Clang
Karl May and the Winnetou series

Behind the Bastards

04:05 min | 3 years ago

Karl May and the Winnetou series

Carl Friedrich German Germany Lacy Saxony Robert Evans Genoa Italy Jake April Callaghan France Cassidy Zachary Writer Tinder Iran Hitler John Seinfeld DAN Sixteen Years Twenty Years