35 Burst results for "Appalachian"

How MLB's Decision To Eliminate Dozens Of Minor League Teams Is Affecting Communities

All Things Considered

03:34 min | 2 weeks ago

How MLB's Decision To Eliminate Dozens Of Minor League Teams Is Affecting Communities

"With with dozens dozens of of minor minor league league teams. teams. Those Those communities communities were were stunned stunned in in cities cities big big and and small. small. These These teams teams are are as as much much a a cultural cultural identity identity as as they they are are a a fun fun and and inexpensive inexpensive family family outing. outing. Dave Dave Mystics Mystics of of West West Virginia Virginia Public Public Broadcasting Broadcasting takes takes a a look look at at one one team team left stranded by the MLB reorganization. On most summer nights, Rod Blackstone can be found behind home plate at Appalachian Power Park in Charleston, West Virginia, riling up the crowd and tossing pieces of toast into the stands after the opposing team's batter, strike out. Since the early nineties. He's been coming to games and is known simply as the toast Man. Now, Charleston's team may be toast. MLB through the West Virginia power a curveball when it announced it was not one of the teams that would be part of the 120 team Minor league lineup next season. Three other squads from West Virginia were also thrown out. Of the 42 teams that will lose M O B affiliation 18 or in the Appalachian region. Blackstone a. K a. The toast man used to work in politics but now works for the power. He says the contraction is a disservice to communities like Charleston, which is hosted a minor league team for most seasons dating back to 1910. It's harder to swallow. And when you look at how there is now a large, gaping hole In this region of the country. That has been expelled from the major league minor league system. When Major League Baseball announced the reorganization, officials said one of the aims was to cut down on travel times between games and also ensure the facilities are up to date. Elster still hasn't sunk in for many people. Charleston's mayor Amy Goodwin, says catching games Appalachian Power Park has always been a go to for families. My kids grew up in that stadium. My kids know that that is something fun for them to Diogo. What? Whether you're a baseball fan or player or not, Goodwin says. The community has long rallied around the team in the ballpark, and vice versa. Not only the trolls have along Andre, really robust history of baseball, But this stadium and this place Great so much happiness. Local officials are still sorting out with the economic fallout will be Charleston Convention and Visitors Bureau CEO Tim Brady says it's not just those who worked at the stadium who will be affected. It's the hotels were team stay and the restaurants and bars frequented by fans in the surrounding area. So one small change to a local economy like this, which is really a living organism effects. Much. Broader than just right there within the stadium, the team commission the Visitors bureau to conduct an economic impact study a year ago, it found the power brings in more than $3 million each year in Charleston, The ballpark wasn't built in a suburb or often, interstate. Ready, says it was designed to rejuvenate part of downtown. But in Charleston, a concerted effort was made to build the ballpark in the warehouse district to help spur development over there, and you've seen that you've seen bars and restaurants. And high rise apartment buildings spring up around the ballpark. While the owners of the West Virginia Power promised baseball will be back next season. It's unknown. What league will be a part of It's almost guaranteed, though not to be the attraction that has been at least not without a major league affiliate for NPR news. I'm Dave message.

Appalachian Power Park Charleston Minor Minor League League West Virginia MLB Dave Dave West West Virginia Rod Blackstone Major League Minor League Amy Goodwin Diogo Minor League Blackstone Charleston Convention And Visi Tim Brady Appalachian Elster Virginia Major League Baseball Visitors Bureau
Utilities will not be shut off for customers who missed payments in Virginia

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Utilities will not be shut off for customers who missed payments in Virginia

"Provider says customers who've fallen behind on their bills might be getting cut off notices in the mail. But service won't be turned off Appalachian power, telling the Roanoke Times this week. The notices are a formality sent out in part because many financial aid agencies require people to have a disconnection notice to qualify for help with bills. Mailer should make it clear no household services being disconnected due to late payments. New state budget legislation that took effect last month indefinitely extended a moratorium on utility disconnections across Virginia. Sports is next.

The Roanoke Times Mailer Virginia
The Sodder Family Tragedy: 75 Years Later

Extraterrestrial

04:50 min | 3 weeks ago

The Sodder Family Tragedy: 75 Years Later

"Long before his house burned down any lost five of his children. George solder saw the united states as a land of opportunity or at least of escape he was born as georgios saw do on the italian island of sardinia in eighteen ninety five. He spent the first thirteen years of his life. They're growing up in a small town on a hill. Not much is known about his youth mainly because he refused to speak about it. It was obvious to those who knew him. Later that something happened in italy that made young giorgio want to leave in one thousand nine hundred eight. He sees the chance to escape his home. Country in boarded a steamship with his older brother headed to ellis island Because we don't know his brother's name will call him. Rafael georgia was thirteen years old when he and rafael saw the statue of liberty and new york city skyline for the first time but whatever excitement. The new land may have inspired in giorgio. His brother didn't seem to share it for reasons. Unknown rafael return to italy immediately after delivering his younger brother to the immigrant inspection station. Perhaps he was only tasked with delivering giorgio safely to america. Maybe he was just along for the ride. It could have been any number of reasons he could have been turned away from. Ellis island for criminality or disease. Regardless when thirteen year old giorgio emerged from ellis island. He had a new anglicized name. George solder he was alone in a brand new country for better and for worse. His new life in america began that day in nineteen eight and he quickly got to work. George didn't stay in new york state for very long instead. He headed west to pennsylvania in order to find opportunities there and find them he did. It took a few years but before long. He left a railroad job in pennsylvania for west virginia and worked his way up through the hauling industry to open his own trucking company. But that wasn't all he wanted out of life in the early nineteen twenties. George met jenny. Cheaper yanni jenny. Like george was also an italian immigrant but unlike him she moved to the united states when she was just three and couldn't remember much of her life in italy. It didn't matter though the two had plenty in common and hit it off right away. They fell in love and soon enough. They got married ready to start a family. They moved to nearby fayetteville west virginia. Their new town was nestled in the foothills of the appalachian mountains and was home to a small but tight knit community of other italian immigrants. Over the next twenty years they became respected members of the fayetteville community their neighbors view george as a successful local businessman and jenny was known as carrying housewife who adored her ten children but a mystery lingered at the heart of this solder family and it involves georgia's past or rather the lack of it. Everyone and their italian american community new. The georgia emigrated to the states. Just like many of them. Andy may have had his secrets but he certainly wasn't shy about his political opinions during the nineteen twenties and thirties. Italy's fascist prime minister benito. Mussolini expanded his power and allied with the nazis in world war. Two during this time. George made it known that he despised the dictator. He sometimes got into passionate arguments with other italians who supported mussolini and reportedly expressed relief when he heard the dictator had been killed in the spring of nineteen forty-five but even still george was reticent to talk about his past however it seemed the community. Opt to let these quirks go. They were fond of the families. Many children the solders had ten kids. Understandably they ranged quite a bit in age. By nineteen forty-five their oldest. John was twenty three years old. While the youngest sylvia was to the family was large an by all accounts. Happy and christmas eve. Nineteen forty five was no exception. That is until a fire changed their lives forever. By the time the sun rose in the morning half of their children would be on

George Solder Giorgio Ellis Island Italian Island Of Sardinia Rafael Georgia America Rafael Italy Georgios Yanni Jenny George Pennsylvania West Virginia Fayetteville Jenny Liberty New York City Appalachian Mountains Georgia
21 charged in alleged drug ring at major North Carolina universities

Levon Putney

00:32 sec | Last month

21 charged in alleged drug ring at major North Carolina universities

"It's possible talks could stretch into the weekend. Drug trafficking rings operating on and near three North Carolina college campuses have been broken up our gym Carcela with details role, and local authorities are calling it an astonishing drug distribution ring at three North Carolina college campuses. Nearly two dozen people are facing criminal charges stemming from an investigation of drug trafficking at UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University and Appalachian State University. English actor Jeremy Bullock first donned a helmet Cape and Jet pack to play

North Carolina Unc Chapel Hill Duke University Appalachian State University Jeremy Bullock
Major drug ring busted that fed pot, cocaine to 3 North Carolina colleges

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:56 sec | Last month

Major drug ring busted that fed pot, cocaine to 3 North Carolina colleges

"Instigators have broken up a drug ring on multiple college campuses in North Carolina. Timberg has the story from the USA Radio News. The next bureau federal authorities they're charging 21 individuals in connection to a distribution ring that funnel drugs onto the campuses of prominent North Carolina universities. The D, a found drug activity at frat houses on campuses of UNC Chapel Hill. Duke University and Appalachian State University. U. S attorney Matt Martin, calling on university administrators to do something they were sales going on inside these houses. Dealers set up inside these houses, poisoning fellow members of their fraternity fueling Culture. The feds estimate more than £1000 of marijuana. Several 100 kg of cocaine and other drugs were funneled onto the campus is from the USA Radio News Phoenix Bureau I'm

Timberg Usa Radio News North Carolina Unc Chapel Hill Matt Martin Appalachian State University Duke University Usa Radio News Phoenix Bureau
Fraternity Members At Three North Carolina Schools Allegedly Trafficked Over $1.5 Million In Drugs

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last month

Fraternity Members At Three North Carolina Schools Allegedly Trafficked Over $1.5 Million In Drugs

"Trafficking rings operating on and near three North Carolina college campuses have been broken up. Federal and local authorities are calling it an astonishing drug distribute. Should ring at three North Carolina college campuses. Nearly two dozen people are facing criminal charges stemming from an investigation of drug trafficking at UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University and Appalachian State University. Investigators allege the drug trafficking involved several fraternity houses at the three schools. CBS News correspondent Jim Chris Sula had that story for us.

North Carolina College Unc Chapel Hill North Carolina Appalachian State University Duke University Jim Chris Sula Cbs News
Air pollution listed as cause of 9-year-old's death

PRI's The World

04:29 min | Last month

Air pollution listed as cause of 9-year-old's death

"We start the show today with the story of ella kissy deborah. A girl who smile could melt. The coldest hard severe bouts of coughing sent ella to the hospital several years ago. I promised her that. I would do everything to find out why she had suddenly become ill. I promise said that. That's ella's mom. Rosalind kissy deborah. The family lived alongside one of london's busiest most toxic roadways after dozens of trips to the emergency room. Ella died in two thousand thirteen when she was just nine years old. Her mother encouraged experts. To plot on a graph. The link between ellas hospital visits and the air pollution levels outside their home and walk is every time there was a spike was in hospital. And this happened. Twenty seven out of the twenty eight times today in a landmark case accord in the uk rule. That air pollution was one of the causes of the girl's death. Stephen holgate a professor of immunopharmacology at the university of southampton studied aleksey deborah's case and offered testimony to the court. She was a a very healthy girl until she was five years. Old men asthma developed suddenly and over two and a half years. She had twenty seven admissions to hospital which included intensive care cardiac arrests. And when i went into the case notes and look at the various pathological details it was very clear that airways were being strict of the protective lining and had lung was extremely sensitive to chemical pollution. She wasn't living on a knife edge. This go beilin sing on one side of a line which just a small trigger would be sufficient to ten Asmara inter catastrophic event. So i asked you about the environment that led to her death. What did the court exactly rule today. In her case it ruled. the pollution. Generally created by traffic is likely was the coal is not only off the poll. Hell she had for two and a half years but also the initiation of asthma and we were able to be The coroner was able to be quite confident about this mainly because was living in illegal levels of pollution for all the time of her life and this of course linked to the pathological changes. I've just described was why pollution was so strongly associated with death on her illness. What do you think this ruling is so important. I think is the first time appalachian direct. They has been attributed to a death of a child. And i think as a consequence of this. It's put a spotlight on app pollution. Which is not just a statistic in relation to human house where we will no absolution is damaging these real people at the end of these statistics and cheers won that. Pay the cost. If this nine year old girls family had the means to move to a less polluted area. She have likely lived. What's your opinion. There are clinical trials. Demonstrate you just what you said child with asthma who has just regular not severe asthma like she has a moose. From a polluted polluted. Area do benefit enormously uncontrolled. Trials have been published in this area so on quite set that if she Today she would have actually done read. Probably quite well and send you wouldn't have died. I mean l. Is tragic story has a dramatic final ending here but this is a huge problem in the us. Where sources of air pollution things like coal fired power plants. They've historically been built near lower income neighborhoods often neighborhoods with people of color. Is that a problem in the uk as well. Oh we sat as inequalities which you just referred to of course which is reflected in covert as well as company experiencing is very much linked to those most vulnerable and often knits the poorer who get exposed to the west pollution. Do you think today's ruling opens the door to the possibility that environmental policy will increasingly be legislated through the courts at least in the uk. I'm hoping the united kingdom government will respond to this in a very positive way. We need the government as well as the medical and health authorities to recognize. That pollution is an urgent and serious problem. That really does need attending to stephen. Holgate is a professor of immunopharmacology at the university of southampton. Thank you very

Ella Kissy Deborah Rosalind Kissy Deborah Ella Ellas Hospital Stephen Holgate Asthma Aleksey Deborah Cardiac Arrests Beilin University Of Southampton Asmara UK London United Kingdom Government United States Holgate Stephen
The Doctor's Wife

True Crime Brewery

05:19 min | 3 months ago

The Doctor's Wife

"So it seems to people that knew her della Dante Satorius spent her entire life using and abusing every man who crossed her path. Falling in love with her was like falling into a spider's Web. Now. This guy was lonely and Della didn't come with a warning label said Doctor Daryl Satorius. Allowed himself to be tangled into that web very quickly. Oh, he jumped right in both feet feet first as they say when they got married in nineteen ninety five. He had no idea none who wife really was yes, and I would think is a wealthy man. You do a background check, but he did find her a dating service. So maybe he trusted them and they let him down. But you know many people recognized that something was off about her. She was the pretty second wife of the doctor but there was obviously something really fake they're. Even, her name was a fake because Dante had been born della. She'd been married at least four times before and all of her previous relationships had ended badly, put it mildly some in some very hateful violence and a lot of property destruction. Those mother name is And she recognizes something was different about della since her early childhood. Oga had met Dallas Father Jim when he was stationed in Liverpool England, he was a soldier who's originally from Kentucky. Jim and August. Fell in love and married as soon as they got back to the United States. They moved into Jim's hometown of OCSAR. In the heart of the Appalachian Mountains Olga plan to move to the city of Cincinnati as soon as they could afford to do that. Yoga. Really. Went through some tough times as a girl. Her house had been bombed during World War Two, and she'd been forced to live in an air raid shelter with her siblings for five years. She was sent to North Wales and as a little girl, she watched men with large canvas bags, remove arms, legs, and other body parts from the nearby homes. So she was sent to live in Liverpool and go to Catholic. School. where she was taught how to be the ideal housewife. So they basically taught her baking cleaning doing laundry cooking, her of important things because that's what she was bound to be. There really weren't any choices presented to her, but shoe was determined before leaving England logo, go into college to study business, and she learned to type really well, well enough to get a secretarial job and she was working in the airport when she met Jim. She was only sixteen and Jim was twenty one. His family was poor. They were really kind to her. So her parents approved of him and they gave their blessing for her to move to the US and Mary. Jim You know they had a lot of kids to deal with not much money. So if they could find someone to take care of one of them, there are probably relieved to plus right? Yeah. So in August wish came true after less than two years in the United States Ogun Gym moved to. Cincinnati Jim worked in a machine shop and he made a pretty good living after Olga had given birth to two daughters Jim fell ill he died of cancer when Della was two years old. And her Donna was an infant. So isn't that incredibly sad I'm very young man in his twenties. STREGIC. Oga At this point is just maybe twenty. Yes she was quite pretty. So within a few months, she did find someone new which she really needed because very difficult back then in her situation to work and raise these little kids. So luckily she met Jean Mellow a nice guy, and he became her second husband and he was happy to adopt her two daughters. Let last Adela did not like gene. Even, though she couldn't have remembered too much about Jim she began to idolize his memory. She kept a picture of him minister service uniform over her bed calling him her daddy in heaven. And as she got older, she developed new memories of Jim and of creating them in her mind and she began to call him the only person who ever loved her. Into turf one her. Yes she was so young. It's just weird that she would do that. Bogan Jin soon had a daughter together and they named her sheryl. When Cheryl was a newborn? Della threatened to smother her. And as the family grew and gene Olga had more kids, della became worse more and more upset. Her sister Donna described Dell is just a mean kit. Della frightened. She would tell her that neighborhood dog would sure hands off. Now this is a friendly old slab of the dog and the kids played with them a lot but. Delo like to Kinda threatened on. You'RE GONNA shoot up. We'll just sounds like she was always causing trouble and the really scary part is that this dog ended up mutilated and killed an alley nearby. and. Della took Donna

Della Father Jim Doctor Daryl Satorius Jim You Dante Satorius United States Cincinnati Donna Gene Olga England Liverpool OGA North Wales Kentucky Dante Dallas Jean Mellow Bogan Jin Adela
Invasive Species Meltdowns

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:43 min | 3 months ago

Invasive Species Meltdowns

"The invasive species that make that career. Yeah and I'm happy to heavy on to kind of couch. A lot of our previous discussions into this big umbrella that is invasive species because it's hot button issue, it conjures up a lot of opinions a lot of very strong opinions oftentimes for people that don't have any connection to. Really going on ecologically. So I think this is something that is really worth having a nice conversation about in a bigger context. Being. A Professional Brown. Of Natural Resources Management for the past like more than ten years, which is absolutely nuts right I mean but. You'll same way to I've known you for like six years now. Seeing how much the forest is changed in? Eastern Appalachian area over the past ten years with the basis species and like the ecological repercussions of them has been. Fascinating and slightly terrifying at the same time and. It's just I. Think we're right on the cost of like the tip of the iceberg where this is going to be our new climate change equivalent. In terms of. The scale of things that are happening, and that's a really important thing to kind of talk about his you know one or two invasive species can be very regional, very specific to wherever you're located. But when you think about the impact, they're having across the globe I mean this is comparable in terms of climate change to the scale of ecosystem disruption that could possibly happen and is happy. Again I'm like I'm very regionally specific being foot muster my career Mayes -cation is from Pennsylvania and West Virginia. In the mid Atlantic area and it's just been there. There's been so much change here but places all around the world are suffering from invasive species I spent some time in California not as a naturalist but enjoying nature on my off time from my corporate job. And the invasive species in California remind me a lot of the mid Atlantic region. It's just it's always seasonal new swath of ecological damage on the same scale. Yeah. An again being regionally specific it's not bad. That's how you have to kind of approach these things you have to be sort of a hometown hero because there's no way to globally say, I'm gonNA tackle the invasive species issue and even with a single invasive species how it behaves in one area isn't going to be. The same in another area you know I always hear people right in. This is an invasive in my yard. Why are you talking about I'm like well, you don't live where it's acting like an invasive. That's why. Yeah, it's been This hometown hero concept has really been like kind of hitting the nail on the head with me lately because. For so many years going to the school for forestry and. Policy Entomology. It's almost like we learned the species are in this category of invasive or exotic unlike we kind of learn this label with them. Then, we didn't do anything because it was almost like you just like doesn't masive. That's how it is unlike arms US role, and now I'm like, no, I really need to be more like a hometown hero and if I see a tree hang on like a dog walk, I need to rip it out instead of just being like. I'm not saying like everybody's guilty of this bill I'm surprised that it took me. So long to realize like I'm an invasive species specialist in I've been like on a certain level ignoring their I guess prowess. In really is going to be one of those like. Grassroots efforts to control invasive species. On a professional level because Regis label them as what they are. Let Them Go. Yeah and I. Think. There's a lot of there's a range of opinions on that in terms of where do you it's kind of like asking what he'll do you WanNa die today. But I I agree a lot of times. You just Kinda hear about this you learn sort of the theory and some of the data the to support said theory on invasions, but in terms of actionable items. Yep, it is something. That, I, think we all need to grapple with in a big way in the coming years but let's start with definitions because this is I think the shakiest ground for most people is this idea of what does it mean to be an invasive species in a lot of times? People will say it's a species from another of the world. Sometimes, it can be a native species that's just for some reason or another. Gone Haywire. So where do we land on our definition of an invasive species? I define it is it's mostly exotic, right so these exotic species are brought into a new landscape where they don't have ecological controls and want those controls could be are things like predators pathogens right? We're all volved where we are supposed to be. Stationed planted but there are native examples I can think of obviously not as common as the exotic examples, but one that comes to mind. A forester but few are out black locust in also like straight maple things like that. Like when you alter the forest soon is usually human activity. When we alter the forest, we provide an ecosystem where it's not a balance and native species can kind of take over this new real estate, which normally may be confined to just like stream banks or small openings in the forest for one tree falls. But instead only come in and do a full. You know very large shelter

California United States Atlantic Mayes Regis Pennsylvania West Virginia
It's Pumpkin Spice Season!

Plantrama

06:26 min | 3 months ago

It's Pumpkin Spice Season!

"Let's. Let's talk a little bit about spices both the spices that go in the pumpkin spice mix and some forged by society. Right we should. We should also mention and I guess the one that I would like to start out with cinnamon, which comes from the inner bark of plants in the genus cinema them. and it is an evergreen tree in the Laurel family and there are several species in growing in various areas and. People might want to if they're into spices, they might want to get you know the Vietnamese version and the Indonesian version or the version you know the from Malabar cinnamon and and just taste them and see it's a spice that has long long been used to not only ceremonially but and in culinary But also, for fragrance and all kinds of symbolic applications as well. I don't think everybody realizes that there are so many different kinds of cinnamon and that they come from different trees and that the flavors are very different. The strengthened the spiciness, the natural sweetness, all of these vary from cinnamon to cinnamon. And I'm very fortunate in Santa Fe. We have a wonderful store called the savory spice shop I took a class there and learned a lot about the different kinds of sentiments. So I actually have a couple of different kinds at home i. think my favorite is the Ceylon Cinnamon. That's the one that I really liked the best although it is much more brittle. So if you're making something with the whole sticks, you have to be a little careful that the pieces don't all break apart but but I love the flavor of that one. Do you have a favorite cinnamon I don't? I tend to. In, cooking I tend to use whichever when I grabbed I. I'm. I will admit but I have ordered several varieties from penske spices which company create. Yeah. Company that I like and So it's fun fun to compare them and to just think about them you know both at their place in history their place in the history of the expiration of the world because you know a good deal of. World, exploration was driven by the desire to bring spices you know back to. Europe? And don't forget. Cinnamon is the inner bark of a tree. That is pretty darn cool. If you ask me who was the first person yeah? Thinking that out it's not the outer bark. So it's not that they just took a piece of the outer bark and chewed on it and thought this is delicious. It's the inner bark and who'd who did that? If I had to guess I would say somebody cut down the tree and smell the smell and. What is that and started sniffing around the tree and figured out where that came from but that's that's you know that's a guess. Well, it sounds like a good guest to me. So we talked a little bit about all spice in our true or false section and I want to. Continue that theme and talk about a spice that I forage for that sometimes called Appalachian. All spice that is the dried fruit of the spice Bush Plant Linda Benzoate, and I've mentioned that. Plant on this. podcast before it is literally one of my favorite forage spices and when I don't have it in my pantry and makes me very nervous because I like to use it in suite applications in savory applications it's absolutely delicious with some natural. Sweetness. It's got the warmth of all those you know Pumpkin pie spices, and honestly it's my go-to spice I rarely use nutmeg all spice and cinnamon anymore because to me the spice. Bush. Kerry. Has It all and it's a wonderful flavor and a very, pretty ornamental plant for yard as well. Well, that's what I was just going to ask you this is not you? Know as as many of these spices from the tropics This is not a tropical plant. This is something that people could plant in their own yard. Yes it's a it's hardy believed to zone four. So that's a pretty tough plant. It's native to the United. States east of the Mississippi everywhere from New Hampshire to Florida there are some isolated populations of it in Texas. But in general, it prefers it's not as happy an alkaline clay soils and that's what we tend to have out here in the West but it's a diocese plan which means separate male and female plants. So if you want to be able to harvest the fruit, you need at least one of each, you can also use the stems and leaves to make a t and they have a slightly different flavor. But for my money, it's the fruit that really is where the love is. Do you picked this fruit when Ans-? Ripe. But not dried and then dry it out. Yeah or is it the seed? Is it the seed or the fruit I'm glad you asked that C. L. because it's both the fruit is is small and read about the size of barbary fruit and I pick it when it's red although if it started to dry on the shrub that's okay and now is the perfect time to go looking for it depending on where you are. But if you're in the northeast the mid Atlantic states now when you should go out and look You can use them fresh and they're they're soft I usually dry them, and then keep them hole in the freezer and grind them as needed. But if you take a fresh fruit and cut it in half, you will see that the orange pulp, the redskin surrounds a soft blackish grey seed. Now, some people say that the seed tastes like pepper and the black pepper and the fruit tastes like all spice and they separate them I kind of think they just do that because. The seed is black and peppers black I don't use it all together and really it. So you're eating both the fruit and the seeds you don't separate the nudist dry and grind it. Very cool. Very cool. Well, you know I don't have any growing in my yard right now but you've you've made me want some. So I'm going to have to check that out for planting next spring.

Santa Fe Penske Europe West Linda Benzoate Bush Kerry Mississippi Texas C. L. New Hampshire Florida
Slowing Down and Looking Around With Julie Zickefoose

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:59 min | 3 months ago

Slowing Down and Looking Around With Julie Zickefoose

"I called you up because they want your expert advice on how to slow down and look around like kind of where to begin because you really seem to have a practice. Of connecting to natures tell us a little bit about you in that. Well, it really really helps to have a dog with a bladder that has to be let out every morning. Because I think a lot of know this the dog brings out her inner child it it it it forces us to go. Oh, well, I'll just take a long walk with the dog and that's a wonderful excuse to get out each and every morning you know without fail because this is an imperative and so I turned that into a morning meditation that can sometimes go four hours or more and you know that sounds like a a sort of a rich Victorian lady way to live I assure you anything but that but I don't have an office that have to go to. My Orchard and Meadow, is my office and once I realized that my life took a decided turn toward the wonderful. And you know I I realized that that observing things and sharing what I see is really my job on one of those people out there who needs to do this and share. So Tell us where you are. I am in Southeast Ohio in the Appalachian Foothold Foothills of Ohio, about twenty miles northeast of Marietta in the extreme southeast corner of the state and So this is a very rolling heavily wooded highly diverse area It's much more akin geographically to West Virginia than it is to what most people think of as flat plains Cornfield Ohio okay. So here we are and when this is airing its October and and we've been through, we will have been through most of the migration Let's talk about the recent migration of the ongoing migration who's been visiting what have you been able to say hello to along the way the snow it's been it's been so incredible. It was very late released September came and went without a bird and I was worried I didn't have my normal pulse of juvenile birds coming through in mid July and I thought Oh and then you know mid to late September third week of September came around and own. My goodness it's like the floodgates opened. So I was vastly reassured the birds had managed despite the incredibly cruel spring very, very low temperatures in late May birds managed to pull off some young that they did it later than they normally do. So these birds were not ready to fly until probably just about now. So they're pouring through and I think the the main stars this year for me have been the bay breasted warblers everywhere Blackpoll warblers as well. I get lots of Tennessee's as many people do I sometimes think Tennessee warbler must be one of the most abundant birds on the planet. Go down to Costa, Rica. You see them in the coffee plantations you see them in Guatemala on the mountain tops they're just all over the place. Magnolia warblers, chestnut sided warblers it's just been. So beautiful say that bureaus are diverse We've had a blue headed. Red. eyed. White eyed and Philadelphia here. So that's always a thrill. Oddly I. Get Philadelphia various but not warbling bureaus. And, I only get Philadelphia bureaus in the fall had one spring record in twenty eight years. The same is true of Cape. May. Warbler who are are most common migrants get gobs of them in the fall there just you know I never use the word trash bird but some burgers do I've got gobs of of Cape May warblers, but I get very few in the spring. So that tells me that migration routes. By season and probably by sex of the bird and it's it's just it's also complex and fascinating and keeping notes is the whole point well, and that's what you just said you said record you referred to record you and and I I my neighbor up the hill she leads birds as well and she texted me I don't know a week or two ago me with mid-september let's say and she said Oh. I. Still have a lot of you know hunting hummingbirds, just the Ruby throated and asthma northeast here and and and she said, you know I. Don't usually get them after this week I. Wonder if they'll still be here next week and so she keeps records right lesser quickly us right and so I quickly went to my Uber Dot Org, my cornell lab of ornithology database. You know my member account there and check and I was like and I texted her right back and I said October fourth two thousand sixteen was the latest sighting of the Hummingbird I ever had. To move. Elo. And I just that's it. Comforts me yes now yes. Says new IDI, right? Yes. Tying yourself into the phonology of the season being aware of what's normal and what's expected in a certain week is such a beautiful sing and it's the old way. It's how people lived. You Know Oh. Will it's about time for the be birds to come back in you know now. But but we've gotten away from that but but it's right within everyone's reach to just write it down on your computer on your phone in bird on paper like I do write it down and then have something you can comb through and see you know what your records look like it's it's a great great thing to do in ties right in and then the the the the Nice segue you get there is journaling. If. You're gonNA write down the dates. You see something right about them and and writing helps you process everything you see and everything you experience and then you have a record.

Philadelphia Ohio Tennessee Southeast Ohio Guatemala Cape May Costa Appalachian Foothold Foothills Ruby Throated West Virginia Rica Marietta
Trader Joes Napa Oakville Cabernet Sauvignon 2018 Review

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:49 min | 3 months ago

Trader Joes Napa Oakville Cabernet Sauvignon 2018 Review

"And cheap wine fighter.com coming again with a kind of a fun one. Well, at least it was fun like adults playing until off the fires and Napa Valley half and all the tragedy and people lost their lives and grape Vineyards that have burned and raped Wineries and people lost their life's work off. But rather to be a downer when I dressed wine, this one is called the Trader Joe's Platinum Reserve Cabernet, Sauvignon, Oakville, Napa Valley 2018 lot 97 There have been a couple of bumper crops in Napa Valley Sonoma that area so there was Surplus and then the covid-19 off but these are wines and so to restaurants and for parties and none of that's going on right now. So there was a trip plus and there was going to be a great many wines that were going to be a prices. They usually never AR CNET and Trader Joe's was starting to show this was a velour the Palm Spring Mountain at Atlas Peak and there might be another one all Napa some Indian from a high-end subdivision small places. I think the Oak Grove that's where Screaming Eagle is front Screaming Eagles when it was 100 Point perfect lines themselves in the thousands of dollars and I figured out I'm going to have a 1490. I have one that off. Ghost videos of Vineyard within two miles of that place or or something like that. I don't know where the vineyard is. They don't tell you that when you're paying $49 for high-end. Well, I'll tell you about you all the details, you know with Cooperage what force the old came from who's arrived start with winemaker the history of the winery all and for the price of these things and when you don't offer you get cheaper, so I don't know if there's still going to be a a glut is just the last gasps Trader Joe's were you want to run out and find these small production wines? I think there was a little bit less than five thousand cases. There's twelve thousand twelve bottles off the case for each of these but which you know is a lot of wine, especially when it's a nationwide distribution. So, you know on a Thursday Supposed to go to continue there's resorting lions and in the works that are coming our way out of cheap price, but you know a lot of that, you know a big deal any more with the fires are happening there and you'll see the devastation and I know you know people lost their lives people of lost history things. They worked on forever. You know, I just saw a man who had 100,000 bottles in one of his buildings in the building burned burned out. It's just, you know, it's crazy drink to him. I'm going to do that. So I don't know if this is gonna be the last of the cheap wines from Napa Valley. They're coming up or what? But they're good the 1499. There's over those got a nose that is worth you just smelling it all the different Roma's going on in there is worth forty nine thousand. I mean you don't get that and just regular then there is a reason why these Appalachians are famous and this is a 2018. It's not a young age worthy. Why that's drink it now. Maybe you could put it away for a couple of years if you want to you know, but it doesn't need to you can drink it right now, but it tastes great. It's got a lot of flavor. It's got its Sleek doesn't have a lot of Weights medium weight on the palate. It's liquid has a ton of flavor. It's you know, it's just kind of flows money's nice deal II 1499. It kicks butt Trader Joe's says that it's if it were a retail branded. Did you have an air brand on it? What's so for about $30 and $30 Napa cabs are starting to really ride, you know that when it starts getting more expensive a lot of that is because of its more often. It's it's rarer line mean, there's not enough to go around you gotta pay to get them but you really hitting some really good wines when you get dirty on the upper end or you can go higher the 13 get you some good one. And and this

Napa Valley Trader Joe Napa Napa Valley Sonoma Eagles Oakville Appalachians Cnet Oak Grove Palm Spring Mountain Atlas Peak
Appalachian State student, 19, dies from COVID-19 complications

Glenn Beck

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

Appalachian State student, 19, dies from COVID-19 complications

"Student from Davidson County has died from covert 19 complications. 19 year old chap Doral was a Ledford high graduate and current AP State student He passed away at a hospital in Winston Salem doctors saying the form of covert 19 that he'd contracted is among the rarest cases.

Doral Davidson County Winston Salem
Appalachian State student dies following COVID complications

Todd Schnitt

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Appalachian State student dies following COVID complications

"Meanwhile, state health officials are also reporting the first death of a college students caused by complications associated with covert 19. Mitch Evans has more on the story, according to Fox ate Davidson County. Schools, said Chad Dora was enrolled at Appalachian State and hoping to become a physical therapist. He was an all conference player while it Ledford in a statement, The Doral family said Chad was very weak for two weeks and that doctors said his was the rarest one in 10 Million

Chad Dora Mitch Evans Davidson County Ledford FOX
Talking Apple's announcements with Phandroid, Nick Gray

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

05:36 min | 4 months ago

Talking Apple's announcements with Phandroid, Nick Gray

"I get the irony of having the editor in chief of Android come on to talk about the apple event. Hey I watched it and let's do this. Okay. I'm not an apple fan boy I can still appreciate good products right? Same same. I used to work in android authority and every time every time I put out a even the slightest thing about an iphone thought that I was a traitor and I was like guys like. I'm allowed to carry more than one phone at any time. So here's the thing. First of all got to give the UPS to help apple. Granted, they have the backing of their partners like Pixar, for example, to make what is a very good looking presentation as far as the quarantine level. Kovin affected trade shows and events and tech shows are concerned I. You know you could. You could expect apple to put put on a good show. It was pretty good granted like with any apple event I kind of not really does off but obviously, like eventually they get into the weeds with their products and you just kind of like okay. Cool. You're you're updating all the IPADS. Dating. All of the Appalachians and whatnot but the whole fact that an iphone twelve was not part of this were you surprised I know people were people were not I was not surprised based off of they set in their last earnings call that the IPHONE would not be coming until. October. So I'll look I mean they they clearly said it wasn't coming and a lot of people seem to have missed that or forgot that Nah and they didn't even they even sent out a reminder once once the event was announced. That no he said the IPHONES. Not Coming till October. and so a lot of people kinda miss that and so that was the speculation of what are they going to announce for a lot of people because some people knew that they weren't announcing the new iphone. So when they sent out the invitation with that weird, it was the apple logo but. Yeah like circling and Tom Whatever I mean. We were speculating that a new apple watch was going to be coming and likely some IPAD information So yeah, I mean that's basically it will. We got the new IPADS and. The. New Apple Watch is because now we have what is the series six is the new one and then the Apple Watch s e. so just like the iphone se we have an apple watch se which is A. I don't WanNa say dumbed down version of the watch because. It's still an incredible piece of Gadgetry but it doesn't have some of the sensors that the main watch has making it useful for somebody who's wanting an apple watch for all of the health and fitness benefits that you can track with the device, but it's probably something more geared towards. A cheaper watch for you know your kids are family members who may not be into fitness tracking you know I would even argue like I agree with you there, but I would even add on top of that. When you put the letters s e on anything apple. I get interested. Like I'll just speak from personal experience because like. If I were to choose if I have no other like knowing that I have other things like my own cameras and my own gaming consoles and stuff like that. If my smartphone was not the center of my universe, then something like a pixel for a which literally I you and and or an iphone se those were the perfect choices for me like I'm actually into. dumbing not dumbing down, you said dumbing down but like slimming my smartphone experience for a better price and they're doing it with smart watches and your Indiapol- ecosystem. I'm actually kind of impressed. Yeah. It is a very, very impressive device and it comes with and Lt version as well which pairs with their new family, what they call it the family sink plan now. Now, you do not need to have it's not a one to one match between a a watch and a smartphone you can connect multiple watches to a single smartphone. So that, you can get on Apple Watch for your children. And also your aging parents so that you can have location tracking and communications with them and fall detection and accident detection. Features built in and pair that with a single device rather than having to have multiple iphones in order to pair that with which makes the Apple Watch. Probably, the first gadget that most parents are going to buy for their children that are not smartphone age ready yet. Yeah. Indeed, and because there's this huge marquette of children friendly watches that are connected that they can make phone calls that they came message their parents or a select small group of people and individuals, and most of those costs. One, hundred, ninety, nine to three, hundred dollars, and all of them have to be paired with a ten dollars a month service plan through your carrier. And just to be clear, the pairing of these devices must be paired with the L. T. E. or this the connected version not just the WIFI version. Yeah, Mindy. So you do have that little bit extra and you do have that monthly subscription that you're gonNA have to pony up for yeah,

Apple Editor In Chief Pixar Tom Whatever Mindy L. T.
Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:01 min | 4 months ago

Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

"Cheap. Wine. Dot Com. Review we put on the. CHEAP WINE FINDER DOT com website Levin years, and going strong. And today we have. Wine. Let me grab the bottle of lane twins. State. Older, by Zinfandel. Lodi. LISTSERV fifteen dollars and I found for twelve ninety nine for this is not an expensive why? And the stateline they own. Several vineyards. ONUM. It's all bears and the Lodi Appalachian, which is the Central Valley. Most. Most wind come from the coast central coast to coast. Lodi Clarksburg are a little bit of different they're. there. They're in the river valleys to the San Pablo Bay, which is the northern part of. This is a fairly well, I wanted to state wine. Not, single vineyard state by. The Lang twins are actually identify wins the. Fourth Generation. Family started. Farming in Lodi in the eighteen seventies in their first vineyard and the ninth eighteen sixteen. which is not that unusual. If you look you look into some of these big name Lodi. wineries they go back a hundred hundred and fifty years. Fairly regular basis and while there are wineries, other Appalachians have. Long Histories. Load is everywhere. and. Why is old vines? And there's a wine axioms. Wine Grapes half the struggle. To become. Complex. And best vineyards in the world are some of the worst land. Almost. No nutrients wraps through. No moisture. Justice not. Survive and thrive. Old Vines since they're old and. On their own without having any additions around them. So you KINDA GET A. Rape fine that is doing what you wanted to do. Donna dependent. From where what? Agriculture land is around. Old Lines are. kind of like highly sought after. These low dial binds are from. Before prohibition and they made communion wines. Church. Oceans communion wine. During prohibition. Kept him going and then the white Zimba trades the sixties planted. Zinfandel everywhere I just keep up the craze in those vineyards which are so so back mid day are sixty seven year old vineyards that are kind of. Little, jewel? How is the? State. Just. Kind of. Like about Lodi. There's a dealt with the same. There tends to be a bit of. A BIT OF A. Local resemblance or they're kind of. The kind of the middle I really liked that. Really High in Norman's infant infantile snappers those fast robles. Tend to, be more classic. Like it when you get this rougher edge to not a lottery rough that just just a little bit. That's my favorite. They tend to be less expensive on top of and there's a lot of great simple producers in California. Really great producers in California. Lodi does a for me may not prices usually right I'm gonNA, take a SIP. Tend to be less expensive clean here you get a single vineyard away a state multiyear Weinberg Thirteen. Don't really find that with some of the bigger producers, their winds there. Are More expensive to not only is it a style that I liked? Cheaper and we actually won DOT com. Also. There you go.

Lodi Old Vines Lodi Clarksburg Lodi Appalachian California San Pablo Bay Levin Norman Lang Rape Central Valley Donna Lodi.
Louisiana, App State lead 10 new teams in Top 25; Clemson still No. 1

Townhall Review

00:14 sec | 4 months ago

Louisiana, App State lead 10 new teams in Top 25; Clemson still No. 1

"Louisiana Lafayette, an Appalachian state or among 10. New teams ranked in the first regular season. Associated Press College Football pole after all Division one teams were eligible to be voted on for the preseason top 25 only teams playing in the fall or now

Lafayette Louisiana Football
Podcasts about Ireland

Feedback with EarBuds

02:39 min | 5 months ago

Podcasts about Ireland

"This week's team comes to us from Kevin Dolan and it's called podcast. It's about Ireland here's why Kevin chose this theme he writes. A host of a podcast on Irish history I've been amazed with the interest around the world with our little island with that in mind I thought I'd share some of my favorite podcast episodes about the island of saints and scholars. Here are the episodes chosen by Kevin, for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first one comes to us from the history of Ireland and the episode is called setting the scene. It's eleven minutes long. In this, the inaugural episode, the Party's players and movements bouncing around Ireland in the early nineteen hundreds are introduced. Next up the episode comes to us from the Irish. Passport podcast and is called who were the celts it's sixty nine minutes long. Celtic. Identity is politically powerful, but historically nebulous a subject of debate among historians and archaeologists while being a source of inspiration to some an irritation to others. In this episode Naomi and Tim Visit Celtic Music Festival in the Netherlands to explore why the concept has such. International. Appeal, Tim Explores the political use and abuse of the idea of the celts in debates about identity and nationalism in Scotland and Ireland. The. Next episode comes to us from Radio Lab and is called tweak the vote sixty six minutes long. In this episode democracy is on the ropes in the United States and abroad citizens of democracies are feeling increasingly alienated, disaffected and powerless. Some are even asking themselves a question that feels almost too dangerous to say out. Loud. Is Democracy fundamentally broken. Next up, the PODCAST is called mother folklore and the episode is called the Blue Blue Grass of Home Irish in Appalachia. It's forty minutes long. In this episode, Rebecca Welles a singer in Nashville tells the lads about her Appalachian Roots and the influence of Irish music on bluegrass and other musical traditions. The last episode of the week comes to us from the blind boy podcasts and is called the Goblin of strange uncertain times it sixty two minutes long. In this episode, a hot take on society's response to Corona virus through the Lens of Grief Psychology, a post Catholic view of Ireland's response. Those are the episodes chosen by Kevin for this week's theme podcasts about Ireland.

Ireland Kevin Dolan Tim Visit Celtic Music Festiva Lens Of Grief Psychology Rebecca Welles Nashville Radio Lab TIM United States Naomi Netherlands Appalachia Scotland
"appalachian" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

07:52 min | 8 months ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

"That brings you one hiking trail in one national park one park at a time. We've been to twenty three national parks from the islands of Hawaii to the desert of the southwest to the mountains of Tennessee to the coastal woodland. Maine follow along with us in each episode as we hike the trails play all of the trail game like one letter change. Hey Jessie what's kids clubhouse for passing gas fart for it that one good that was really good. We also invent drag queen names like this. One Mini van driver minivan driver with many van driver. Minivan driver is a play on many driver. Will Ray many? Oh Yeah. And she's a cool mom and we end every episode with two rounds of Trivia National Parks. Primetime Times three an unassuming and boring carbonated alcoholic beverage from this Florida national park known for its snorkeling and scuba diving. And not it's been US mundane the scheme champagne. That's right. Join US every Monday. For new episodes and tune in to gaze at the National Parks podcast one hiking trail one national park. One deer is on conservation. This is greg reaching out to you with a special co host on this bonus episode of is on conservation. Matthew Polski how you doing. I'm good how are you? I'm doing quite well sweating here in my warm closet and we're not even in the summer months yet so I can't wait to see where this goes. Yeah you're gonNA need an air conditioner for that closet. I think I don't think it's going to happen. I'm just going to sit on a block of ice or something. It's just not going to be comfortable. That's just how it is so has been hard at work producing a series called common land and season two of that show just got completely derailed by covid nineteen. What happened our first episode of season? One we did share as a bonus episode of USA back in January and so we produce that first season which I've been working on for for a long time over a year I was working on that first season of common land and the concept behind the show. Is that each season is deep dive into the science history politics behind the creation of different protected area so national parks monuments the area that we focused on in season one is a national conservation area and we had a plan for our second season of the show to be focused on the Appalachian trail which is protected areas of very thin band of protected. Land that stretches twenty two hundred miles from Georgia to Maine. It is a national scenic trails part of the national scenic trail system which is managed by the National Park Service. But our start date for this trip right and I mean so the concept if I take a step back here the concept behind the second season of the show was. We weren't just going to produce a season of common land about the Appalachian Trail. I was planning on through hiking the entire trail with my mom. And we were going to sort of tell the story through the lands of Couple folks that are actually making an attempt to hike this long distance trail of all the way through met yet. You had your your bags packed. I mean you had everything you had cleaned underwear lined up next to fresh toilet paper. You're ready to hit the trail. You're you're all but in the car on the way and then boom lockdown yes. We were Ten days away from our start date when we finally made our decision to postpone so yeah we were supposed to start on March twenty seventh and it was the seventeenth when we made that decision that we had to postpone and that was done in response to this organization that manages the Appalachian trail the Appalachian trail conservancy putting out a statement essentially a strongly encouraging everybody to stay away from the trail. All Hikers Thru Hikers Day hikers. So yeah and you know that sort of right for us you know. We were sort of like eagerly anticipating the start of this trip But also you know watching all the updates coming in and we were following the spread of Covid nineteen Very closely because we had this concern that it was going to affect the trip And then when you know when the Appalachian Trail Conservancy came out you know with this guidance. Strongly discouraging anybody from getting on the trail. I mean it was. It was a relatively easy decision for us to postpone even though it was painful and difficult because lots and lots of planning had gone into this it at that point right. It wasn't super difficult decision but I was curious about what that decision was like for folks who had already started their trip right because some people start in January or February and there are people that were hiking the Appalachian Trail. That had already hiked hundreds of miles. You know and we're over a month into their trip And then to you know to be at that point you know and to be in that mental state and then to be told that you have to get off trail and you have to end your journey. I just I was trying to put myself in that head space and so that was kind of the inspiration behind this episode. Yeah I can imagine too if you've already kind of like if you haven't left yet there's a little bit of a godsend that you can just okay stop and Replan can renegotiate. But if you're in the middle of this trip it's almost like being placed in a little bit of purgatory not being able to finish. You know you can't really go back. I mean yet. Well tell tell us a little bit more about. We're GONNA listen to today. Yeah so basically the the piece starts out by sort of exploring like my personal motivations to do this trip to do this through hike the Appalachian trail as well as my mom's personal motivations to do the trip and then we kind of explore like what happens. You know how this very unexpected situation you know led to having to postpone the trip and then I kinda delve into sort of exploring this question of what was this like for folks that were already on the trail that we're already you know not not just people who are on the trail. You know we also have a an interview with a woman who was the caretaker for a hiker hostile along the trail who's interacting with lots and lots of through hikers and getting perspectives from lots and lots of different people that were already on the trail and who were sort of struggling with this information about this cove. Nineteen struggling with their decision about what to do if they should continue their hike or not and then we close it out with you. Know this just sort of an assessment of life where people are now you know. Some people have decided to get back on the trail. Most people haven't but it's you know there's still a lot of questions I think out there as far as you know. There's there's this much you know this episode of opens up this much. Broader question of like what sorts of activities are appropriate are Like you know what? How can we recreate in the outdoors during this moment right Without like fearing for our own health but also fearing that we might spread the disease to other people into.

Appalachian Trail Appalachian trail conservancy US National Park Service Maine Jessie Hawaii Primetime Times Matthew Polski Tennessee greg Florida Georgia
"appalachian" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:02 min | 10 months ago

"appalachian" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"President and CEO of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy says a large swath of the trail runs through Pennsylvania she says the past several days it has attracted lots of day hikers especially families and children who have been congregating at trail heads and scenic points risking exposure to the respiratory disease many are unable to maintain social distancing while walking on sections of the trail itself so Marissa is the group decided it had to put out a warning the only thing that we saw that with the responsible decision for the safety of everyone as well as the resource not just the people but also the trail itself after everyone to please just stay well is Marissa is the group cannot close the Appalachian Trail or physically bar access to trailheads however she says the Conservancy has an obligation to tell people that hiking along the Appalachian Trail at this time potentially increases the risk of harm to those who disregard this warning Marc Abrams KYW newsradio wolf administration has so far resisted a lobbying campaign to reopen all six hundred state wine and spirits stores which have been closed to help stop the spread of the new coronavirus Italy's Paul Kurtz reports the Pennsylvania liquor control board Sean Kelly says the agency will not be re opening the brick and mortar operations but it is considering resuming limited online sales as it continues monitoring the outbreak along with the governor and state health officials and that's not what Chris Wong wanted to hear he's the head of the distilled spirits council of the United States and says while he understands the need to protect people's health there are creative ways to keep stores open while reducing the risk to employees and customers could be limiting access into the stores it could be allowing W. kept up your bed or to go up unless you want to be a lot of progress distilled spirits as well for now the situation for Pennsylvania residents is every man and woman for themselves and a lot of them are defying the stay at home order and driving to Delaware and New Jersey Sabrina Harrison made the half hour drive from Philly to stock up I.

President and CEO Appalachian Trail Conservancy Pennsylvania Marissa Appalachian Trail Paul Kurtz Sean Kelly Chris Wong United States Delaware Sabrina Harrison Philly Marc Abrams New Jersey
"appalachian" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

06:00 min | 11 months ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And the Appalachian Trail a beautiful alternative to crowded national parks jerky force forces working to preserve our mountain treasures this is the Tom Hartman program about today that our member club is called let the people pick the president the case for abolishing the electoral college by Jesse Wegman and I'm reading from the interaction this is a page twenty but what exactly can we do about the electoral college people been trying to answer that question for more than two centuries since the first proposed amendment to the electoral college was introduced in Congress in seventeen ninety seven there have been more than seven hundred attempts to reform or abolish it more by far than any other provision of the constitution only one has succeeded the twelfth amendment which was ratified in eighteen oh four to fix a technical flaw on the college's design but left it otherwise intact in late nineteen sixties an amendment abolishing the college you're replacing it with the national popular vote passed the house of representatives and came extraordinarily close in the Senate but was blocked by a filibuster at the time eighty percent of the American public support and switching to the popular vote as did president Richard Nixon and other top Republicans and Democrats to some this litany of failure speaks to itself I think it's a waste of time to talk about changing the electoral college former president Jimmy Carter said in two thousand Carter and supported a national popular vote in the sixties and seventies I would predict a two hundred years from now will still have the electoral college he said was president Carter right is simply our fate as Americans to remain trapped by the historical quirks of the constitution it is too easy to revere into our to change after the failed effort in the sixties when American politics were far less polarized today and there is no simple partisan divide over the issue it's clear that a constitutional amendment is not in the cards but there may be another way to call the national popular vote interstate compact an agreement among states to a war all of their electors to the winner of the national popular vote rather than the winner of their statewide vote the contact will take effect when it is joined by states representing a majority of electoral votes two hundred and seventy thus guaranteeing that the candidate who wins the most votes in the country becomes president the ingenuity of the contact is that it doesn't touch the constitution its target is the statewide winner take all rule currently in use in forty eight states mane and a brass are the exceptions this rules what makes presidents out of popular vote losers it incentivizes presidential campaigns to ignore more than a hundred million American voters living in non competitive states during what should be a national electoral contest into a series of bitter hyper local malls it focuses nearly all campaign spending and policy proposals on a few so called battleground states where even a small shift in voting can lead to an electoral jackpot for one side or another at familiar red blue map will obsess over every four years it's nothing but a visual representation of state winner take all rules with the stays stamps democratic or Republican as though that is its true identity regardless of how many voters from the other party cast a ballot there this is bad for democracy and should concern all Americans no matter where they live or which political party they support in contrast when candidates know that all those are equal and they need a majority of them to win they're forced to seek the support of all Americans and craft policies that appeal to as many people as possible popular vote compact was launched in two thousand six and got its first member state Maryland the following year as of October twenty nineteen fifteen states and the district of Columbia together representing a hundred ninety six electoral votes to join seventy four more and the compact takes effect so far only democratic majority states have joined the compact and while the twenty sixteen election dealt a significant setback to efforts to enlist Republican led states lawmakers of both parties around the country continue to support it and Republican led chambers have passed it in four states critics of the contact call it an end run around the constitution and it's true that the constitution's framers never mentioned something like a popular vote contact they also never mention the winner take all rule but that didn't stop the majority of states rapidly adopted it to benefit themselves that's the whole point of the compact the framers gave states near total control over how to allocate their electors the fact that the compact is an agreement among states also means that unlike a constitutional amendment which is effectively permanent member states may back out if they later decided they don't want to be a part of it opponents of the popular vote argue that no matter how you might achieve it it's not the way our country is built as a popular saying goes were Republican not a democracy the electoral college is one of the core Republican elements of the framers constitutional design like the Senate and the Supreme Court sure there precisely to prevent majorities from running rampant in other words majority rule is not our only organizing principle and perhaps not even our most important to problems however with this argument the minor one is on the surface involves terminology the United States is both a Republican and a representative democracy the two terms describe the same thing a government in which the people the ultimate power but elect representatives to make laws policies and other decisions on their behalf the founders used the term Republic to distinguish what they were building from a monarchy for them to mock Chrissy generally referred to as the director of all ideas in ancient Athens for the New England town meeting where the people literally makes the laws themselves but American politics at the national level has never been and never will be a direct democracy so any distinction between the terms today is meaningless as one political columnist put it to say that the US is a Republican not a democracy is like claiming the beef and pork but not cows and pigs the.

Appalachian Trail
"appalachian" Discussed on Locations Unknown

Locations Unknown

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Locations Unknown

"And this was based on the gun powder residue found at the scene. It took another four hours to get to. ATV's up the mountainside on an old logging road troopers had a chopped down trees to clear the way so that the bodies in evidence could be removed after that the investigation proceeded rapidly from Karen Lutts now remember Karen earn was with the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and had seen crews twice the day. He was going up to the shelter. She described crews and his red gym bags. They found one such bag at Thelma marks and the other at the Darlington shelter the library. Note that Flat feet had discovered gave gave them a name to go on. So they were actually looking for Casey Horn at this point. Yeah so Glenda Hood now this is Jeff Hoods Woods. Mom was at home in Signal Mountain Tennessee and she happened to switch on the radio on the morning of September fourteenth so this is a day after the bodies were discovered just in time to hear the news report that to hikers had been murdered near done cannon Jeff had just called from there three days before she knew her son was is careful in the past when they had discussed someone meeting a bad end in the outdoors. He always told her he didn't know what he was doing or he wasn't doing what he knew he he should be just the same. She Phone Jim. Larue and this is Molly's dad up in Shaker Heights Ohio and told him what she'd heard her. She said he burst into tears immediately and he said I was sure it was them. I just knew he saw molly's mother. Connie pull into the driveway with loaded groceries. He walked out and told her. I think this is going to be the longest day of our lives. So that's like that parental intuition that we always come across in a lot of these cases like suzy hurt. Like it's almost like you know. They had that feeling I would venture to guess he had just a pit feeling that that day and that call was almost confirmation of something he already felt. Yeah it's kind of weird when you go through these stories. You see the recounts from the people loved ones that were closest closest to the to the victims. It's almost like they. They know what's going to happen. There's some sort of connection that goes above and beyond information. They're hearing you're seeing so now I'm going to take a few excerpts here crews defense attorney and this is what we're talking about in the beginning. This is after his trial a year later. But it's important important to paint the picture of what happened that night and after crews left shelter that morning so his attorney was Gerry Philpott and he says he believes the couple did re shelter I. He said they were setting down for the night it was summer it would have been pretty light out still. He came upon the scene in something happened. This is a brain on cocaine and a quarter of Jim Beam. Philpott says crews. He would take a quarter of Jim. Beam in a cigarette. Pack full of cocaine powder and that is how he would hike. So I mean that's where it's it's an it's insane you get into like he's already obvi- mentally destroyed and now you're putting some sort of jet engine behind that by just adding cocaine An alcohol and alcohol. Yeah which I back in my paramedic days when I'd come across people on drugs you get somebody who's really coked out. It's like superhuman strength and not thinking clearly making very stupid decisions. Yeah and that's just probably somebody who doesn't have an underlying underlying mental condition exactly that's his quote unquote normal on a day-to-day basis. And we've all seen you know friends when they they've had a little too much to drink. So yeah factor in the mental issues. The you know the cocaine and now you know a a bottle of Jim Beam in you know you can kind of see how something like this could happen. Yeah I mean to do stuff like that that that's horrific. Yeah at you. You can't be a normal person let alone on without some sort of drug enhancement to make it to make yourself go through something so horrific and awful so crews shared very little information with him and this his his his attorney. He says he never wanted to talk about this incident or any of his alleged murders incidence in the days following the murder. And this is. We're not kind of cutting back to the real time on the trail so in the days following the murder crews would meet and interact with a few other hikers on the trail based on the conversations later recounted to law enforcement crews assumed. Jeff Molly stories as well as their gear here so he basically took on their personas. Yeah Cruz said. He'd started hiking in Maine around the first of June and was trying to catch up with Muskrat one of the through hikers. The couple and earl have met. So He's actually in this Kinda leads into if he's telling their story he talked to them because he wouldn't know this information. He wasn't reading log entries the whole way. Yeah so he knows you know trail names. He knows where they started. He's knowing information about them. So so maybe he when they met it. Wasn't you know violent at first. Maybe he got to know them a little bit. Yeah which is very very creepy and the era very disconcerting. For sure the up so earl swift and this is again our writer from the Outside magazine. Who's telling the story Most of the story was still on the trail hiking in Virginia's Shenandoah National Park when a pair of day hikers informed him that a couple had been killed on the trail up in Pennsylvania. Five days before for Earl called home immediately to find out more information and learned that it was unfortunately molly and Jeff. He writes in the article that he spent the next few view day stunned in disbelief. He was attempting to catch up to a through hiker. He had come in and out of contact with named Marcus. Markle Marcus Makaluza of Tennessee. His trail name was GRANOLA. Earl caught up with GRANOLA and another southbound through hiker. He said the main topic of the conversation was obviously the killings. He's at that time with. They did not know is that cruise was in custody. A Federal Park Rangers in harpers ferry having been captured only a few hours before before as he walked across a bridge in the Walked across a bridge over the Potomac. There was actually a hiker who'd even barked on a freelance search for the killer and recognize Jeff's pack on his back in sounded the alarm. Yes is that foreshadowing from before that bright. Green Gregory Gregory pack that really stood out actually helped and it sounds like You know even in the era before Internet I it sounds like the the story story of these murders kind of started spreading on the trail. Pretty quickly yes. Oh I think it's very evident than news. got a hold of it and when that happens. If you're in search Gotcha story you could probably find it and like I said like I'm remembering going back and reading newspapers and things like that watching television It I'm sure it was easy to get information on. If you were trying to find it yeah cruise was jailed pending trial a lawman Pennsylvania began putting together their case. The families families of the couple actually became very close as they grieved over the deaths of their children so discussions even began and questions raised whether the trails should be shut down while so they. They were contemplating shutting the whole Appalachian trail down at this. This is not the family this is just Kinda and again. I can't really isn't like some sort of like board the trail. Yeah it makes all the decisions but it was some I mean. This was a gruesome murder and nothing like this has ever happened especially in the back country hiking community. which which if you think about there should not be anything violent going on there and after this happened really shook everybody So Jim and this is molly's father said that's when Molly's voice would come up and tell me if you ever let my death be an excuse for anything to happen. The trail never forgive you so he was young. Ah fervently against anything like that happening. Mal was where she wanted to be doing what you wanted to do carrying about what she wanted to care about. Having Fun and meeting and enjoying so many people he says to die doing something you love is not the worst thing in life. There are no guarantees. Her Dad was obviously very strong. Yeah this whole thing to be in that type of state so I don't know how I would react in that case and I don't know if I would be that calm and that reflective on arguably doing the more right thing you know I it's you you get. That said like I'd probably WanNa go murder the guy and I'd be full of rage and vengeance and he seemed to be in a place of peace which is I mean? Just confusing seem to me because it kind of it makes me upset thinking about it. He I mean I can. I can see the one side of it. You know the parent you know. Your kid was killed in a gruesome murder. You probably I could see wanting revenge. I could see you on the trail closed down things like that. But in the flip side you know as both of us do backcountry. She hiked quite a bit. Something ever happened to me. I would definitely not want. The area was hiking closed down or anything like that because now we know the risks of going out into the back country which we tried. Prepare for anything that can happen. But you never know. You wouldn't want your legacy to be tied with something that took away some beautiful thing in nature. Yeah and I think Jim realized that and was very vocal go about I think you're saying that's not even on the table. Molly.

Jeff Molly Jim Beam murder earl swift cocaine Jeff Appalachian Trail Conservancy attorney Glenda Hood Darlington shelter Jeff Hoods Woods ATV Pennsylvania Gerry Philpott Casey Horn Signal Mountain Tennessee Markle Marcus Makaluza Karen Lutts GRANOLA suzy
"appalachian" Discussed on Locations Unknown

Locations Unknown

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Locations Unknown

"Like Joe said this took place on the Appalachian Russian national scenic trail which is generally known as the Appalachian trail or simply the. At it is a marked hiking trail in the eastern united. It states extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia in Mount Joe You're going to have to help me with this one could Hatton. It had an in Maine a apologize headed has can had an. I don't know if you if you already know we're we're pretty bad with names so Feel free to blast us on facebook. Yeah A lot. A lot of people like to comment about how we don't know and just like the last episode or the pass episode Iv to the point where it's like. Well I don't really care what you think is because we care but some of these names are just pretty pretty crazy. Try It's totten. That's Tatton Guitar so the Appalachian Trail Joe. I've always this is on my list of places to hike. Oh absolutely there's just so many amazing national parks in the country that feel like I have to hit those first before the Appalachian trail. But it's definitely something that's on my list along with the Pacific I see so. Do you WANNA do sections of it or you want to actually set aside the months and and do the full through hike. I would love to do the full through hike. Just don't know how I would make that work with normal life but you never know. It's on the bucket list. So let's let's do it when we retire. Okay I'm in so the Appalachian trail if you don't know is very long. It's actually twenty two hundred miles long. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy describes the Appalachian trail as the longest hiking. Only trail in the world. More than two million people people are said to take a hike on the part of the trail at least once each year so it sounds like a pretty busy trail. We'll end. It sounds like an. I didn't actually know this Mike but it looks like what they're saying is it's the only trail that's only walkable meeting like if the P. C. T. might have sections that you could write an ATV on or Avihou this. This seems like it's the longest one the world where it's literally only walking. Yeah so it sounds pretty cool. I know there's a lot of different scenery and You Know Mountains and planes and it's it's a cool trail So the history of the trail The idea came about in one thousand nine hundred ninety one. The trail itself was completed in nineteen thirty. He's seven after more than decade of work. Do we know if this was a conservation corpse project that's during the depression like a dead conservation. Obation no no he said corpse. CCC I know you met the core course. It's spelled like corpse corpse recording this late. I know what you meant jerk. Thank you I. I'm not sure sure I was just curious out you keep describing. I'M GONNA look it up. Okay we're doing this more live the Appalachian. The trail is maintained by thirty one zero clubs multiple partnerships in his managed by the National Park Service. The United States Forest Service and the nonprofit Appalachian Asian trail conservancy most of the trail is in forest or wildland although some of the portions do traverse through towns roads and farm land. So if you're planning planning a through hike this a lot of thru hikers attempt to hike the trail in its entirety in one single season. The number of hikers per year has increased steadily with with about seven hundred and fifteen northbound and one hundred and thirty three southbound through hikers reported in two thousand seventeen if hiking at one way in a single season doesn't sound intense enough some people do a Haiku called a Yoyo basically they hike all the way up the trail and then come all the way back down in it looks like one season so that cheese that is very intense glutton for punishment right. I don't think I'm going to have the Yoyo on my bucket list. Maybe just one way. That's completely unnecessary. The Appalachian Trail the continental divide trail and the Pacific crest trail form. What is known as the the triple crown of hiking in the United States? And I definitely say I've never been on the Pacific Crest trail either and I've hiked over the continental divide. But Yeah I've have just done segment. I've done segments of the continental divide. We did actually. We are in Montana coming. Coming down from fifty mountain out is chunk of that the case. We're actually talking about the murder of hood. larue happened on a seven mile stretch of. At near Cove Mountain Cove Mountain is a wildland in the George Washington and Jefferson National Forest and is located in the Appalachian Mountains of southwestern Virginia About four miles east of Buchanan Virginia the forests vast and mountainous terrain harbors a great variety of plantlife over fifty species as of trees and over two thousand species of shrubs and herbs. So it's You know very foresty. Imagine it. It's lush it's lush. I imagine imagine it probably the northern sections of. At will would remind us a lot of force in Wisconsin. Yeah just because it's what can withstand the cold and wind the bitterness southie start getting a little bit more moisture and warmth so As far as wildlife I think your biggest biggest predators in the area going to be black bears. I'm assuming those get more common. The farther north you go other types of animal in the the At are white tailed deer bobcats bald eagles and your other typical forest animals. So all in all it sounds like a amazing adventure to it actually hiked the entire thing. I would love to get the triple crown. Mike Yeah I bet you meet a lot of really interesting. People say natural. Yeah that's what's really cool about. This is because because And we'll obviously get into it along the time line but when there's so few people that do a thru hike and you have little charts along along the way and it's it's what the four service uses to track. WHO's through hiking? Yeah you'll learn that. These people are constantly catching up to one another passing each other falling back so they develop relationships along the trail and a lot of information I got was an article that was authored by one of the people on the trail with Jeff Molly when this happened so it's it's GonNa be a lot of first hand witness experience variance and then what we'll do is we'll link the actual article too and you'll see I pulled a lot of it verbatim out of there just because it's very factual based and I grabbed information from other people's accounts counts and things like that but it's a fantastic story fantastic obviously being grim. But it's just really. I think what I really was intriguing about. It was how much information insight. We got into such a grisly murder. Whereas you would think such a remote place somebody might find these bodies and and you just know nothing about what could happen but you do have this time? Line leading up to the event of these people interacting with the victims and the murderer as well. So it's it's a good story. Laureates grizzly it's terrible. It's unfortunate but it. It's really intriguing and I think you said You you've got quite a few pictures from the case so we'll get those posted on facebook facebook similar to the love pass case yes. Yeah we'll have An album probably a couple hours after the show gets posted so everyone can go look at. You know when you're starting to hear us discuss these things and actually see what the lean to look like in the different areas looked like what molly and Jeff looked like Jeffrey Hood and Malia Larue met in Salina Kansas where the two worked for Church sponsored outfit that took at risk children into the back country to teach them how to hike camp and basically hopefully set them on a more prosperous path. So right out of the gate. It's like a little bit upsetting like these are really good people like they. They spent their free time in their work. Time working with at risk kids in the wilderness. Yeah it's really cool. I know you know a lot of kids that grew up in the inner cities. They don't get a lot of chances to get out into nature so that's it's a really cool thing that they were doing absolutely yeah and he has a kid. I mean you and I think I was in boy scouts as a kid. I don't know about you. Yeah as in conservation clubs so we got to go up to boundary waters and stuff. Yeah it was something. I look forward to every year as a kid going to camp and being out in the woods so yeah. That's great that they're able to do that. For at at risk youth so jeff was described as a friendly contemplative Tennessean even tempered and patient molly a a year. Younger was described as a sunny energetic artist in high school she won a national contest to design nineteen eighty-four. US postage stamp. The two shared a love for kids and the outdoors. Jeff Rock climbed in Colorado and taught climbing at New Mexico's philmont Scout Ranch. Molly had tackled to outward bound courses and spent a year providing wilderness therapy to kids in the Arizona desert so it sounds like they. They have a lot of experience in the back country rock climbing and different terrain so new Mexico and Colorado. We're going to be you know kind of two different trains. You can hike in. Yeah not to make light of like camp counselors but these these two were at a whole `nother level level of ability in backcountry. Just like hey. I work the summer camp in my counselor and I can kind of do stuff. These were these are like borderline survivalists tight level hikers and backpackers so they knew their stuff. So the young couple learned that they'd be laid off soon. So they're doing all this stuff. They learned they're going to be laid off and a six month. Hikes seemed like a good way to decide what to do next. So those are the type of people that can Do do the yo or even just the through hike Just have nothing really stable. So Molly's father. Jim larue recounts a phone call. He received from his daughter. And this is quoting. We got the phone call from her one day. She said you know. I've always wanted to do the Appalachian trail and I have a friend here who wants to do it to. Do you want to know something about the friend. Ah.

Appalachian trail Jeff Molly Appalachian Trail Conservancy Appalachian Asian trail conser facebook Pacific crest United States murder Mike You Know Mountains Springer Mountain Maine Mount Joe Jeff Joe Jim larue National Park Service United States Forest Service Montana Hatton
"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"With bitch is just as important it's dealing with some. Who's lost something needs to find it? Gotcha. That makes good sense. So you mentioned this this book the silver bullet in other American witch stories in obviously, if you've listened to much talk, you know, that I am really interested in silver bullets. I tracking down in in discovering that the silver bullets were much more associated with witches than with where wolves up until the nineteen forties. Like wildly. Yeah. It's I mean, it's like silver bullets were really really really important, but for which is shape changers. Not not where Wolfson particular. And so I didn't know this book existed. That's really cool. I'll have to track it down. Obviously, I'll put a link in the show notes. But when you were looking at which lore of the Appalachians or Appalachians. I I'm having trouble fighting my roots. So. This embrace your roots. It's kind of podcast. That's right. Yeah. When you're when you're looking into which is the Appalachians. Did you see a lot of stories involving silver bullets? There's a couple. Yeah. I'm actually like holding the book right now, there's a lot of story about they tend to appear lot in stories about shape changing witches, which are common, of course, throughout American and British folklore, but up in the Appalachians their OB cases, where there's these these animals that are maybe kind of not animals and people will shoot at them. And and the guns won't fire in men. You know, they get a medicine man come in. And you know, smelt them a silver bowl mill shoot it in the next day. Someone in town is limping they're like a hot it with you. Yeah. It's all I that. It's a witch in not aware wolf, right? Yeah. It's that whole trope gets moved over to where we'll floor, and I just find that fascinating. It's the I wounded knocked zero. And then there's somebody in town. That's got a ban. On their ear. You know, really? So a little bit. So. Lot of the colonial perspective that came to the Malaysian was from Scots Irish descent, and so you almost like a one for one. Transition of folklore from the British Isles to Appalachians. That's for you skit like black dog myths. Look black shuck follows you. He may prelude death in your there's lots of late death superstitions. If you see you hurt death, if a mirror crab. Let's get those are really great. But then like, so even the ghost lore of like what to do with a ghost how to conjure ag-, I was trying to talk to a ghost had dispel ago. So all these come directly from the British Isles. And so it's one of the long term products that I got going on. Now is next ration- of lesser known kind of local English book or from different provinces and stuff like that. Because it's me, and it's like it's creature in Santa sukey attend to land to the superior in creature stories like this thanks attracted to their a lot of literal one for one parallels with Appalachian folklore. So a lot of the lake lost grades disappeared in the river river folklore, which has which actually comes a lot from light water bodices in old lake. Anglo-saxons stuff from the British Isles. Work animal Roman lar- stuff in general. So dislike it's translated in the seventeenth eighteenth early nineteen hundreds as like, Baptists and stuff. So interesting like the ads the cultural shift surrounded as the cultural connotation transforms into. But what we think of as at LA Dame, the folklore candidates dragged along with it. So it's just it's it's a really interesting liquid at the same time holdover, but at the same time like it's right on the cusp of everything that's happening societally as history Appalachia has progressed. Yeah. I I've noticed that. It's well. And a lot of the way the folklore comes over from Europe, brother. Well, if you look at is true for everywhere that it comes from. If you look at a voodoo and hoodoo as it came over from Africa and got transformed, but also even the word at Celtic the idea of gouverneur gusts going getting graveyard dirt in if you get..

British Isles Wolfson Europe LA Dame Africa Appalachia wolf gouverneur Santa sukey mill
"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"It sounds like an Indian name. But I just don't know. Yeah. Yeah. Well, what other monsters appear in the text that you would like to talk about. Tiffany one talking about raven muggers to say about ridgemont. Yeah. So three the Macher. You don't really especially I especially appreciated officers version of any. They don't really have a face. It's kind of just like a ceramic mask sort of thing. Okay. This group of just like endemic, which is kind of playing in the land, basically are worshiping the raven Macher as kind of an upstart God, essentially and doing dark deeds to kind of lake usher for its arrival. There's kind of a low crafty invent the story that I really like. Great secret knowledge today. So the rate of Macher itself in a is a Cherokee legend, I'm unsure if it's something that appeared pre colonization were post colonization likely where the divide is basically. But it's a sensually just a dark spirit that is related to death rights so often mentioned before like, essentially it. Hovers over you in peers in it sucks. The on all the remaining years that you have left to live out of you and take set for itself. So if you are gonna die eight years, it leaves eighty years or so it's kind of like it's very in very very quickly, but the only person who can defeat it is like a particular type of well-trained shaman, essentially. And so if I if I recall correctly, you can't see it like, it doesn't really take physical form. So there's time today of ghostly element to it that I really like little Italy. If wants to be seen can take four and things like that. But above by arguing for sleep inactivity. See there's rain in Moctar is the super traded like like like to well-versed Shane in these in these particular rights in trying to depict them in physical artwork is kind of interesting because like like. Had you depict the individual. But. Love crafting and problem. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. What is it? Look like, it's indescribable was it was Eldridge in the name -able. I suppose the problem. I don't all it. Prejudiced draws itself. I don't see what the issue. And that's the. The problem with like like anytime you you've checked the ill word love crashed onto anything label. What is it look like it's incredible. It's completely up to whoever's drawn before or whatever treaty that imaging before. But I tend to I don't know Mike personal work since I am like creatures. I lift like Elliott illogic reconstruction, I tried to grounded a little bit reality venture slight tweak it a little bit to where it's a little bit. Like, Nick censor, those joints don't work, or why is this hair flying around or something like should get into like like an otherworldly flavor? Sheeting like that. So it went the raven Macher. I tried to not get it inches. I did a did a version of the rain Macher where it's upper happy doesn't have edges, but the lower has these long stenciling legs these awful little feat that are kind of grabbing onto the surface of it sitting on. Horrible debt mask. I I'm very impressed with all the artwork. It looks amazing. Thank you, can you describe Anna's abilities the way I would describe Anna's abilities is it's a little vague in that way that the sort of abilities of most folkloric, which is are a little bit vague. She has some element of just sort of raw magical power, but mostly everything that she does is training and technique, and sort of wandering around is almost like she would not think of herself in this way. But as an ethnographer who's going around picking up his folk knowledge and incorporating it into her sort of like retinue of tricks, but really her her biggest powers that she's very observant. And she's a good talker. Which is very important when you're sort of a smallish woman facing down robbing but somewhat chatty monstrosities, Ben. Oh, yeah. So did you did you include the Snell against her? Snell, Augusta's not in this one. But I do want to get to it into future story. Okay. Also, there's there's the there's a great monster. Which is Murphy North Carolina, which is see the giant Leach, which is one of these great monsters that shows up in a in a Cherokee folk tale about this place where two rivers come together in..

Macher rain Macher Snell Anna Tiffany ridgemont Nick censor Italy Eldridge Murphy North Carolina Moctar Elliott Mike Shane Leach Augusta eighty years eight years
"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"Letting us have look it looks beautiful. And I I'd really love to see a hardback of it myself. So that's I hope you reach your stretch goals. I grew up in the north Georgia mountains, you know. And even so I was I was surprised at how little of the folklore. I ran across you know, just in sort of natural oral history aural tradition. Most of the time I learned from reading fiction or reading books about folklore and things like the Foxfire books, and as one of the inspirations you've talked about was mainly wait Wildman in his silver, John stories sort. That's interesting sort of character in. Some some fiction people may or may not be familiar with. But can you talk about how you got your source material? Like where did you go to find out about this folklore? Sure. So one of the main sources that I used and I've really literally just started like years ago. Just started collecting books of Appalachian, folk ways and folklore, and you know, some of them are really quite useful stuff. Like strange tales of the darkened. Plenty ground is a really good. I'm in the deeper. I got I started getting into books like which is ghosts and signs by Patrick gainer, which is a really fantastic compilation of mostly Virginia ghost, and which Lor. And then the the most really the most useful book was the silver bullet and other American witch stories which is compiled by Hubert Davis, which is really fantastic treasury of various like American, which narratives and motifs and folklore and one of the things that I found in the course of researching this and also reading stuff like James Mooney, you know, minutes and legends of the Cherokee. Is there's all of this. There's all this material. But there's there's so few good books that are just general overviews of like Appalachian specific folklore. It's all regional compilations. It's all oh, here's folklore the smoky mountains, here's folklore of Tennessee. Here's folklore of North Carolina or West Virginia. So in order to really get that sense of like what the regional motifs. Are you have to get all these books, and like read them in just compare notes, and sort of try and put together a broader understanding of the sort of like folkloric systems that you're working with you know, I find it interesting that I grew up calling it the Appalachians in up until like a fairly recent episode of monster talk. I just always thought that's what it was. But I- apparently a lot of people say Appalachian in. I hear you saying that that you did you notice that or did you run into that before the difference in the pronunciation or the pronunciation? I don't actually know where that comes from. So I grew up when I was younger saying Appalachian. And then when I spent time sort of like driving around in North Carolina for sort of unrelated reasons, but I'll take any opportunity to get up into western North Carolina. I heard people say Appalachian and somebody actually corrected me as you say Appalachian. But actually, it's like throwing Appalachia. I was like oh alright. Ya'll your I don't. So. It's really fun. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Because I mean, the the ranges self stretches along way. So, you know, my grew up in it. But my my sister took me to task because she said when I say that it sounds like I'm saying we grew up as hillbillies, and that's not really the same thing. So hardly my now, my grandmother, I would say she did. I mean, my family was you know, all into moon shining and all kinds of other things. But yeah, so we were we we're not hillbillies. Well, honestly, it's it's interesting that you bring that up though, because there's actually one other book that I wanted to mention which is really sort of foundational to this project, which is called a ramp hollow by Stephen stall, and it has nothing to do with folklore. But it's all about the sort of logging and mining of Appalachia, and how you know, the the sort of American conception of of the mountaineers went from being, oh, you know, that these wonderful pioneers were taming the wilderness to oh, these backwards hillbillies who couldn't find their way out of a paper bag and really.

North Carolina Appalachia north Georgia mountains Hubert Davis Patrick gainer James Mooney Wildman Tennessee Stephen stall Virginia I John stories West Virginia
"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"You might say, but whether these legends are based on predictive hoaxes are genuine belief in supernatural haunting 's the mountains around here full of monsters, and that's why we're gonna be talking about that. In this episode, more stir doll. All right. Welcome to muster talk to Asher, L, Beyene and Tiffany therelw. We're here today to talk about folklore of Appalachia. But we're also here to talk about your new project the Kickstarter that was remarkably funded in one day. This is Anna O'Brien the ghost days in theology. So let's let's let you guys do some introduction. I need to Sydney hill. I n a concept artist. I worked for about nine years mostly in video games. I said on full freelance done children's books. Yeah. Do you name it? I can draw it. I've always been like a big creature monster fan for a long time to be marine biologists. And so I've always kind of had a quiet creature pensions to let my work. But yeah, sure about earlier this year, we've known each other online for bit and he was like with neon this Appalachian folklore ending and yes, right time, right place. Right fronted. So awesome offer. I'm a journalist I mostly work on sort of like natural history and ecology stuff. But I also have carved out a little bit of a sideline writing about folklore for anybody. Who will let me do it which is not really as many people as you'd imagine. I mostly got interested in. Appalachian folklore because it was something that I started working on as a, you know, right around high school and just kept putting aside and coming back to putting aside I didn't coming back to and my real interest in folklore and and writing sort of developed together. So now that I mostly writing nonfiction, it's really nice to kind of sit down and do much more imaginative stuff because they they don't let you make stuff up when you're a journalist they shout at you. So you got to have an outlet somewhere. Well, so much for the fake news story. Do you? You're in Austin. Are you doing? Okay. I mean, I've got friends who worked down there and they're bullying their water. Still is that are you doing? All right. That's a that's a fun thing. There is basically the the river that runs through Austin town lake is currently this just soupy Brown morass. But it's really neat because a bunch of a bunch of the hill country creeks run into it. And they're crystal clear, so you get these really weird zones where it will be just like pure clear. Green water, and then it meets the main river, and there's like a little bit of swirl. But it's like a really clear line. It's it's boil water and Aquafina. Well, I hope he do. Okay. I love Austin. What an amazing town. I'm going to say a little shout out to my favorite coffee shop, which is a hounds tooth coffee. Oh, my God bless, unfortunately, it's almost five dollars a Cup. All right. That's the areas. Trouble number to me. Yeah. It's a little rich in my my blood. But man, they make a good Cup of coffee. So. Yeah, satellite. Well, anyway, we're here tonight to talk about Appalachian folklore. But also about your project, maybe we should start with talking about your Kickstarter, even though it's been funded. There's still some room for out. Maybe let me back up just a little bit. What is kick started? Because there's going to be some of our listeners who don't even know that much so Kickstarter as a platform in which you can basically present the idea for a project, and it'll take you have like a good pitch. A good presentation. And you basically say I have this really cool thing that I'm I'm willing to work on I had this much expertise, and whatever whatever background kind of sleep per finally stories that people can like get a sense for who you are wait rate from and then. For the age of transparency. Just basically you say I need this much money to liquidate modern to fund way movie to find my act to there's a lot of table top games. Dozen dragons type stuff with rights. Here's an listening. But there's a couple of us. Yeah. There's a new community. That is. Yes. On the Facebook group has been amazing every time I say something about dungeons and dragons roleplaying everybody goes crazy, which is great. Yeah. No. That's like I do our tax against two people..

Austin Anna O'Brien Asher Facebook Austin town lake Sydney hill Tiffany therelw Beyene five dollars nine years one day
"appalachian" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"You know, for all those people who are tough enough to make it to the not quite halfway point. Yeah. All right. So this isn't exactly surprising vice foot. You should probably wear shoes when you're on your hike. I'm giving some kind of a no-brainer. Today, but I say that because have you heard of the barefoot sisters? I haven't apparently these two sisters from Maine traveled both ways on the AT and for about two thirds of their hike, they weren't wearing. She can't even imagine bananas. But anyway, this is how they put it. We have decided to try hiking barefoot because it was the way we had always walked since we were kids and in the mountains are home or on the coast of Maine. We love the connection to the ground that barefoot hiking gave us every surface felt different underfoot, granite shale, pioneered -als, thick mud. It felt good, which does have a certain romance to it, but it also sounds like they grew up fairly it totally sounds like the girl. None of those surfaces sound like things I wanna walk on. This is all. I mean, maybe the Ma that might feel kind of nice. It's squishy after a long walk, but still. So I know you looted to this in the intro, but I'm going to steal your thunder because I just thought by this fact, but did you know that June twenty-first is national hike, Nick. I mean not to be a wet blanket on this, but is this even legal mango? So yes and no new g. within national parks actually is legal so long as you're not doing anything sexual but forced and Park Rangers tend to discourage naked hiking in general, because the risk of sunburn is so much greater. I mean, somber and other kinds of game. If you've ever wanted to hike the in the buff for some reason, then June twenty-first is your data hit the trail. And that would be my day to not Appalachian trail. That is excellent of ice as usual mango. I mean, this is truly the kind of content that I think our listeners tune in for, which is why I'm going to hand you today's Trump's. Well, thank you so much. We'll and thanks so much for tuning in, hey, if there ain't listeners other piked AT, we'd love to hear your stories. You can.

AT Maine Appalachian trail Trump Park Rangers Nick
"appalachian" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"You're listening to part time genius or talking about what it's like to hike the Appalachian trail. So this isn't something I thought of before, but apparently there's this whole sub community of people who try to hike the entire AT as fast as they possibly can. You know because leisurely hiking twenty. Two hundred miles isn't challenging enough. So the speed hiking practice caught on in the early nineties and ever since then it's been this constant tug of war of records, and I say, records plural because they're actually separate records, depending on whether you do supported or a self supported run. It's on a support it around the hiker has a companion or crew that kind of shadows them along the trail. They might provide water or food or fresh supplies, even moral support, which of course is incredibly helpful on such a long hike. And then on the flip side is self supported run means the hiker takes care of all these things themselves. So every five days or so, the hiker would have to leave the trail and then head into a nearby town to restock on food supplies. I mean, that might sound like a burden, but those self-support runs are really the kind that most regular hikers make. Since you know, there's only so much weight you can carry in a backpack and thankfully restocking actually isn't that difficult because the eighty intersects with the road every four miles on average, which is way more than I expected. I wouldn't have guessed that the. Brought you into civilization that often, but obviously always hasn't been that way. Yeah. Well, it is kind of surprising, but even with stores in towns, just a few miles off the trail that still more time than some speed hikers want to spend. But the record holder I want to talk about today is a self supported hiker his name. As I mentioned his Joe McConnell, he and when he broke the through hike, speed record last August, he was just twenty six years old, but get this. He averaged forty eight miles per day for most of his. Finished when he finished this thing. It was with a stunning one hundred ten point eight mile push over the course of the last thirty, seven sleepless hours. I mean, this. Nightmare. To me, the guy is just the machine and it was that final push that helped him just destroy the previous record by a full nine days. In fact, he even beat the current supported record by ten hours and in the end mcconaughey hiked the entire Appalachian trail in the fastest time ever reported forty five days, twelve hours and fifteen minutes wait. So he basically hiked the whole Appalachian trail in like a month and a half. I can't even imagine the, it's unbelievable. I mean, after setting up camp for the night McConnell, he says he ate like nine s'mores, and then the next morning, his girlfriend drove straight to a diner where he ordered the hungry persons special, any ate half of his girlfriend's breakfast for good measure. I mean, I just can't even imagine what this guy felt like at the end of this thing I know being up for thirty seven hours, you know, as self difficult for some people and to be running the whole time just seems insane over mountains. Yeah. Well, gay pointed me to this interview and runner's world where he talked about some of the struggles he faced along. On the way. And so I thought I'd just read a quick excerpt from it. It was a constant battle. He says, describing sprained ankles, extreme chafing, wasp stings, painful blisters a sore on his lower back swollen quads. And a case of ramdom Malaya's which is when muscle tissue breaks down and releases damaging protein, the blood and it can be very dangerous. Actually, easy days on the AT were few and far between, but there is one thing that made those rough days a little bit more bearable for Joe, and that's something that hikers referred to as trail magic. Have you ever heard of trail magic? Yeah, I've read a little bit about it. It's like those small acts of kindness from strangers. Yep. Like you'll be hiking the long suddenly you'll find like a cooler full of sodas that someone's left as a pick-me-up for any hikers going by the. Yeah, that's right..

Appalachian trail Joe McConnell mcconaughey AT Malaya thirty seven hours twenty six years fifteen minutes forty five days twelve hours five days nine days ten hours
"appalachian" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Hey, there podcast listeners welcome to part time. Genius. I'm well Pearson and his always I'm joined by my good friend man guest ticket or on the other side of the soundproof glass steamrolling his way through a tub of rocky road. It is rocky road rocky rocky road ice cream. That's our friend and producer trysts than McNeil. I get it rocky road. Stupid am my anyway, believe it or not. Trysted actually trying to pass this off as part of his training for hiking the Appalachian trail on. He's done a hike the whole thing or what. But he claims there's a tradition that began around the nineteen eighties were hikers would down a ton of ice cream. I, I'm just not so sure about the mega. It actually is a real thing. It's called rally gallon challenge hundreds of AT hikers, take it on every single year and Tristan is getting a little ahead of himself though as he always does the challenges something hikers do once they reached the halfway point of the track actually in this town called pine grove furnace in Pennsylvania. Uh-huh. And ideas to celebrate the milestone by wolfing down. A half gallon of ice cream in under an hour. There's like a time limit on it does actually, this is general store there that's been hosting the vent for about forty years now. And the owner says that the all time record for half gallon challenges under five minutes. Oh, gross. That is we'll, we'll have to put our friend Yasser the competitive, either up to the challenge to see if he could beat that. But that sounds disgusting. And I'm curious, do the challengers get anything for pulling this off asides brain freeze? Of course. I mean, you get bragging rights of course, but there are these little prizes. They call him victory spoons and it's basically one of those little wooden spoons that comes with an ice cream cone except this one has the words member of the half gallon club printed onto what a fan. I mean, I actually love hearing about all the Appalachian trail traditions that have sprung up over the years because you know at twenty two hundred miles the trail really is its own little world. And at this point it feels like the trails, unique social life is is really as much of a draw as the beautiful scenery or the sense of the challenge. And if you think about it, there's this entire community spread across fourteen different states. And now as we've learned in Morocco as well, maybe one day, but the only thing that ties them together is that poll they feel toward this trail. See, you've got this team of trail maintenance, volunteers who keep the root clear and safe for hikers and supportive residents along the way and these adjacent towns. And they come in to cheer on the hikers or give them food or often even a place to crash for the night. And then there are the hikers themselves, and so they'll often meet strangers from all walks of life. But you know a few shared hardships a couple thousand miles later and they form these lifelong friendships. Yeah. I mean, I have a few friends who've done this and there's clearly no. Question that hiking the is this life changing experience for tons of people. Yeah. Well, you hear that over and over. And so today we thought we'd take a closer look at why that is. So we'll talk about how the trail got it. Started about some of the most notable folks who've hiked it also dig a little bit deeper into life on the trail and check out a few of the clever ways that intrepid hikers have found a keep things. Interesting. So there's a lot to talk about, but where where do you wanna start mango? Well, how about running through some quick stats about the AT just for those who aren't familiar with it? So for starters, the AT is the longest hiking only footpath, not just in the US, but in the entire world, it's official length fluctuates every year. I, it's because miles are added removed as they performed various upgrades and repairs along the passes. But in general, trail runs just under twenty two hundred miles. It stretches from Springer mountain in Georgia, all the way up to mount katahdin in Maine, and along the way, the trail cuts through the mountains regions of twelve other states. And while millions of day hikers visit some. Portions of the trail every year they eighty is probably most famous for its so called two thousand mile club..

McNeil AT Yasser Appalachian trail Tristan Pearson producer Springer mountain Trysted mount katahdin Morocco US Maine Pennsylvania Georgia official five minutes forty years one day
"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A musical over uh i'd say yes uh is the very short answer that's terrific well listen elizabeth will pro uh musician featured on the grammynominated album big ben killing thanks so much for joining us and thanks so much for singing your voices beautiful thank you for having me ted olson music historian professor of appalachian studies at east tennessee state university he's the producer of the grammynominated album big ben killing the appalachian valid tradition ted thanks for being with us to pleasure thank you john you can continue the conversation and get the on point podcasts at our website on point radio dot org and you can follow us on twitter and find us on facebook at on point radio i'm going to go out with the parting glass by rosie and cash it's an old world song of departure from the album big ben killing john harwood in this is on dang to stay but sanders said is should rise and you should nuns i june to leave iran sends saw fleeing good knives and and i am b u you good night and john j b u s u on point is a production of w b you are boston and n p r.

ben appalachian studies east tennessee state universit producer twitter facebook john harwood sanders ted olson professor iran john j boston
"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Uh preserving a go culture and and suffered shock came through here ny p seventeen as well as many other places that but i was wondering about uh africanamerican influences i haven't heard anything ethic of uh i think of the john henry is probably one of the most famous bowed the varlam understood uh they touch on that in the in the album that they're producing randy thanks so much uh ted olson absolutely we have a performance of john henry on the album by the african american singer and mrs kia and we most definitely wanted to include all the different contributions to the appalachian ballot tradition so yes and is the african american contribution a major one yes certainly there are a number of ballots that have that are affiliated with the african american tradition that emerged within kind of greater appalachia you know it it's maybe not the main line per se but it's a very important kind of branch from that from the tree and it's one that appalachian people are very proud of appalachian music is after all a blended musical tradition from many different cultural influences so uh we do talk a lot in this album about the british influences upon appalachian balaji but we also talk about the other cultural influences and it is a quite diverse tradition but let's hear another track we've got a tune by grammy award winning musician david hold he sings the story of the notorious north carolina outlaw here's auto would the it dan dan bongino raided day the animal with the.

john henry grammy award david dan dan bongino ted olson mrs kia north carolina
"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Up weird go in your own come goal might turn but a young lady news there this is on poisoning i'm john hart way by tam lynn by archie fisher abalata from the scottish borders that has a magical quality it's featured on the grammynominated album big ben killing the appalachian valid tradition we're talking about and listening to appalachian ballots this hour you can join the conversation are you part of this music community has the oral tradition of passing on stories changed as it lost something in today's world we're at one eight hundred four two three eight two five five that's one eight hundred four to three talk you can also follow us on twitter and find this on facebook at on point radio in listeners you can head to our website on point radio dot org for a plate list with all of the songs were featuring today ted olson's with me from asheville north carolina he's music historian professor of appalachian studies that east tennessee state university and producer of the grammynominated album big ben killing the appalachian ballot tradition in from richmond kentucky darrelle elizabeth jones she's a musician from this ballot tradition and is featured on this album a ted i want to start with a four point that we alluded to in that introduction there which is what is the relevance and the vibrancy of this music today when uh technology has changed how people consume music and pass it on uh and uh is this something that still has more than a tiny audience.

tam lynn twitter facebook north carolina professor east tennessee state universit john hart archie fisher ted olson asheville appalachian producer richmond kentucky elizabeth jones
"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Now joining me now from asheville north carolina is ted olson he's a music historian and professor of appalachian studies at east tennessee state university he's produced and written liner notes for many documentary albums of appalachian music the latest album he produced big ben killing the appalachian ballot tradition is nominated for a grammy for best album notes ted welcomed on point glad to be here john thank you uh ted first of all let me establish my kinship with you uh geographically i've got family in asheville and wayne's ville spent a lot of time uh at lake journalists co uh which you may be familiar with nearby there um and i i guess i'd want to start by asking you how you got into the area of specialisation that you did how how did appalachian ballads become your thing well i grew up during the appalachian uh kind of full revival which was kinda sub said of the american folk music urban revival in the '60s and '70s and i actually grew up in washington d c where a lot of ex pat appalachian people had relocated and i met a number of appalachian musicians such as soda hazel dickins send john jackson and some others and these folks saying appalachian music and ballots were the shall we say the johner of music that they kept alive in their lives that can that i connected with because those ballots told ageold stories that i felt were quite timeless in universal and so though i use a coal drew their music pulled me here exactly and as an educator i feel that so our wonderful teaching opportunity to younger generations to learn about a history and culture and values sin and such so ballads are timeless are you yourself a musician imi performed over the years in a number of venues around the united states and quite heavily round appalachian iaaf for a number of years was one of the few singer is i suppose at some of the blue grass festivals that i've performed who specialized in ballots.

north carolina professor appalachian studies east tennessee state universit grammy asheville wayne ville john jackson united states ted olson ageold
"appalachian" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"appalachian" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Maybe we could put up like a a billboard so people are there were walking the trailed excite tune into this well that you know the the podcasts available you can download wounded and patrick chila nichemarket men but the number of people walking the appalachian trail have you bust out the new backpack no i have not yet but once my surgically repaired knee none of got replaced is healthy than maybe that some my wife says he let let's try would you try the appalachian trail i said yet when i retire ukrit do you think it's like appalachian trail beer and she does he just try some appalachian trail no i knew exactly what she was saying when and we made like appalachian trail aol who are you will is that is appalachian trail trademark there's something are you led to just use that why is it what that we give ideas on the air in instead of talking privately like how 'bout app trail aol or app l we're late appalachian brewing company by many years ago how 'bout at pale and you download it to your phone yeah speaking of what's the jam patrick show app available napster thank you and you could get legalzoom to mixtures dead nobody steals your copyright there which is not a law firm here notes on and there's not billable hours and that's what's great about it that's why the keep the prices low but i hope that your surgically repaired knee heels up soon and then you can get started hitting the great outdoors to i would like to yeah because it's it's a good time by the way the trigger guerrillas fired up ready to go it's for tses meet friday uh sheahan irving in less than an hour he has to spin the wheel of punishment here you guys have been great helping us out on twitter with some of the things to put on the slices of wheel of punishment we do have one where he has to say nice things about the the ginger.

aol law firm sheahan irving twitter patrick chila appalachian trail