35 Burst results for "Appalachia"

The battle over Chinese tech might not change under a Biden administration

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:13 min | 2 months ago

The battle over Chinese tech might not change under a Biden administration

"One thing. The biden administration will inherit when it comes into. Office is a trade and tech war with china. President trump put all kinds of restrictions on american companies doing business with china on the use of technology from chinese companies like z. T. weiwei bans on chinese smartphone. Sales here and of course an executive order banning tiktok and we chat that still in court the moves were ostensibly about national security but also an effort to keep china from developing the next generation of technology. Faster than the us. Sam sacks is a cyber fellow at the nonprofit new america and a research scholar at yale. I asked her what. Us china tech relations are like right now. I think it's just creating this. Uncertainty are us companies going to have to choose. They want to tap into essential founding to bring home manufacturing to the united states or they want to choose to be in china at tap into gusty or policy in china. And it's kind of creating a sort of zero sum environment for business. The what does that mean for the incoming biden administration. What might we see. Around these restrictions via administration one wants to shift away from a unilateral approach going to partners and allies in europe. And saying hey if you don't ban away from your networks we're not going to share intelligence with you anymore. I think we're going to still see a hard line. Approach on companies like wow way but the intent is to do it with other countries The challenge here with the multilateral approach is here's a real digital divide across the atlantic right now and european officials have basically said we're just as concerned about the unregulated power of silicon valley companies as we are about authoritarian Coming from china one had bridged. At digital chasm and to there are countries in europe that are really dependent on chinese exports and it actually double down or invest in rnd china interesting so the biden administration may attempt to pursue a more multilateral approach. But find that the isolation is kind of embedded. it's not as global and effort as as we thought. I think they're going to have to really walk back from the isolationism under the trump administration. And also i think get our own house in order when it comes to technology policy european concerns about in the us have to do with things like however regulating privacy and anti and surveillance here. Which sundays are bigger issues than just china. So we have to find alignment on those grounds before. We can begin to work with europe as a counterweight to china. What has china done in the interim to become an even more important supplier to other parts of the world by placing these restrictions on china. Did the us actually force china to kickstart more of its own technology. Chinese government has long talked about weaned off of reliance on foreign technology and they throw billions of dollars in a lot of policy support at industries like semiconductors but then they haven't really succeeded at doing it. I think what happened though. Is the Away these were wakeup calls. That said you know what. It's this is a national security issue if companies like wal wait get embargoed from chips and software so. Let's make sure we do this right. And we've seen as a doubling down on china's efforts to wean off foreign technology. You know maybe time around will be successful. It's been studying in the past though. And then what about strategically growing the tech sector in the us moving semiconductor development to the united states. Being less reliant on that chinese supply chain. Have we seen that. Start to expect it to continue jill really early days. So there's a number of bills making their way through congress which would create more incentives for us companies to invest in our d. manufacturing. At home. you know this is one of the areas. I think where a divided congress might actually make some progress China has had made in china twenty twenty-five baited america. Twenty twenty five may come back around and particularly if you're happy. Gop led senate where they're going to try to block a lot of up biden initiatives american industrial policy might be the one area where they kindergarten. What about tiktok do you think we're gonna get to keep it biden administration probably thanks. There are bigger data security risks out there than tiktok one and two. There's a real concern about the overuse of executive authority. The problem is that it really politically difficult to stand. Our the litigation. That's going on. I think politically will be hard for the biden administration to withdraw that case even if they think there's bigger fish to fry and there are a lot of problems that come with setting a precedent like bannon and appalachia talk. But it's not going to be easy to do. I don't think will be top of his agenda.

China Biden Administration T. Weiwei Tiktok Sam Sacks United States Europe Trump Administration New America Biden Chinese Government Yale WAL Congress Jill GOP Senate Bannon Appalachia
Coronavirus cases go up, the market goes down

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:38 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus cases go up, the market goes down

"Yet things up it's pretty simple. Virus cases are way way higher in way more places. There is no relief package coming probably February at the earliest if at all, if everybody is honest with themselves. And that's it that all spills over into the real economy which the stock market is not thank you very much but it does reflect and so you get a cratering day on Wall Street today all three major indices off three three and a half percent all sectors got clobbered including the reason commercial aviation. We mentioned that because Boeing reported a quarterly loss of four hundred and sixty, six, million dollars this morning planes just aren't selling right now company also said it's GonNa lay off and other seven thousand people. So marketplaces and Euler gets his going with a story about a company that is a big factor in that real economy I was talking about. Boeing said today expects to end next year with around one hundred, thirty, thousand employees. It started twenty twenty with a workforce of one, hundred, sixty, thousand. Richard Otto Lafi as an aviation analyst at -Til Group historically, Boeing's been the world single biggest planemaker and the biggest single exporting manufacturer in the US. So it really isn't needle mover in terms of the broader economy and Sorta like Ge. Boeing has worked to diversify Boeing has a lot of commercial military defense software and engineering programs. It's not just building the. Big Seven, forty, seven jets of old. That's Arthur Wheaton at Cornell University. It's a pretty big corporation and has a huge impact on supply chains. He says there's a vast array of subcontractors in the US and worldwide that produce four and with Boeing. So in demand for Boeing products declines, it's felt by many of Boeing seventeen, thousand suppliers like those who make. Jet Engines and parts for wings keeping my you know these are not just people that are turning wrench. Michael Boyd is an aviation industry consultant in Evergreen Colorado. So it's not like just getting rid of couple of mechanics you're getting rid of some highly trained people that you're going to have to get back eventually when people eventually returned to flying but Richard. APPALACHIA te'o groups as his fear is that manufacturing will soon start feeling the pain of the pandemic like retail and hospitality already have and I think unfortunately, we're bound to see additional production cuts in job losses in the commercial aerospace industry along with other similar losses and other parts of the economy because as the biggest companies go so goes the American economy. I mean dealer for

Boeing Richard Otto Lafi Arthur Wheaton United States Michael Boyd Appalachia Cornell University Evergreen Colorado Consultant Analyst -Til Group
Spooky Stories Week

Feedback with EarBuds

01:39 min | 3 months ago

Spooky Stories Week

"This week's theme comes to us from Shane McClellan and is called spooky stories. Here's why chose this theme he writes Hey. My name is Shane McClellan. I'm the creator of the files podcast and theme I chose is spooky stories because while October the spookiest time of the year. Here, are the episodes chosen by Shane for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from old gods of Appalachia and is called prologue. It's nine minutes long. Welcome to our APPALACHIA. We're hearts are good. Hands are. And no one wants to talk about what sleeps beneath us. The next episode comes to us from the cue files and is called the Donner Party, it's twenty three minutes long. This is the horrifying story of the Donner Party told like never before. Next up is scare you sleep and the episode is called Cannibals it's thirty seven minutes long. Spooky soothing unnerving bedtime stories. The next episode comes to us from stories with Sapphire and is called Dula for death. It's twenty nine minutes long. Listening for unique perspectives on death. and. The last episode of the week comes to us from euphemistic and it's called a vampire feeds. It's thirty three minutes long. Here's the description real vampires the draining of blood, the feeding on others and the quest to keep others fed. Those are the episodes chosen by Shane for this week's theme Spooky Stories.

Shane Mcclellan Donner Party Appalachia Sapphire
"appalachia" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

03:39 min | 4 months ago

"appalachia" Discussed on Sidedoor

"And you can hear the little POPs in squeaks of the old-timey recording device..

Apple product-launch event features one big unknown

The MacCast

06:27 min | 4 months ago

Apple product-launch event features one big unknown

"I'm not even going to wait. To Bury the leader, I am going to lead with the lead, which is apple's. Upcoming special event that's going to be happening on Tuesday the apple time flies special event virtual event. Not GonNa. Have any press their in person, but they are going to hold it on. Apple's campus. As. A matter of fact they put up a web page on their site for the virtual event and it has a little hidden Easter egg feature. If you go to the page on and I, list of ice, an IPAD or an iphone, and you tap on the little event logo, Apple Logo, you get a whole augmented reality experience that you can play around with. So it's pretty interesting I won't give away what is if you haven't seen it yet just fire up your way you're safari on Ios and go to the apple event page, but the event is going to be streamed live September fifteenth starting at ten Am Pacific Time from the Steve Jobs Theater on the Apple Park campus. They're saying this one is going to be streamed I believe. So I don't know if there's going to be reproduced like they did the last apple event for worldwide developer conference or if it actually is truly going to be a live event, we'll just have to wait and see they are saying lives. So take them at their word on that one. As you can probably guess from the title, it is believed that this event is going to focus on Apple Watch, Time flies, watch it all fits. Typically, apple announces new watches alongside their iphones but as with almost everything this year this year is different. We already know that apple had plans to delay the announcements of release of the IPHONE that came up actually in the worldwide developer conference call or was it last quarterly results colleague Arab? Quarterly. Results called that came up and So we're not expecting iphones, but we are expecting Apple Watch. So Apple Watch series six is should be coming out. The rumors are looking to be true. We're expecting them to add a blood oxygen level monitoring as the main new health feature in it. Also, we're hearing about improved cardio gram or electrocardiogram features. Also, design is expected to remain mostly the same although we could always get some new finishes colors. Of course, new watch bans usually come out seasonally around this time. So the new fall colors we would expect to see that there is some hints that there might be a new blue color. Midnight Blue Agassi's this is also a rumor we've been hearing about surrounding the iphone twelve that it might come in a new. Blue Color. I'm I'm kind of thinking with a name like midnight blue. That it could be more like blue black SORTA like they did with the the green model in the iphone eleven although the logo for the new event is kind of this Pale lighter blue and I've seen some mockups and some people suspecting that it could be that sort of blue collar. But I think they specifically said midnight blue, which says to me a deep rich dark black. Style. Blue. So we could get a new color apple-watching that could be a hint of a possible new color item they a lot of times like to match those things and then there was also It's expected that they're going to drop the forced touch feature and that's mostly because they're also removing from watch os seven. So it doesn't really make sense need to have the hardware in there anymore, and apple has been moving away. From force touch. With all of their products in recent years. So that makes sense. There's also a rumor that I read that it could possibly the new Apple Watch. have. A fast charging feature to help better support the new sleep tracking that's coming in watch seven. So the ideas you'd be sleeping through the night and then when you're getting up in the morning I would remind you to throw it on the charger get charged back up for the day. and. So if you had a fast charging feature I think more people would be willing to do that to know the not going to run out with their to not. They're not going to excuse me run out of. Battery do during the day. So those are some of the new features planned for the APPALACHIA six or rumored to be planned for the Apple Watch series six. Also at this event, there are possible rumors of a replacement for the Apple Watch series three most of this information coming from leaker John Prosser. Says this is going to be the lower cost option. Apple has had the Apple Watch series three in the lineup that was kind of entry level Apple Watch, and then you would move from there. He says, the design would largely remain the same as the Apple Watch series for with a forty forty millimeter and a forty four millimeter size available. One of the things they would do to keep the cost down would would be that the new watch would not have some of the more advanced features like the e c g APP or the always on display definitely going to be an entry level model he also mentions the branding would be that the low cost model would be the Apple Watch with the series six, possibly getting a new apple watch pro branding, and while on the surface that makes a lot of sense considering how apple. Markets some of their other products and the other parts of the lineup kind of brings it in line with all of that, there has been some. there has been some conflicting information coming from I'm more who has been calling the new lower cost Apple Watch replacement for the Apple Watch series three Apple Watch S E and You know apple often will play around with different marketing names in different branding, leading all the way up to the event. So all of this kind of has to be taken with a grain of salt we won't really know to apple till apple announces it. So they've probably played around with all this branding. Do we take the low cost model and call it the se in that kind of matches with some of our other branding? Do we go the whole Apple Watch, Apple Watch pro route and I'm sure they've thought of it all. Who knows what they've actually decided on I? Guess we'll find out at the event on Tuesday.

Apple Apple Park Developer Appalachia John Prosser Steve Jobs Theater
Podcasts about Ireland

Feedback with EarBuds

02:39 min | 5 months ago

Podcasts about Ireland

"This week's team comes to us from Kevin Dolan and it's called podcast. It's about Ireland here's why Kevin chose this theme he writes. A host of a podcast on Irish history I've been amazed with the interest around the world with our little island with that in mind I thought I'd share some of my favorite podcast episodes about the island of saints and scholars. Here are the episodes chosen by Kevin, for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first one comes to us from the history of Ireland and the episode is called setting the scene. It's eleven minutes long. In this, the inaugural episode, the Party's players and movements bouncing around Ireland in the early nineteen hundreds are introduced. Next up the episode comes to us from the Irish. Passport podcast and is called who were the celts it's sixty nine minutes long. Celtic. Identity is politically powerful, but historically nebulous a subject of debate among historians and archaeologists while being a source of inspiration to some an irritation to others. In this episode Naomi and Tim Visit Celtic Music Festival in the Netherlands to explore why the concept has such. International. Appeal, Tim Explores the political use and abuse of the idea of the celts in debates about identity and nationalism in Scotland and Ireland. The. Next episode comes to us from Radio Lab and is called tweak the vote sixty six minutes long. In this episode democracy is on the ropes in the United States and abroad citizens of democracies are feeling increasingly alienated, disaffected and powerless. Some are even asking themselves a question that feels almost too dangerous to say out. Loud. Is Democracy fundamentally broken. Next up, the PODCAST is called mother folklore and the episode is called the Blue Blue Grass of Home Irish in Appalachia. It's forty minutes long. In this episode, Rebecca Welles a singer in Nashville tells the lads about her Appalachian Roots and the influence of Irish music on bluegrass and other musical traditions. The last episode of the week comes to us from the blind boy podcasts and is called the Goblin of strange uncertain times it sixty two minutes long. In this episode, a hot take on society's response to Corona virus through the Lens of Grief Psychology, a post Catholic view of Ireland's response. Those are the episodes chosen by Kevin for this week's theme podcasts about Ireland.

Ireland Kevin Dolan Tim Visit Celtic Music Festiva Lens Of Grief Psychology Rebecca Welles Nashville Radio Lab TIM United States Naomi Netherlands Appalachia Scotland
Identifying Sedges and Rushes

Plantrama

05:32 min | 5 months ago

Identifying Sedges and Rushes

"GONNA start off with a section for the plant new talking about what the differences are between surges, grasses and rushes and C. L. had a pneumonic device or saying that I really liked and I. Bet. It's going to help you remember what the differences are. So C L would you share that with US please note this sort of to my mind when I was at the Garden Center where I work the other day and one of my fellow employees, he brought a a plant but some customer had growing in his lawn and he said I always get confused between the correct the sensors and the grasses, and I'm not sure which this is and he gave it to me and I said, well, here's how you can remember said just have edges Russia's are round and grasses have nodes from the tips to the ground. I like that one a lot. It's a good thing to help people figure out how to identify their own plants for so many reasons first of all, because you know it's good to know what you have but second of all, if you come across something unexpected or unknown in your garden, maybe something you didn't plant it'll help you figure out whether it's something you want to keep in your garden something you WanNa pass along to a friend or something you WanNa, throw on the compost pile so Let's start with having edges because it's such a nice raw and said just which is the genus Karic's right We have a native such as I think in every state first of all and important to know what they are because sometimes I know in my area people say, Oh, what is that grass that is growing in the woodland and it's so pretty and nobody ever knows that I want that in my yard right but it isn't a grass, it's a and it's either character Pennsylvania or or. Appalachia and these are native such as in our area, and they are beautiful and the edges is they just have a blade that has an edge, the outside edges, and then Kinda fooled in the middle and that goes all the way down in the plant. So so she cut in cross section, it would almost triangular. That's right. Yeah. That's right and one of the really nice things to my to my mind because my. House in Pennsylvania is in the woods and what I love about the characters that. So many of them will tolerate some shade whereas in in the ornamental grass category there there are some grasses that will tolerate but most of them, really like full sun. So using a character is a great way to get that shape into your garden. If you've gotTa Shadier spot the native ones, they are beautiful dark green, their drought tolerant. So they are not spreaders like grasses are usually they're mo- grow more in clumped, but once they get established in an area. They are fairly thick and almost look like a very long lawn in shade, and so they're very pretty and then there are those variegated ones or any number of them that make either great single specimen plants in your garden. Or make great ground cover I have carrots ice dance in my garden, and that's a very vigorous grower and as such, it makes a great ground cover and another way to use these characters. Especially, some of the larger ones some of them that are maybe a little bit taller than you might expect ground cover to be is. A great transition plant. It helps link different parts of your garden bed together. So if you've got a MAGENTA flower here in an orange flower here and you don't particularly want them next to each other plant, some carrots in between in in some kind of interesting shape with a curve and and help the the garden, make the transition from one color to another and if you use a variegated variety of. You're going to have that color in your garden all season long because it's not something that you plant for its flowers, you get the color from the foliage itself. So let's talk a little bit about Russia's when we have both. Russia's that are native and Russia's that are not and they are indeed round. They have a blade that comes up oftentimes they have a little flower on the end of that round leaf and we often find Russia's growing in places where the soil is a little bit moist. Although, I will say that in my area of new, England John Fuses is our native rush and I see that kind of popping up willing to take its chances in drier areas as well. So and these are very pretty plants. They are pretty and they have I mean the texture. So interesting. So you mentioned that there round and unlike the. If you caught a blade of a rush. In half and Cross section, you would see that round shape of the stem, some of the taller ones. Open and spreading sort of vase like shapes. So it's a plant that you can see through and appreciate the structure of the plant almost like a living sculpture in your

Russia Garden Center Pennsylvania C. L. I. Bet Appalachia Ta Shadier MO
Episode 87, Tips and Tricks for the Apple Watch; Bandkeeper product review - burst 1

Mac Minutes

08:12 min | 6 months ago

Episode 87, Tips and Tricks for the Apple Watch; Bandkeeper product review - burst 1

"Welcome back to the MAC minutes podcast episode any seven for Monday. August. Third Tips and tricks for the Apple Watch and Band Keeper Product Review. This is the MAC. Minutes podcast where you will hear about the world of apple and how technology can help work smarter personally and professionally we'll give you the news you can use in minutes not hours. That's why this is the minutes podcast. I'm your host John Scudder from Anchorage Alaska. Let's now go to the show. In this episode, we will give you some tips and tricks to use on your Apple Watch. I'm sure you will find a few of these new even today avid user will also do a review of the band keeper binder which protects your apple watch bands. Let's not waste any time and get started with MEC minutes, tips and tricks for the Apple. Watch. The first one is to turn off always on display. If you're not a fan of the always on display. It can be disabled if you choose to to turn on or off always on display I go to settings on the watch slick display and brightness tap always on feature. Or Off The second tip is to move the clock up fifty nine minutes ahead of time. Some of us are always running behind. This trick will put you ahead of schedule and arrive early in assistance of arriving on time, you can easily set your watch by a few minutes to turn on this feature. Go to settings slick Glock start at plus zero minutes and use the crown to increase or decrease the time moved forward. Number three adjust your quick replies on messages using the messaging APP on the watch can be very beneficial to deliver a quick message. I have multiple quick messages I use when I cannot access my phone an example one I use it as while driving which I don't use my phone and it's an important message and I want to let the call or know that I'm aware of their texts. Here's how to set up some standard responses to edit the message options I visit the Apple Watch application on your iphone. Scroll down to the messages APP select default replies. Scroll down and Select Ed reply and then type out your message and save. On the number four, have your APPs appears list view instead of grid view. I like to have my apps organized, which in grid mode was quite the accomplishment instead of having the APPs icon shown only in the grid view list view list apps and organizers them in an alphabetical order. To apply this feature press, the digital crown next forced touched by gently applying pressure to the watch face in one spot select list view or grid view. Number five quickly send your location using the Apple Watch to quickly send your location to a friend or family member. It's easy using the Apple Watch to use this feature, go to messages on your Apple Watch. Nex select the contact you wish to send your location to. Force touched by gently applying pressure to the watch face. In one. Spot. Then select send location. Number six, unlock your APP watch using your iphone. You, can unlock your Apple Watch whenever you unlock your iphone in one of two ways on your watch open the settings up then pass code and finally turn unlatch with the IPHONE. On Your iphone open the watch up tap my watch than tap pass code, and finally turned on lock with iphone. Number seven, use the flashlight on APP watch. The flashlight on the iphone is much brighter but using the watch flashlight is just enough to light up darkened door lock or nearby objects while preserving your night-vision. Also, you still have your hand free while using it. To turn on the flashlight touch and hold the bottom of the screen swipe up to open control center then tap the flashlight icon. Swipe left to choose a mode steady white light flashing white light or steady red light to turn off the flashlight press the digital crown on the side button or swipe down from the top of the watch face. Number eight use the camera APP on the Apple Watch. If you take shaky photographs or want to position your iphone photo and then take the photo from a distance. You can use the Apple Watch view the iphone camera image and take the photo. You can also use your Apple Watch to set the shutter timer. This gives you time to lower your wrist and raise your eyes when you're in the shot. To take a photo, I opened the camera APP on your Apple Watch. Second position, your iphone to frame the shot using your Apple Watch as a viewfinder. Third to expose exposure tap the key area of the shot in the preview on your Apple Watch. To take the shot tap the shutter button the photo was captured in photos on your iphone, but you can review it on your Apple Watch. Number nine activities with the Apple Watch here's how to change your move goal. Open they activity APP on your Apple. Watch. Go to your rings than firmly press the screen tap to increase or decrease the number of active calories for your daily move goal. When you're done tap update, you can change the move goal but not your exercise or stand goals. And Ten workouts with the Apple Watch check your entire history from the activity APP on the IPHONE I consider this the best tip of the mall opened activity up I phone. TAP The history tab, which is in the lower left corner to see details about your all day activities on the calendar. A dot appears next to the days. It's on the upper right corner of each day that you worked out. And a humorous point leave it to apple put dot there and expect you to know what it's all about. To see more detail Tapa, day to get information about a workout tap the workouts tab then tap the item. You'll get a workout map and a whole page of information including heart rate graph heart rate recovery time distance elevation act of calories, distance pace, and more. So on your work, I'll map there's colors that explain your pace yellow is the average pace. Green is the fastest pace red and orange are the slowest paces. All sections are based on averages for that section in length of time to complete if there are gray dots on the route, this is a weak or nonexistent GPS signal. These dots are where the watches filling in the gaps. Now, it's time to move onto the accessory for the Apple Watch enthusiasts. This is an accessory that anybody who likes APPALACHIA's would love as a gift stores, your bands for your Apple Watch in a secure manner. Ban Keeper Offices Storage Solution, for watches, watch watchman's startling jewelry in pages that lie flat in a suitcase for easy travel you can add pages if you need to add storage or by a big binder that holds many

Apple Alaska John Scudder Ban Keeper Offices Appalachia ED Green DOT
"appalachia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:00 min | 6 months ago

"appalachia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Appalachia, where squirrels or 86 to 86 cents a pound. And food is dirt cheap. And paying for that house. You know, the one that's crumbling. And you have Ah, the couches with the sprung with the spring sticking out sitting on that front porch. How much you think you pay for that? 200 bucks a month. $500 a month. You grow your own food. for dinner. $600 a week. Extra. You get See, That's the argument that the Republicans are making their saying, Hey, let's look at this need based The Democrats are saying Absolutely not. It's universal. Everybody gets it. Oh, and I do have to apologize for people living in Appalachia. Now that we, you know, on the Internet and the podcast. People all over the country can listen in. So for those of you that are living in those parts of the United States. I humbly apologize, even though every word I said was true. All right. It's not true. They don't sell squirrel by the pound. OK, they sell it by the squirrel. They sell them individually. I apologize. It's like avocados heir sold individually. Bananas by the pound. All right, Corona virus, making us very socially awkward. That's another spin on a social level. It's a different world. This is and when we come back exactly your chance to win some money. Some really money. If I am 6 40 live everywhere in the I heart radio app Jennifer Jones leads by a squirrel thie Trump administration has agreed to allow migrant kids detained in a hotel in Texas to stay in the U..

Appalachia front porch Jennifer Jones United States Trump Texas
Citizen science project is changing the climate conversation

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 11 months ago

Citizen science project is changing the climate conversation

"White Husic is a biology professor at Moravian College in Pennsylvania. She studies how climate change affects forest habitats in the mountains of Appalachia and had been thinking a long time about how to engage people in conversation about climate change and a state that has a long history of fossil fuel use especially in rural areas. Where it's kind of controversial so in two thousand ten US started the eastern Pennsylvania phonology project. She has local residents to submit data about when they saw certain flowers. Blooming trees leaping out and birds returning in the spring. I thought it might be interesting to think about. What are people noticing in their backyards? Perhaps a way to start a conversation. That wasn't politicized right from the beginning. She says the project helped her build relationships with local residents and organizations who now trust her expertise she's been invited to speak to fishing and hunting groups and she says people call up to talk about what they're observing in the region and they contact me to say. Hey I noticed this change. Do you think it's due to that stuff? You work on is almost like this. Don't say climate change but they're talking about it and asking about it which I think is a huge change from just a few years

Professor Pennsylvania Moravian College Appalachia United States
Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

Short Wave

08:50 min | 11 months ago

Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

"TALKING FRESHWATER MUSSELS. And the fact that they're dying off. Where should we start so I actually want to take you to South West Virginia right near the border with Tennessee? Mattie put on your waiters done okay because we're about to get into the waters of the clinch river so the clinch river flows at the feet of the southern Appalachian Mountains. The water is cold very clear and that is good news because freshwater mussels live on the bottom of rivers. They're kind of like sorta like the less edible version of their saltwater cousin they don't get the same love but they bury themselves in the sediment and among the rocks on the bottoms of rivers and I went out to find some of these muscles with Jordan Richard a biologist with the US fish and wildlife service who is obsessed with freshwater mussels and it did not take him long waiting out into the water for him to find what he did not want to see how long this is a matter of like. How long does it take until we see something that died very recently won? Shell was just laying there even say it's not buried. That's its footing Jordan. There he'd reached into the water and pulled out that muscle a pheasant shell. That's the species but should be buried in food. Not that's dead and this show is about the size of his palm. It's this beautiful. Golden Brown color But the Muslim side is usually a smooth. Pink is turning Greyish Brown and frayed around Sedgwick's Basically it's rotting in place. I saw that one took a few steps out and by the time I stopped right there at like five expecting not a good way which I'm pretty I'm pretty used to like coming out of your thing and I'm GonNa see just getting completely like bombed with the muscles but it's obsolete lousy you out there finding like dead muscle after dead muscle. Yeah I mean they were everywhere and you heard Jordan say but this is really not what he was expecting. It was not the time of year that they typically see a bunch of mortality You know he was just being nice and taking a reporter but biologists have been going at different sections of the clinch river since it was first noted in two thousand sixteen and in just one section of that river the US Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that the number of pheasant shell muscles that have died is in the hundreds of thousands knee. It sounded like I don't know just hearing his voice on the tape that he was super upset. Yeah I mean he was on the verge of tears when we were talking and then he tried to apologize about later. Which I didn't think was obviously not necessary but it was upset because he's so frustrated by what's happening they don't know what's causing this and there's this kind of feeling of helplessness. This guy is so passionate about freshwater ego systems. It's his entire life. I mean he actually said that he had three fish tanks house one by his bed one by the foot of his bed and one in the living room so yeah very understanding wife. Okay but let's talk a little bit more about why people are trying so hard to save these muscles. They play a really important role in freshwater ecosystems. Right totally so. They don't often get the attention they deserve. Here's someone who knows that all too well. People don't tend to get quite as excited about things that lack burns. Unfortunately that was emily blevins. She's a conservation biologist with Versi Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Which you know besides having a really cool name is a nonprofit that focuses on some of the world's more under loved Chrisny. I'LL SAY AT ONCE. I'LL SAY THOUSAND TIMES INVERTEBRATES. Don't get enough credit. I know I mean I think as vertebrates are a little biased but these muscles do deserve a ton of credit. There are filter feeders so that means that they filter water through them. While they're down they're just chilling on River Bottoms. There's research that shown they can remove pharmaceuticals from the water and pesticides and flame retardants and they remove E. coli from the water. They're like our little water filters exactly so a few of the biologists. I talked to really did say you can think of them. As nature's equivalent to a BRITTA filter cleaning up the water that we drink implant but they all sorts of cool stuff like reducing the size and impacts of dead zones. Those big nasty you know fishing life killing phenomena to keep occurring in the Gulf. They do that by filtering out. Sediment and agricultural runoff They sequester carbon phosphorus heavy metals in their shells. They reduce fecal bacteria from water. And you know like what's not to love about Madonna got it thank God. A single freshwater. Mussel can filter more than fifteen gallons of water in a day and besides that they provide habitat to tons of other species. One biologist described them as like the fresh water equivalent to a coral reef. So these muscles are clearly out here doing a lot of work. We don't have any idea what's causing these die-offs so no I mean we have some hunches but you know Jordan. The biologists set it could be a million different things that is causing this There's a bunch of folks working on this from around. The country. University was constant is doing a lot of work and they've recently identified a virus and bacteria that they say are statistically associated with the dial keywords being you know statistically associated so not enough to say hey dingaling we found it but they're highly suspicious of a pathogenic cause and that is where their research is focused right now. What about the stuff like we? Humans are doing on climate. Change for example. Does that seem to be a contributor at all? Well I mean there's no doubt. The climate change is stressing river ecosystems as it is just about every system everywhere but it does not seem to be the driver of what's going on here as far as scientists can tell But I think it's important to note that there are other human components it sort of brought us to this place as I mentioned freshwater mussels or already on the brink and that is because of human activity fun fact before the Aplastic Freshwater Mussels were actually collected in cultivated by the millions to satisfy a commercial demand for buttons. Their shells were pearly white inside right. Thanks for Buttons Fresh Harman's But even more damaging was just you know the general destruction that was brought along by Human Development. So there was pollution from coal mining in the southern Appalachia Rivers dammed for power streams diverted for agriculture wetlands pay for housing and all of those things have brought freshwater mussels to the point where a mysterious die off can happen and it becomes so crucial to find out why fast because there's so little wiggle room left in the system all right eight. Your bumming me out. What's the plan? So there is a contingency plan all right and there always needs to be a contingency plan But like most contingency plans. It's one that nobody wants to use in this case it's a hatchery or nursery more or less for freshwater mussels one of our living screams So pheasant shells in here. That's the one that really dial so basically this place is like a last line of defense for some of these species they're going to breed them in captivity so at least they're not totally gone from planet earth. Exactly so tim and the other. Biologists are reproducing muscles. Here keeping them safe until they're mature enough to be brought back into the wild they're basically stock and when the recent die off started on the clinch river. They brought a bunch of muscles here from part of the river that wasn't affected And those muscles could not just be used as stock but they could also use a baseline a healthy sample to us as they search for the die-offs 'cause Worst case scenario they have to take some of those muscles and try to repopulate parts of the Clinch River. Where the muscles of Dino are going to stand idly by watching the way we're GonNa do the best we can to help them produce progeny. So of the species isn't going for Jordan Richard. The biologist remitted beginning also is helping with this effort and he says it you know he knows. That muscles aren't as photogenic as a rhinoceros or polar bears but freshwater mussels are crucial to the health of other species. So if they go. We're going to have a lot of problems is not sexy to care about the foundation of Your House and you could renovate your kitchen but he says if that foundation is crumbling and you ignore it by the time you notice a problem because you fall through the floor. It's too late to do anything about it. And then everything else including your fancy. New Kitchen is going to fall through to

Clinch River Jordan Richard Us Fish And Wildlife Service Tennessee River Bottoms Shell South West Virginia Appalachian Mountains Mattie Versi Society For Invertebrate Gulf Britta Reporter Emily Blevins Appalachia Rivers Dino Human Development
Wild Hydrangeas of the World

In Defense of Plants Podcast

10:22 min | 11 months ago

Wild Hydrangeas of the World

"Dan Hinkley it's great to have you back on the podcast. Welcome thank you very much Matt. It's great to be back. Well you've already been on the episode before and we've talked a lot about your background but for those that didn't listen or new to hearing your name Tell us a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Well essentially A glorified gardener. I am the director at Herons Garden in Kingston Washington Nets Garden that I started in nineteen eighty seven with my partner Rubber Jones. I currently have a personal garden in India. Nola just twelve miles away from Heron's book called win cliff. Both of those gardens are open to the public. If you should ever find yourself in the areas of the we encourage people to come to walk around and and then I do a little writing. Delo speaking some design consultation so a lot of a lot of fingers in different pots but all in all plants in on all the blast. Ya Fantastically charmed existence for any plant lover but You Know People WanNa know more about your background in You're working plant exploration. They can listen to the previous episode. After that was recorded we talked a little bit about maybe diving into more detail into some of your favorite groups and we both agreed that the hydrangea. We're going to be the topic of discussion and I'm really excited to pick your brain about this. This group of plants today great. I mean it's one that I have had an infatuation with ever since I've been a kid and of course it's another one of those wonders of the plant world at once. You get to know a little you you realize how little you know and so you know it's unfolding but ever so entertaining both four in a plant explorer but also for a gardener at the such great application to gardens of North America and in Europe. Weather not necessarily native to write. And this idea that the more you look the more you realize how little you know about this group I mean. This exemplifies my entire experience Since we talked about doing this episode of growing up my experience with hydro was largely just a couple of pom pom varieties and then a little bit later on meeting. At least one or two are native species in the wild in southern Appalachia but I had no idea the breadth of what this genus in this family overall has presented the world. It's been very successful in north and south and east and West and just like you had a hydrangea. Nekia Lada outside our back door in northern Michigan. That's like zone. Three B thing. Some managed to survive in blonde some every year. And then we also had hydrangea lessons. Annabel and everybody my age at least to live on the east coast new or knows Annabel because it was such a mainstay a mop head. Arborescence wanted a heartiest hydrogen. Just so you know. That's that's where my introduction came as well but as I started traveling I was dumbfounded. By how many niches they have occupied. How successful the genus. The family as Ben as a whole and also at least in the Pacific northwest. How many of those can be brought into cultivation in? Add a great deal to the garden not only by flower but with foliage as well. Yeah and so thinking broadly about this. I was actually new to the idea. That hydrangea had. Its own family. I kind of limited with CAPRA fully. Acc so sort of a broad spectrum treatment for taxonomy sake here. What's going on with this group Obviously is a lot more refined but it was even a decade ago when I first started looking at these. You'd oftentimes find Hydrangea For Gay she was one of those bags of everything that didn't know where they belong. They put it in the sanctuary. Casey so It has now been refined obvious. Leads through a lot of different means available to taxonomic. It is a family to its own. Hydrogen Jasey and they have Would quickly dissect this. There's two sub families in hydrogen JC Eighty and James Yoy D. And then within the sub family HYDRANGEA LADY. They have made two tribes. Which are the hydrogen d. e. In Philadelphia? So it really for the sake of time in one hour fairly gonNA scratch the surface with just hydrology e which is where the the breadth of ornament event is but the the other tribe in the in the hand I drank. Philadelphia's obviously has Philadelphia has dude see as a tremendous number of other plants that we are familiar with in our garden so they're lumped rate in with hydrogen JC. Now that's awesome. Yeah then there's you know it's one of those things where again I looked deeper and realized I recognized a lot of those those. I guess that makes sense that they're related but again for the sake of time. The hydrangea you're going to be our focus specifically the genius hydrangea and roughly speaking. I mean we're we're still working and I'm sure things will change In the years or decades to come but roughly speaking how many species are within the genus. Hydrangea There's you know it changes. Because obviously lumper's lumper's splitters continually added but it ranges around sixty about sixty species. But you know they're still discovering new species and in particular in northern parts of South America just three years ago they identified. I think it was fourteen. Fourteen or fifteen new species of climbing Evergreen hydrangea from the mountains of northern Ecuador and Peru Bolivia Colombia in there. So you know. It's still a lot to be learned about true. Hydrangea as out there. They certainly have not all been discovered yet. Another big realization for me in trying to get familiar with this genus was this diversity of life-form you mentioned climbing and I'm sure. Plenty of gardeners will recognize climbing varieties of her Georgia. In of course the obvious shrubbery ones. I mean this is a really cool thing that that seems. Like hydrangea has found different ways. To make a living as a woody plant depending on where you're you're looking for them yet no Absolutely Obviously most people in North America will be familiar with hydrogen novela which is an Asian species. That's the hardest most dependable deciduous flowering plant for Shade Climbing Planet. I should say ourself clinging plant for shade in climates But new go south on occasion in Asia's while you find climbing evergreen species of hydrogen in I would say ninety nine point nine percent gardeners even in the Pacific northwest where we can grow. So many of these are aware of the fact that there are climbing evergreen branches at provide grateful during the summertime and wintertime and then beautiful flowers. That are dead ringers. For what we in our minds think of is a hydrant right on and in thinking about sort of diversity at least here in North America You know sort of West East divide always stands out especially when it comes to gardening You're located on the West Coast as you mentioned what you have over there or is this something that at least in. North America is largely assigned to east of the Mississippi and Sorta down south from there. So like in a broad sense mad here. I'm I'm sitting nine Sonny Bloch this morning a rare sunny day in the puget sound area and right off the block that I live on the two hundred foot bluff repeat Assam. We have native stands of our native Philadelphia's Philadelphia's Louis named after obviously Lewis and Clark fame and in the broad sense that is indeed in the hydrant JC. So I can't discount the those plants. If you to California now you can find Wesleyan Carpentaria and of course James Lia and a few other genera mostly not all that ornamental so. I can't say that west of the Mississippi is deposited in hydrogen JC but Zero through hike packages zero. So we have to get east of the Mississippi before we run into the only two representatives of the genus in North America. And you. You've already made not worth one of those are Bresson's which is very widespread from New York. Even Southern Quebec all the way down into Florida and the Gulf states and has variations of geographical variations within. But just a darn good dependable plant for gardeners and then Hydrangea Chrissa fully. Which is more? Gulf state oriented a beautiful very distinctive. You know probably one of the most distinctive hydrogens in the entire family is is found in in the Gulf states and You know turn the breeders loose on these which they have with Gusto in the last ten to fifteen years in your ending up with these new pink varieties of our lessons and then all of these extraordinary forms of The Oakley Hydrangea. So far cry from what was available to me as a young lad when we had a Annabel that was about it. Now we have you know pink the pink forms bread by the Maestro of plant breeding. Tom Rainey at North Carolina. State University is really Extraordinary things expanding the breadth of ornament within that that one tax of

Philadelphia North America Annabel Pacific Northwest Mississippi Gulf India Dan Hinkley South America Matt Nola Herons Garden Capra Michigan Heron Tom Rainey Delo Director North Carolina Kingston Washington Nets Garde
Kentucky coal miners end protest with paychecks

All Things Considered

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Kentucky coal miners end protest with paychecks

"In eastern Kentucky coal miners blocked a railroad track today in protest the miners worked for quest energy and they said they hadn't received pay since December twenty seventh the protest follows the example of a different group of Kentucky miners those miners staged a similar blockade for months last summer and eventually won back pay told Russell is one of the miners who protested today your stand up for yourself and and for for dressing as we got your money somehow you know and it worked for them so much I don't give a shot to see if we can get our money somehow Sydney bowls a reporter for the Ohio valley resource joins us from Kentucky where she's been covering that protests in Sydney I know you've reported that the protesters wrapped up did these miners get what they wanted they did they did we got word late this afternoon that the miners had received back pay in their bank accounts the miners are saying that they were concerned that if they hadn't locked the train they wouldn't have received that money but in kind of a complicated twist they're also saying that there are concerns that taking the stand will make it harder for them to find work in the future right because this is been a very high profile protests right and they feel like they got paid because of it absolutely minus that I spoke to were we're fairly certain that they wouldn't have received this pay if they hadn't locked that string how about the company Qwest energy what comments have they had on the situation so I received two statements from quest energy yesterday in the first statement they were very conciliatory they said they understood the miners frustration and they were doing everything they could to make sure the miners got paid but ID interestingly in response to some follow up questions that I sent them quest energies parent company American resources corporation sent me an additional statement that had a very different tone they were essentially planning the minors for not receiving pay saying that by blocking this train they were making it harder for for them to receive back pay so those were the comments from quest energy before since the blockade is ended have you heard from them I have not heard from them since then I want to talk about the blockade itself because it's the second in half a year what's going on with this industry and its workers right so coal mining in Appalachia production has been on the decline since the nineteen nineties but this is a really prolonged and extraordinary slump in order to combat the the declining share of coal in our nation's energy portfolio a lot of cool companies have been turning to metallurgical coal which is called it's used to make steel but recently we've seen that even that turn has not been enough to to bolster this this flagging industry we recently had some analysis showing that coal mining in Appalachia is expected to decline a further twenty percent by twenty twenty one and that means that things are not likely to turn around that's in the bowls a reporter for the Ohio valley resource covering the coal miner blockade in Pike County Kentucky that blockade has racked up anything so much

Kentucky
Nearly 2 dozen malnourished animals rescued from abandoned house in Appalachia

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Nearly 2 dozen malnourished animals rescued from abandoned house in Appalachia

"There's been a disturbing find at a run down house in Appalachia CBS news correspondent Jim Chris hula has the story on animal abuse state troopers checking on an abandoned house in Perry County in the hills of eastern Kentucky found in nearly two dozen malnourished animals including cats dogs pigs chickens and ducks Tammy nobles with the local animal rescue group all of them were not in good shape some of them has been hospitalized there very Nancy idea that they were trying several of the dogs and cats are in critical

Jim Chris Hula Perry County Kentucky Appalachia Cbs Tammy Nobles Nancy
Professor locks herself to pipeline construction equipment

Climate Connections

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Professor locks herself to pipeline construction equipment

"Twenty eighteen of Virginia. MIDTECH associate professor. Locked herself to an excavator in nearby. Jefferson National Forest. She was protesting the construction of a natural gas pipeline for fifteen in years. I've been teaching undergraduates about the role of the fossil fuel industry and Appalachia and the ways that it has damaged people's environments slightly hoods health. So when emily sadder white heard about the proposed pipeline. She was determined to help stop it. She's not just concerned about the local impacts. She says to reduce global carbon pollution. Virginia needs more renewable energy not fossil fuels. She says if the State's dependence on fossil fuels continues to grow oh the repercussions will be felt far far far from here with the rising sea levels and the extreme weather events and the droughts and the Okla instability that comes with all that satellite was arrested for her action she says as a privileged person with job security she can afford that kind of risk and then not everyone one should follow her specific example but she hopes to see more people demanding clean energy. However that works in your life

Virginia Jefferson National Forest Associate Professor Midtech Appalachia Emily
In Measure Overhauling Energy Policy, Ohio Pivots Away From Green Energy

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:06 min | 1 year ago

In Measure Overhauling Energy Policy, Ohio Pivots Away From Green Energy

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast Business Gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary. Mary comcast business beyond fast. LEARN MORE AT COMCAST BUSINESS DOT COM working to support wind and solar has become almost standard in states nationwide. Some are even phasing out coal but not Ohio. It recently passed a law doubling down subsidies for power plants. Ohio public radio's Andy Challe reports the new law adds hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidies for coal and while it does add twenty million dollars for existing solar farms it rolls rolls back renewable energy requirements and even scraps the energy efficiency program it also does out one hundred fifty million dollars in subsidies to keep open open to nuclear plants that had been scheduled to close opposition to the legislation formed some strange partnerships natural gas companies. The environmental advocates and conservative activists all fought on the same side against what they saw as unnecessary bail out for power plants. It's like this one. The kayaker creek coal plant which sits along the Ohio River workers were eager to talk about the critical cool role. It plays in the region. Chad Burton says for his family. It means everything. My grandfather actually worked here for thirty six years. You know it's put food on my table. Since nineteen fifties the new measure ensures that Kager creek stays open for at least the next six years but if you drive just thirty miles north to Athens workers at another company have their own stories to tell so when we get new contracts contracts. Are we WANNA make celebration here in the office. We will come up and we'll ring style. Roberto Washburn runs third son solar and says her company is proof. The APPALACHIA can be more than just coal. She's discouraged by Ohio's pivot away from Green Energy. Other states are positioning themselves for future while high of seems seems to be holding onto a dime part of the past. We need to create an environment for future generations and by using renewable energy. I really think it puts Ohio in exactly exactly the wrong direction. That's Democratic State Representative Casey Weinstein who argues that this drastic shift hurts both Ohio's fight against climate change inch and its future job creation hopes the new law sends a signal to businesses that we don't want wants you here. That's the impression that we are giving them but for Republican State Representative Bill Sites. The cost of continuing the green energy requirements especially the efficiency officiency mandates were too high sites argues that mandates like those are less effective than the subsidies he voted for. We have mandated in the past. The utilities must make their electricity with this particular kind of fuel. I think that's stupid. Sites Defense Coal as a measure to support grid diversity and reliability other supporters say saving nuclear would mean saving Ohio's largest source of non-carbon-emitting energy and some environmental advocates agree ratepayers will see reduce charges because of road back investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency but they'll see increase fees to support court those nuclear and coal subsidies the average monthly bill will end up dropping by about two dollars a month supporters of green energy policies call that shortsighted headed and a bad investment other states are deciding to put more money toward green energy and innovation but the debate in Ohio is not over yet. A citizen's group is trying to take their law directly to voters and put a referendum on next year's ballot. Their message is clear no bailouts for power plants for N._P._R. News I'm Andy Chow in Columbus.

Ohio Green Energy Comcast Ohio River NPR Kager Creek Chad Burton Andy Chow Roberto Washburn Representative Andy Challe Casey Weinstein Athens Democratic State Republican State
"appalachia" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"appalachia" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"West Appalachia and the Ozarks very non CBS news there's news a tether Myers with your micro climate forecasts are new makes the sun and clouds temperatures much cooler this week compared to last week were actually below the seasonal average county whites by a few degrees what about in the mid to upper seventies at the beaches today low eighties for most of our inland valley communities temperatures stay comfortable right there Wednesday of this week expect things to warm up by Thursday on am seven sixty I'm is it's heather Myers I doubt sunny and seventy eight in Sam T. the Padres open a three game series with the Chicago Cubs tonight down a pickle park cal Quantrill gets the start for the pot is more Mike Slater coming up AM seven sixty talking breaking news Hey bill o'reilly here when Brad and Roger through discussing all the issues of the day I'll wrap it up on the Riley update tonight six forty five right here on a M. seven sixteen. Friday at one tire one o'clock hour we talked about country music are you telling my tone I did not mean to talk about it for the dye our but finally figured out and never mind the torque TQ late my problem with modern country music including that Blake Shelton song right there which had the thing that I hate. as retirement at one o'clock with the grand finale of this whole conversation finally condensed are thought to just brief points. we're gonna make sense of it all coming up in about a half an hour and you can use that as a as an example of that Charlie seven email I did not know that at Stephen white install new windows does numa windows also do retirement planning did I mention I've seen white when I was doing the Newman commercial I didn't catch it is Charlie gas.

heather Myers Chicago Cubs Charlie gas Padres West Appalachia cal Quantrill bill o'reilly CBS Blake Shelton Mike Slater Sam T. Stephen white Roger Brad Newman
America's suicide rate has increased more than 40% over the past 15 years

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

America's suicide rate has increased more than 40% over the past 15 years

"America's suicide rate has increased more than forty percent over the past fifteen years and researchers have detective some trends the number of suicides in rural areas is climbing faster than it is in cities among the reasons more isolation unless opportunity to be involved with social group lead researcher Danielle Steele Smith personage of uninsured of the of the veterans higher levels of social fragmentation and disjointed mess U. S. counties with the highest suicide rates were mostly in the west Appalachia and the Ozarks Gerry non CBS

America West Appalachia CBS Researcher Danielle Steele Smith U. S. Fifteen Years Forty Percent
Suicide rates are rising, especially in rural America

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Suicide rates are rising, especially in rural America

"America's suicide rate has spike more than forty percent over the past fifteen years and siding with suicide prevention week Ohio State University researchers have detected some trends which may explain why the number of suicides in rural areas is climbing faster than it is in cities among the reasons more isolation unless opportunity to be involved with social group lead researcher Danielle Steele Smith personage as uninsured at the veterans higher levels of social fragmentation and disjointed mess U. S. counties with the highest suicide rates were mostly in the west Appalachia and the Ozarks Gerry non

America West Appalachia Ohio State University Researcher Danielle Steele Smith U. S. Fifteen Years Forty Percent
The Marshall Plan

Planet Money

03:18 min | 1 year ago

The Marshall Plan

"Couple of weeks ago we visited the george george c marshall foundation in lexington virginia and we are here. It's next to the campus of the virginia military institute. George marshall is this v._m. Is most prestigious alone ready darren. I'm ready. The foundation was really excited to have us and to be honest. We were pretty excited to reserved parking for mr result ski and mr woods anything's ever been resorted with my name on it. The building looks like an armory cement. Now a lot of frills like a police where you would wait out a nuclear winter or hide plutonium good morning good morning good morning. We all knew we were there to meet a guy named age poll baron. I grew up in houston texas and then after college marine corps and served for twenty four years. I was air controller and a helicopter pilot as anybody buddy told you you have a resemblance john mccain. I've heard that paul does kinda actually look like john mccain. He's wearing a navy-blue jacket with a pin. Tell me about that bad on your jacket foundation pin. It has five stars on it. Five star general marshall was a five star general polls. An expert on the military strategist and statesman hates men. George marshall came over sway to ask him but something that's come up again and again in the presidential primary debates. Everyone's talking about the marshall plan julia alien castro. One of the things i proposed in my plan is essentially a twenty-first-century marshall plan for central america kissed gillibrand. What congress needs to do is pass. A marshall marshall plan to rebuild puerto rico make sure candidates are calling for marshall plan to fight climate change a marshall plan to improve national infrastructure structure forward a douglas plant and the reason we call it. A plan named after a person is not just in honor of frederick douglass to remind us of the marshall plan. That's buddha judge. He's calling for a marshall plan for racial equality and here's hillary clinton a few years back calling for one in appalachia. We have to have like the equivalent of a marshall plan. Bush called for juan obama. You get it and this isn't new. Actually there've been calls for more marshall plans since the original marshall plan which by the way began in nineteen forty eight that year someone called for a marshall plan for stray dogs and cats but no one is being really specific about what a marshall should plan actually means. It's just like this magic. Catch all never mind. The details will fix it term so those made us wonder what actually was the marshall through plan. Why is everyone always talking about it but kind of never really doing it. Hello welcome to planet money. I'm greg results ski and i'm darren woodson today on the show with going back to the caddock days just after world war two and two guy who came up with this plan to help your rebuild after the war george c the marshall. It's a story about what might be the most successful intervention history when we sent bullets of cash actual boatloads to help not just one other country but sixteen other countries. Thank you uncle sam that so generous yep. That's not the full story. The whole whole world hangs in the balance

George George C Marshall Found George Marshall Marshall Marshall Marshall John Mccain Darren Woodson Virginia Military Institute Virginia Congress Houston Hillary Clinton Frederick Douglass George C Texas College Marine Corps Paul Julia
Mountain Dew Turns Mistake into Marketing Win

Business Wars Daily

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Mountain Dew Turns Mistake into Marketing Win

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney leabeau's. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p._b._a. Dot com slash b w daily the uh for i'm wondering i'm david brown and this is business wars daily happy friday everyone well. It's every manager's nightmare chimaera public mistake one so obvious factually inaccurate but there's just no hiding it. That's exactly what happened to the marketing department. At mountain dew the iconic connick soda brand owned by pepsico back in june. The brand launched a campaign called the do nited states intending to celebrate the uniqueness of all fifty states is it designed bottle specific to each state and promised prizes to soda drinkers who collected all fifty but it made one glaring geographical error over on one map. It mistakenly assigned ownership of the upper peninsula to wisconsin for the record. The upper peninsula belongs to michigan. That's the twenty six thousand thousand acres of land that separates lakes michigan and superior as fast company notes yeah. It's hardly a priority for most fortune five hundred companies but not surprisingly residents of the upper peninsula or the u._p. Is the call. The region were quite miffed. The guy who runs the u._p._s. twitter handle a man named bugsy sailor triple triple dog dared the brand to come out with a special upper peninsula branded mountain dew and to give a free case to every u._p. Resident well. We wouldn't be too surprised to find business schools using this case as an example of what to do when you're caught in a blender pepsico took bugsy sailor seriously asli that's right within a day mountain dew vice president of marketing nico- portwood got in touch with sailor assured him the brand would make a special upper peninsula salah bottle now. They needed suggestions for what to put on it. Portwood asked residents of the u._p. They're called uber's to tell pepsi co. What was special about the remote region then the brand designed new label and plastered on nine hundred six bottles of mountain dew gave the sodas away at the upper peninsula state fair where by the way they also gave the ninety thousand attendees chance to dunk mountain dew employees in a dunk tank talk about eating crow more seriously. The brand also redid digital t._v. commercials commercials giving the upper peninsula back to its rightful state on the map. What pepsico couldn't do was to sell the branded soda to come out with quickly one thing to navigate the tricky approval processes and regulations necessary to put it on store shelves well that would have taken too long portwood told fast company in the process mountain dew grew hundreds of thousands of new fans on social media mostly from the u._p. And got a boatload of publicity so what could have been an embarrassing flop turned into a refreshing win for a brand that unlike most sodas is still doing well rival coke as the country's most popular soda but surprisingly mountain dew is the fourth most popular soda in the country. That's according to the motley fool which says its success. Ass is largely regional mountain. Dew is particularly popular in appalachia. The south and the midwest and now in one tiny corner of michigan mountain dew is now number one problem wondering this is business business wars daily this week's episodes were written edited and produced by late apetit ran emma portland edits. The series executive producers marshall rated by for non lopez test one. I'm david brown have a great weekend. We'll see you next wandering. This episode is brought to you by centro. Online from pitney bowes shipping thing in mailing from your desk has never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney bowes with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats and packages right from your p._c. And you are back back to business in no time. Try it for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale but only when you visit p._b. Dot com slash v._w. He w daily that's p._b. Dot com slash b w daily.

Pitney Bowes Pepsico Dunk Mountain Dew Nico- Portwood Mountain Dew Michigan Mountain Dew David Brown Pitney Leabeau Connick Soda Michigan Twitter Wisconsin Lakes Michigan Bugsy Pepsi Vice President Of Marketing Appalachia Centro Emma Portland
"appalachia" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"appalachia" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"This is what they call the sung Appalachia Appalachia. The best people to make weird rap music titles are either really stoned adult musicians or eleven year old kids because that's how you come up with Appalachia. I gotta tell you. I didn't hate it. That's the part. Listen professional wrestler rapper. I've got to possible job vocations for feel good. I feel like he's warming up to me though today. He is he that anyways. You get seem in his underwear. It was totally. 'cause I was like it's halftime. And I want to get some shots up because I saw your hoop, and then I go daddy Eighty looked looked like. like okay. Clearly was it. So you put the Piazza. No. Go ahead. You wanna shoot some hoops? And I didn't know 'cause you know, he's like, look, I'm just a stranger basically in his house, and he was into it immediately. So I was like you want to go outside hoops. He goes. Yeah. Definitely. And then I looked at him standing. There is underwear I go should I take my pants off. Probably. Yes. And he was like no throws it. It's. The big week for female, personal trader Pantelis basketball. Nobody look I'm great with kids. People wonder if I hate kids, I love kids. I just I don't have any. That's all you kids killed it on March thirtieth. I take. How does he know about the Mariners six and seven? Fishy. Fish getting giggle hair. Hey, thanks to dissolve on. Thanks to hashtag talked. Thrones..

Appalachia Appalachia basketball Mariners eleven year
"appalachia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"And then it has what's called milk dip, which is a warm milk sugar concoction that when you take the Sunkar out of the oven, you pour that over the top and it seeps into it. I expect that foodie heaven someday there will be an entire room that is just devoted to people loudly arguing about what's the difference between cobbler and Asanka a Betty and a crisp, and you know all the all the terms, if things that you can get three people at room and get five opinions. Right, exactly. So what's happening to Apalachee now is it, is it a million different stories? Is a going back to find its food ways and routes. Obviously you're involved with that and it's going to keep some of the past, or is it like most of the rest of America? We just keep moving into the future. Well, Appalachia, I won't say more than there are other regions, their contractors that value their past because of our storytelling history, which I was going to site is another reason why we name our beans because then we can tell you the story about it, and there's nothing we love better than a story unless it's eating and they're both kind of in the same realm. So Appalachians are young Appalachians are very keen to embrace their history and couple of things have changed in the economic landscape. There is the absence of coal which is, of course being argued about now. But at the time that I wrote, the book was perceived as a done deal. And in the wake of that communities are looking to establish smaller economies that are interlaced with one another and therefore sustainable. So food becomes a piece of that. You know, food becomes a piece of something that can be produced to be sold elsewhere. Can also feed you and your family. It becomes a gathering place for the people in the community. Food is a way to to create a tourism economy and farming can become a way to continue to stay on the land and continue that tradition. So we are, as we have always been in an interesting moment in Appalachia, and I just feel incredibly fortunate to get to ride around at my Chevy Astro and write about it. It's pretty fun. Ronnie. Thank you so much fascinating book, and it's just nice when someone takes time in the years in the hours to really to really do the research and find out what's actually going on Ronnie. Thank you so much, Chris. That was Ronni Lundy book is called vittles Appalachian journey with recipes. Growing up in Vermont, the locals had a keen sense of place. One family name their street Tudor road. And the next week neighbors across the way, put up a sign, Skidmore bowl for every hill in valley was named for reason, minister hill swearing hill southeast quarters road and bear. Mount Appalachia takes us names seriously to Logan, giant and greasy cut short or the names of Appalachian beans. Today, things are named by marketing directors in Appalachia names. Tell real stories about real people in place and some lucky people even get too cold home. Right now I'm heading into the kitchen milk street. The chat with editorial director, James Hirsch about this week's recipe pesto Geno visit, Jim. How are you? I'm doing great today. It's pesto day. It is and many of us in the food world have made it eighteen different ways over time, but it never is anything like what you get in Italy, and I always thought that was well. Okay. Basil's better than ours. But you went Italy. Yep, to figure this out to Genoa and I guess it turns out it's not just the ingredients. It's how you make it is it is. And you know, one of the most important lessons as always was that we do everything wrong. First of all, our ratios ingredients are way off in Genoa garlic is almost an afterthought in pesto in the United States. It tends to be very dominant flavor, but it's really supposed to be more like salt and just heighten the other flavors..

Appalachia Ronnie Genoa Italy Mount Appalachia Sunkar Apalachee Betty Ronni Lundy James Hirsch America Vermont Astro United States editorial director Chris Basil Logan Jim
"appalachia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"I'm gonna guess it's not Asia in Appalachia, somewhat in the midwest, south of Appalachia others for ten North Carolina. So these me so makers are probably about my age, and they were part of the counterculture that came in to Appalachia and settled and had an impact on the food ways starting in the late nineteen sixties. And they also represent an interesting botanical. Biological factors that they're regions of Appalachia that share certain characteristics with parts of Japan and parts of China that don't show up and other places. Let's talk about beings in that Apple's the names are so great. So I'm going to read Elizabeth. The Gallaher the lens may notes, holy land, rose, beauty case knife, pink tip, greasy Spangler, Logan, giant, and the Deutsche chambers greasy cut short. I just thought, wow, you know. So beans were obviously very important part of the food ways, but these names are just fabulous. Well, and this is so southern Appalachian to me. So I will beans are vital because you were using the pig in order to supplement you were using it at seasoning. You weren't putting a big piece of meat on the table. And so the bean at self becomes the protein. So everybody planet beats everybody, planet beans. Beans mutate spontaneously, and easily adapting to the sunlight and the mineral quality in the ground. It's the time of day as at cetera, et cetera. So the I could give you my bean and two years later. If you lived on the other side of the holler, you would been growing bean from my being seed that would have different characteristics. And so families and and people would name their beings after their family are after the region where it's grown, there's the road mountain is one of Bill best beans and give them funny names to like there's lazy wife being which is a Alesi wife being is always a being with a large being a large bean seed in it. Because when you think about it, you string it lists you get more being for your for your work apples. I recognize a lot of these thousands of rice, jelly flower, sweet..

Appalachia Asia Apple Gallaher Deutsche chambers North Carolina Bill Elizabeth Alesi Spangler Japan Logan China two years
"appalachia" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Mexico City beach area? The storm surge was big enough that many of the houses there along the beach have been swept out to sea people on Saint George island that is in the Appalachia area failed to evacuate and called nine one one. They were unable to be rescued. They have not now been found now that the storm has gone major devastation in the Appalachia area, the Mexico beach area that is where the eye of the storm came in down in Florida. They're still a sin and now that the storm has gone major. Devastation in the Appalachia area, the Mexico beach area that is where the eye of the storm came in down in Florida. There's still a significant flood watch flood warning down there, but port Saint Joe Appalachia cola east point care, Bella Saint, George island, Mexico beach, lots of major devastation. The media is trying to get in there. Again, they had to leave that area and move over to Panama City, Panama City and west the thirty eight area still saw devastation still saw a lot of damaged buildings and homes. The storm surge came up into Rosemary beach into the homes there the front loaned, the Rosemary beach in the that area. All those those fancy will neighborhoods, but it's not nearly what happened in the Mexico beach Appalachia area that area where the I can't remember because because the store sir because a hurricane turns counterclockwise and turns into itself spiraling in. The wind on the northeast side is as the storm whips around is the strongest part of the storm. So the eye in northeast of the I is is where most of the damage happens that part is coming up through middle Georgia this evening. They'll have seventy eighty mile an hour sustained winds south.

Mexico beach Mexico beach Appalachia Appalachia Rosemary beach Saint George island Mexico City Panama City Florida Bella Saint Georgia
"appalachia" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Partly cloudy at Pittsburgh International. It's nine o'clock. I'm Paul Rasmussen. Michael is now a category four hurricane so powerful. It is expected to remain a hurricane as it moves under over central Georgia tomorrow, the governor there has issued a state of emergency for ninety two counties. The National Hurricane Center says the eye of the hurricane is nearing the Florida coast south west of Panama City in Appalachia cola, three hundred seventy five thousand people have been urged order to evacuate including the military at a base in the path of the storm. I'm Cami McCormick at the Pentagon. Some of the worst of the storm surge could hit Florida's Tyndall air force base home to six hundred families all non essential personnel. There have been evacuated and the air force will likely be relocating fighter aircraft that are stationed there. The National Hurricane center's latest. Forecast. Indicates waves and tides could inundate the base top winds are one hundred forty five miles per hour. The storm is about ninety miles south west of Panama City, three cases, have a mysterious illness that partially paralyzes children have been confirmed here in Pittsburgh, a FM acute flaccid myositis affects the spinal cord children's hospital is treating the patients this disease resembles polio. But there's no vaccine there have been thirty eight confirmed cases in sixteen states, so far what causes it is unknown perhaps a virus the symptoms include weakness of the limbs, spatial, drooping and trouble swallowing or speaking in treatment is primarily alleviating symptoms. The Woodland Hills school district is offering to settle several civil rights lawsuits for more than five hundred thousand dollars the post gazette reports a federal judge will have to approve the settlement five black students sued in two thousand seventeen alleging that white school administrators filed false criminal charges to cover a Bourboule abuse and excessive force. Including shocking students with stun guns in body. Slamming them another legendary name in American retail is reportedly near bankruptcy. Here's CBS's. Jim Taylor Sears gosh. Remember them. Cash strapped companies.

hurricane National Hurricane Center Panama City Florida Tyndall air force Pittsburgh International Cami McCormick Woodland Hills school district Jim Taylor Sears Paul Rasmussen Michael Pittsburgh Pentagon Appalachia CBS Georgia white school five hundred thousand dollars
"appalachia" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Appalachia yakking about hunger they sense people seem to sense that he that he was vulnerable that he had a vulnerability about about him that made him more human more protocal and more empathetic yeah and i i don't think i know i've never seen that sense the other thing that he had was the willingness to challenge orthodoxy whether it was liberal orthodoxy or conservative orthodoxy we were sitting in new york city there was the famous exchange you had with i think it was there maybe it wasn't here but a student who said who's going to you know who who's gonna fight the w these wars and he said you are indiana i think you're right you're right yes yeah yeah his point being that we we need to bear these burdens together if we're going to bear them and you know he had no problem telling hard truths and there was just this gritty authenticity to him and maybe it was part of that fatalism yeah but he didn't play the games that other politicians played in that regard he was he was very much willing to tell people stuff they didn't wanna here yeah i think in retrospect once he announced you know after back and forth and lyndon johnson as president lyndon hadn't announced that he wasn't going to run again so finally announces and march seventeenth saint patrick's day in the senate caucus room or his brother had announced for the president in nineteen sixty you now nces and he runs and after i think very brief period of time he became a truly free man you know it's interesting as to why because you know there's this great book you probably read called the last campaign by thurston clarke yeah and the basic sense you got in that book was there was a kind of fatalism around that campaign there was this sort of cloud hanging over it as if there was almost the cessna maybe this is through the rear view mirror of history but that things were so unsettled and anything could happen and that kennedy had kind of a fatalistic view of himself and his own life given what he had lived through with his brother given the nature of the times maybe that was the part of the freedom that he fell yeah i i agree with that there's the it's on tape now and film that day motorcade through chinatown in the san francisco los angeles during the california primary when there was a series of firecrackers set off as as the motorcade passed and the look on his face just a momentary look on his face was you know is this is you know right yeah i think people you know we talk about how unsettled the times we live in now but you think back to sixty the brakes folks yeah it's gonna have a sense a history while as it that's a completely different topic the fact that we don't know our own history country but yeah on the day the robert kennedy was buried on june eighth on the day he died actually june sixth yet seen sixty eight one hundred six young americans were killed in vietnam in the in the week that he died three hundred twenty two is the total killed in action in vietnam in the month of june sixty eight i think it was like over a thousand dad over half a million troops yeah in vietnam yeah riots in american cities yeah a police riot at the democratic convention in chicago yeah i remember that well yeah yeah as well i was i was a kid new york then in watch that on tv you mentioned john tunney you went you you went on to become a changed my life speechwriter for john tunney change california changed my life yeah a california i couldn't believe it you that that campaign became kind of the the basis of the template for this movie the candidate is famous movie that ends with this the the history doing what do we do now after the candidate wins but and you actually had a role in that yeah yeah yeah that was it's a funny scion of a.

Appalachia
"appalachia" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And people were there whether it was this forestry guy who wanted to digitize stuff for his business or whether it's grandma and grandpa and the grandkids and after this event seven hundred people in idaho signed up to learn to code together apple came and we were doing swift and so now there's book clubs in idaho of those seven hundred thirty two percent of them make less than twenty k half of them are women and apple is showing up by video to mentor them it so there's sort of this hustle way and it's happening all over the country in the mississippi delta across the board we were in appalachia and pike ville tiny town we're driving by the coca cola bottling facility and rethinking that's cool number like oh my god of course the tech companies in the cool building and so they had founded a company called bit sources coal miner entrepreneurs who had made many companies in the coal sector who have transformed to have bit source drill bit source code company eight hundred people applied for those twelve jobs and their first job was learning to code now the returing jobs to america and pike phil and also i love their culture their silicon holler and they don't have some valley like awesome i wish they would stop all that stuff but okay but but i love the the point of it is to that it's this kind of latch a culture together with now tech advanced tek great stuff i mean they had the fabulous ads diagrams that we know from google all over the wall and also celebrated their own history we're gonna take a quick break now from a word from our sponsors we'll be back with this interview from the code conference after this.

idaho apple mississippi delta google appalachia america seven hundred thirty two perce twenty k
"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"You know trump supporters are still trump supporters so it's unlikely that people i think you know there's there's going to be a switch flips and that people kind of sniff out of what is happened to them and come back on board and you know embrace something been towards the common good so to speak so my priority is a person who cares about these issues who worked in the region is reaching as many people that are illegal by the political establishment a lot of people here feel that down by party politics on both sides of the aisle they don't they don't consider themselves political and they don't do civic engagement for bringing them gradually into the process is what drives my work absolutely and and final question i mean as people i'm sure we watching listening wants to support your work what what what does what does appalachia quote unquote or what does the left what does the populist movement there connected to the populist left everywhere in this country i mean what do you guys need what would be most helpful need solidarity what we need in the region is more people to meet us where we are understands that you know the myth that were voting against our interests constantly is is this that we have a limited amount of political choices available to us and you know that is that has the fingerprints on both makram from republicans so we need a better range and i think this is true of the country at large but especially true appalachia we need a better range of political choices we need a better range a political candidates and we need to communicate this to the establishment that this has to happen otherwise we'll never get any momentum aroon but on these issues.

trump appalachia
"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"East or here's why there's crime and a city these one note cultural narratives which catch if you things and obscure so much and part of it might even obscure other things that are also negative by the way it's not just a question of like oh you know here's the real positive truth it's just the question of really the full template so maybe you could you start with i guess also referring back to apalachee dealing with some of these structural problems the fact that there's also this like you said you know you could just easily do think piece on appalachia for bernie and you know appalachia of economic populism union militancy grassroots ecology yeah exactly and you know that's the narrative that starting to form now in the wake of the west virginia teachers strike in two thousand sixteen last year it was a place where everyone with care five at something happening in the region would affect the rest of the nation and of course that was you know trumpism now everyone is excited it will you know a lot of people are excited for something that started in west virginia to kind of 'cause you know wildfire and carry over to the rest of the country so it's interesting to me how quickly the narrative of appalachia can which but absolutely you know it's not might my concerns about appalachia the narrative in reporting or not that we need booster ism or that we need more positive narrative about the region we actually just need more nuance good or or bad for example i think you know reporting on the opioid crisis in the region has generally been pretty good very realistic and of course you know of.

appalachia bernie west virginia
"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The more generalized press bertie of them but there has been this resurgence under trump you know and then the vance book why like what is that doing why is what is apple in all the endless profiles to you have a problem with as well of going and you know talking about the opioids and coal and basically it that's it yeah there's a couple of different things going on on the most basic level there's genuine interest in the you know the rising appalachia because it's been so strongly linked to the rhetoric that the trump administration i campaign and now administration is using idea that the cool industry can have a comeback i'm the forgotten worker things like that so it's you know it's understandable that people want to especially the press to come up to understand how those messages and is re new realities promised a resignation resonating on the you know on the other end of this there's a lot of you know psychological projection happening i think in you know we're an incredibly turbulent time and it is comforting for some individuals particularly i think liberal individuals to think that we can project through things that are talks ick onto our region there's a place where these kind of problems can be contained that they're not in our backyard they're always going to be somebody else's problem and it somebody else that is done this drift but is brought us to the to this moment not you know good white people in wealthy or blue parts of the country and sort of splitting the middle you know between both of those positions there's the reality that launches beset by many different kinds of issues but on the same hand there's you know kind of a perverse curiosity about.

apple appalachia vance
"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Gets poor white people we can use that as a nother back doorway to justify similar sets of policies globalization exporting jobs and so on yeah that's really interesting i think what is aligning conservative and liberal thinking disregard and you're absolutely right that the basis level it's a conversation about what's people with power people without power deserve but looking back a little bit further back in apple latches three what we see emerge from the liberal position is kind of confidence that there is a pipeline that we can you know utilize that will get people bring them out of poverty and transform them into functional middle class people so this is sort of like the logic that drives the war on poverty that poor appalachia appalachian also african american in urban centers can assimilate can be part of the growing middle class and that there market solutions that can make this happen such as i'm helping to fund education but also so doing economic diversification through things like tax breaks or corporate brenton kind of additional liberties two different kinds of corporations to come and bring new jobs to apple watch which is of course under the dominion of the extractive industry so there's the faith that i think many types many many liberals would still like to believe that there are market solutions to poverty that will work and so this is what in my view aligned a lot of conservative and liberal thinking about appalachia this belief that there is a crowd pleasing solution to the problem of poverty in america why epaulets and now you mentioned you know the sixties and and bobby kennedy i guess you know a lot more than me but it does seem maybe a bit more you know noble back then of the idea of kind of like we need this could a spotlight on different areas of exclusion in the the.

apple appalachia america bobby kennedy
"appalachia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"South in an appalachia but to wisconsin for example do you believe that this suggests that the pendulum is going to swing beyond west virginia to revive the labor movement and resistance against corporate america and the man it's fascinating to me in two thousand sixteen we sign narrative where the nation with terrified that something that was happening in appalachia in west virginia was going to leak out and contaminate the rest of the country and of course that was trump is and now people are quite excited for something that's happening in our region to spread beyond its borders igniting a wildfires the metaphor used so people are incredibly hopeful that we might see the rise of a new labor movement that finds a way to navigate around these really oppress their right to work laws they're hoping that it spreads two other states like oklahoma arizona kentucky you're now all talking through potential strike actions that that's where we are in as somebody who um you know thinks in terms of pendulums i enjoyed the way that the direction that it's swung now but i am also sceptical that there's intense and cohesive set of politics behind this momentum so far so far elizabeth like you thank you so much historian elizabeth traffic is the author of what you were getting wrong about appellation coming up still more of what the coastal elites don't understand about working class america and it's used this is on the on the media is supported by a language out the teachers reallife conversations in a new language like spanish french and german devils ten to fifteen minute lessons available in the app store or online at the apple b.

appalachia west virginia arizona kentucky elizabeth traffic america wisconsin oklahoma fifteen minute
"appalachia" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on WSB-AM

"I do know that i have a problem with that when you are when you take two kids and they have an equal we did score equally weighted score and the in you a sign of bonus point to the kid who came from the the bad neighborhood from the bad part of town from the rule area it to some degree what you're doing is you you know that the other kid they're not going to necessarily be shut out because of their scores but you are allowing people from a rule or a poor area who otherwise you'll have the opportunities to access those are pretender dis uh on the grounds that is they may then most likely give back to their community were they came from leader in life and a conservatives fight amongst themselves over that issue is affirmative action okay if you use in economic peace program and you don't look at race but the left wants to define people by the color of their skin and they wanna give preferences to people based on the color of their skin it is far more likely that the black student from a wealthy suburb who has he to period nuclear household is going to exceed the performance of the white student from appalachia whose data's in jail and mom works three jobs but what's going to happen if the white student from rural appalachia from the broken home competes with the successful black student who has a two period household from the suburbs colleges are going to give the black sheep in the leg up because of the colour of us skin and i just i personally have a problem with us looking at the color of some one skin and deciding that we're going to give that person an advantage because of the colour of their skin the trump administration agrees with me and they're looking into it the trump administration is looking at targeting funds go into colleges that do this that that wheat race uh that that ignore other factors and i think they should i think it's a good idea i think it's worth doing the faith of the.

appalachia
"appalachia" Discussed on Material

Material

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"appalachia" Discussed on Material

"But the circus over speaking of like really weird things to spend your time on so google the word spinner and in the google search appalachia neocon like about what happens at care khow let's see cooling sbi in in your sleep luna up dare go but he come up you can just can go he kind kinda as an slightly yet an actual interactive fidgets spinner that you that spins if you've which with her with your finger with does nothing but they've someone realize there's a lot of people talking in writing about fits bener's and the very i wrote this and now it's part of the code based on the clintons have them they have like light up one's go in the dark wine massive disney character widens and they're just on instagram like may my god sister and her brother there's plenty of patients i don't understand the youth it slept bracelets all over again they don't understand this a cyclical um we were all crazy i slept braces in the nineties we thought they'd be forever we thought we were the career the cutting edge of new generation and now what happened is not as fini babies for ads for i forget the name of the kid furby serving at talked though right and all of which talent things that creepy uh i i still have not as about their better with the skin those ended this fidget thing also has a number of options and it's got numbers between one in six and spinner so he can do affleck as a random number january but a cool when the doesn't just say okay your rented numbers eighteen you can say can we give me sixty positions on the board than i did to the drop down falloon size yogurt ula some spent a lot of time on this picking on people spending tom of things is an intern project i'd go gulf say said show dale if you want a fulltime job here at the end of their sixweek the kids are into these spinner things dierickx and he could do this one of those.

bener clintons dale google appalachia disney affleck intern sixweek