35 Burst results for "Apollo"

Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

Weekend News

00:42 sec | Last week

Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

"Is taking another step toward its goal of returning humans to the moon by 2024 with a crucial test this afternoon, Like the Apollo moon rockets, NASA plans to launch the Artemus move missions from Kennedy Space Center. But first it has to test its space launch system rocket in what's called a hot fire, lighting up the four monster engines of its core stage testing. Other associated launch hardware. It's not here in Florida, but rather at the Stennis Space Center near Bay, ST Louis, Mississippi, They'll load up the tanks with 700,000 gallons of super cold fuel, fire it up to simulate the launch and early asset phase of a flight. Space agency hopes to fly in on crude test mission of the rocket late this year.

Kennedy Space Center Stennis Space Center Nasa St Louis Florida Mississippi BAY
NASA’s Space Launch System Hot-Fire Test

Eye on Veterans

00:39 sec | Last week

NASA’s Space Launch System Hot-Fire Test

"Another step toward returning humans to the moon. With a crucial test Saturday afternoon Like the Apollo Moon rockets, NASA plans to launch the Artemus move missions from Kennedy Space Center. But first it has to test its space launch system rocket in what's called a hot fire, lighting up the four monster engines of its core stage testing. Other associated launch hardware. That's not here in Florida, but rather at the Stennis Space Center near Bay, ST Louis, Mississippi, They'll load up the tanks with 700,000 gallons of super cold fuel, fire it up to simulate the launch and early asset phase of a flight. Space agency hopes to fly in on crude test mission of the rocket late this year. Peter

Apollo Moon Rockets Kennedy Space Center Stennis Space Center Nasa St Louis Florida Mississippi BAY Peter
U.S. Space Command Headquarters May Land In Alabama

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last week

U.S. Space Command Headquarters May Land In Alabama

"In the South. Several states, including Colorado, Nebraska in Florida, were hoping it would be them. But instead, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey is announced. The space command is going to Huntsville, known as Rocket City for its rich space history. Werner von Braun. His team developed the first American Rockets and the Saturday five used during the Apollo program at Huntsville's Redstone Arsenal. Huntsville is also the home for Nasa's Marshall Space Flight Center and Space Camp. Space Command is not to be confused with space Force, which is a different branch of the military. Peter King. CBS NEWS

Kay Ivey Huntsville Werner Von Braun American Rockets Rocket City Nebraska Colorado Alabama Florida Redstone Arsenal Marshall Space Flight Center Space Camp Space Command Nasa Peter King Cbs News
NCR in Talks to Buy Cardtronics

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:20 sec | 2 weeks ago

NCR in Talks to Buy Cardtronics

"More details about the end. See our car, Tronic said, tie up and see our first of all in talks to buy car Tronics card. Tronics previously agreed to a sale to Apollo for $35 a share. Heart. Tronics earlier said it got a new offer of $39 without naming NCR. Now Jones initially breaking word that NCR was in talks to buy car Tronics,

Tronics Tronic Apollo NCR Jones
Interview With Ben Seidman

The Insider

04:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Ben Seidman

"And welcome to episode. See how smooth welcome to before. Yeah welcome to episode four of the insider vanishing and on the line. Today i am lucky enough to have been seidman. Ben how are you today. Hello everyone hello damien. i'm wonderful thanks for asking you. I'm currently i was in. I was on a private island in miami. A couple days ago and then las vegas at the palazzo doing a show with derek hughes. And now i'm in the upper peninsula of michigan population. I think it's three now that i'm here. So you know things. Things change quickly guys. Don't get cocky okay. we're gonna kick off with this because some people we have listens around the world And you mobile night in the states than you are here so with no disrespect intended. Who are you and what do you do no no not at all. I'm very very famous. And the stance. But let's just let's touch without room misspent seidman who are you what do you do. You have forty three seconds. Okay i first of all used the first half of that to clarify that. No one knows who i am. And then i'll use the second half to say i do. Magic tricks mostly primarily on stage. You do stand up comedy in magic together. That's most of my work but my background is close up magic which i still do occasionally and still love so. There is something else that you might become more known for which is a new show on netflix. Tell us about that. Yeah yeah that's a fun thing. Yeah i'm very. I'm very honored to appear on a netflix original. That just dropped about a week ago. Called the brainchild and the show is a science show for kids produced by pharrell and also atomic entertainment. Who are the guys who did Brain games that apollo robbins and other great magicians also appeared on so they kind of they teamed up with ferrall design. This concept end. It's a kid show version of of brain games in a way where they want to teach kids about science. Which i think especially right now. I don't know how things are over in the uk but especially right now in the united states. I think teaching young people about science is more important than it ever has been and it was a lot of people who denying science in general so getting kids into it is great and yeah i did segments doing magic on that show and i think they translated it into all the languages so wherever you are listening from. Yeah if you haven't net flex go on there and you might you know if you're in korea. There might be korean person who has overdubbed my voice and And i think wherever you are if you get netflix. You can search for brainchild and see my segments. The ones that. I'm most proud of are on the episodes space and social media. So it's episode one and episode five and Yeah they're they're pieces. That i designed specifically for the show for the theme and i'm really really proud of that material. I've just seen them. And i've just watched them and i am. You see this is an interesting thing. Whenever things on television youtube comments always default to although they may not know the particular inaccurate they will say pre show or setup all stooges and i watched the first one. And i was like okay. There's something that that's crazy and the second one is a beautiful sleight of hand. So do you want to talk about either of them all sure. Yeah this is. This is the first interview that i'm actually talking about. So yeah i'm very. I'm incredibly happy with how they turned out. Obviously hindsight you always want to change things. But there's two interesting things. I think that are worth mentioning number. One is the social media. Piece was I'm i'm concerned one big concern with it and that's that people are just going to go with. Oh they're stooges and because it really looks clean it really looks good But i'm incredibly proud of the method that i developed. They are not stooges at all. I promise from the bottom of my heart. They are completely completely fooled. I didn't have them write down information before the show or anything like that. This really hit them like a ton of bricks and even though it looks completely impossible. It's a mellow. It's a method that i had developed several years ago and then continued to tweak and finally solved all the problems in time to make it work for this show so that is my promise. People will say. Oh it's completely sat up it. Is i promise you from the bottom of my heart genuinely fooled. It is really really impactful for the spectators live. Let's

Seidman Hello Damien Derek Hughes Netflix Apollo Robbins Pharrell BEN Miami Las Vegas Michigan Korea United States UK Youtube
Greek Mythology Sites

Travel with Rick Steves

04:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Greek Mythology Sites

"East and the other one towards the west. They flew around the world and they both met above the site of delfi when zeus all where they met he said. Okay this is the center of the earth so he took these giant stone and throw it there and from that point they say that the naval of the world was created and that was the site of delfi. Now there was an oracle there. Yes so how did that. How did the gods speak to the people at delfi. The story says that the people at that time which is around eight of years before the birth of christ they started seeing their goats going up on the cliffs and then hoping very happy very enthusiastic so the goat started hopping after visiting delfi yup and they followed them and they realized that they were inhaling. This vapes so vapor is coming out of the world out of the earth like a crack in the ground. There's a crack in the ground. And the ideology of managed to discover with geologists the managed to discover rox with signs of specific chemical contents of fumes. That will come okay so they realized that there was something magical. Competent back then signs was not as developed as it is now that they believe that this was a divine sign so everybody is believing. The gods are speaking to the people through a crack in the earth in delfi up in the mountains north west of athens and then how did the people who were in power capitalize on that to take advantage of that delfi became the most important placing the ancient world. Everybody all the kingdoms they would go there in order to find out. They should go to war if they should do. Big public works whatever. They had to decide if they felt. It was a very important decision. They would go there and nas the oracle for advice. So it's going into this mysterious temple and you've got priestesses and robes and crazy things and they really think this is the the oz on earth there would be these young girls that were inside special rooms underneath the temple of apollo and they would inhale vapes and starts talking in a way that no one would understand so they had priest that would decipher. We got to decipher as he wanted to today as a tourist. What do we see in delfi. Philippos see the ruins of the temple of apollo was the treasurer of the athenians. Which is building that the erected in order to commemorate because they took a lot of money. I suppose what's on the to the horse. Yeah so every city stayed with covid tone treasury the athenian you walk up to the temples and the theater and race course and so on and you pass all these temples that were treasuries collecting all that money. it's a fascinating place to check out one of the best sites from ancient greece. This is travel with rick. Steves with johanna wanna costa and phillips kind of cars. We're talking about greek mythology from the travelers point of view. You wanna if you're taking groups around whereas one site that you like to take groups where you really want to understand the greek mythology behind it. There are so many. It's all over the country wherever you were wherever you see mountains plans. Everything has a mess behind it. But there's a part of the peloponnese peninsula which is really unknown to the people come into the country. The heart of the peloponnese. The area called acadia very rich mythology over there. And one of my favorite stories is the story of where the name came from. So there was zeus. Who was a playboy. He was always in love with many women. Herro was his god. His wife hera okiro once fell in love with a beautiful girl. Her name was callisto and She got pregnant and hero found out and she really got mad. So zeus change their woman. Kelly stole to bear an animal and she was wandering around the mountains. The beautiful forest server. Katya she before that i should add. She had a baby and the baby grew up. His name was cass. He became a very good hunter growing into the forest and one day there was a bear right across from where he was so he took out his bow and arrow he was ready to hit the bear. The zoo so what is going to happen was horrible so he immediately changed the boy to a little bear as well

Delfi Mountains North West Oracle Philippos Johanna Wanna Costa Athens Steves Herro Hera Okiro Phillips Greece Rick Katya Kelly Cass
Restaurants In New York Barely Scraping By As The New Year Arrives

Mark Simone

04:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Restaurants In New York Barely Scraping By As The New Year Arrives

"So You want to go out for a New year's Eve to a restaurant and celebrate as you probably have done in many years in the past, because you're not going to times Square? I wouldn't go to times Square, no matter what if it was 60 degrees and no cove, it Difficult Times Square on New Year's Eve. Just not my thing. I want to actually pee in your toilet. Not in my pants as I'm sitting there for five hours waiting. But if that's your thing, you can't do it right. So restaurants in the city or closed because of an edict. By the governor. That science based. Of course, he's just trying to react and do something. Because here in Westchester, we can go Dinan. There's a there's a capacity limit, but All these restaurants have changed, you know, like in some of these booths They'll put the plexiglass between the booths and skip Boots. So every other one could be occupied. Which is silly. Why the hell are you putting up the The Plexi class. All this stuff meant to keep the Crazy. Power hungry Health Department inspectors or The deputy sheriffs or anybody else who is being sicked upon you. From slapping you with a fine well, there's a new lawsuit that just came out restaurant group class action lawsuit against the Blasio and Cuomo. And basically it was started by the seaport house in Manhattan. There the first plaintiff butts class action, and they're basically saying, Hey, look. We cannot and will not respect or obey any further takings of our fundamental liberty. Interest in freedom's good for them. Because this is not based in science is only 1.4%, according to the state's health Department of Coronavirus cases. Not deaths. Positive cases, which could mean nothing. That are attributed to Restaurants, But the restaurants in New York City are bearing the brunt of this, so AH, place. I always go because I went to Fordham and I love to go to a couple basketball games a year we get together. We go to the game before the game. We go down to Arthur Avenue, which is across the street not fought right? And we go toe. Pasquale's Rigoletto will go to Dominic's will go to zero to know that all the good places down there that make it special. We can't do it now. Charlie. Apollo is the owner of Dominic. So, what happened to bump into yesterday? My wife and I, My mother in law went went out for lunch in Yonkers. Where, Of course, no problem. You have no restrictions other than some capacity limits, But we can have a good time and we did indoors. But Charlie Apollo and Dominic's and all the other restaurants in New York City can not. Charlie, How are you? Good, Bob. Thanks for having me today. So how bad is it? I mean, you guys have been through so much where you've had to shut down, And then you were able to open up for limited capacity or take out only by the way I'm not a take out kind of guy. When I go to a restaurant. I want the food to come out hot. I want to enjoy it. I want toe be with friends or family and not have to go to grab. You know a bag, Get it home and then have to reheat it. I'm not just me. I know a lot of people do it. Thank God they do because it's keeping you guys alive. But What's going on right now? Your restaurant Arthur Avenue, All of New York City. Are you guys air hanging on by a thread, right? That is correct or not the revenue all the restaurants, um, on Arthur Avenue followed protocol, according to the governor, I thought we were doing a good job of it all. I think all the all the city restaurants were trying to do the best they could. His shutting us down to the holidays was was very big alot restaurants and all the revenue are suffering right now. It's not enough just to sit outside. It's way too cold. On the houses they built on the street. They're trying to do the best they can with them, But it's just not enough and take out is not enough. So I think not only on off the revenue, but all to the city. Always four restaurants. We're all suffering pretty bad. Just think the governor should have a little bit more of a heart and kind of think about the small guys in this business because it's a trickle effect. It goes all the way down. On the restaurant's This applies to all the employees is just a trickling effect that it's hurting everyone.

Difficult Times Square Power Hungry Health Department Blasio Dominic Health Department Of Coronavir Dinan Times Square New York City Charlie Apollo Westchester Cuomo Charlie Pasquale Fordham Manhattan Yonkers Basketball BOB
Security operations centers: a first principle idea.

The CyberWire

05:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Security operations centers: a first principle idea.

"The idea of operations centers has been around seemingly forever friedrich limb in his a history of western technology suggests that the concept goes back as far as five thousand bc amazing anytime an organization grows big enough either in terms of function or one. Small team can't do everything. Leaders have built these centers to men's the workflow and status of the various groups into coordinate. If you fast forward to the early days of the technological revolution we started seeing organizations. That began looking like a modern day sark. But we're quite there yet. The classic example is how nasa managed space missions starting way back in nineteen fifty eight now for those. Who don't know me. I'ma space geek specifically. I love everything about the space race between the russians and the americans during the nineteen sixties in fact as a side note the washington post lillian cunningham produced a thirteen episode podcasts. About that very thing last year it is called moon rise and i highly recommended. But did you know that when neil armstrong and buzz aldrin landed on the moon in nineteen sixty nine that the russians had a remote controlled spacecraft up there at the same time. I didn't know that. Until i listen to the moon rise podcasts. The russians crashed into a moon mountain as armstrong and aldrin. We're flying back to the lunar module so maybe that is why the russians don't advertise that much. But i digress. One of my favorite space movies is paolo. Thirteen directed by ron howard. And one of the things. I love about that. Movie is how it depicts the energy and sense of purpose of an operation center. Here's the actor. Ed harris in a virtuoso performance playing gene kranz the real life nasa flight director delegating tasks his crew of operational teams on what they need to do to get apollo thirteen at home. And the meantime whenever frozen command module to power it up another but the re entry batteries. We've been tried before we've never even stimulated it before gene. We're going to have to figure it out. i want people in our simulators working reentry scenarios. I want you guys to find. Every engineer designed ever switch every circuit transistor and every lightbulb. It's up there then. I want you to talk to the guy. Knee assembly line actually built the thing. Find out how to squeeze every aunt at both of these goddamn machines. I want this mark all the way back to earth with time to spare never lost an american in space where surest not gonna lose one on my watch. Failure is not an option. If that doesn't bring chills down your spine you might be dead. I'm just saying when telephone network started appearing in the early nineteen twenty s phone companies like eighteen bill traffic control bureaus to handle long distance traffic issues by the early nineteen sixties. At and t. Handled most telephone switching through mechanical devices and build a network control center or noc to manage it. At and t. Historians consider this to be the first knock ever built by nineteen seventy seven bell systems had built the first national knock in bedminster new jersey which looked a lot like modern knocks. Today there wasn't much security yet but if there was any knock operators were doing it in the us intelligence community the nineteen sixties were fraud with international incidents like the cuban missile crisis of nineteen sixty to the arab israeli six day war in nineteen sixty seven the us pueblo capture and nineteen sixty eight the prague spring crisis and czechoslovakia also nineteen sixty eight in the one. Twenty-one shootdown crisis in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine the. nsa decided that. They needed an operation center to manage their efforts. Across a wide swatch of international activity. Based on the freedom of information request. The nsa released a document in two thousand seven that described the formation of the first national cigarette operations center or insomniac in one thousand nine hundred seventy three and according to charles berlin. I hit him on lincoln and the answer me. He's a former in sock director. The innocent kept adding more responsibility to over time. He said that it's secret. Sauce was when the nsa decided to pair offense or cigarette defense or comsec in the same place. Eventually they replaced the word singing in the title with security. In other words it became the national security operations center. Berlin said that when cyber came along years later the toll of michigan came too big to keep in the in sock in the. Nsa created the national cyber threat operations center or the in talk to deal with it. But with the addition of the concept mission these operations centers started to lean toward defensive security on the government side and in the aftermath of the morris worm which was the first destructive internet worm

Lillian Cunningham Gene Kranz Nasa Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Aldrin Ed Harris Ron Howard Bell Systems Washington Post Paolo Armstrong NSA Bedminster NOC National Cigarette Operations Charles Berlin Czechoslovakia New Jersey Prague
Astronauts beam Christmas message of hope to Earth from space station

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Astronauts beam Christmas message of hope to Earth from space station

"And Christmas is a day off for the international space station crew. Astronaut Shannon Walker says she's got something in common with many people back home. The holidays are typically when people get together. I also recognize that so many people won't be able to be visiting their loved ones. This holiday roommate Victor Glover, We do have a family up here and so will be enjoying a special holiday. Together, they'll all be able to phone home and they'll enjoy some recently arrived gift and special holiday food. Today the first astronauts to spend Christmas in space. The evidence the earth that was the Apollo eight fruit, which spent Christmas Eve circling the moon in

Shannon Walker Victor Glover International Space Station
Compose for Desktop

Talking Kotlin

03:49 min | Last month

Compose for Desktop

"Here to talk about something really exciting. Which is desktop or composed for desktop right. So now if folks aren't familiar about. I think it was like a couple of years ago that Google launched Jetpack composed right. Which is new way of doing Developments on android which takes advantage of the kotlin compilers plug in model and takes inspiration from react and flutter and similar frameworks right and we actually had a show with leland who's one of the folks behind it so that's jetpack composed which is android and you've decided to do compose for desktop right. So tell us uae. Like begin with the wall why of dolls and nikola even before why it's Topic today. I could even onset kushner y y compose i mean usually there. I'm like many yard. Firm works in the and in general like a muscular like low level system software and so Back why was the interested in looking at that particular firm or and why believe that. This accident not not framework but more like Like a programming language on its own just a little bit different beckons. Say graphical becca than your typical compiler markets so so compose is actually pretty exciting technology Because it's not a you're more well. It sells itself as you are but picture. It's way more it's It's an approach to thinking balked Like amputation and incremental competition and no way to connect to the state of program to presentation on the program so And make make this. Like this mapping this different than distance latian very very straightforward and and in a sense. That's what every programmer dos They somehow we shall is the the like they do. They do data transformation and and very important part of updated. Information is a dance form data into some perceivable state which is what what what people usually And i guess the huron your face a lot of interesting Like fundamental Being like you need to be both fuck incremental transformation so if you change something lethal ended. That's the typical sedation. If they just change a little and You get Routinely small update in in outward. So that set a deadline that information need to need to go through the whole computation. Happening your program. So that's a that. The general story belt incrementally in impose for example and and it takes the radical approach it soon as the robot is most complex Coaching apollo wagon an existence. The moment so that's an untreatable. Cultural compiler wargin and it wasn't even working on the on the mainstream coaching bottle of full on until one point. Four zero release earned if all that took wire to its version of autumn

Leland Kushner Nikola UAE Google
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | Last month

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
Fantasy Football: Players to start or sit

CBS Sports Radio

01:35 min | Last month

Fantasy Football: Players to start or sit

"Again and talking about their fantasy value and whether or not you could, you could pick him up or if you're monitoring match up some defense for the postseason 40 Niners right now in Yahoo fantasy leagues only owned in 38% of leaks was I told you they've been susceptible to give it up points and I think even if you picked him up this week, and this would be the week to do it Before, but we kind of get hip to the fact that they may have a decent schedule for week 13 against Washington Week 14 against Dallas. This would be the week to pick them up only 38%, a legion, Yahoo! And one thing to consider as well in talking about Washington. You said Alex, Miss, not the same guy agreed. They throw the ball a lot. They've been thrown a lot more with Alex Smith. They've been far more effective. It racking up yards and the yards they can put up. And certainly do damage to the to the point total for your defense when you get a touchdown excuse it all, of course, but I think for their matchups week 15 and 16 Excuse me, 13 and 14. Apollo 14 14 and 15, Washington and Dallas. Not bad matchups. And also I'll tell you what, though, but you're right. This is the week to picked up because Hey, man, the bills are an offensive, you know, not powerhouse, but they're pretty damn potent on offense. If the Niners even if the Niners lose the game, But hold the bills, too, I would say under 21 points if it's if it's a low scoring tight game, and, um, I think that the statement will be made. Is Josh Allen is having a hell of a year. And if they can not shut him down, but quiet him. Ah, little bit than then. Yeah, I think there'll be a big time pick up next week. So this week is the week to grab him and stash him. Bring it on back to build walls Rather be away too early than a week. Too late with this point. Seriously,

Niners Washington Dallas Alex Smith Yahoo Alex Josh Allen
Chinese spacecraft carrying lunar rocks lifts off from moon

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:20 sec | Last month

Chinese spacecraft carrying lunar rocks lifts off from moon

"Spacecraft lifted off from the moon last night with a load of lunar rocks the first stage of its return to Earth. It's a third Chinese spacecraft to land on the moon and the first to take off from it again. Its mission was to collect about £4 of lunar rocks and bring them back to Earth. Earlier this year, U. S Apollo astronauts brought back hundreds of pounds of moon rocks.

A Conversation With Dr. Maya Angelou

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

05:27 min | Last month

A Conversation With Dr. Maya Angelou

"With the release of her book. A song long up to heaven a song. I like to do at a song long enough to have enough. I said many times. Maya has been one of my greatest teachers. I am so blessed to have her in my life. She is the one. I often look to for strength for wisdom for comfort and courage and also just to talk you know everytime we on the we're not talking about courage and with sometimes we just laugh a lot anyway. The sheer power of her words and insights have moved and inspired me. And i know millions of you. Maya says at a song flung up to heaven is the sixth and final in the series of books about her remarkable life which she began with. I know why cage heard sing the first book of dr angelo's bestselling autobiographical series was. I know why the caged bird sings. It made her literary star. Stayed on the new york times bestseller lists for two years. It is brutally honest account of her painful childhood and how she rose above being raped by her mother's boyfriend when she was just eight. And the six years of self-imposed silence follows next. She wrote gathered together in my name about her struggle to make ends meet as a single mother at age. Sixteen working as a cook. a dancer. a madam even a prostitute next in singing and swinging getting married like christmas. Maya takes on her journey into show business touring europe as a singer and dancer walnut phone informative and millions read the heart of a woman. Were maya takes us through one of the most fascinating periods of her life from her debut at the apollo theater to her first meeting with malcolm x. to the joys and challenges of raising a teenage son then in all god's children need traveling shoes she follows her heart to africa in search of her roots where she teaches at the university of ghana and works as a journalist alongside malcolm x. world now poet author actress activist. Dr maya angelou has risen to greatness time and time again is more phenomenal phenomenal phenomenal woman than ever. Please welcome my dear friend. Dr maya angelou do want to talk about something. Other than and wisdom shrink in hope. What is seventy four wheel like. It's so wonderful. It is so good. I thought the fifties were hunt. Until i reach the sixty the sixties out there. They're out there who. Then when i reached the seventies mount no the seventies you want to reach the seventies. everybody's stay alive reach this because do you feel age you know. This is a society that so puts age and ageing. And we're so concerned about it. Is there a point where you say. Oh yes. I'm now an older woman. No there are some things that have not escaped. Me team has not. Ecstasy has not satisfaction has not disappointment has not fear has not courage has not so there are some things which have not escaped me. So that keeps you young If you start thinking that you know it and nobody can tell you anything. You found the one way and you can tell others faults. It's already over. it's already too late. You have become old at eighteen at twenty five when you think you know everything but when you know a do a lot you've been around a long time and you've paid attention like you so interesting though because people say to me when you call her up and you talk to her. Does she talk like she talks when she's and it is true many times i call them my and like just the other day he says on the morning. I'm sitting in my kitchen table and she just starts a conversation. Let me get a pencil. write this down. She's talking and then she are you there baby go. Yes so tell me. What is this significant of a song flung up heaven It comes from the third verse in the nba by pauline's dunbar. And i'd love to say please. That may i the first. I says i know what the caged bird fields on me when the sun is bright on upland slopes when the wind blows saw through the springing grass and the river. Floats like a sheet glass when the first bird sings and the first bird oaths and the same perfume from its chalice steals. I know but the caged bird field.

Orbits are roadways in space: Heres why you should care

The 3:59

05:11 min | Last month

Orbits are roadways in space: Heres why you should care

"So you have nice explainer on how orbits working and you talk to one of these professors who called orbits roadways in space. I i like that. I like that idea. How does orbiting around the earth work in. How do scientists and engineers actually ensure something like a satellite maintains a stable orbit around us orbits. I think are under appreciated. What you might not realize spaces actually pretty close. It's only about sixty miles up. Which yeah okay. That's a lot but you know if you get in your car and drive sixty miles. It's not going to some entirely new zone in the universe right but space is very different. It turns out the hard part about space is not getting up sixty miles. It's getting so that you're moving. Horizontally fast enough to stay in orbit. You come right back but if you go horizontally fast enough you stay in orbit. And that's where that roadways in space comment is germane because what it means. Basically you're going fast enough that you don't fall down and hit the earth you don't go you stay up there and it's it's pretty neat. There's some atmospheric drag but mostly if you put a satellite in orbit it just keeps whizzing around the earth. And that's pretty remarkable one of the actually. I was researching this story. What am i. The my favorite parts of it was looking at what is called newton's cannonball so isaac newton right gravity lights l. This stuff back in the sixteen hundreds he had actually a really good thought experiment that reveals a pretty clear way. How orbits work. he said. Imagine you're up at the of a very high mountain and you shoot a canon ball horizontally now if you shoot it. With a certain speed goes near flies a little ways and plops down hits. The earth fired a little harder. It goes farther and it's the earth but if you fire it at just the right speed the gravity that pulls the cannonball down exactly balances the curvature of the earth so it just keeps on going around the earth now and the real world. That's not possible because during the mountains. High enough in there's a resistance and all that kind of thing but it still shows. I think pretty elegantly. What in orbit is it's this balance of of an object spacecraft falling down because of gravity but also moving horizontally fast enough that it that it keeps on going around earth in in an orbit. Well that's an interesting trick because you talk about moving horizontally at the right speed. When i see rockets launched their. They're launching up vertically right not not horizontally. So how do you get from that. Tremendous bruce up vertically to a point where it goes horizontal and stable enough to actually maintain its orbit chirp. This is one of the tricks of rocket. Rocketry says why when people talk about rocket science. It's not easy right rockets. Actually almost immediately start turning sideways right after launch so at launch they go up and they use a lot of fuel to go up but the majority of the fuel they use is to go sideways so when you watch space shuttle or space x or any of these rockets you'll note that it starts tipping over towards the east usually and it tips over more and more and more and more. If you watch a spacex launch they actually have a very nice Three d computer view that shows the track of the rockets and you can see that very rapidly. It's going sideways more than it's going up. So the vast majority of the energy needed to put a rocket into orbit is pushing it sideways. Not up if you look at some of these rockets like new shepherd from blue origin. Jeff bezos says rockets startup. Those just go up and down. And that's actually a lot easier than going sideways. Which is what spacex does when it gets a satellite into orbit or in iss launch capsule with some astronauts in it. It's a lot harder to go sideways. Yeah you know you talk about this rocket science. This is not easy stuff calculating you know when it needs attorney or how it gets to the pre velocity. It actually maintains or like. How difficult is that to calculate. It's pretty difficult and you. It's not just the calculation it's also the execution so you have to steer the rocket and what you have to realize about a rocket is. It's you're sitting on top of a controlled explosion so you can think of something like unisom. Tnt blowing up or something. It's catastrophic huge release of energy. A rocket is the same kind of thing. It's a chemical explosion and you just control it just enough that the thrust in one direction. So it's pretty hard to get this balanced just right. It's easier these days because you have advanced. Computers have accelerometers all over the place that no just exactly how much thrust is pointing which direction and you have radar tracking stations that can give lots of details about the launch. So it's easier than it was gonna by apollo missions fifty years ago or something like that but yeah it's still hard.

Tremendous Bruce Isaac Newton Newton Jeff Bezos Spacex
The Apollo Library for GraphQL

Talking Kotlin

03:23 min | 2 months ago

The Apollo Library for GraphQL

"For folks that don't know anything about this. What is apollo. how does it fit with roth. Qu'ils can you give a brief overview of that. i can take that question So how doing oscar. Much since the beginning and we have open source implementation of logically. Things are off curiel. Stacks maybe i should say oh god stop would be good. Oh so rescue allies I like to think of it as a rest on steroids. So it's a way to communicate with your back. End of that allows client to query specific fields as a need so unlike at traditional rest. Api you query. Jesus and you have off seems so some of the things you might want and some of the things you might not use we've got you l. You can clearly hea- quest only the shells and that as to unit so it's It's a nicer bathroom. Mincy women and its way to model your your data your back Which moves a lot of patients between kids and and on top of that. The nice thing we ask you this. What's a started. What made me love got you all is that it's a completely totally tight. It's actually. It has some similarities with coach because it has features such as a note safety and all types. It's it's a computer type system. So i think it's a very good candidate are good companion to have a when writing quran. So it complements kotla nicely basically right. Yeah there's a to walk city well together because of the same concept and being able to have type safety from your beckoned to your funded is a super useful and as a korean developers are really okay so now tell us about apollo. Where does this sit up. And the way it is Actual clients for and Also falls a jvm and for coaching. They took that later. So it's named envoy because this is where most of us use it so issue haven't annoyed that and you have acura beckham apollo android Will generate models typeset models. That mucho back. So in a very high level it's a adultery gins that generate some code and sauce. Feis that you can later use with a one timer is at two does fascinating and also all kinds of things like jerry quest gushing so essentially you give it an end point and then it generates everything needed to talk to that endpoint right. Yeah give it an an point and customer fight so you would you fight your language. So you'll give goth terrell. find your. give us chemo. Defines orders types in your back end and that put the models for that

Curiel Mincy QU Kotla Roth Oscar Jerry Quest Terrell
On the Origin of English

Lexicon Valley

13:10 min | 2 months ago

On the Origin of English

"So here is the basic story. The idea is that germanic goes back to some original language. We call it proto germanic. We can't know what it speakers would've called it. There was this original language that became german and english and swedish et cetera and that would have been spoken probably in that little neck of denmark or maybe a little southwards of that in. Let's say about five hundred bc. So that's where proto germanic would have started in the meantime there's a thesis that that language was profoundly impacted by invading or at least imposing people from the near east people from way down where there is today lebanon and syria and israel specifically it would be the phoenicians. The phoenicians were one of many people in that region and they would have spoken a semitic language. I e a language related to what we know today as hebrew and arabic and if we wanna go. Further afield aramaic and cross the red sea. And it's i'm hurric- in ethiopia. But they spoke of semitic language and we know what they spoke because they wrote it down because they actually were the first people who grabbed the alphabet when it was very quietly and scrap invented probably by mercenary soldiers in egypt. The finishes took it and made into something that they use. Basically to write down business related things they want writing epochs. They weren't writing the grapes of wrath. But they were writing and so the phoenicians are the ones who end up spreading the alphabet throughout the world. In any case more to the point the phoenicians were big travelers. they did not like to stay home. The phoenicians started ruling the roost. They were probably in about eleven hundred bc and they didn't just stay there they sailed. They traded they got themselves around what was then considered by people like them the world throughout the mediterranean they keep on going westward and of course once you get out to where there's no more land while you might start going up into like spain and they kind of around the coast they traded. They brought things back. They were great intermediaries now in the middle east. They had their cities like like tire and blows or carthage. That you hear so much about on the north coast of africa that is phoenician or punic territory but they sailed and you know there is evidence that they sailed not only to roughly spain and portugal. Which is what we have absolutely concrete evidence for them doing but as evidence that they kept going and they went all the way up to northern europe and past. What's now germany. And they actually would have gone all the way to that part of denmark. One little piece of evidence is that they got people. Amber got some amber in greece. If you've got some amber and what is today lebanon. While the amber as often as not from up in that baltic northern european region they had a lot of amber amber is pretty. I think amber is preserving bits of dinosaur tales and insects and things like that but also just gorgeous you kind of want to bite it. Big amber trade. Well they always seem to have it. We'll have they get it. Well it would seem that. They had some sort of connection to northern europe. That in itself doesn't mean that they sailed all the way up there and got it because there were ways of trading amber just a cross the european continent but the fact that they had so much amber is one of a great many things. It's like the spokes in a wheel. An argument is about various things that all seem to point in the same direction. What about that amber. But more to the point it's about the language what is wrong with manic. Why is it so odd. Well what is this case that these people came from the near east and sailed all the way up around your understand. What the thesis is. The idea is that speakers of phoenician settled in somewhere in this part of denmark and there was long-term settlement where speakers of this phoenician and speakers of this thing we called proto germanic mixed to the point that many people were basically speaking proto germanic in phoenician to an extent this is what we linguists call language contact theory. The idea being that proto germanic ended up being really stamped by this other way of being a language because there would have been these settlements where venetians ruled the roost and their language seemed to be the cool one and it was the one that people switch to so the proto germanic ended up being profoundly affected it kind of wanted to be cool and became more like venetian. What's the evidence that that happened given that. There is no archaeological evidence. Partly because what would have been the shore back then has since become underwater. So we can't really dig up wear. The settlements probably would have been well. One of the things is words. So as i said so many words in germanic languages don't trace back. They just pop up all of a sudden it's about one in three and that's a conservative estimate. Now some of the experts. Just don't give a damn about that. And they have other things to do. They have bigger fish to fry in that as perfectly understandable. Sometimes you just don't give a damn you know what i don't care about. For example i do not care about outer space. I remember when there was the apollo landing and everybody was so excited and they actually rolled in a little black and white. Tv into my classroom. We were supposed to watch. I didn't care. I'm more interested in what's going on here astrophysics. I respect it. But i do not care about saturn

Denmark Lebanon Spain Red Sea Syria Ethiopia Carthage Europe Egypt Israel Mediterranean Portugal Middle East Baltic Amber Greece Africa Germany European
A Conversation between Tara Brach and Elizabeth Lesser

Tara Brach

04:54 min | 2 months ago

A Conversation between Tara Brach and Elizabeth Lesser

"Elizabeth. We are so delighted to have you with us. Thank you thank you thanks. It's a pleasure thank you. Hello everybody from all over the place. It's lovely to be with you. Yes i wanna jump right in to do your new book because i fall. We get grabbed by the tidal. Cassandra speaks can you just have to come up with that title. Who is cassandra. Let's just start writing with that. Well i've always loved mythology and religious texts. You know. I just love reading whether it's the bible or the koran or the buddhist texts or the hindu texts. I've just always just because humans learn through stories. that's how we learn. So i've been fascinated with stories and i didn't take me long to notice even way back in college that wow most of the books we love. Heroes tales the parables the myths they're written untold by men because back in the day. Ps also a lot now. The storytellers were men. And there's nothing wrong. With the stories. Men tell and the values men tell their stories from but a big swath of humanity was left out of the storytelling so when packing Reading reinterpreting everything. From adam and eve to chinese stories to the greek myths and as i was writing and i was writing about one of the greek town. The tale of cassandra we were in the midst of the metoo movement. Now i know that seems maybe like ancient history. Now we've all been through so much but really it was just like a year and a half ago and one night. I was watching television on. I was watching the televised trial of those young girls who had been molested by their doctor. Dr larry nassar and the judge in rare way of dealing with the trial. First of all allowed it to be televised and allowed one hundred twenty five girls to tell their story in front of the cameras with dr nassar sitting there and for years and years thirty years he'd been at it for years and years. These young women most of whom were olympic athletes had told their mothers had told their parents had told their coaches that college coaches the us olympic team coaches. They've told them that this man had been molesting them but no one believed them. And i was reading the story of cassandra. At the time. Cassandra was a princess. She was the most beautiful princess of the king of troy and troy was an ancient city. That was often at war with greece and she was so beautiful in lowering all the men wanted to marry her including the gods apollo. The son of zeus wanted to marry her. Zeus wanted to marry her and apollo offered her a gift. The gift of being clairvoyant. That she could be able to see into the future. She would see what was going to happen to her family. And her countrymen and her world and she wanted that She's very spiritual person she she wanted to be able to see into understand so she accepted the gift but he neglected to say that she would have to have sex with him right away after she got the gift but she didn't want to and he was furious so as the story goes he spat in her mouth in put a curse on her. Cassandra you will be clervoy int- but no one will believe you. And for years. She saw what was coming. She saw the war. She saw the trojan horse. She saw her brother's all dead. She saw her city in ruins and she would say it but no one would believe her. So as i was watching these young women. I thought they are cassandra's. They are telling their truth their experience but this time they're being believed and i thought that's what i want this book to be about changing the way the old story ends so it doesn't end with women not being heard women not being believed so that we had meant to who knows their inner feminine. So that finally. We respect that part of ourselves so deeply. It's really this part. That i was leading in the meditation and we get so much clout in musculature. That are stories begin to matter an actually change what it means to be human

Cassandra Dr Larry Nassar Dr Nassar Elizabeth Troy Clervoy Olympic Greece United States
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"The budget is left out when attending the Potsdam Conference two weeks earlier. The brand new president Harry. Truman had advised Stalin that the United States had successfully tested a bomb of stupendous explosive. The Power Stalin politely acted surprised and pleased but secretly he'd been well aware of the American atomic bomb project. and to tell the truth he really didn't think that much of it. It seemed insanity to him that America would spend the vast fortunate adjust invested for the sake of one single weapon now divisions in the answer Army divisions not just a bomb or two that was on August fifth on August six in Ola gay returned from her mission and three days later boxcar had limped back from hurts in the time between these two missions. Stalin had ripped up the neutrality pact that he'd had with Japan throughout the entire war a pack that had ensured that neither Russia or Japan would have had to fight a two front war but now that the Pacific were had been won by the Americans. Stalin Alan invaded on a relatively small scale. Some of the islands of the Japanese nation with suckling and correal Allen's a cynical move by the ultimate cynic but one that kept those islands under Soviet occupation for the duration of the cold historically. There doesn't seem to have been any single single lightbulb moment. When Stalin realized that his carefully laid plans for capturing all of Europe had evaporated in a millisecond flash up picador an instant when every weapon in the world was suddenly made obsolete? That is exactly what happened. Those two flashes of light that had ended World War. The two had miraculously prevented the conventional World War three that America and Britain had not the slightest chance of stopping or even slowing down until it was all over and far too late but slowly over the course of days or even weeks. Stalin began to realize that what this expensive American toy had done into. Brief flashes lashes was what the entire Nazi war machine had failed to do negate the ground power of the Red Army not only with the triumphant United States states. Air Force be able to annihilate Soviet armored concentrations the imperialist enemy could rain atomic death down on Moscow Leningrad Stalingrad and every other Soviet city not even the Russians who so far had been forced to withstand anything could withstand that the overwhelming Soviet advantage manage in conventional forces thousands of tanks millions of men had been balanced out by a hundred pounds of gray metal cuttingly engineered by the the best minds on the planet. Who's been working around the clock for the past several years out in the desert wastelands of New Mexico so now now perhaps you understand the mindset of the two superpowers as they entered into their forty three year conflict? The Soviet Union bloodied but unbowed by the most appalling war in human history. Division after battle-hardened division waiting along the entire length of the invisible the iron curtain the United States which had invested time money and resources to create a miracle weapon that had rendered the invasion of Japan and mood and stood ready to do the same to the Soviet invasion that had been so carefully prepared and was waiting in the wings on one side the brute force sledgehammer rich hammer the land army of the largest nation on earth with the seemingly endless supply fresh recruits capital of sustaining a seemingly endless amount of punishment on the other side the scalpel the millisecond timing needed terrain atomic fire from sober bombers in the dark blue skies of the stratosphere stratosphere now of course Russia would need the bomb and quickly American conventional forces would need to be rebuilt and quickly but the pattern for the entire fire. Cold War had been set right at the beginning. Massive Soviet superiority in conventional-arms versus massive American superiority and technology and know-how quality versus quantity was the question that determined the Cold War the American inability the unwillingness anyway to commit to the kind of casualties of conventional war in Europe would entail against the Soviet inability despite fanatical willingness to catch the American military in the continuing advances in lethality needed to offset the disparity in numbers both East and west of the Berlin Wall that had yet to be built both sides stirred at each other and realized their only chance for victory. Lay in fighting the next war on their Own Conditions yet each side realizing that the fight on their own strengths would paradoxically trigger the strengths of the other side. So there sits the reason for over four decades of stalemate and terror each side unable to fight on the battlefield their opponents and yet each side with the ability to catastrophically harm the other. It was this delicate hair spring balance the kept and would continue to keep the cold war cold the Cold War. What we saw is written and presented by Bill Whittle produced by Robert Stirling directed by Jonathan? Hey executive producer. Is Jeremy Boring. Our supervising producer is mathis glover and our associate producer is Katie Swinnerton postproduction postproduction producer. Alex Englaro story producer. Jared Sochaux edited by Matthew Sheller original music by Kyle Paren- audio recorded and mixed bye. Mike Corallina designed by Cynthia and Ghulam the Cold War. What we saw is an esoteric radio theater production copyright as Tarik Radio Theatre Twenty twenty?.

Stalin Alan United States Soviet Union Japan Tarik Radio Theatre Twenty twe Europe America producer Potsdam Conference Red Army president supervising producer New Mexico Harry Truman correal Allen Army Pacific
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"The only reason I'm alive to tell this tale of what we saw is because of the existence of nuclear weapons that's not hyperbole in nineteen forty I five. My father was a newly commissioned second lieutenant in the US Army. I have a photo of him in his graduating class on the back. He got most of his classmates to write a sentence about about what the expected to be doing in ten years. More than half had the same answers. My father. My Dad wrote in pencil quote I expect to be killed fighting for my country unquote. They all expected to be killed fighting for their country. Now I don't know the history of any of the other men in that photograph but if I had to guess I think it would be likely that none of them would end up being killed fighting for their country now if they'd been marine butter bars well that would have been an entirely different story. My father arrived in Germany Germany and late April of nineteen forty-five by that time just two weeks before V e day victory in Europe. Day the Soviet Red Army still had a lot of fighting and bleeding left to do on the way to the fuhrer bunker but the Americans who could have beat the Soviets Handley to the German capital had been halted dead in their tracks not by SS Panzer divisions but rather by a direct order directly. Shaef Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces that order to leave Berlin to the Soviets Soviets came from the same supreme commander who decided to let Charles de Gaulle's free. French army. Be the first to enter newly liberated Paris just nine months earlier over the vehement vehement protests of George Patton Winston Churchill and a host of other bewildered allied leaders. The man who had given these orders would stand firm by them the glue holding holding together this persnickety British French and American Alliance together was general. Dwight David Eisenhower and his remarkable sense of fairness and decorum as the Americans entering the war. In the last weeks of one thousand nine hundred forty one began to shoulder more and more of the burden the British who'd been fighting since mid nineteen thirty nine naturally early enough resented being told what to do by what they considered to be swaggering up starts in late. Comers after senior American official had griped about his counterpart is that British Bastard Bastard Ike just tore into him there are no British American or French bastards in these headquarters he roared. There are certainly bastards aplenty and I'm looking at one. Oh I could stop the American armies because he felt that the Soviets deserved to take Berlin recipient question about that the Russians at separate twenty five five million casualties and untold destruction and misery since Germany had invaded Russia with the launch of Operation Barbarossa in June of nineteen forty one after fighting and winning what was without question the greatest running battle in the history of the world. The Red Army had fought its way back from a few rubble piles els in Stalingrad and then slowly slogged their way boots step by bloody booed. Step One thousand three hundred seventy eight miles back to Berlin so the Russians were sledge hammered into a disorder and chaos of catastrophic dimensions. Catastrophe was so complete that it made ironically have saved Russia from collapse of the Red Army had earned Berlin. There's no question about that. But both Ike and President Roosevelt had been entirely too trusting Joseph stolen and sympathy for Russia had endured was nearly universal among the Allies Winston Churchill. Perhaps using his tremendous intuition could already sense since the iron curtain even before Germany surrendered. He loudly complained that British and American armies could have liberated not only Berlin but Vienna and other capitals titles as well he instinctively felt that wherever the line the Soviet Red Army happened to hold when he surrendered would be in fact the line of an ideological logical trench that would bisect Europe as surely as the horrific physical one had done during World War. One but I do wonder along with many others. How often President Eisenhower would regret this? Decision by generalize and the world of freedom. The proudest.

Soviet Red Army Berlin Russia Germany Dwight David Eisenhower US Army Winston Churchill French army Supreme Headquarters Allied Ex Europe George Patton Winston Churchil American Alliance Charles de Gaulle Stalingrad Handley Paris official commander Ike
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"Lenin Trotsky Molotov Stalin all of them pseudonyms names invented by the men who bestowed them upon themselves. These were the founding fathers of the Russian revolution and since the thesis of this entire what we saw adventure is that whatever was on one side of the Berlin Wall was a negative image of what was on the other side. It bears mentioning that while the American Revolution began with the collection of prominent citizens boldly sadly and in the case of John Hancock brazenly signing their real names to a declaration of independence. The Russian Revolution was born of men constantly instantly on the run from police wearing disguises as they were smuggled in and out of secret safehouses men whose real names were known to this. Our secret police. Unlike the proud prominent and successful Americans of seventeen seventy six the Russians of nineteen seventeen or unknown students radicals outlaws men robbing banks naming naming themselves after romantic figures revolutionary literature or more likely intellectual sitting in cafes in France and Switzerland endlessly dicing and parsing and debating political political theory theory theory always theory Marxist Leninist Trotskyites Bolsheviks mensheviks zinoviev debating Bukharin. ISM sharing safehouses sharing wives engaging and passionate screaming matches that sometimes ended with fistfights in basements cellars and all of it. A very very long way away from the reason and disciplined appealed to logic and practicality among the most famous men in the country openly finding entirely different answers in a public hall in Philadelphia. So who were these men. But one of them Ladimir Elliott Juliana of a man who called himself Lennon. A failed lawyer who watched an idealized older brother hanged in front of his eyes by this our secret. Police after refusing to ask for clemency Lev Davidovich Bronstein a brilliant. An arrogant student. Who against all odds would become a kind of military genius who've virtually co ran the revolution with Lennon under the alias? Leon Trotsky Buzzer Slav Mikhailovich scrubbing a Dour humorless apparatchik capable of prodigious amounts of work and who named himself Molotov the hammer and of course Joseph Zarian a bitch Dzhugashvili a former choirboy from the Caucasus with the badly crushed arm and the ravages of smallpox written forever forever across his face utterly ruthless utterly paranoid low level strongmen calling himself Koba constantly pursued by the chronic. The SARS secret police police who arrested him seven times excelled him six times and who had escaped essentially walking out of Siberia five times before meeting his idol Lennon and his Nemesis Trotsky is Lieutenant Molotov and finally changing his name yet again to Stalin the man of steel now. These are the names that most people now now but to understand the Soviet Union to really get in your bones what life in Soviet Russia was really like. You have to go to other names. Aw dzerzhinsky Yokota yezhov barrier the check the GPO the key the MGB the KGB endless rebranding. The same dreaded Soviet secret police through which the Russian people would be ruled. Intimidated and pacified through the years using the only real weapon. These revolutionary intellectuals really knew how to wheel that weapon.

Lenin Trotsky Molotov Stalin Lennon Lev Davidovich Bronstein Lieutenant Molotov Koba Berlin Wall Soviet Union John Hancock Soviet Russia Ladimir Elliott Juliana Philadelphia France Switzerland Caucasus Siberia Joseph Zarian Dzhugashvili
"apollo" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

15:03 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Aaron Mission Control suggested switching quote S. C. E. Talks. No one quite knew what that meant but they did it. It worked worked. And the crew were able to navigate to the moon with Conrad's saying Whoopie as his first word as he exited the lunar module I onto the Lunar Surface Conrad Conrad and bean conducted two spacewalks set up some science experiments took color video collected rocks and pieces of the surveyor. Three probe that landed on the surface more within two years prior and then they returned safely to Earth on November twenty fourth. So in the spirit of the fiftieth anniversaries. I had a chance to sit down with Dr. A Harrison Schmitt recently the lunar module pilot of Apollo Seventeen and the only geologist to walk on the moon. He came to our Studio to Speak About The fiftieth anniversary. Sirri of the Apollo Program. But I had a chance to ask him more about his apollo seventeen mission. What a scientifically interesting about the moon and what we have to look forward to during the arduous artem Program so here. We go forty seven years after his launch to walk on the Moon Dr Harrison Schmitt. Enjoy the county. You didn't have Dr Schmidt. I am very honored to be speaking with you.

Conrad Conrad Apollo Seventeen Dr Harrison Schmitt Dr. A Harrison Schmitt Apollo Program Dr Schmidt Aaron Mission Whoopie geologist bean
"apollo" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Aaron Mission Control suggested switching quote S. C. E. Talks. No one quite knew what that meant but they did it. It worked worked. And the crew were able to navigate to the moon with Conrad's saying Whoopie as his first word as he exited the lunar module I onto the Lunar Surface Conrad Conrad and bean conducted two spacewalks set up some science experiments took color video collected rocks and pieces of the surveyor. Three probe that landed on the surface more within two years prior and then they returned safely to Earth on November twenty fourth. So in the spirit of the fiftieth anniversaries. I had a chance to sit down with Dr. A Harrison Schmitt recently the lunar module pilot of Apollo Seventeen and the only geologist to walk on the moon. He came to our Studio to Speak About The fiftieth anniversary. Sirri of the Apollo Program. But I had a chance to ask him more about his apollo seventeen mission. What a scientifically interesting about the moon and what we have to look forward to during the arduous artem Program so here. We go forty seven years after his launch to walk on the Moon Dr Harrison Schmitt. Enjoy the county. You didn't have Dr Schmidt. I am very honored to be speaking with you.

Conrad Conrad Apollo Seventeen Dr Harrison Schmitt Dr. A Harrison Schmitt Apollo Program Dr Schmidt Aaron Mission Whoopie geologist bean
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"It go over it was orange soil alright burnt orange appropriately enough when later analyzed scientists discovered that this orange soil was the result of an Ancient Fire Fire Fountain on the Moon Best Estimate is that three point six four billion years before a volcanic eruption on the then act of moon blue millions of drops of lava into the lunar vacuum which cooled rapidly into very fine almost circular grains. What will we have found? I wonder if Congress and the president hadn't been so shortsighted. What might we have seen walking inside the world's biggest football stadium the sixty mile wide two and a half Mile Deep Taras Prater called Copernicus the meteorite that made the crater tyco hit hard enough to send plumes of white subsurface material halfway around the moon?.

Taras Prater Congress president six four billion years
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"Command Service Module Kittyhawk piloted by Stewart Stewart Russa and began its descent too Fra Mauro after Hand Flying Antares even closer to its intended landing spot than any other Apollo mission before sense Alan Bartlett Shepherd Junior stepped off at the foot pat and onto the lunar surface in Uttar silence his mind on other things apparently because he walked several yards away from the lamb before remarking quietly as if to himself and it's been a long way but we're here now apparently preparing preparing for his imminent retirement from the space program shepherd took a couple of swings without a t engulfs all-time most difficult centrum. That's swing was captured on tape by his Lunar Macho pilot at Mitchell rookie astronaut Edgar de Mitchell only made a single flight into space but it was a doozy it was the sixth human to walk on the moon was his only flight and so ended the H.. Series of Apollo missions now Apollo fifteen was supposed to be h mission but as that deep.

Stewart Stewart Russa Edgar de Mitchell Fra Mauro Apollo Alan Bartlett
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"The Pooch Big Time Alan Bean quite by accident. You understand was about to make Apollo twelve the forgotten landing coming into the picture Nappy F._A.. It now one of the great hypes regarding the second lunar landing was that Apollo twelve not terry those blurry black and white T._v.. Cameras rather new state of the art year that would show the surface of the moon in living living color Conrad being the lunar module intrepid made a brilliant absolutely pinpoint landing just close enough for them to walk six hundred feet or so to visit the unmanned surveyor three lander which had landed back in April of nineteen sixty seven it was the first and only time that humans have been able to visit the space probes the came before them and paved the way intrepid landed in the southeastern corner of oceanus press alarm. That's the ocean of storms now and this particular piece of real estate had been visited three times before Apollo twelve the surveyor three pro from nineteen sixty seven which they examined the Soviet Luna five mission in nineteen sixty five would have made the first soft landing on the moon but the retro rockets failed and it just dug another crater to fly over the ranger missions was accomplished an atlas agena combination from Cape Kennedy. I of them was America's ranger. Seven which in July of nineteen sixty four also crashed into moon but that was the mission plan for Rangers seven it was designed to crash in the Moon Nasr's ranger sevens impacted the moment in a pre-selected target area it also took the first image of the moon obtained from an American space probe and four thousand three hundred more of them as it rocketed into the moon at two thousand three hundred miles per hour the last image recorded objects about a foot wide. This traffic jam in the southeastern end of the ocean of storms had drawn so much attention that the I a._A._U.. The International Astronomical Union Multinational Consortium of leading astronomers which is among other things responsible for approving every single name on every single feature that we discover out in space well the decided cited that after four missions in two craters that particular patch of ancient lava would henceforth be named mayor cognitive the known see now. Unfortunately we didn't get to see that Apollo twelve is the missing mission for so many of us because as being followed Conrad down the ladder to become the fourth man on the moon his first task was to set up the brand new widely hyped color camera but Alan Bean who understandably was probably we pretty excited ended up missing procedure and he removed the Lens cover before he had the camera securely in place that camera got pointed for a few moments directly at the sun the delicate electronics and the camera fried almost immediately and we didn't see anything on Apollo twelve that means for most of us like it never happened. That's the power of the image for you and needless to say the next mission Apollo Thirteen would be historic. Apollo thirteen was the first and only mission to the moon that I clearly saw on the pad go off with my own is also there was some kind of an explosion. Apparently I could afford to be a little flip about this because there's nothing I can add to that. Magnificent work that Ron Howard. Tom Hanks at Harris Bill Paxton Kevin Bacon and Gary sinise did on the movie Apollo Thirteen based on the Book Lost Moon by Apollo Thirteen eighteen commander Jim level it is hands down the best nonfiction.

Alan Bean Moon Nasr Conrad Rangers International Astronomical Uni Ron Howard oceanus Cape Kennedy Tom Hanks Soviet Luna America Gary sinise commander Bill Paxton Kevin Bacon six hundred feet
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"March Third Nineteen nineteen sixty nine one hundred and forty days before the landing of Apollo Eleven. The first of the man rated limbs was finally ready for its first shakedown crew Apollo nine would step back to finish the demission skipped dipped due to delays with the lunar module. Call signs began to be used for the first time in project Apollo during the flight of Apollo nine NASA had stopped allowing crews to name their spacecraft after Gus Grissom at given his Jimmy three-capsule the name Molly early Brown after the unsinkable Molly Brown of Legend in a backhanded reference to his liberty bell seven capsule sinking after splashdown but now for the first time the two independent spacecraft's command service module and the lunar. Module would be on the same flight separated by distances of a few inches to one hundred fifteen miles. They couldn't both be called Apollo nine so starting with this mission all the remaining moon missions would fly in ships named by their flight truce Jim McDevitt who had pleaded with the late ed white to return from his space walk on Jimmy four with command this mission Dave Scott who'd been sitting next to Neil Armstrong on July eight when that capsule threatened to spin itself to pieces would pilot let the Apollo nine command service module named gumdrops while Rusty Schweickart would put the lunar module spider through its paces now after another faultless launch of their Saturn five booster Dave Scott repeated the hundred eighty a degree turn that the now.

Molly Brown Dave Scott Jimmy Gus Grissom Jim McDevitt Neil Armstrong Rusty Schweickart NASA forty days
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"Command module up and away from any inflict catastrophe all of these programs tmz began in earnest and from the very beginning it was decided that individual private aerospace companies would be responsible for the individual components North American Rockwell would build both the command and service modules as well as the second stage the Saturn five the U._S.. Naval aviation specialist grummin would build both the descent and asset stages of the lunar module commercial aviation giant Boeing would build the immense first stage of the Saturn five and the critical third stage went to its archrival Douglas Aircraft Company I._B._M.. Would handle the instruments guidance until elementary functions and unlike the Titan to booster used on the Jim and I program which just left off the pad the sheer size as of the Saturn five minute far more sluggish almost lethargic at Liftoff Dick Gordon who flew both on Jim nine eleven and Apollo twelve with later described the Saturn five as an old man's ride compared to the zippy titan to in fact Buzz Aldrin and a few other Saturn five jockeys admitted that they could not tell exactly when the Saturn five had lifted off the ped- without checking their instruments. That kind of thing wasn't a problem on juvenile tighten.

Jim Buzz Aldrin Douglas Aircraft Company Boeing Dick Gordon five minute
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

Apollo 11: What We Saw

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: What We Saw

"The in the earth and the farm and all Darden Monomania the name as Apollo finally starts to take wing to shocking to learn that the entire program and everything it accomplished really was the world's most spectacular plan B. in part three of what we saw. We'll see how this simple straight path to the moon was too complex too expensive into to having instead an intricate ballet of rendezvous docking transfers and all the rest ended up being the path that we finally chose to the moon this plan B. Approach required vastly more skill than what we originally thought we would need for Apollo nope. We ended up going down that road anyway since when you get right down to it skilled US way anything from a fire during a routine test to Christmas messages from the Far Side of the Moon Watch the Apollo program got to that one giant leap the series very small steps choose to go to the moon and this detained and do the other thing not because they are evening one be they are hard and or one we have thirty minutes past the hour lift. I hear the ankle as Landis.

Darden Monomania US Landis thirty minutes
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

16:16 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

"You know, while spaces certainly cool in. It's having a moment. Not everybody is convinced that the financial burden that pulling off. These missions is really warranted. Would is that everybody wants is a moonshot people are looking for that grand moment. Something big something big, and so many people what you're suggesting or saying, we need to nurse shot. Right. We have to climate change. Exactly. But Buzz Aldrin thinks we needed a Marsh shot, and Joe Biden works with MD Anderson calls it a cancer shot to radical cancer. But the frustration of this partisan war. Affair that we're in right now. There's this dream of wind. Can we can all do a grand collective thing together universities? Academicians working with the private sector, working with the federal government in the sixties. I argue in my book, if Kennedy had not been killed. I'm not sure that four point four percent funding for NASA could have continued for. Pol, there were a lot of people that didn't want to go to the moon on the right. Barry Goldwater, Senator Arizona wanted the money to go to the US air force into militarise space, and on the left people like Jay William Fullbright, Senator Arkansas, and Walter Mondale were posed going to the moon. They wanted to fight urban poverty in many African American leaders, like Reverend Ralph Abernathy said, no moon, but the day of when they that we of the launching of the they all fell in the line and said, we want these astronauts to come back alive, and we're proud of the tapes, looking at the coverage on CBS and the other networks. What stood out to you? You when, when you re watch these scenes fifty years later, just how even though we know the result now, like in the Apollo eleven documentary, how nervous I still get and be meaning even though we know it's a success. It's just like my gosh, are they gonna make it? And I think the Apollo thirteen movie is, is so popular with Tom Hanks, and that was a mission that almost was utter disaster that I every time I see an astronaut in space. I'm worried about them coming back. But also, I think it's the image of earth like the Bill Anders photograph of earth, rise, the idea that we were aiming for the moon, but it was really about looking at planet earth, you know, lonely, you know, blue green marble floating out there that brings the sniper yet used the word romantic, but spiritual feeling of space exploration, and then also I realized that we have done a lot. It was sense, Apollo, not just in the private. Sector. But what Jet Propulsion Laboratory Caltech, Pasadena, does with the Mars, and they're in the Mars Rover Mars expedition been phenomenal. But they may just hasn't captured more than the that, you know, thirteen to twenty five percent of the American public's interested, but a large part of our country just seems to tune it out. That's also because you don't have, you know, a human you don't have a pulse landing on Mars or on the moon right now. And people, you know that gives people real skin in the game when they feel like a human life is on the line. They can see themselves in whoever that astronaut is, and watch people wanna watch someone on earn real journey. Exactly. And I think as what you were talking about. That's also why NASA says space programs they turned more towards earth. Following the Apollo program in the, you know, started focusing on ISS and the shuttle program or what have you to, you know, instead of looking outward start looking more. Inward and I think now we are at a time or NASA is at a point where they're ready to look outward again. And that's why you have, you know, new missions to the moon on the horizon, and hopefully Mars. And, and the thing is, is had we never landed on the moon had NASA never pulled that off at American never pulled that off, he would just seem like hot air, talking about potentially going to Mars. And I don't think that anybody would give credence to any talk about a Mars mission, had we never landed on the moon and had the broadcasting of that not been so, so intense and just, you know, so visceral their lessons from fifty years ago that apply today. Wrapping up till I wonder what, what do you think that the biggest takeaway is from your research for, for American moonshot with a lesson should be as everyone looks to the fiftieth anniversary of this. Well that we have to do space exploration in the name of peace. No war, and that we have to have a, a spur. For when the last things Neil Armstrong did was said to Aldrin leave the packet on the moon and Alder leaves a pack it in, in it or medals commemorating, the Soviet cosmonauts, who had died and their space program. And we did that because without the competition like John F Kennedy and his Rice, University speech, put in there, you know, why do we climb out Everest? Why does rice play university of Texas and football? It's a challenge. So it might be China and all that they're doing on the dark side of the moon in the Chinese space program. That makes American say we want to go back to the moon before China. We want to go to Mars before any other country, nationalism might might be what, what triggers the funding as they used to say, NASA. No bucks. No buck Rogers Apollo program caught cost twenty five billion dollars. That's about one hundred and eighty billion in today's money. And in order to stoke the imagination, you need the media to. To cover space in a way, that's prime in in front and center. Not just on a NASA channel that only space buffs, watch Kennedy's, that in that speech, the vast stretches of the unknown and the unanswered. And the unfinished still far outstrip our collective comprehension. And those words are true today. There's still so much. We don't know Kennedy's Rice University speech of September twelfth nineteen sixty two is the finest utterance of any president, dealing with public discovery in the power of exploration, and he cold connected, our astronauts, in that speech to age of exploration of the oceans to Christopher Columbus, and Magellan, and the like in in he knew that we were getting spin off technology from going to the moon rights like GPS and MRI cat scans heart. Fibula tres anti-icing devices, one could go on and on it earned itself, eventually going to the moon by. All that spin off technology. Yeah. People have not read the speech or having read it in a while Google. It's worth re reading it's right up there on NASA dot gov entire text of Kennedy's speech. The other thing Brian that I just wanted to add to, as I if it speaks to the moment in time that we are in terms of, of the media's coverage of space is that I have a job that I am the space reporter for CNN CNN hasn't had a space reporter in quite some time. But as you pointed out earlier, people are looking for something to root for they're looking for something to be inspired by, and there's nothing more inspiring in my opinion than space exploration. Rachel, thanks so much for being here in Douglas best of luck with the new book, again, the title is American moonshot, John.

NASA John F Kennedy Buzz Aldrin Reverend Ralph Abernathy Tom Hanks Bill Anders Joe Biden Google CNN Pasadena Barry Goldwater Jet Propulsion Laboratory Calt China Neil Armstrong reporter US MD Anderson
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

"One hundred twenty five million Americans are glued to their television screens. Awaiting the moment. The Neil Armstrong will take his first steps on the moon. This was brought into the homes of people all across the country and all around the world, thanks to the big networks. CBS ABC and NBC. And thanks to the television equipment that was installed on the lunar module by NASA. Nowadays in this fragmented media world, it is hard to imagine what that moment must have been like everybody all watching the same thing. Let's go back in time now with Douglas Brinkley CNN historian and author of the brand new book American moonshot all about the sixties and the space race culminating. In this incredible day nineteen sixty nine. Oh, thank you for having me. Appreciate it also joining us here. CNN's innovation in space. Correspondent Rachel crane. Thanks for having me Brian. Thank you, both for being here. Dulles you're just out with this new book all about JFK his ambitions to get America to the moon. And then that accomplishment, the end of the sixties. Let's go back even further. You were born not far from Neil Armstrong in Ohio, right? Yeah. I grew up in a town called Perry's Berg, Ohio, which wasn't too far from Wolpe, Connecticut. So when the big day of Apollo eleven Neil Armstrong's famous moment on the moon. We were all cheering like band. She's because it was the home. The homeboy was being the first human being on the moon. It was quite a big deal. And like many in my generation, particularly boys that age we're collecting NASA memorabilia of all the astronauts trading them, like playing cards. Yeah. Baseball players on the like and later, I got to do the official history. Of Neil Armstrong, four NASA in two thousand one I conducted that. And in the book, which which uses as aural histories you write about the night watching the moon landing at night. Take us back to what you remember as a as a boy, watching this historic event, unfold will the big thing was, you know, the timing in so we'd have to sleep differently nap differently to be up for when the moment happened. Right. And I and that was odd that we were juggling entire calendar to stay up for just to be awake for the moment, Dr L mal knew was going to be coming up. Almost eleven PM eastern time, we'll, and that's right. And when he finally put his foot on the moon, and we realized we did it just, you know with the whole family just arrived in cheers. L A phone pepper buddy talking. I mean this was a moment. You had five hundred was just one of five hundred fifty million people around the world watching listening to radio. And if I've gone around the country on my book, American moonshot, people of a certain generation all remember where. They were that day. We often talk in history about these big moments, like Pearl Harbor, you know, or Kennedy assassination or nine eleven but they're all tragedies. Paolo eleven Neil Armstrong was a was a great moment for all of you, Mandy, and television played a key role in generating support for the space race in the first place. I mean, that's something to recognize that having cameras having live coverage having the ability to witness all of this ensure the more Americans were on board to spend enormous sums of money for this. It's all about TV John F Kennedy during his debates with Richard Nixon said Nixon, if you're elected president, I see a Soviet flag planted on the moon. If you elect me it'll be an American flag. Then Kennedy start doing his press conferences and got great play on TV. But it's been Alan Shepard went into space as a counter statement to you're a good Garin, the Soviet cosmonaut, that's made fifth nineteen sixty one Kennedy could not. Believe how many millions of people tuned in for Alan shepherd, and then particularly watching on the nightly news read brought afterwards, and then particularly with John, Glenn in nineteen sixty to the point being that Kennedy recognized that this was a TV bonanza put an astronaut bring him down. And they start being seen as Kennedy Space core. And at the news outlets. Piccoli CBS IRO, Walter Cronkite, biography Cronkite, a bit hobby horsing, the space beat since the nineteen fifties, mid fifties. When there was no space speed. He has binders was going to, you know, Cape, Canaveral and working out of a station wagon and all of that. And so he really started tracking also the networks loved space because they could train the camera on the launch pad. They had a countdown. It was dramatic it, would, you know, nobody knew if you were gonna come back alive or not stakes are high, fifty fifty chance when I interview Neil Armstrong that they Armstong felt of success for Paul. Eleven fifty fifty success meeting, getting back alive. Well, he didn't say it that way. He said that they we might have to be aborted, the mission at some point that there, the idea that it would go smoothly was about fifty fifty. And so for granted now in William Safire, the speechwriter for Richard Nixon wrote a whole letter waiting for Nixon to say, sorry, Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins died that letter exists. He can read it as a historian. So now we know it was a success. But at the time, it was hair-raising pins and needles situation because Apollo one blew up on a nineteen sixty seven on the launch pad and Gus Grissom and Roger Chaffee, and Ed white perished in a fireball and test exercise. So the odds of Apollo eleven working fall asleep they were even and Rachel, I think there's a real parallel between the days of Apollo and now but the guards the role of the media. In bringing these events back then into people's homes, but now into people's cell phones. Right. And every screen imaginable. Right. Of course. I mean right now, if SpaceX has a catastrophe. You see it on Twitter moments later and there's go pros all over the, the rocket itself. So the imagery that we have now is, you know, really brings you right up to the flight line almost of these launches and they're so much excitement. Brian right now surrounding space exploration, because it really does feel once again, like space is cool, that there's big things happening in space, and, you know, there's no greater discovery exploration story than that of human beings going and exploring SP space. I mean, it is it is in our DNA to explore, and we are all wanna know where we came from, we've all always looked up at the cosmos and contemplated. Our origin story. There's the. Practical and the poetic motivations to exploring space on the practical arguments why to do it. You have, you know, it's, it's sponsored technologies development. There's jobs education, national security, planetary defense, even you know, that we need a plan b what's going on. With climate change what's happening to our planet that we need to ensure their survival of, of mankind. But there's also the poetic argument and motivation to go that we want to know where we've come from that is that it is in our DNA to explore from the days that we walked out of caves to see the light. Exactly. And those I feel like the anchors fifty years ago, the best thinkers understood this Cronkite. You know in his own way, brought the majesty of the moment alive through his words and through the pictures, I thought it was Cronkite greatest broadcast moment, was covering of Apollo eleven you know, he, he would go on for hours on end he became known as the iron man of broadcasting. He was the most trusted person in America as he would soon be called. And he just did a flawless job. He had consulted people like Arthur, c Clarke, the great science fiction writer, you know, he had people like Wally Shera when of the original mercury astronauts, as anchor buddy. He you know, dealt with the history of space in fantasy rounds like a f-, you know, buck Rogers and flash, Gordon. He would talk about everything in such an informed way because he really believed that, that moment was the greatest moment of the twentieth, century. He had covered d day as the United Press International correspondent and. So he knew about g day but he thought that we broke the shackles of earth in nineteen sixty nine after the tumultuous sixties at the death of RFK and Martin Luther King junior, Vietnam war country torn apart. And then it's like a, a psalm everybody pulling together for this grand historic moment. And he had gotten a no, the astronauts, and their wives in a deeply personal way in retrospect with Cronkite didn't cover was that these were all white men, five ten and in under that were in mercury Jemma and Apollo. Meaning it wasn't Representative of diversity, and that there were women who had trained to be astronauts, call the mercury thirteen. They passed all of Dr Randy love, laces, endurance test, but due to gender bias they weren't allowed to be in the astronaut corps. So it's not until Sally ride nineteen Eighty-three that we have first American woman in. Space. But now when we talk about going back to the moon, like vice president Pence did in Huntsville, Alabama in the spring. I think the big motivator may be the first woman on the moon, if we're going back to the moon, there has to be a woman, astronaut, and that will be a big, big event that will be a TV moment that'll start galvanizing people. The problem with Apollo eleven was after we went to the moon ratings started dropping off for the other Apollo mission. Really? Yeah. They just weren't the bonanza anymore. Interesting. So Nixon cancels, the last three Apollo missions to scrap some because figures it's too risky. I'm not getting the big ratings and with the chance of dead astronauts, on my watch are very, very high. Think that the ratings that you're speaking of the dwindling ratings, also speaks to the excitement of the American people surrounding lunar missions, you know, at the time even right after Apollo eleven successful mission. American support of of the Apollo program was only at fifty three percent. So you know, we kind of look back at history with these rose colored glasses on. We think that the moon landing was this thing that really unified not only America but the world and it certainly did to an accent. But, you know, a lot of people were not convinced that the financial burden of pulling off this mission, which, you know, four percent of the federal budget over four percent of the federal budget was dedicated to the Apollo program that it was really worth it. And so then the Apollo program was cancelled early. And we haven't had a man on the moon or a woman on the moon or man back on the moon. Let alone a woman on the moon since the seventies, our final episode is all about the future of space. What, what that's going to look like whether it's going to be back on the moon, whether it's going to be going to Mars. And there's a lot to think about, and what that picture is going to be, you know, what's interesting is that we were just talk. About Americans support of a moon landing back in the day. We'll right now a recent Pew Research study showed that only thirteen percent of Americans think that sending humans to the moon should be a top priority and only eighteen percent of people think that going to Mars should be a priority of NASA. So, you know, while I'm quite biased because I myself a myspace enthusiasts the American people..

Neil Armstrong Walter Cronkite NASA Richard Nixon John F Kennedy America Rachel crane Kennedy Space Brian CNN Douglas Brinkley CNN Apollo NBC Ohio Pearl Harbor Baseball CBS ABC
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

"And we are back now talking about all things. Apollo eleven and the importance of the human computers. Joining me now is the author of the bestselling book, Hidden Figures. Margo Lee shutter -ly. Her book was adapted into the award-winning film, both the book and the film showcase the critical roles of women behind the scenes at NASA, especially at the Langley research center for the mercury and the Apollo missions, Marco. I know the idea for this book came to you almost a decade ago at this point. Right. It was about two thousand ten when you started thinking about exploring this subject trite, and it really came out of my own personal story. My father who's now retired worked at natural Langley in Hampton Virginia as a research scientist as a consequence, I grew up there, and I had a very, very good fortune, to know women like Christine, Darden, and Katherine Johnson and Mary Jackson as a little girl. I got to see these role. Models who worked with my father at NASA, which, you know, every kid new while the smart, people work at NASA, and it was, but it really wasn't until I started on working on this book many decades later as an adult that I got a sense, for the true, scope and depth of the work that these women did, and it's meant the world to me to be so connected to people who were both very unassuming and extremely talented and doing this work for our country and the people you introduce us to in the pages of the book and the film adaptation. There described as human computers, help us understand what that term means. Sure, Brian will today, we think of computer as a piece of desktop software something you plug it into the wall. You know, it turns on it's like trying to, and it does all of our mathematical, heavy lifting for us in addition to a lot of other things, but the fact is for most of human history. A computer was a job title. Oh, it was the name or the title of a person, whose job, it was to compute do computations, do mathematics in a variety of different fields. And for most of the twentieth century, those people were women, so so much of the twentieth century, and the great advances that we've had in technology in defense in transportation, those things have come about as a consequence of women were human computers, sitting in rooms doing math in amazing critical job. So, so tell us about what you included in the book and the differences with the film. So I when I started working on this book, it was really obvious to me from the beginning that in order to get the whole story, I would have to start in World War, Two so many things happen in our country. Somebody changes happened during local or two and, and this is very similar. So I started with World War Two, and that was really the generation of women who are portrayed in the movie. Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson Dorothee von who started either. During the war, or just after the war, and who were on the job in nineteen sixty sixty one sixty two those early sixties, which is those are the events that are portrayed in the movie Christine, Dr Darden. She came along after those women nineteen sixty seven you know, in the middle of the, you know, we were still going full steam ahead to land on the moon. So that is the reason why she is not in the movie, the producers made the decision to focus on that time period. So the time leading up to World War Two, you know, the early part of the Cold War, Korean war. And then the aftermath of, of Apollo is in my book, but it is not portrayed in the film. So let me step back in time, here again, Margot, let's go back to the Apollo period, that, that you recount in, in your book, you, of course, describe what it means for. For these women to be working in a predominantly male predominantly white work environment. How pervasive was discrimination? How prevalent were these problems that you documented? Well, I think they're really two things or a couple of different things that changed over time when the women, I began working at NASA Langley in the, in the late mid thirties when white women for started working their World War, Two was really what opened the door to black women. There was legal discrimination. There were segregated workspaces the reciprocated bathroom segregated cafeterias. This was in the state of Virginia, which, which was, then a state, were Jim crow racial segregation laws applied. And so the women really had to work in a situation where there was that kind of legalized segregation now all of the women really had to, to work through expectations. And, and let's say customs in practice. This is related to gender discrimination. So, for example, even when women did the same work as their male counterparts, they could be paid less or given less of an opportunity less of a promotion. And, you know, one of the things that's really exciting about this book, and it was exciting to me about the research was to see how those women circumvented those that institutional idea that perhaps women were not as, as good at engineering as, as they could be at, at math. You know, which are two different job categories or that the women were satisfied just doing their jobs that somehow they didn't have the same ambitions, as did their male counterparts. So it was it was a really it was as much an interesting, look at the Evelyn of race and gender in the workplace, as it was an look at the development of airplanes, and of our space program. We're also helping rewrite the narrative rewrite the. History that many of us have been taught for decades that, that it was mostly if not all white men in white shirts, and black, skinny ties that put men on the moon. Why did that narrative? Take hold for so long before you and others have helped correct? Well, you know, those are the pictures that we saw you, we, we always saw the pictures of mission control. Those were the, you know, the white guys and skinny ties and the white shirts, and really even more than that, when we think of the space program, we think of the astronauts, you know, the fact is that hundreds of thousands of people and their brain power, their hard work many, many years of work. We're required to put the astronauts on the moon. We have a tendency to look at the, you know, the famous people and, and assume that they got their all in their own when the reality is for, for any great achievement. There are many, many people involved in making it happen. And it just so happens that if you're talking about women if you're talking about underrepresented groups, you know, we have the idea of what is scientist, or engineer looks like and they fall outside of those those boundaries. But one of the things that I think is very exciting about the state of history. Right. Now is that we are looking for those people. And I think people Muffin assume that when they look at a great event, or they look at successful people that they should also look for what they might not know, or -ssume that there's something missing and include those people who haven't been included in the narrative in the past into the future. What are the ways you'll be continuing to do to highlight the women who contributed to this project into NASA as a whole? Well, I think one of the ways we honor their legacy is by looking at the people today, who are doing those things, one of the things that's really wonderful for me doing the touring for, for Hidden Figures, the book and the movie is, I've met so many young people who are excited about engineering. They're excited about math. They're excited about NASA. They're excited about the future of space travel. And many of those people are women and young girls, and so and, you know, they get to look to not just Dr Darden or the, the other women have. Hidden Figures, but they get to look to a number of women who are in the field making strides today. They took the female astronauts, black female astronauts, you know, these are things that would have been all been unimaginable. When the first women went to work at NASA. So I, I really think the best way to honor their legacy is to shine a spotlight on the people who are doing the work today. Margaret, thanks so much for joining me. Thank you, Brian. It's been a pleasure. We're looking forward to the worldwide television premiere of Apollo eleven on CNN this summer, thanks so much for joining us, and be sure to tune in for our next episode we're going to take you inside the media moment. That was the moon land. The manhunt for the Golden State killers over and there's a suspect in custody. How did law enforcement finally ID him after searching for over forty years, who exactly is the suspect Joseph, James Dangelo? How did he fly under the radar for decades? And what are some of the victims and their families saying about the arrived? I'm Biagio Messina and I'm joke Vinci's and those are some of the questions, we explore an all new episodes of unmasking killer. Subscribe now at apple podcasts a rare ever you listen to podcasts..

NASA Dr Darden Katherine Johnson Brian Christine NASA Langley Langley Margo Lee Langley research center CNN Marco apple Virginia Margot Biagio Messina research scientist
"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"apollo" Discussed on Apollo 11: Beyond the Moon

"Welcome to Apollo eleven beyond the moon. I'm Brian Stelter, CNN's chief media correspondent, and an amateur space buff. I may superfan of the CNN film. Apollo eleven. It's already won a bunch of awards and a lot of you've already seen it in theaters across the country. We loved the film so much that we decide to do this podcast. To learn more about how the film was made and how the country was changed forever by putting a man on the moon. If you haven't seen the film, yet, you're gonna learn a lot about the mission and about movie making. And if you have seen the film, we're gonna take you behind the scenes with additional stories you've never heard Apollo eleven the film will have its worldwide television premiere this summer on CNN before we jump in today's episode with Apollo eleven's director Todd Douglas Miller. Let's just take a minute to set the scene of America nineteen sixty nine. Richard Nixon is president. The average income is eight thousand five hundred fifty dollars. Woodstock is about to become the musical event of the century Sesame Street is making its television debut and the draft for the Vietnam war is beginning. There was so much going on such a consequential moment in time. But this was the most important event of the mall. All script for man..

CNN Brian Stelter Todd Douglas Miller Richard Nixon Woodstock America president director eight thousand five hundred fi
"apollo" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"apollo" Discussed on Liftoff

"I am so excited for less mutiny and more moon on this episode. I think we should jump right in. That's right. We don't want a moon Tany. Boy. All right now before we get to the mission. It's self. I want to talk about Saturn five because this is the first mission with satisfied and people onboard at first flew as a part of the crude Apollo four and Apollo six missions those were the tests with no people on top of a giant scary rocket Apollo eight would be the first time astronauts road, the saddened five into space. Of course, the Apollo six seven five as we've talked about in a past episode experienced several issues during its flight, including a violent pogo oscillation two minutes into flight that would have pretty seriously injured. Crew if they were on board after it's troublesome. I stage of been shed the S two second-stage began to experience its own problems having to engine shutdown due to a ruptured fuel line and my personal favorite cross wired connections between the Motors and onboard instrumentation. Yeah, they were just trying to hot wire there. These issues caused as you might expect major concerns within NASA. The pogo would have been strong enough to put the crew in dangerous. I said they could have been injured or worse. Premature engine shutdown. Also, not good could make getting into the right orbit for lunar injection difficult. And then you can't go to the moon due to the tight timelines where there's a goal to be on the moon by the end of the decade assembly of the Apollo eight Saturn five began in December nineteen sixty seven just a few weeks after Apollo four. So by the time Apollo six flew and those problems were uncovered the Saturn fives Lord stages actually already been stacked within the vehicle assembly building. So NASA with the amazing amount of work d- stack them stack. These guys take them back apart to address the shortcomings, but the rocket was rejoined in the fall of nineteen sixty eight that's a bad meeting. Right. It's like, oh, we actually need to take this thing back apart. So we can fix it. Yeah. Yeah. But that was that was why a politics was was not good. It was not good. It was good in that. They saw all these problems and they got to fix them. But it was bad in that they had to start taking rockets apart in order to do that. And you talk about the end of the decade. Yeah. We're talking about a year away. That's the deadline to get to the moon. So things are tightening up. Now, the rocket wasn't the only Apollo hardware causing delays, the lunar module was behind schedule. And in August of sixty eight NASA announced the testing, the limb would not be part of Apollo eight. That was a real bummer as we'll find out for one of the crewmembers NASA administrator Thomas Paine said that they plan for eight only to use the Apollo command service module to CSM pending the successful flight of Apollo.

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"apollo" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"apollo" Discussed on TechStuff

"Welcome to tech stuff. I am more host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer without stuff works in the of all things tech and we are in fact continuing our journey into space or at least the history of space travel. And I know we talked a lot about space. We're going to be talking more about space for the next few episodes because it's a fascinating topic and I love looking into it and there's so much to talk about the this episode. We're going to focus on the later Apollo missions, and we will also switch over and talk about the development of the Soyuz spacecraft, the Soviet space craft that was intended to be a competitor to Apollo and is a workhorse for space travel. Now. I mean, it's the only spacecraft spoiler alert that will actually bring people back and forth between the international. Space station in upcoming episodes. I'll talk more about launch vehicles which we frequently will refer to as rockets. And I will also talk about the space shuttle program. And then after that, we will move onto non space related topics. I know talked a lot about it, but I could've gone into even more detail about the various spacecraft and their subsystems and how they all work. But I realize that it would be overkill and I didn't want to go absolutely nuts. So let's pick up where we left off, which was after the return of the Apollo eleven capsule now Apollo eleven wasn't just a phenomenal achievement in science engineering, astronaut training, although it was definitely all of those things, but it was also effectively the end of the space race that had started when the Soviet Union launched Sputnik into orbit and put that out as the first man made satellite earth orbit. The Soviets had one, those early victories Sputnik being the first one, but also they were the. I put a human into orbit. They were the first to put a woman into space, but the Americans had managed to be the first to dock spacecraft in orbit and no one else was able to put people on the moon. Although the Soviets did try to do that to talk more about those efforts later in the Sepah sewed Apollo eleven pretty much sealed the deal. And after that success, the space race was affectively over symbolically. It would not be over for a few more years, but the Apollo project still had several more missions before it would end Apollo eleven was not the end of the Apollo program. Apollo twelve was the second mission to have a lunar landing. The crew would deploy tech called the Apollo lunar surface experiments package or all set a l. SAP this was a collection of geophysical instruments. Apollo eleven had a more modest collection of experiments that they carried that one was called the early Apollo surface experiments package. Edge or e Sep that one had to official experiments and then two additional experiments that were not officially part of e Sep. This is where I start looking into NASA records, and I say, what's the difference between officially being part of something and not officially being part of something, but still going along for the ride and being left on the moon. But maybe that's just me getting confused by semantics NASA on Apollo. Eleven was mostly focused on landing people on the frequent moon and then getting them back home safely. So science was sort of a secondary priority, right? It was not the highest priority for NASA for that for the Apollo eleven mission. They had some scientific experiments they wanted to include, but mostly they just wanted to concentrate on getting people on the moon and then getting them back home safely. The purpose of all sap was to monitor the environment of an a region close to the Apollo landing. Site for at least a year after the end of the visit to the moon, Apollo seventeen version of all set was designed to to operate for two years. And so they're, they Apollo twelve. One was just the first also all of the other following Apollo missions would bring similar packages along some of them worked for up to eight years before mission control would shut down all remaining all set projects on September..

Apollo Apollo landing NASA SAP Jonathan Strickland Soviet Union executive producer official eight years two years