35 Burst results for "Apollo Program"

The Speech Richard Nixon Never Gave

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:45 min | 3 months ago

The Speech Richard Nixon Never Gave

"On july twenty fourth nineteen sixty nine neil armstrong and buzz aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon during their time walking on the surface which only lasted about two and a half hours. They received a phone call from the president of the united states. Richard nixon for purposes. That will soon become obvious. I'd like to play the entire clip free now. And don't worry it's not very long kneeland is talking to you by telephone from the oval room house and this certainly has to be the most historic telephone. Call ever made from the white house. I just can't tell you how proud we all are what you have done for. Every american this has to be proudest day of our lives and for people all over the world. I am sure that they to join with americans and recognizing what an immense speak. This is because of what you have done. The heavens have become a part of man's world and as you talk to us from the sea of tranquility it inspires us to redouble our efforts to bring peace and tranquility to earth for one priceless moment and the whole history of man. All the people on this earth are truly one one in their pride in what you have done and one in our prayers that you will return safely to earth. The call caused some controversy. People objected to using the moment to put the emphasis on a political leader. Democrats were upset. Because nixon had only been president a few months and most of the apollo program had been developed under the kennedy and johnson administrations nonetheless. The controversy was rather minor and soon forgotten. The speech however wasn't the only speech that was prepared in the lead up to apollo eleven the nixon administration was thinking about what they say in their phone call to the astronauts nixon speechwriter. William safire was contacted by an astronaut and was warned about something that they should be prepared for in a new york times article nineteen eighty-nine where sapphire was a columnist for years. He wrote quote. Frank borman our liaison with the astronauts brought the image making You wanna be thinking of some alternative posture for the president. In the event of mishaps the blank looks at this techno jargon he added like what to do for the widows suddenly we were faced with the dark side of the moon planning death if it came would not come in a terrible blaze of glory. The greatest danger was that the two astronauts on the moon would not be able to return to the module in that event with no rescue possible. The men would have to bid the world farewell and closed down communication preparatory to suicide or starvation.

Kneeland Oval Room House Nixon Administration Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Nixon White House United States Frank Borman William Safire Kennedy Johnson Sapphire New York Times
U.S. Space Command Headquarters May Land In Alabama

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

U.S. Space Command Headquarters May Land In Alabama

"In the South. Several states, including Colorado, Nebraska in Florida, were hoping it would be them. But instead, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey is announced. The space command is going to Huntsville, known as Rocket City for its rich space history. Werner von Braun. His team developed the first American Rockets and the Saturday five used during the Apollo program at Huntsville's Redstone Arsenal. Huntsville is also the home for Nasa's Marshall Space Flight Center and Space Camp. Space Command is not to be confused with space Force, which is a different branch of the military. Peter King. CBS NEWS

Kay Ivey Huntsville Werner Von Braun American Rockets Rocket City Nebraska Colorado Alabama Florida Redstone Arsenal Marshall Space Flight Center Space Camp Space Command Nasa Peter King Cbs News
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 8 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Policy Technology Economics Science Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
OSIRIS-REx Begins Countdown to Touch-and-Go

Innovation Now

01:15 min | 10 months ago

OSIRIS-REx Begins Countdown to Touch-and-Go

"Over two, hundred, million miles from home Cyrus rex is preparing for Nasr's most ambitious sample return since the Apollo program this innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future in just a few days the robotic spacecraft Cyrus Rex will descend to the surface of asteroid Banou to collect a sample of rocks and dust that can be returned to Earth for study. Practice runs have been conducted flawlessly confirming that all systems are primed and ready for the task. The space craft, which is the size of a large fan will attempt to maneuver in an area the size of a few parking spaces although the entire touch and go event will take nearly four and a half hours. Touchdown will last a brief sixteen seconds. During that time, the spacecraft will fire one of its pressurized nitrogen bottles to agitate and lift surface material which is caught in the collection head. Then Ho Cyrus Rex will fire its thrusters to back away from the new surface if sufficient sample material is not collected, the spacecraft is. With, enough onboard nitrogen charges for two more attempts in near future

Cyrus Rex Ho Cyrus Rex Nasr Apollo
Human Factors in NASA -An insight into HF on the Orion Programme. - What is orion

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

01:04 min | 11 months ago

Human Factors in NASA -An insight into HF on the Orion Programme. - What is orion

"We are designing developing a spacecraft that it's capable of taking people Beyond low-earth orbit for the first time since nineteen seventy-two. The last time we landed on the moon as part of the Apollo program or the Iraq program is just one small element of the overall Artemis program through which we're trying to get returned humans to the moon for the first time since those days. So our focus is on the Orion spacecraft will carry the crew we can support for astronauts in space for up to 21 days in the Orion spacecraft. So that's are designed to parameter for that Artemis includes not just a riot includes thoughts. Let's rock. It includes the ground systems that will recover the crew launched the cruise recover the cruise. It also includes the lunar Gateway space station as well the human Landing system wage. So much we will use in future missions for more lunar exploration. So the quite a complex an operation then to have it could be quite motivated to have such a such challenge.

Artemis Orion Iraq
Grand Moon Landing Plans: NASA Awards Lunar Lander Contracts to Blue Origin and SpaceX

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Grand Moon Landing Plans: NASA Awards Lunar Lander Contracts to Blue Origin and SpaceX

"From wonder. I'm David Brown. And this is business. Wars daily on this Wednesday may sixth ever since John F. Kennedy ask Congress to fund a mission to the Moon in nineteen sixty one presidents have been captivated by the dream of conquering the cosmos. I've believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal before this decade is out of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth. Why the Moon why Mars? Because it is humanity's destiny to strive to seek to find we will give NASA new focus and vision for future expiration. We will build new ships to carry man forward into the universe to gain a foothold on the moon and prepare for new journey to the world's beyond our own that of course was JFK followed by President. George H W Bush in nineteen eighty nine and his son. George W Bush in two thousand four. Both bushes attempted to chart new courses for America to return to the moon. But these initiatives failed other space exploration plans of struggled to is Congress. The American people grappled with conflicts over money and namely it became difficult for taxpayers to justify spending hundreds of billions of dollars in space instead of funding urgent needs here on Terra Firma as a result the last time in American set foot on the moon was was the Apollo Seventeen mission in nineteen seventy two now in twenty twenty. That conflict has risen once again. The White House wants to put the first woman and the next man on the moon by twenty twenty four. That's four years ahead of an earlier NASA plan. President trump ordered the speed up in two thousand seventeen to make the optimist moon landing program. Nasa needs a Lunar Lander a spaceship designed to ferry astronauts from Lunar Orbit to the Moon's surface and back again late last month NASA awarded three contracts to private companies to build just such a lander in total the space agency. Funded almost a billion dollars worth of design and development. One of those contracts went to a team led by Jeff bazars his company blue origin. That team was awarded the largest of the three contracts. Almost six hundred million dollars though. Use It to design a lander somewhat like the one used in the Apollo program. Elon Musk's spacex one. A one hundred thirty five million dollar contract to work on a gigantic reusable lander spacex his lander which reportedly can carry one. Hundred tons of cargo is based on. Its starship spacecraft. Eventually the starship is intended to transport people to Mars The New York Times reports. The third contract for two hundred fifty million dollars went to a team led by Huntsville Alabama Company dianetics. The three companies have ten months to develop their lunar landers new definition of a space race. Anyone at that point NASA will have a clear idea of which lender they'll choose one prominent company. They didn't make the cut. Boeing. Nasa didn't say why it declined to award Boeing contract according to the Guardian but in December test flight of its star liner spaceship failed. That test flight had no crew aboard but the star liner was built with the intention of transporting astronauts to the International Space Station sending astronauts to the moon by twenty twenty four. He is fraught with technical organizational and financial challenges. Perhaps the toughest one is the cost. Nasr's twenty twenty budget is more than twenty billion dollars in twenty twenty one. That budget will have to increase by three billion dollars to fund the Lunar Lander according to the Guardian NASA administrator. Jim Breitenstein Stein said the agency expects Congress to fund the Optimist Moon landing mission despite the economic toll the corona virus is taken on the American economy. It's

Nasa Congress Optimist Moon John F. Kennedy Nasa Administrator George H W Bush Twenty Twenty President Trump America Boeing David Brown Elon Musk International Space Station Terra Firma Jim Breitenstein Stein Nasr Jeff Bazars Huntsville Alabama Company White House
"apollo program" Discussed on Get A Grip On Life

Get A Grip On Life

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"apollo program" Discussed on Get A Grip On Life

"Or not find anything. I can't sort of my clients if I can't find this product And sometimes it's something else where the company Shifting Direction Not GonNa do this anymore. We're GONNA do this And sometimes it's just it's cluttering up his space. You can't use it for anything else. Ears a cost of real estate. What's IT costing you to store or something? So if you have e-waste are these hundred pound you'd be boxes are you wouldn't believe it's we WANNA. We started a one of the things. We're the largest any recycling Toronto second-largest lightbulb recycling. And so we bring back if I sold. There's many light bulbs I recycle net. I'd be very wealthy Man Anyway. Recycled lots of light bulbs here and we also started to do. Batteries in e waste is what kind of went with. It is hard to recycle stuff right. We started doing you would leave Skid Shit people are saying that people are yes computers. That are worth money again. Like I'm telling you like. They see our key monitors. That are this long. Come out you know. Pet computers and stuff. I see back and that's GonNa be something computers really all that. Actually so stuff comes out you know. How do people know what the Persian ethic great question give it up even example more so the Apollo program? Okay which is the moon. I believe they can get away if you run for a second so the Apollo Program..

Apollo Program cluttering Toronto
Apollo 15 astronaut Al Worden, who circled moon, dies at 88

America's Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Apollo 15 astronaut Al Worden, who circled moon, dies at 88

"Celebrating the life of a hero here Apollo fifteen astronaut al Worden who circled the moon alone Wallace two crewmates drove around in the first lunar rover has passed away at the age of eighty eight his family announcing Wednesday died in his sleep in Houston warden flew to the moon in nineteen seventy one with David Scott Gemmer went as command module pilot Wharton remained in lunar orbit while Scott when descended to the surface with the Apollo program's first moon buggy that was his only spaceflight he was a NASA space astronaut class chosen in nineteen sixty six Scott's one of four Moonwalker still alive when died in nineteen ninety one R. I. P.

Al Worden David Scott Gemmer Wharton Scott Wallace Houston
Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden, Who Circled Moon, Dies At 88 in Sugar Land, Texas

Kim Komando

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden, Who Circled Moon, Dies At 88 in Sugar Land, Texas

"A largely unsung hero of the Apollo program has died astronaut L. warden who made just one space flight he flew to the moon in nineteen seventy one aboard Apollo fifteen but as the command module pilot he orbited the moon all astronauts David Scott and Jim Irwin landed on a Ford died in his sleep Wednesday he was eighty eight one Jack Callahan this is fox

L. Warden David Scott Jack Callahan
Technologies for the Moonwalk

Innovation Now

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Technologies for the Moonwalk

"Fifty years ago the Apollo Program developed technologies at an unprecedented pace technology developed for the launch and journey into orbit evolved into shock absorbers that keeps structures standing during breaks and medical monitors that help save lives every day technologies created for the historic moonwalk advanced into radiant barrier insulation space blankets that safeguard both people and homes news and polymer fabrics that protect firefighters. The military and civilians technology engineered forgetting the astronauts home safely grew into inflatable rafts offs. That have saved countless lives and rechargeable hearing aid batteries. That help people hear the world around them. Getting to the moon was hard but the benefits benefits for all were huge. Today as we go forward to the moon and onto Mars we are building cutting edge technologies that Dr Exploration and in another fifty years will be celebrating the contributions from the Artemis programme that will transform our lives for generations to

Dr Exploration
Skylab: NASA's Best-Kept Secret

American Innovations

10:17 min | 1 year ago

Skylab: NASA's Best-Kept Secret

"Fifty years ago. America's space program achieved its greatest triumph danced when Apollo eleven put the first men on the moon by the Apollo program was a remarkable success story but is NASA was sending men to the moon they were engaged in another less celebrated project one even more important than the moon landing to humanity's potential future in space that project was called Skylab America's space station chances chances are you've never heard of Skylab. If you know anything at all about it you know that after it was launched into orbit it came crashing back down to Earth but before that crash Skylab Skylab taught NASA more things about living and working in space than any program before it so why then did one of the engineers who worked on Skylab once call call it the quote little red headed bastard out behind the barn why do so many accounts of Nastase achievements barely mention it why have most Americans never heard rid of America's first space station. This is the story of Skylab. Now says best kept secret. It's October nineteen sixty six five years before the deaths of the soil used eleven cosmonauts at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville Alabama Alan beam arrives for his first day on a new job instead of his usual blue flight suit the thirty thirty four year old Texan whereas a blazer and tie he's been named the first chief astronaut for something called the Apollo applications program or a AP but he's not happy about it like every other NASA astronaut being wants one job more than any other to go to the moon he at least wants to get into space but at Apollo applications. There's a slim chance he'll get do either. It's a research development program away for NASA approved at the expense of hardware and technology of its lunar missions could be used for other purposes somewhere down the line way way down the line. Most a projects aren't expected to fly for years. If ever as far as bean's concerned he's been grounded still being tries to walk into martial with an open mark. Maybe A P isn't as bad as his fellow astronauts back in Houston. Say It is. He's heard that they're working on a space station. That sounds like it could be pretty neat. Eat beans first meeting is with Marshall's director a German rocket scientist named Verner von Braun. He's the genius behind the towering Saturn rockets that will send the Apollo astronauts to the moon before that he built deadly V two ballistic missiles from the Nazis during World War Two bean Anna's half expecting him to look like Colonel Klink from Hogan's heroes with a monocle dramatic scowl but he's a charismatic bear of a man with thick grey streaked hair and the only trace of an accent welcome new tenant being. Please call me out. It's a pleasure to meet you sir. The pleasure is all mine. Let me give you a tour marshalls. Russia's buildings are huge massive hangars built for housing one hundred forty foot long rocket stages and all the equipment needed to assemble them in the corner of one building. Something catches beans. I is that a lunar landing module. Yes but it's not going to the moon. It's been modified to house a solar observatory. We're calling it the Apollo Hello Telescope Mount. That's pretty neat. Where's the telescope still in development by one of our contractors ball brothers research ball brothers the same company Mason Jars the very same they've designed many solar telescopes for unmanned satellites but we believe that a manned telescope can gather much better images ages and and more detailed data behind one of the hangars von. Braun's shows being a water filled pit the size of backyard swimming pool an engineer in a flight suit climbs out of it small lead weights dangled from his belt and boots bean realizes that they're using this pool as a primitive zero gravity simulator me later. I didn't know you fellas at a neutral buoyancy tank well technically we're not supposed to but the boys decided to build one in their spare time. Let's just keep its existence between us for now. Houston may not be happy to know that we're getting into astronaut training be knows what von Braun means until recently Marshall the only designed what NASA calls launch vehicles in other words rockets von Braun convinced NASA higher up still at marshalls start building manned vehicles as part of Ah p but some at the manned spacecraft center back in Houston felt he was invading their turf to appease Houston. NASA decided to keep all astronaut training. They're not at Marshall but it makes sense to being why Marshall would need to have its own onsite training even if it's not officially sanctioned your secret's safe with me Doctor. What else have you got to show me. I saved our best for last fund. Brown leads being into an empty hangar. Several men are standing around some in white lab. Coats others in blue flight suits being recognized as some of them as science astronauts a new set of recruits who haven't flown yet but are being trained to accompany me pilot astronauts on future missions. Several of them are drawing on the concrete floor with white pieces of chalk. An engineer is arguing with an astronaut. We need need more room for the science experiments fine but where are we supposed to sleep being doesn't understand what he's looking at. What is this Dr Von Braun. Its plans for our orbital workshop. We're still hashing out the floor plan orbital workshop. You mean a space station. Yes has been nothing quite that ambitious. The entire thing thing will be assembled inside an empty Saturn four B rocket stage. Our budgets here are limited. We have to make the best of whatever's available. I hope you enjoyed your tour sure lieutenant bean now. If you'll excuse me being can't quite believe everything he's just heard and seen a telescope designed by Mason Jar Company. A renegade astronaut training tank a chalk outline representing a space station back in Houston. They like to joke that a AP. AP really stands for almost a program after von Braun's tour. That description seems pretty accurate but after a couple of months on the job being begins to enjoy himself he likes scrappy atmosphere at Marshall Von. Braun encourages his engineering teams to experiment find creative ways to get the most out of shoestring you string budgets and leftover parts from the Apollo Lunar Program being has a degree in aeronautical engineering himself so he appreciates the problem solving that goes into figuring figuring out how to launch the space station sorry orbital workshop the size of a small house he also gets a kick out of practicing maneuvers in the neutral buoyancy tank the concept behind it as simple but carefully distributing lead weights around a diving suit. You can get it to where the person in the tank neither rises nor sinks but floats it just as they would in zero gravity. It's perfect for testing procedures that are simple on solid ground with more challenging in space like unscrewing a bolt from hatch which one afternoon in the tank. That's what being is trying to unscrew a bolt twenty. It's easier said than done in zero gravity hurt cottrill buoyancy. Everything's dictated by Newton's third law of motion for every action. There's an equal and opposite reaction so every time being tries to turn his ranch is body starts twisting away in the other direction an engineer watching from above communicates through a breathing tube attached to beans helmet doing down there. It's harder than it looks almost got it though he breaks his one foot against the side of the tank and turns harder under the effort nearly sends him head over heels but it works the bolt is finally turning got it a little son of a gun. He's so engrossed in what he's doing doing that. At first he doesn't notice the safety divert helping him on the shoulder. He turns and sees a look of panic on the diver's face than a telltale string of bubbles rising up from his own suit shoulder. He's sprung a leak. Instinct kicks in bean tries to swim to the surface but he's wearing nearly seventy pounds of lead weights. It's there's no chance he can swim his way out. The safety diver tries to pull him to a ladder but it's too late. Water is collecting inside being suit dragging dragging him to the bottom being called out through his breathing tube to the surface on leaking fellas but don't worry of a plan. He lets the water in his suit. pull him to the bottom of the tank. Then with some effort he walks to the ladder and hauls himself up the safety diver follows and helps them pull off his boots to drain the water from suit. That was close. You Okay al I'm fine fine but hey does. Houston still not know you guys have this tank is it might be a good idea to tell them before you drown your first astronaut in January nineteen sixty seven. AARP has gone from almost a program into an actual program. The Apollo Telescope Mount once envision as its own separate spacecraft gets combined with the orbital workshop to make one on single massive space station plans take shape for science and medical experiments testing the human body's response to extended stays in is zero gravity marshalls engineers developed new methods for storing and preparing food and disposing of voiced the even finally get the budget to build a bigger NASA sanctioned neutral buoyancy tank. A tentative launch date for the station is set June nineteen sixty eight. The first crew demand it. We'll stay up for twenty eight days twice. As long as anyone's ever spent in space being grows cautiously optimistic. Maybe the space station it really will fly and he'll be the one who gets to fly it

Verner Von Braun Nasa Houston Engineer Marshall Marshall Space Flight Center Apollo Bean Skylab America Apollo Telescope Mount America Marshall Von Alabama Huntsville Russia Aarp Nastase
To return to the Moon, astronauts need new spacesuits

SPACE NEWS POD

07:01 min | 2 years ago

To return to the Moon, astronauts need new spacesuits

"We're going to be talking a bound an astronaut a nasa astronaut actually that is telling nasa that they need a new space suit for for their twenty twenty four artists missions now the artist mission is going to be sending the first woman in the next man. The surface of the moon in nasa is still using technology from the seventies basically and and their space suits of the they've been upgraded and you know they've been enhanced a little bit but they're basically you know the the kind of the same suits as they were back back then and sandra sandy magnus who's a flight tested former nasa astronaut let nasa know that they have a big problem during an official meeting of space flight safety experts in houston texas on friday so nasr's aerospace safety advisory panel both the ACT up which is an independent group who has represented by magnus held its quarterly meeting at johnson space center asep is tasked the valuating nasa safety performance in advising the agency on ways to improve their performance so since it's were going back to the moon really soon. It's only five years from now. We're going to need new technology. We're going to need new spacesuits. We're going to need a way for our nasa the astronauts to <hes> beyond the surface of the moon safely were using the same technology on the ISS assess that we used during the apollo program basically been enhanced like i said before but same suits this and that was the reason why we were supposed to have a <hes> all women's space walk a little while ago and because these suits didn't work properly that's why it never happened now this companies like spacex and boeing who were making their own space suits in there making them because they're sending astronauts back up to the international space station from US soil on US rockets in in the next year or so so in november of this year. If all goes well spacex will be sending the first people back to the international space station from united states on one of their rockets in one of their capsules and they'll be wearing spacex space x spacesuits now these are only built for launching from the earth to the national space station but massa. Maybe able to contract this stuff out to private. Companies like spacex or boeing boeing has a really grey suit as well. I didn't wanna just highly space x there but boeing has a really grey suit and boeing his also sending astronauts back to the international space station from US soil in the coming coming years so so there's some technology out there that they're using this new technology and you know magnus has been up to the international space station twice and she spent over five months in orbit and she knows what it takes to make safety a priority when you're in space. She said an integral system required to put boots on the moon. Are the boots basically saying hey these space suits aren't up to par with what we need as astronauts to get back to the moon and do it safely. She added that the space suits are essentially actually one person spaceships that deserves similar levels of funding and scrutiny as the rest of the optimist program 'cause we hear about the launch vehicles the s. l. s. possibly using a spacex or boeing walk rocket or rocket am using the capsules from these private companies or like i said using a ryan and s LS which is nasa's gigantic a next level rocket now they're focusing on that but they really need to be working on these spacesuits getting them up to par with new technology and the new ways as we're going to be exploring on the moon's surface. We're not just going to be digging up rock samples anymore. You know that's what the original the original apollo missions were for there for exploration. There were some science stuff but these ones these missions are different. We're going to be building a colony on the moon and we're going to be building technology that will allow us to settle human beings on the surface of our closest neighbor. The moon so magnus went on to say they're complex and they have stringent safety requirements and are a critical component of not only the lunar program but actually any potential. You'll exploration path the human spaceflight being engaged upon in the future so make a spacesuit. That's good for the moon. Make a good spacesuit. That's good for the trips and also make us base sued. That's good for anything past them looking forward lord future-proof it. If we wanna go to mars we got a spacesuit this ready to go so suit up jumping your rocket. Let's get an starship ship and we will launch ourselves to mars and we'll be fine doing it. We're not gonna be in any sort of peril because of our space suits so nasa is only operational. VA spacesuits are off planet right now on board the ISS they do attest suits here on earth but the only operational wants that are fully operational are on the international space station. They're each about forty years old. When was the last time you had any piece of clothing. That was ten years old. I don't think it happens but these space suits are so good that they're forty years old and they're still functioning but there's showing the signs of their age. They've lasted a really long time. The technology still works but it's very outdated. The painl- anal previously reported the nasa is struggling to upgrade their suits. Let alone maintain them. The problem doesn't lie simply. The fact act the suits are old. The fact the manufacturers of several critical components including the very fabric of the suits have now gone out of a business so you can't get these materials from the same companies that started making these suits to begin with so it's time to move on it.

Nasa Boeing Spacex Sandra Sandy Magnus Johnson Space Center United States Houston Texas Nasr Official VA ISS Massa Ryan Forty Years Five Months Five Years Ten Years
Pioneer of Spaceflight

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Pioneer of Spaceflight

"He created the concept of nastase mission control. This is innovation now. Christopher c kraft was one of the fourteen eighteen members who helped put humans in space and on the moon craft joined the nasa space task group in nineteen fifty eight as nasr's first flight it director he personally invented the mission planning and control processes for crewed space missions developing procedures for go no go decisions space to ground communications space tracking and crew recovery born in nineteen twenty four in feebis virginia chris did not develop an interest chris flight until a professor at virginia polytechnic institute now known as virginia tech passed on his interest in airplanes nasa presented did craft with the agencies ambassador of exploration award given to astronauts and key individuals from the mercury gemini and apollo programs grams for realising america's vision of space exploration nassar's johnson space center named building thirty housing mission control in his honor but christopher crafts legacy was immeasurable. We join nasa in paying tribute to one of spaceflights earliest pioneers for innovation now. I'm jennifer pulling innovation. Now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa.

Nasa Johnson Space Center Virginia Polytechnic Institute Christopher C Kraft Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Virginia Nassar Director Professor America
Benefits on Earth

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Benefits on Earth

"The apollo program brought real world benefits to people here on earth. This is innovation now. Bringing you stories stories behind the ideas that shape our future fifty years ago the apollo program developed technologies at an unprecedented pace technology developed for the launch and journey into orbit evolved into shock absorbers that keeps structures standing during earthquakes and medical monitors that help save lives every day technologies created for the historic moonwalk advanced into radiant barrier insulation space blankets that safeguard both people and homes news and polymer fabrics that protect firefighters the military and civilians technology engineered forgetting the astronauts home safely grew into inflatable rafts offs that have saved countless lives and rechargeable hearing aid batteries that help people hear the world around them getting to the moon was hard but the benefits benefits for all were huge today as we go forward to the moon and onto mars. We are building cutting edge technologies that dr exploration.

Fifty Years
Who is Boris Johnson?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:18 min | 2 years ago

Who is Boris Johnson?

"A major I will all democracy and nuclear armed superpower is to be led by a shambling tousled blond with a complicated relationship with his ex wives and the truth who made his name principally as a professional media buffoon and has demonstrated a persistent willingness to pander to the worst instincts of his party and his country if he thinks it will serve his animating purpose on E. himself. What could possibly go wrong? We have a really good man is going to be the Prime Minister of the U._K.. Now for a Saxon is tough his spine <hes> <hes> this a Briton trump they call in Britain trump and people are saying. That's a good thing that they liked me over there. That's what they wanted. What they what they one one need? He'll get it done. Boris is good is going to do a good job comparisons. Between Boris Johnson and Donald Trump are as irresistible as cheap shots usually are and do not finish a complete picture difference which may prove crucial to Johnson's prospects is that while trump was elected by the American American People Johnson was chosen by the small Coterie of mad retired colonels and they're resentful wives who constitute the membership of the U._K.'s Conservative Party. I know that there will be people uh around the place will question the wisdom of your decision and they may even be some people here who still wonder what quite what they have done but let's begin with basic the younger affi while we re County C._v. of the United Kingdom's new prime minister for the benefit of Monaco twenty-four global audience our British listeners can according to inclination the put the kettle on all stalk purposefully into into the sea fully clothed never to be heard from again. And Johnson arrives in Downing Street via what looks like a diligent and studious ticking off of every milestone of a serene procession through the British Establishment Eaten Oxford The Times the Telegraph The Spectator Parliament the morality of London the Foreign and Commonwealth Office but there has been much more to it yet weirdly much less to it than that more to its in the as Johnson has stumbled and lurched from desirable job to coveted post he she has turned himself into a fondly indulged national figure known universally by his first name and address far too often as such by the British media among which he inevitably has many acquaintances. You've lied to the people of Lebanon your own Shit Stop. Can I call on you to throw that remote. I'm sorry I'm sorry I pull the giants to so you just pulled tight. I'm various and blessed to it in the Johnson has accomplished very little in any of those roles beyond the burnishing of the renown of Boris Johnson. He lost his first newspaper Job for inventing quote. Then made his name as a Brussels correspondent by filing absurd FIBS about the E._U.. He Left City Hall with a legacy of uncomfortable buses and unusable water cannon and a huge bill for a bridge that never got built his stint as foreign secretary is widely recalled with both gratitude and incredulity that he didn't inadvertently get Britain into a war with Finland and we know the mantra of the campaign that has just gone by Casey forgotten it. I was going to come to deliver brexit unite the country and defeat Jeremy Corbyn Not GonNa do the question now faces Johnson and the United Kingdom and NATO and the E._U. is whether he will or indeed can for the first time in his enraging Lee consequence free life rise to the office he inhabits. It is no secret how Johnson Johnson sees himself his two thousand fourteen book the Churchill factor was a none too thinly disguised attempts to encourage readers to perceive similarities between Johnson and his subject Churchill also being a former. Journalists of willful personal habits who overcame successive setbacks to rescue his nation at a moment of grave peril the difficulty well one of the difficulties with this analysis is that Churchill didn't invade Poland himself whereas brexit Johnson's looming nemesis is significantly a crisis of Johnson's own orchestration many of the underpinning folk myths of the Brexit Movement the straightened bananas the banishing of prone cocktail cocktail crisps were created or amplified by Johnson during his time reporting on the E._U.. If the fate of a nation didn't rest on the spectacle of Johnson being consumed by the beastie unleashed would be quite satisfying viewing doing. I'm afraid that in the there is such a rich thesaurus now of things that I've said that to being <hes> one way or another through what Alchemy I do not know somehow misconstrued that it would take me too long hi to engage in a food globally tillery of of apology to to all concerned. It is very difficult to imagine that this is not what now awaits him. Johnson has promised that by Hook or crook the U._k.. Will leave the E._U.. By the most recently. Leash scheduled departure date of October. Thirty First Johnson has urged his fellow citizens alone by invoking the spirit of the Apollo program which fifty years ago this month put the first men on the moon. A few of Johnson's fellow citizens have been sufficiently churlish to observe that Armstrong and Aldrin reached tranquility base after the cleverest people in their country had spent the thick end of a decade constructing a workable apparatus forgetting them their brexit. Thus far has been almost exclusively a cause of opinion hawkers slogan Breyer's and Opportunity Yahoos Johnson who fancies himself a man of destiny may find his allies as painful as his opponents. I think it would be a huge mistake. Damaging unnecessary and I think also dishonest I could not serve with Boris Johnson all of which is assuming Johnson even gets the chance he faces on helpful parliamentary arithmetic his party remains as divided and Cranky as ever and that is to say nothing of the catalyst of chaos that is brexit. It's very important moment for the Brexit and we look forward to hearing what the new prime minister.

Johnson Johnson Brexit Prime Minister United Kingdom Britain Boris Donald Trump Churchill Conservative Party Brussels City Hall American American People Jeremy Corbyn Breyer Lebanon Brexit Movement Finland Commonwealth Office Oxford The Times
"apollo program" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Clayson. We're discussing the first moon landing fifty years ago this weekend and the road ahead for the U._S.. Space for U._S.. Space exploration ration- and you can join the conversation fifty years on what are you now learning about that mission about the role of women about American dominance in the world follow us on twitter find us on facebook where it on point radio from the Earth to the moon is a nineteen ninety eight H._B._O.. H._B._O.. Mini series starring. Tom Hanks it's based on my guest Andrew Chickens Book a Man on the Moon which tells the story of the Apollo Program during the nineteen sixties in early Seventies. This seemed to picks the moment before liftoff of Apollo twelve the second lunar lunar landing mission store with me this hour Andrew Chacon. He is a space historian and author of a man on the moon the voyages of the Apollo astronauts which was made into that it H._B._O.. Mini series <hes> also with me from Houston is Alex Alex Stocky. She is the NASA and science reporter for the Houston Chronicle and Co host of the podcast cigarettes and rocket fuel. Let's go to the phones. Fred is in Boston Massachusetts. Hi Fred Welcome to the program Graham Hi Jane. I just thought it would be interesting for people to hear that. I was returning from Vietnam Vet Night Flying Between San Francisco in Chicago <hes> the the aircraft commander announced over the P._A.. System that men had stepped onto the moon <hes> there was a huge cheer on the aircraft. <hes> the one by one <hes> the flight crew came back <hes> <hes> the folks in First Class bought US hold drinks in the back. <hes> people were just ecstatic and <hes> it's not just landing on the moon but landing to see my wife and Chicago made a big deal. You'll never forget that Fred. Thank you at a great story. I appreciate your call. <hes> so much enter Chacon <hes> president Kennedy's assassination in nineteen sixty three really could have derailed or delayed the success of the Apollo mission but it didn't and inland Johnson proved to be just as fervent an advocate for the space program. Didn't he even more so really I mean <hes> when Kennedy was trying to think of what to do to beat the Soviets in space he gave that task to Lyndon Johnson. It was really Lyndon Johnson who spearheaded that that effort at the White House and after Kennedy's assassination Johnson showed himself to be the most space <hes> positive president we've ever had <hes> and but you know he was overtaken events the the war in Vietnam is our caller was part of <hes> meant that even though Johnson loved NASA love the space program he had to turn his attention to things like the war and which began to <hes> cost much much more than the Apollo program. I mean really it makes the Apollo program looked like a blip <hes> and so that's one of the reasons why even before we got to the Moon Nasr's budget it started coming down. It's ironic that within a year after Apollo eleven NASA found itself confronting a very uncertain future declining budgets and wondering what to do next so that's interesting Alex Duckie skied the Apollo era era was a special time because political will and funding aligned in unison but that came to an end yeah and it came to an end very quickly as Andrew was saying you know sort of I think the the blush fell off the rose rose if you will and the U._s. very much was thinking okay well we did it. We accomplish what we were trying to do. Why are we still spending money on this especially when we have issues with poverty and homelessness and that sort of thing and and even before we made it to the Moon <hes> lawmakers were questioning why we were spending so much on Apollo and if it was really necessary thing part of the issue was that it had a very specific mission in that it was created?.

Lyndon Johnson Andrew Chacon Apollo Moon Nasr NASA Alex Alex Stocky Fred Kennedy Chicago Tom Hanks Andrew Chickens twitter Houston Chronicle facebook Houston Massachusetts Andrew Graham
Practicing for the Moon

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Practicing for the Moon

"When astronauts like Neil Armstrong and Edwin Buzz Aldrin came to NASA Langley to train they often be found at the lunar landing research facility an iconic structure known as the Gantry this this is innovation now bringing stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future standing at a towering height of two hundred forty feet the lunar landing research facility was built to model lunar gravity a full-scale lunar excursion module simulator could be suspended from the Gantry Steel frame so astronauts could practice piloting the limb the final one hundred fifty feet before landing on the moon and inclined wall and ingenious system of slings and cables meant that a suited astronaut walking sideways could experience what it would be like to walk on the Moon where gravity is only one sixth as strong as Earth's after the Apollo program concluded included the Gantry was re purposed as an aircraft crash testing facility and recent drop tests proved that this historic landmark still plays an important hole in space exploration for innovation now? I'm Jennifer.

Gantry Steel Edwin Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Nasa Langley Apollo One Hundred Fifty Feet Two Hundred Forty Feet
Neil Armstrong, Congressman And Armey discussed on The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

03:00 min | 2 years ago

Neil Armstrong, Congressman And Armey discussed on The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

"Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo lunar module eagle on July twentieth nineteen sixty nine an area congressman Armey Vera has a particular interest in the anniversary and share some thoughts on the events so think about it fifty years ago Apollo eleven took off for the for the man now I'm not gonna say I remembered I was four years old that yeah the excitement what that represents and now we're coming up on the the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing on Sunday something that is probably one of the most remarkable achievement from throughout human history and something that was an American achievement we oughta celebrated and be proud and they're just soak up what that represents and then also learn from it as we move forward you know it's true it was one of those things where was nonpartisan it with everyone pulling together everyone cheering and and dazzled and inspired by the events that transpired it exactly and that's yeah that's reminder I mention that in our subcommittee hearing today that you know it was both democratic and Republican presidents yeah it was a goal that we set as a national goal and your president Kennedy had no idea how we're gonna complex that goal but we set our minds to it and we did it and that is the best of who we are and it wasn't just the American cheap and it was a achievement for all humankind and yeah let's let's learn from that what's that again yeah try to get that candy spirit back and not just America but back in Congress it is a challenging to get everybody behind one thing these days and remembering this perhaps brings bring some inspiration to people that it can be done it really doesn't yeah there's that challenges that we can all agree upon if we take the politics out of it yeah climate change you know changing weather patterns your property even infrastructure yeah those are all things that yeah we as Democrats and Republicans are set down and say what's one big idea that we want to rally around that would be good for the country that would yeah the NASA program and the Apollo program created so many new jobs and so many new bands invention so we have to find out one big idea and say yeah let's go for it you know maybe that's curing cancer that shouldn't be Republican and democratic and it has the ability of yeah creating a whole bunch of new jobs new industries new companies yeah we ought to do that then I hope yeah either this president and that's not this president yeah the next administration challenges us to to be go beyond who we are and you know finally when you think back I mean fifty years ago and how much technology has changed yet it still seems like an a remarkable achievement doesn't it yeah it absolutely does right I mean it it's still give G. M. goose bumps it was it was remarkable let's do it again congressman Armey they're they're six twenty one traffic

Neil Armstrong Congressman Armey Commander Apollo Fifty Years Four Years
"apollo program" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Of fabric yeah until they had like hundreds and hundreds of needles they had they had small needles but big machines to like fit. All those layers of fabric like giant needle is just to stick up for a needle is still pretty small and then you small needles because I think the NASA specifications where one sixty four of an inch <music> of precision too big a hole in yeah couldn't make too big a whole couldn't go off seem too much because everything need be sealed so precisely these space suits were called the Ale seven eight for Apollo seven for the generation so there were like six before that and l. for the International Latex Corporation who made the suits and I'll see was mostly known for playtex underwear and stuff but there is a part of the company that submitted bids for Industry and government contracts of light suits and things like that this happened over lots of years and there were bid processes and there was work with other military suppliers to the Apollo missions space suits and it was all very fraught and the International Latex Corporation was dismissed a lot and they were are fired one and it almost didn't happen like their involvement was almost completely next and tell there was a spacesuit competition in July nineteen sixty five or they competed against two other agencies and one mostly because of the strong bendy joints man they developed called convolute S- for mobility because a lot of the other spacesuits submitted were really boxy <hes> and couldn't let astronauts move or like fit within the lunar module. GotTa wear that thing inside yeah and also you can't put it on outside. I never even thought about that. Bend over and pick up rocks and do all that with tight seal so yeah I just thought it was cool that a lot of the reason that Apollo eleven astronauts were safe like bouncing around on the moon as because of experts seamstresses who are so good at their jobs doing traditionally very feminine work but on a superhuman level like more than any other clothing process that has ever been that also sort of makes me think of the women who wove all the coating yeah it was like individual copper wires that they had to weave together to like hard code all the like software for co-wrote memory little ladies they knit. They knitted software. I feel like I'm going with the this is a better anecdote. <hes> your Sam Greg listening really doing science though greasy arm the series seems like sort of a big big endeavor and also like with the communications is just like all of the things that had to happen that weren't like big space rockets. Yeah you also have to build a bunch like a whole communication network and you have to figure out how to make space suits that you can walk around on the moon with almost everything that happened wasn't the big space mostly. The big phase rocket was we'd already we ought to do that. I I think once he got to the point of little ladies knitting stuff for you'd be like maybe we should wait a few years until we know how to do this. I guess Nope wasn't importance that well. You can listen to our new episode of CY show that little ladies we don't but we talk about how there's some logic to the idea that maybe if we put this back a few years it would have been easier <hes> but there's also some logic to say like maybe if we had waited there wouldn't have been able to do it and we'd still be sitting here. Never having been to the moon was the political who will all Soviet largely it was proving that America and capitalism we're better than the Soviet Union and Communist. I'm Steffan. Did you or your point. I have to give a point. I like the teamsters is I think Greg deserves a point to Sam. Thank you Greg Greg still alive. Yes I believe you still alive..

Greg Greg International Latex Corporatio Apollo NASA teamsters Soviet Union America
"apollo program" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"For a boy Oy Oy Small Human Greg's arm would fit in their Greg's Vin. They're called his wife and handed her measured Greg's on around yeah. I feel this way about modern car engine bays like they're so small and tight. I'm like you can't reach anything no but I was looking at a picture of the oxygen generation system on the I._S._S. and like it's all designed so that everything is is like very boxy. There's like a lot of room so they see. It looks like you can just take off a couple of screws like that's how it should be done. It's not the prettiest but it's functional a little boy to don't fix. I wanted to put like new Ram and my laptop. I do that by I buying new lap pretty much yeah. You need a really little boy to reach into your be. Just I need to ant man down with some Ram shoot. Okay good fact Sam okay. There's a nonverbal cutest start going so spacesuits have to be really really carefully made to keep astronaut safe. They have to be pressurized and have a tight seal to keep an oxygen resist extreme temperatures protect against U._v.. Radiation be tough but flexible enough so that they can do things and so when I picture spacesuits being manufactured I've imagined like high tech machine and proprietary polymers and some sort of like complicated NASA facility where they're doing all this secret but for the Apollo Eleven mission the space suits foreign on the moon were custom-made for the astronauts using a lot of the same materials as bras diaper covers and girdles and there are handcrafted by seamstresses with more so even gluing and rubber dipping precision than luxury clothing on giant custom sewing.

Greg NASA Sam
"apollo program" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The entire world within a week long celebration nobody else in the world during a weeklong celebration every single day people can come out and they can get something new and different all related to both the the history of Apollo eleven the Apollo program in general although the president feature of exploration so today we have gene Kranz the Apollo eleven flight director is also quite director for many other Apollo missions as well and that he had in doing that launched a breakfast with the bacon eight AM for you that you do not play by play of what he was doing in mission control what when Apollo eleven listing loss which was Tuesday July sixteenth nineteen sixty nine you can be with us in the morning to do that and then you do another evening presentation at night and unfortunately for all the listeners that both of those are sold out but it's incredible you know hats off to Denver into a policy with the premium thing that Mr Graham here to Denver ends up throughout the rest of the week we have speakers and thought leaders every single day you can hear from the lunar lander teen in the lunar gateway Tina Lockheed Martin you know that a corporation the list goes on and on do you get feedback from those guys on whether they're optimistic about space exploration in the future are the sap of the space shuttle program has been shut down for now sure that's a good question actually NASA just just the release information made the announcement that we as the as a nation are going back to the moon but twenty twenty four that's going to be happening and it's gonna be a lot different than it used to look you know NASA basically you Sir on the shelf they have everything they work with you know the four hundred thousand people involved in the Apollo program that everything from you know government working down to this contractors and subcontractors but there there's a lot more private industry that's working on it today and the more public use the Lockheed Martin's building the Orion capsule you know one of the folks doing that in the about a corporation in leading the way with dream chaser and what what they're doing with lunatic ways well so it's going to look a little bit different but the feedback that we've gotten from you know the original Apollo folks is optimism and excitement for the next generation and you know we're in a somewhat of a space race with China India India and other folks to anything from the moon as we speak and you know there there's a lot of but about that and so you know I'd like to catch it it's that it looks like a it another generation space right so we're very good at it and that is country going one on one in talking about Apollo palooza taking place today in leading up to the events of the moon landing five twenty five money.

Without Space, We Die

Curiosity Daily

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Without Space, We Die

"You've ever wondered why we care so much about studying space or why it matters that we found an ice volcano on dwarf planet, then you're not alone. We get plenty of questions on social media. Wondering why space is so important. That's why we got in touch with today's guest a scientist, and SpaceX Decatur, who has some pretty great insights into why we need space here. He is. My name is Kevin Jada Brune. And I am a former NASA rocket scientist so space exploration and space technology. These things are literally in our everyday life, like they make life possible. We use GPS we use credit cards. We all look at weather forecasts. But the main important thing is that without space technology. We literally die and a lot of people don't know how important and impactful all of the things that are going on. In outer space, the things that have been developed through the Apollo program to now how that actually allows us to live safely and continue on living. So one of the stories, I really like to highlight is a man named George grace. So George grace is an accomplished artist in buffalo and a story by Ivanhoe describes Georgia's use of cancer treatment known as photodynamic therapy or not. So this treatment is actually medication that is activated by LED lights, and this LED activating technology stems from using LED's to grow plants on the international space station.

George Grace Kevin Jada Brune Scientist Nasa Decatur Ivanhoe Georgia Buffalo
What Can Marsquakes Teach Us?

BrainStuff

04:16 min | 2 years ago

What Can Marsquakes Teach Us?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here ever since Nasr's insight mission placed it's dome-shaped seismometers onto the dusty Martian surface in December hopes were high that the robotic Lander would quickly detect its first Martian, quake or Mars quake. Well, the wait is finally over the mission seismic experiment for interior structure or size confirmed its first eight rumble coming from the inside of the red planet on April sixth confirming that Mars is seismically active size team lead. Phillip Longman said in an acid statement. We've been waiting for months for its signal like this. It's so exciting to finally have proof. That Mars is still seismically active. We're looking forward to sharing detailed results once we've had a chance to analyze them. Nasa hopes to use seismic signals like these to give Mars up health check of sorts like a doctor placing a stethoscope on their patients chest inside is doing something similar. It's trying to hear what makes the planet tick unearth, the cacophony of seismic signals bouncing around. Our planet's interior become distorted as they encounter regions of different densities by measuring these seismic waves, we've learned about the different unreachable layers deep inside our planet. Marzieh's interior is something of an enigma. The planet doesn't have a global magnetic field for reasons we have yet to fully understand and its volcanic activity was extinguished hundreds of billions of years ago, if the planet is geologically or more accurate area logically dead. How can it produce Moore's quakes at all? It's thought that as the planet continues to cool. It's shrinking and crack leg was small quakes that echo throughout the Martian interior mission. Scientists also want to listen out for meteorite impacts that will produce their own mini trembles perhaps turning insight into a real time meteorite detector. Until now Mars quicks were theoretical possibility. But now that we know that they're they're they can be used by insight to understand what lies beneath the planet's surface, according to mission, scientists this first Mars quake is a pip squeak nothing like the tremors, you're used to if you've ever lived in southern California on Mars, however this week quake stands out in the comparative. Silence of Mars is quiet. Innards other weaker seismic signals have also been heard over the past month or so, but their origins are more ambiguous. Although the April sixth vent was too weak to be used gain much information about the Martian interior. Scientists are excited as we've seen something like it before on the moon during the Apollo program, astronauts placed five seismometers on the lunar surface which detected thousands of mooncakes between nineteen sixty nine and nineteen seventy seven these seismic waves helped scientists learn about the lunar interior and even helped model it's formation. Although inside this just one seismometers on Mars, scientists hope that it will give us a window into the mysterious Martian interior that we know so little about. Today's episode was written by Neil and produced by Tyler clang, brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this unless of other earthshaking, topics. Visit our home planet has to dot com. And for more podcasts from iheartradio iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode of brain stuff is brought to you by AT and T and it can wait eighty two percent of people admit to using their smartphone while they're driving. We're all used to seeing it. But ninety three percent of people don't approve of distracted driving. We feel awkward speaking up about it. And it's time that changed because it's not worth the risk a text a like, a selfie, whatever it is when you're driving. It can wait. So the next time you see a friend family member or other human using their phone while they're driving. No that it's okay to say something distracted driving's, reckless speak up. It can wait. A message from AT and T.

Iheartradio AT Capital One Phillip Longman Nasa Lauren Bogle Nasr Tremors Marzieh Apple California Moore Neil Tyler Clang Four Percent Ninety Three Percent Eighty Two Percent One Percent Two Percent
"apollo program" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Now back to the story for fifty years conspiracy theorists have wondered whether the Apollo eleven moon landing actually happened or if NASA fake the entire mission as a propaganda tactic. If that theory were true. There's been shockingly little evidence revealed to support it an estimated four hundred thousand people work on the Apollo program either directly for NASA or for the defense contractors that manufactured rockets and space capsules surely if there were any deception somebody would have come forward about it by now conspiracy theorists point out that the Apollo program was heavily compartmentalized, the rockets and spacecraft where manufactured in different factories all over the country, the astronaut, selection and training process was separate as well. Only a couple hundred people maybe fewer would have been able to see the full picture creed. Nasa had given the press nearly unlimited access to its space programs, but Apollo was different. The press was only allowed to report on the scant information they received directly from NASA without seeing or speaking to the employee's directly with such tight control. It would have been relatively easy to manufacture a narrative surrounding the Apollo program. Even if journalist questioned what they were being told they wouldn't have any facts to dispute it that may be true. But there are similar explanations for the secrecy. If sensitive information about the rocket technology leaked to the Soviet Union. It could have given them a leg up in the race to the moon, and the Apollo missions were hardly the first government program to be shrouded in secrecy, take, for example, the Manhattan project which developed the atomic bomb during World War Two an estimated one hundred thirty nine thousand people worked on the project and not. A single detail leaked until it was declassified after the war. Well, that's not entirely true. Several spies made their way into the Manhattan project and send information back to the Soviet Union which helped the Soviets develop their own atomic bombs, but years after the Apollo missions the Soviets never accomplished their own moon landing. This may be a case of the US government learning from their mistakes. It's possible there were no Soviet spies in the Apollo program at all. Or if there were information was tightly controlled enough to prevent leaks. It's also possible that NASA was swarming was buys with. There was no useful information to report because the US was no closer to accomplishing a moon landing. Then the Soviets were the issue there is that NASA produced extensive documentation of the moon landing. They took pictures made films and even broadcast live from the moon's surface. The evidence of the moon landing is overwhelm. Ming, but the evidence is also full of inconsistencies conspiracy theorists posit that the footage from the moon strips was actually recorded on a sound stage produced in directed by Stanley Kubrick while the production was broadcast live to the world..

NASA Apollo US Soviet Union Manhattan Stanley Kubrick Ming fifty years
"apollo program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Then we paid the price and they knew I think the original budget for the Apollo program was twenty twenty billion dollars and a wind up costing twenty four or twenty five billion which was a really fine performance on it. Well today that twenty four billion dollars adjusted that that number would be like about one hundred hundred thirty five hundred and forty million dollars. So you look at the size of Nasr's budget today, the difficulty you have convincing congress to make that higher and the political aspects that go onto in the various departments that they've added to NASA. It's very very difficult today. And I'm not sure when we're ever if we ever going to get back to that kind of a luxury. But as I. I've thought a lot about this one because we had we got into a cadence in. We did it in Germany, and then we had to break for the fire and Apollo, but we were right back into the cadence of of thinking operationally. Yeah. We were thinking ops. And I don't think we over thought the process, we trusted the people in the hardware. A lot and had we flown more missions. We may have lost one. Who knows like well it says, it's a risky business. But but I think the the ability to accept that risk was easier in fifty years ago. There's just no doubt. And. In the cadence keep kind of coming back to that. I remember sitting next to cliff Charlesworth for the launch the earth launch of Apollo eleven. He had asked me to I was a systems guy, and he was a Fido type of guy. So we kind of made a team, but I never will forget sitting there. We went into a hold on the Saturn in. I had just been named to be the lead flight director on Apollo twelve. Which is an next mission. I was sitting there in the Apollo eleven count down in a quiet moment. And I started thinking about twelve what I had to do to get ready. So here I'm sitting at the launch of the first landing on the moon thinking about the next mission. But that's what happens to you. When you get into that kind of repetitive. But it boy we were we were all sharp. We all of our people the guys that some of them here. We kept our skills sharp because we kept borking, and we didn't have long breaks. Yeah. For future programmes. We have the international space station in operations twenty four seven for humans on board for eighteen years. So we have every day an opportunity to practice our operations mindset for an orbiting vehicle what we are worried about with the cadence of the flights for the commercial crew program being roughly twice a year and the Orion program being once a year. How do you maintain that sharpness for the dynamic phases of flight? So those a an area that we recognize we didn't really have to address an Apollo because of the frequency of the missions. But that we are going to have to address for the future programs, and you go to fun too. In this natural. We didn't have much coast time we did have some coast going to the moon at we did -til on some coast. But even there we were active. We were making mid course corrections and barbecue in the spacecraft. You know, turn it rolling it keeps temporary. And and that was that was the real difference. We every mobile everything we did. There was dynamics all the time going on. And which kept us. It was a hoot. It was fun. And and it never got boring. Even when when these guys were sleeping..

Apollo cliff Charlesworth Nasr NASA congress Germany director twenty twenty billion dollars twenty four billion dollars forty million dollars eighteen years fifty years
"apollo program" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"The short answer. Obviously is yes. But the is a longer answer if you unlucky with who you sit next to on the bus or get buttonholed by at a party a much longer answer this holds that man never went to the moon. The Apollo program was a monstrous fraud and propaganda stunt cooked up by the US government and filmed in some studio backlot. This is obviously idiotic hypothesis the Apollo program employed, four hundred thousand people, and it's almost certainly easier to just fly into the damn moon and get that many folks to keep a story straight the moon hoax theory, like conspiracy theories in general only merits are the contemplation or refutation because bizarre, and by many poles increasing numbers of people believe them. The moon hoax. Conspiracy theory is probably contestant field probably the stupidest. But it certainly wasn't the first people have been believing in conspiracy theories for as long as people have been believing in anything religion usually rooted in the idea that some unknowable omnipotence is orchestrating events. Behind the scenes is very arguably a point on this continuum. But until recently conspiracy theories were regarded when regarded at all as an obsession of friendless, cranks malodorous Bose. When you didn't in two thousand and two Buzz Aldrin himself to lated mainstream opinion on the subject when we read of the heckling of one, especially pestilential toll mentor. He turned around and belted him. Reme- coward and a liar. And. But in this wretched century, regrettably conspiracy theory has been energized and weaponized by the internet, and by social media in particular, which has inaudible ding, bats and crackpots previously and rightly shunned by civilized society to commune to depressingly influential effect, this wretched century started pretty much with an event that could have been designed, and it's doubtless possible to find people who believe it was to excite the tin foil handed the dreadful terrorist attacks on the United States timber. Eleventh two thousand one. These inspired an industry films books, and especially websites demonstrating that nine eleven was a false flag operation by the US government, and Israel and all of a shadowy players. None of these theories made any sense at all. But then conspiracy theories don't have to they function as an addictive means by which people who don't understand anything can feel like they understand everything and more crucially to the current political era as a rallying point for the angry and ignorant a coterie large enough to have some influence at the ballot box. Once it became clear that a conspiracy narrative could be constructed around pretty much anything the London bombings of two thousand and five sandyhook primary school massacre of two thousand twelve climate change vaccinations. The possibility that ever Levin has been replaced by clone. The conspiracy theory became a powerful political weapon. People are trying to figure out why is he giving his president? It's not a birth certificate. The current president of the United States launched his political career by flaming up a conspiracy theory the one which holds that he's predescessor Barrack Obama held the office illegitimately having been born elsewhere. I know that there's going to be a segment of people for which no matter what we put up this. You will not be put to rest, we do not have time for this kind of silliness. We got better stuff to fit was obviously ridiculous and even more obviously racist, but as late as December two thousand sixteen thirty six percent of Americans were willing to declare that they believed it among Trump voters that figure was fifty seven percent. This is possibly the defining paradox of Trump voters think new minding fights. But professional wrestling is real. Because conspiracy theories so people keep manufacturing them, the DEA that Hillary Clinton was running a paedophile ring from Washington DC pizza joint was persuasive enough that one at in turned up with a gun. This one has walked into a cult cold Q on which Seve's that President Trump is the target of a deep state plot to thwart him, whereas Scholley any deep state worthy of the name might have figured out a way to keep a bloviating simpleton out of the White House before. Now, we have even endured a revival of the most odious of old conspiracy theories the one which holds the holocaust never occurred..

president Levin US government Trump United States Buzz Aldrin fraud Reme- coward Hillary Clinton DEA White House Seve Washington DC Barrack Obama London sandyhook primary school Israel Scholley
"apollo program" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Ground zero Since before the conclusion of the Apollo program in nineteen seventy two Some people have questioned the moon landing claiming that they were faked in some way or another by NASA and presumably with the Accu. Acquiescence or or perhaps even active involvement of other individuals and organizations mainly Stanley Kubrick that he probably was the one who directed the moon. Landings and we did a show all about that too while back but I remember back in nineteen ninety five I enter tain the fake moon landing topic to see if anyone. Still believe we didn't go to the moon And the, reason why I did it was because I was half kidding when I did. It in fact when. I wrote I wrote a story called good luck Mr. Gorski other myths about the moon I wrote that story I did it, have kidney because my father expressed his doubts about it ever happening when I. Was five years old And so, in, the back. Of my mind was always that doubt I saw it on TV so it had to have happened right at least so I thought Throughout my life I, was a believer of the moon landing in sixty nine. And, then I had an opportunity to speak with Bill casing who is a senior, technical writer at Rocketdyne and he was speaking to prepare does expo ball places now casing wrote. A book in nineteen seventy six claiming. The moon landing was faked and, he proceeded to tell me why he told me that he'd before the Apollo eleven program there were people. Who work for NASA they were anonymously posting flyers everywhere questioning the technical expertise of the moon landing or, of what they're attempting to do with the moon landing and how just before, the moonshot Neil Armstrong nearly died during a training flight before. Landing on the moon and he was. That was when he. Was the command pilot on, Gemini eight the only NASA mission to be aborted because of an emergency. Now on may sixth nineteen sixty eight there was Apollo thirteen there, was also. That too but On may, sixth Nineteen sixty. Eight Armstrong was flying in the lunar landing research vehicle less than one hundred feet up when he lost. Control over it and how do Jack and after was recording the fight and captured Armstrong ejecting from the vehicle moments before it crashed. Down and exploded now NASA reported vehicle was a total loss in the ensuing crash. Of Armstrong ejected any later he would. Have been dead he would have died The lunar landing research. Vehicle was the actually the precursor to the lunar module that he used to actually. Land on the moon it was very, different from anything that It was a lot different than a navy platelets just put it this way it was. Used it was the very same Lander That they were going to use for, the moon and it crashed on earth nearly killed him so, you can imagine that it was a. Year before the, moon, landing and he was. Supposed to learn how to. Pilot this thing and he nearly killed himself piloting. It and, he said well you got, to understand this was like a tin this is. From his oral history project we wrote he says. It was like a tin. Campbell Soup cans. Sitting on top of some legs So casing was pointing out to, be all we talked about Gus Grissom's Daffyd talked with. All this stuff any also pointed out a few things about the moon landing that I thought, wow that's some amazing stuff and he spoke to me for what, seemed like an hour but it was actually stretched out for at least three hours so needless to say he was one of my first guests on ground zero, wasn't that I was, out to disprove the moon landing and I'm not here to disprove it tonight but I was just blown away by what he said he certainly gave me reason to, doubt that we landed on the moon in. Nineteen sixty nine but it also showed me that people get pretty angry, at anyone but even brings up the possibility that we never, went to the moon and after I. Literally angered a, group, of people that listened to by the my show. Originally the regional show I really wanted to investigate. Just how many people doubted the moon, landing back in the nineteen sixties and beyond that And so I found out. That you'll get a lot of polling did a lot of reading and finding out that did, you know that most people who don't believe in the moon landing, are our European fifty seven percent of people in Europe believe we didn't land on the moon in nineteen sixty nine fifty seven percent forty seven percent in the, United States but that's, only if you read the statistics outside the United States because NASA will have you believe that three to five percent Believe we didn't land on the moon and sixty nine I believe we eventually went I believe that the technology improved we eventually went that's why we, started having mishaps with Apollo thirteen and but yeah we did eventually go in sixty nine kind of, have have my doubts about that and I and, I have a lot of reasons why am I doubt about that for technology second what word von Braun Brandon said about it So I mean if they. Were to have like an alternative way of telling kids at yeah, there are a lot of people who think we didn't land on the moon but. They won't do that they'll continue to perpetuate this. Idea that we landed on the moon in? Sixty, nine when they when? It could have been Did they. Actually.

NASA Neil Armstrong Stanley Kubrick Accu United States Mr. Gorski Gus Grissom Bill writer Europe Jack Rocketdyne Braun Brandon Daffyd nineteen sixty nine fifty seve fifty seven percent forty seven percent one hundred feet five percent three hours
"apollo program" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Inviting in your show kaku i was i was sort of grow grew up during the apollo program based programs so you know i was a young kid completely fascinated with the fact that we could send people in the moon to land walk around so i thought that was absolutely amazing and i believe that was the beginning of my sort of journey into into signs and indeed engineering i wanted to become a space engineer initially i wanted to be the one who send people up in space maybe you know dumping one of the spaceships my cell phone day so that much mason science began and what steer you in the direction of mathematics computer science and then to get a phd and artificial intelligence absolutely so i started my studies in the field of control engineering because i was very keen to understand how space slides could be made possible and i guess one thing led to another that was introduced in god's by several people at my university was not nba teas and there was a lot of debate around what would be the next step in and whether we should build systems based on the human condition architecture how the human brain works so whether we should build another kind of symptom of that debate was was pretty interesting to understand the human mind so i thought hey what a great way to understand the human minds engineering and that's so that's how i met gradually into a i did several projects at university of who builds buildings my systems and then decided to continue with a phd okay well your book in our own image differs from other books in artificial intelligence because first of all it starts with the history the ancient history the history going back all the way to the greeks where we have myths we have mythologies about robots and perhaps every society has some myth or other of our interactions with things which are mechanical and come to life for example pygmalion which eventually came became the broadway musical my fair lady is about the whole idea of a statue coming to life and we have the mythology of.

engineer nba
"apollo program" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Critics of the apollo program had one complaint in common the price tag throughout the sixties public opinion polls show that a majority of americans believe the country was spending too much to beat the soviets to the moon the administration had estimated the program would cost between twenty and forty billion dollars by the end of the decade and august nineteen sixty three issue of reader's digest asked are we suffering from moon madness the wall street journal proclaimed a month later many americans doubt man lunar flight is worth huge cost knee article quoted one female bank executive a group of brilliant engineers found a glamorous toy and wanna play with it others thought the money could be put to better use paying for schools on employment assistance or medical research and a nineteen sixty nine article moon dust and black disgust booker griffin would write in the los angeles sentinel here's a country that cannot pass a rat control built protect black babies from rats but can spend billions to explore rocks crater and dust thousands of miles away former president eisenhower scoffed at the programs budget saying anybody spending forty billion dollars in a race to the moon for national prestige nuts congress also pushback arguing in a nineteen sixty to report for momentary transcendence over the soviet union we have pledged our wealth national talent and our honor a decision must be made as to whether project apollo is vital to our national security if our security is not at stake a less ambitious program may be logical and desirable in nineteen sixty three congress cut nasr's budget for the following year by almost five hundred million dollars but in spite of growing criticism kennedy stood by the space program on november sixteen nineteen sixty three he visited cape canaveral where he saw nasr's progress on the gemini and apollo missions firsthand while they're perhaps for the first time kennedy began to fully appreciate the scope of these massive projects the visit stayed with the president six days late.

wall street journal executive booker griffin eisenhower soviet union nasr cape canaveral president los angeles sentinel rocks crater kennedy forty billion dollars five hundred million dollars six days
"apollo program" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on Little Atoms

"There's a study done by on apollo the economic return on the polo ninety 75 by chase economics and they found that for every dollar spent on going to the moon fourteen dollars came back into the us economy and that came back because of the inspiration load of it came up the the new dna move extra engineers and a number of extra scientists nicole my kids got inspired by the apollo program it grows the economy so it's obvious but we don't bother you know we have illegal initiative to say let's deep this in schools and don't do in scale build the lhc houma and then kids get interested because it's interesting yeah and and just very briefly speaking of going into space what about ditching government and focusing on private industry look at with virgin still a virgin galactic you you can do that i mean one way that which ryan said to to get some more money back in spray signs is to encourage the industry to to invest in a philanthropic way immanent happens more in states that it was in britain and has complicated the reasons for that tax system and things were you can do that but okay that thing is that science is a a long term investment and it's for the public good and it really it bluesky science are indeed in that scale the lhc look that still that doesn't ever immediate economic return and therefore it sensible for the public to fund stuffed as an economic return you might say well believe that to industry because as an economic recession is deeply idiotic for the government trinity or are we going to him quickly in the last couple of minutes i was going to talk about prions upcoming series seven wound is all his bats i look out for that the only maggia is only right fillon but before we finish rebecca this afternoon as invented in a feature for this show so i think we should give this a test outing yeah i ask people on twitter if they had any questions for bryan and so a lot of people sent me an questions and i thought one was particularly grape submitted by cates web is her twitter name and she said that so much has been accomplished in the in physics in the past hundred years where do you think regained to be one hundred years from now uh in.

virgin galactic ryan britain economic recession rebecca twitter cates us bryan one hundred years fourteen dollars hundred years
"apollo program" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To remember the apollo program um uh with traffic from sixty nine to seventy two at the enemy the apollo program all the experts nasa was saying we would go to mars uh by then and making 80s the next decade by you certainly by the end of the next decade there was pretty confident prediction so by the 80s of course it hadn't happen and now is projected for the early 2000s and now they're saying well around the twenty three but there's no plans no i was going to say they don't have anything planned doubt no no and the things that were supposed to happen bite now by 2017 medicine bigger ryan spacecraft and the new booster rocket and and a return to the moon and all these get cancelled one after another when it gets time to spend the big bucks the it gets cancelled now or is it bad i honestly don't know it depends upon whether you think people should be going near or whether we're doing just as well or better with uh robotic spacecraft we did pretty well with galileo and cassini an voyager before that and i had the mars exactly so should we spent a lot more money to just put a few people there at risk their lives i think the public uh is excited to do that when the first astronaut dies there if that happens uh suddenly everybody's going to collectively let out their breath role now i don't know about this you've got the chinese long like knots trying to get to the moon and everything else uh that they'll do it because they got the anywhere money and they want the prestige and maybe the next time you know these food on the moan it's not going to be tang it will be it'll be general so stick it well that's right absolutely it's amazing though that we went to the moon with 48yearold technology yes thank god but that was great i mean that's a great adventure the saturn five rocket oh i love that that uh that huge rock each one of those engines the f one the.

nasa
"apollo program" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Lima say a keep forgetting who will lose was a lucy is playing metro come and then you know how many times can you get fool so uh if we are old enough to remember the apollo program um uh with trap some sixty nine to seventy two at the envy the apollo program all the experts nasa was saying we would go to mars uh by then i am making 80s the next decade by you certainly by the end of the next decade there was pretty confident prediction so by the 80s of course it hadn't happen and now is projected for the early 2000s and now they're saying well around the twenty three years but there's no plans no i'm just going to say they don't have anything planned out no no and the thing that were supposed to happen by now by 2017 business and bigger ryan spacecraft and the new booster rocket and and a return to the moon and all these get cancelled one after another when it gets time to spend the big box the it gets cancel now or is this that i honestly don't know it depends upon whether you think people should be going your or whether or we're doing just as well or better with uh robotic spacecraft we did pretty well with galileo and cassini m voyager before that and uh the mars exactly so should we spent a lot more money to just put a few people there at risk their lives i think the public uh is excited to do that when the first astronaut dies there if that happens uh suddenly everybody's going to collectively let out their breath road i don't know about this you've got the chinese coming along like knots trying to get so the moon and everything else i'll bet they'll do it because they've got the money and they want the prestige and so maybe the next time you know these food on the moan it's not going to be tang it will be it'll be general so strict it well that's right absolutely it's amazing though that we went to the moon was 48yearold technology yes god but that was great i mean that's a great adventure the saturn five rocket why would love that that uh that huge rock each one of those engines the.

Lima nasa twenty three years
"apollo program" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on KELO

"Key forgetting who will lose was it lucy who is playing that joke come and then you know how many times can you get fool so uh if we are old enough to remember the apollo program um with traps from sixty nine to seventy two the enemy the apollo program all the experts nasa was saying we we go to mars uh by then i am making 80s the next decade by you certainly by the end of the next decade there was pretty confident prediction so by the 80s of course it hadn't happen and now is projected for the early 2000s and now uh they seen well around the twenty three but there's no plan no i'm just going to see they don't have anything planned out no no and the things that the worst supposed to happen by now by 2017 but there's some big orion spacecraft him a new booster rocket and and a return to the moon in all these get cancelled one after another when it gets time to spend the big bucks the it gets cancelled by now or is this bad i honestly don't know it depends upon whether you think people who should be going near or whether or we're doing just as well or better with uh robotic spacecraft we did pretty well with galileo and cassini and voyager before that and uh the march exactly so should we spent a lot more money to just put a few people there at risk their lives i think the public uh is excited to do that when the first astronaut dies there if that happens uh suddenly everybody's going to collectively let out their breath war and i know about this you've got the chinese coming along knots trying to get to the moon and everything else i'll bet they'll do it because they got the eddie will by and they want the prestige and so maybe the next time you know these food on the moan it's not going to be tang it will be it'll be general so's check it well that's right absolutely it's amazing though that we went to the moon with 48yearold technologies yes god but that was great i mean that's a great adventure the saturn five rocket boy we love that that uh that huge rock each one of those engines the.

nasa
"apollo program" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"What happens when the science and technology space comes down to a pie envelopes joe higgins and welcome to this episode downtoearth from the naked scientists the miniseries it explores how technology developers space is also used back down on earth this episode how developing an astronauts drew to dig holes in the moon helped lead to the development of quotas vacuums in 1968 nasa launch the first of the apollo program missions to the moon as well as the ultimate goal of being the first humans on the main the apollo program was also used to conduct scientific research this included drilling holes into the moon remove samples for testing back on earth the six apollo flights that lent on the moon returned three hundred eighty two kilograms of luna material including core samples these samples real much about the composition and origin of the moon including the moon may have once had his own magnetic field and get sample was deeper from the moon's surface the apollo astronauts needed a drill and just light using a vacuum cleaner or hedge cut down on earth the astros didn't want to have a run lung power extension leads crossed the moon banks their lunarlanding macho so instead nasa looked into developing a coatless batterypowered luna drill the ends that working together with black and decker a power to was manufacturer who in the early 1960s have released the first coldest electric drill and coatless hedge trimmers travelling as far as the moon takes a lot of energy and nasa was keen to minimise the mass in needs transport batteries were heavier mbochi to minimize the number acquired an efficient electric motoo is needed in order to cut down the power demands engineers from blackened decade developed computer programs optimize the electric motors design reducing the energy needed.

joe higgins astros nasa nasa three hundred eighty two kilog
"apollo program" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"apollo program" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"A way i'm going to more than that but at the end of the day i i'm excited by this in theory and we are building the beta right now and for me the tire hits the road as an entrepreneur if i love it and i use it and until i love it and and use it all the time it doesn't go into the out there needs to be something i'm passionate about for anybody who doesn't know what is your fascination with star trek and how deeply have you baked it in ticks that green shirt companies so so i was born in the '60s and and apollo occurred apollo eleven occurred nineteen sixty nine which was incredibly formative moment in my life the entire apollo program and at the same time you know star trek debut to nineteen 66 i didn't see it then i saw it in the reruns and it had three seasons in total but when i was seeing it nineteen sixty nine nineteen seventy apollo showed me what was going on right now and star trek is this is where we're going and the one to punch just made me enamoured with the future in space it this was this with the destiny of humanity we're about to launch into the cosmos and so i became enamoured with star trek and the more you look at star trek star trek gene roddenberry the creator writer producer of star trek i know his son rod rod berry gene roddenberry was a brilliant man would gene roddenberry created was a set of technologies.

producer writer gene roddenberry