35 Burst results for "Apnea"

The Real Story of Jan. 6th Is What the Government Does to Innocent People

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | Last week

The Real Story of Jan. 6th Is What the Government Does to Innocent People

"Well isn't that the story of what I mean honestly Nick this has been the story since Maybe since Trump took first took office but especially since all this COVID madness has hit and that transition of power this has been the story What they're telling us in the media in the left wing media is happening does not match up with what's happening before our very eyes You're right there You didn't see some violent revolution that was going to overthrow the United States government I don't even know how they thought that was going to happen What guy with horns sits in Nancy Pelosi's share and then what Fill in the blanks They are telling a completely different story Yeah like I said most of the people there that I saw were my age or older and what were we armed with like blood pressure medicine and Holy Grail in our sleep apnea machines If you're going to overthrow the government you need some young people okay Maybe a military would help too Maybe But as we start piecing together you know talking to people that were there what we really discovered as we went wrong was that the real story here is what the government is doing to innocent people who really went there and did nothing else Families that have had their doors broken down by the FBI And you know this man that they came after never been arrested for anything Alex and his wife and they treat these people like Pablo Escobar or serial killers or something S.W.A.T. teams humbert vehicles going down a little neighborhood For the streets I mean it's a pulling but the government is doing And the reason they're doing it is to have a chilling effect They're trying to terrorize and demonize Americans who disagree with the leftist agenda and make sure that everybody understands This is what's going to happen to you if you stand up

Donald Trump Nick Nancy Pelosi Apnea United States Pablo Escobar FBI Humbert Alex
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

03:43 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"Is it david. I can't remember his last name that wrote the blue zones. And it's basically the same concept i mean. If you look at okinawans. They're eating me so with their moderate amounts of protein meat. It's it's always a little bit of something fermented. So i mean i think the point and then western. I price also addressed the issue of like fayek acid in beans and all of that stuff and like how to go about eating beans and reducing the fight. Ag- acids so. I i agree. I think that all things in moderation. And when i say things i don't mean like junk things in moderation i mean like you know food groups eliminating a complete food group. I feel like is it always comes back and bites you in the butt exactly right. So that's a little off. I guess a little made. No i am so glad to hear. You're so like minded. Yeah i mean. I get a lot of people that reach out to me and i'll go and look at their website or something. They're like really pushing a plant. Based diet and a lot of times it just have to turn down some of those. Because i don't want to push plant based diet now. I did have a cancer survivor. Who says she eats predominantly plant based diet. She's been in remission for thirty years. I'm like i get it. She was diagnosed with stage. Four terminal cancer seventeen. She lived in a really bad environment. So as you know. I think in certain circumstances that can be okay but General health. I feel like people have to eat at least a moderate amount of megani. Now i agree with you. There are certain things that plants don't give a certain vitamins. B vitamins that plants don't give i don't know bacteria that we talked about the importance of the bacteria that we harvest that we use in our gut we get that from like raw milk rachi us and fermented plants. So i mean yeah. Interestingly recently started supplementing with human milk liga soccer rides and it made such a huge improvement and my digestion. I could not believe 'cause. I eat products foods you know. I eat asparagus and wrestle sprouts and all the product is i feel like i do a pretty good job of eating. Both you know from entered foods with probiotics and also prebiotics but y'all when i added the hmo supplement. I was amazed at how much better i felt so apparently it takes quite a bit of products to keep your gut in balance. So that's just a little extra made me think about it when you mentioned that getting back to sleep apnea yeah. I'm so what exactly you said that you do sleep. Studies for research like what's the goal of your research. What what's the end goal. If depends so in the insomnia steady. We were we were. It was a double blind randomized control. Drugs study which now the drug has come to market because it was effective. I don't deal with the products i do. The studies rising so an asleep. Steady is a very benign study. It's like we're not injecting anything in them where were measuring apnea and they're measuring the quality of their sleep so right now we're about to start a study on patients with sleep apnea mild to moderate that if an oral appliance can be used a daytime or plants can be used with designed to tone the fringe space. Wow brian alpha grinch muscles.

cancer Ag david apnea soccer insomnia sleep apnea brian alpha
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

03:45 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"Yeah the ring is you can get some decent data oriented. No no i mean. It's it's like it's one of the better ones. Okay yeah but like like anything. It's like unless you have a proper medical. It's not going to tell you the well. I know like i mean the thing about it. Is i think if you have asleep problem clearly. You should get asleep study done but for me i feel like i get good sleep most of the time and so for me. It's more of a curiosity than anything else. I'm like last night was great now. The other night wasn't so great. The main thing that for me it helps was my hygiene. Is that once. I started using a tracker. I was more inclined to go to bed and get up at the same time every day as opposed to well. I can watch women episode of this or i'll just go out with you know do this. I got into more of a habit of keeping a pretty regular sleep routine so that was the way helped me and so i think that there are a lot of people out there. Maybe they don't realize that their snoring and that maybe they're not getting really good sleep. They know they go to sleep. You then they feel like crap next day. They don't know why. Yes exactly. Well i was gonna talk about that. You had touched on a ten gingerly. And i wanted to bring it up so men and women past menopause with sleep apnea will complain a fatigue. Not when they wake up they'll complain fatigue around four or five o'clock like sometime in the late afternoon they'll have a little crash they need a little. Pick me up right a little sugary dish or a red mole or coffee or something that is very typically unsound sleep right whereas women of childbearing age. They'll be based on the estrogen levels when they wake up. They're like exhausted. They feel fatigue right away. yeah that makes a lot of sense Not to keep harping on this with my husband poor guy. I'm like throwing him under the bus. Direly here but you don't get so common though. I wear in appliance. I'm one of those people. Well he he drink energy drinks for years and then his blood sugar. I would test his blood sugar in the morning. I'm like. I'm just curious if your blood sugar is high because some of the things he was saying to me made me think maybe maybe his blood sugar as out of balance so i checked and it was a little high one morning and so i'm like you need to do this. And this and this gave him some tips and he gave up the energy drinks entirely off. That's wonderful and i mean he has sanity drinks are terrible. I know he has thanked me so many times. I did not realize how much it was affecting my health. And everything else and so. He's been off of them for several months now and he's eating pro team regularly and he knows some other things but anyways yeah i feel a wonder how much of it's related between the sleep in leading energy drinks but he does work really hard so yeah so the there is with the call four our energy or five hour energy those other ones twelve the ones with b. twelve. That's okay That's okay if i would prefer to have a method kabbalah mean instead of science kabbalah me. But as that's what b twelve days. But i mean. That's a vitamin source of energy. Right eating a whole foods. Like a mango is a good source of getting those vitamins. And get picking up your energy..

sleep apnea
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"Hey guys this is the best equipment in the world for measuring sleep apnea right. They go yeah. And i go. And it's the most convenient for the patient because so many so much of it as wireless they go. Yes i go. i'm not comfortable. They just laugh at me with other. What about their business. Right so i understand. There is a difference between an in home in an lab steady. Even the best in lab steady is not the most comfortable thing in the world. But you know it's one night so it's really not the end of the world. I did it. I slept through the night with all that stuff on me and it was fine. And it's it's okay to do it in the lab you get the most of data now at same time. I'll say if you're the kind of person that when you go on vacation and you're staying at a hotel and the first night you're not getting a good night's sleep you kinda getting used to the room. The air conditioning vent and the and the people honking outside whatever and then the spy second third fourth night. You're more comfortable. You can sleep better if that's you. It's probably better. You do the sleep. Study in your own home if follow. Why because you're going to get a more realistic sleep study. That just seems to me like it would be across the board for people like it more accurate if you're at home. Well it's more accurate if you're at home but also when you're at home you're only getting what six channels of data whereas in a lab. You're getting at least twenty. Okay and a big chunk of it is the eeg your brainwave. Fleets and your autonomic nervous system your heart rate variability. these are incredible tidbits of information. You get more data in one night of a inlet study then you do in any blood. Tests wow okay. It's an incredible amount of data incredibly useful amount of data..

apnea
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"We've got the sympathetic on the perez pathetic when we are in sympathetic mode right and are by the way just say no about the nervous system. It's either or the end. We don't have a mechanism. That's like okay. Well we're going to run away from this predator and we're also going to digest this lunch right if there is none of that. It's we're all that's our focus right running away or fighting or right. now we're vulnerable. But we're repairing and we're digesting and restoring so when you're in that fight or flight mode from constantly being what's called aroused in your sleep from those debate stages asleep you get into this automatic mode right and that automatic motives which shifts you into hypertension and the reason i say curative for those diseases because we have countless number of sleep studies and studies themselves were taken patients with both diabetes and sleep apnea treated them with sleep at a c-pap or appliances. I'm talking thousands of studies and bill and their diabetes. Either goes away or as totally resolved. Type two same thing with hypertension right now with hypertension. There's so many diseases right. Diet chronic pain though. There's a lot of reasons why someone can have hypertension. But this is what. I tell my medical colleagues i go. Listen if you've got your patients on three industrial strength diuretics and you're basically barely keeping them below one forty over a hundred or one forty over ninety it's pretty guaranteed that they have sleep apnea just do a test and you'll find out but if someone has just you know mild hypertension and they can get it. Resolved with some diet and exercise or many lightness safe medication use than in not necessarily sleep apnea but it could be the way you find out as you test So as far as a say like someone who snores but they really don't seem to or they don't know of any other health issues. is that snoring. Enough is enough because snoring still causes the arousal. 's they did a huge study out of the cleveland clinic. They started with eleven hundred patients and they did sleep studies on both partner's husband and wife and what they found was the of the people that had sleep apnea. They had twenty seven arousal and our k. And of the the bet partners with no sleep apnea they had twenty one arousal per hour on average so they started off with eleven hundred people and they whittled it down to one hundred fifty that could tolerate the cpap and of course the people on the benefit you know. They had a lot of improvement but then they asked at interesting studies but they asked the lead partners. How are you doing since your partner has been on cpac. And they're like wow. My headaches gone my mood is better my children tell me a much easier to deal with a little bit of my aches and pains have gone away totally on..

hypertension apnea diabetes perez sleep apnea cleveland clinic headaches
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

03:45 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"If you decide to go get treated gets you possible. A resolution of those health problems so how. Ns forgive me if this is a dumb question but how are sleep apnea and diabetes related so the main explanation is inflammation by retarding sleep so we have four stages asleep stage one two three and rent so stage three is delta where we get almost all of our growth hormone and state. You know remers where we get mental and emotional resolution. And they're still. We're still learning about remm. We only learned like five ten years ago that we have a lymphatic system. In our brain called the lymphatic system and specifically during ram it cleans out the beta amyloid plaques in our brain right so this is not known sleep apnea. We've only known about it for forty years. It's a pretty new science for so and and and interestingly so western medicine itself is well under two hundred and fifty years old right. Chinese medicine five thousand. I evaded medicine. Six thousand years old. You know they didn't have these obesity problems and these sleep apnea problems in that..

apnea diabetes obesity
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

05:38 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"Know how bad the clenching and a team j problems can be as a result. Mine always have a tm. Jay sort of twist to them to help control the clenching And help minimize the clenching iowa. I almost always add that to my flights are tm jay and sleep apnea always related. Not always no okay. But it's hard to find a separation in my office and my office. By the way is a franchise we have over sixty five in the world. Were all over the. Us canada all over australia new zealand. England bahrain and dubai. The you know. And that's unprecedented for the private sector having a methodology to treat tm j. disorders. Let alone sleep apnea. That's a whole other thing. But yeah so we wanna make appliances to treat tm disorder to help minimize the clenching and keep the jaw in a very neutral position what we call sanctuary relation. And we'll actually bother to take an x ray to find out if we did it or not. That's one of the that's one of the ways that Internally i would tell another dentist if a dentist said what makes your place different than you know the other places that doing it. We'll tell you what we do a proper neurological testing to find out if we can be the origins of their tim jay disorder but externally we you as a lay person you could see. Does the person not just taken x ray to see what my job looks like Do they bother to take an x. Ray see where they're putting it. That's something you can do because traditional oral facial pain doctors won't do that and what's called neuromuscular. Dentist won't do that and they're just kind of light crossing their fingers going. We got you know sort of thing which we don't. We don't do that it. Just i'm a little hung up on this though. Because if someone's clenching their jaw seems like it would be really hard to have. You know snoring. Or whatever i think of when i think of sleep apnea as like mouth open. And we need to give him jay's mouth close so can you explain it to me. I'm like i'm stuck there. Yeah so there's been a couple of studies done and i'll go into more detail about what we think. The origins of it are so a poly sonogram which is a an overnight. Sleep study like in a lab with like twenty leads all over your head face arms and legs and we can see what's happening in real time and what these studies have found is that when someone's airflow was starting to slow down right. It didn't lose oxygen. They didn't hold their breath completely. They just had very shallow breathing like that. What they found was as the the airflow was tanking on the thermometer. Their patients were clenching their teeth. They were using their master muscles. Right and the clenching muscles but and then when the airway was went back to normal it was no longer restricted flow. The master stopped off. So we see that and then we also see that so that particular condition is called upper airway resistance so when we look further and find out when there's a nasal obstruction and someone has mouth breathing and then there what's called entitled. Co two drops. Will we actually see the clenching reflex happening after that. So what will happen is they'll the mouth will be open and what we say out gas too much. Co two. they'll get rid of two zero two and believe it or not. And it was gonna shocking. Co two more important than oxygen as far as your body's concern k..

apnea tim jay bahrain Jay iowa dubai new zealand England australia canada Ray jay Us airway resistance
"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

03:10 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

"Healthy motivation. Now let's dig in on the dish with rebecca huff. Dentist just five years. I was asleep. Technologists and a master's in psychology I got into sleep because my focus was tm. Jada sorters and and chronic pain and know we found out that is one of the reasons why we clinched. Our teeth is because of sleep breathing disorders. And so i decided okay. Well i should. I should learn. I should know more about these sorts guests for example things like tm. Jane's you know sleep apnea. These are things that can't be fixed with acupuncture and herbs right because if someone has a tma problem if it's acute it can be but the problem with with someone with the problem is if they continue to clinch their teed every night and sometimes during the day that you know you never going to resolve with acupuncture even lasers are what have you because the patients go back into what we call tera function so at thou studying the sleep. The courses for dentists treating sleep back. Yeah we're all basically learn how to make this appliance and then by our appliance is basically the gist of about ninety ninety five percent of her and then my alliance. You mean the yeah. That's that's how we treat so the conventional treatment for sleep apnea is cpap machine. Yeah you take you know you put this mass gone and it blows air like a balloon to open up your way and it works great but it has a less than fifty percents adherence rate. So you know the next best thing is an oral appliance. Fda approved appliance and in fact all respectable medical bodies have all admitted that from mild to moderate apnea oral. Planes is preferred. Patients are going to stick with it and for appliance. Can you explain what you mean by that. Yes the whereas. C-pap is a pneumatic splint. It's literally putting positive airway pressure in the throat to blow it out like a balloon and oil appliance is a splint is like a fiscal split. So the top and bottom pieces are attached so that one. You're john can't fall back in you know when you're on your back and they can keep your airway open at a certain spot and now we've we. We have additions to it. We can put little shelves in there that lift the tongue to help patients while on the roof of their mouth we can. We can actually have. What's called the poster tongue misdemeanor which litters a false euboea. That's hard and it keeps the tongue down from falling back and rubbing up against the soft palate and we even have ones that have like a a little kind of help open up. Today's allows us well. And of course my focus..

rebecca huff apnea Jada Jane sleep apnea Fda john
"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

04:09 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

"The opinion line on courts ninety-six fm. A new as you heard. Trevor was on the show with us a couple of weeks ago talking about sleep apnea forceful we discovered. It's far more common than we thought. But secondly he mentioned at device that he got in your practice. I believe was to help with his sleep apnea and we wanted to find out more okay so sleep apnea is something that affects maybe a billion people around the world but eighty five percent of those will go around without even knowing the habits so where we come in as dentists is that we hope supply These devices that fit over people's top and bottom teeth and when fitted they bring the louis your forward and they create a bit of space at the back of the throat which which kind of unblocks things now Just bj very briefly and with a without going into too much detail. There are lots of different types of sleep apnea but it's categorized really in three different ways. It could be mild moderate and severe and for the people that have moderate or severe. Really the mandibular devices that we make the mandibular re-positioning devices which is what they're called. They're probably better off having something else. to first festival to try this thing called positive airway pressure and of mask. That goes over your face. That's that's the cpap machine that the career and what what particularly through this to our attention was trevor had tried. that didn't like it and top. There's got to be a better way. And that's how we found the dental device. So so what exactly is it. It sits over the gums as it does. Yeah so i mean as you say that the cpap is the gold standard but it it. It isn't doesn't work for everybody not they. Don't the compliance isn't always greet people find they find it very difficult to wear or scott side effects that they don't like but the devices feet over your boss rio bottom and your top teeth and so in order to have one of these you know they're not suitable for everybody..

apnea Trevor trevor scott
Midlife Weight Gain: Don't Blame Your Metabolism

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Midlife Weight Gain: Don't Blame Your Metabolism

"Most of us reach our final adult height at around age. Eighteen or twenty. Unfortunately that doesn't mean that we stop growing on. Average americans continue to gain a pound or two a year every year from the time they reach adulthood until age sixty or so when this trend starts to reverse of course by then a lot of damage has been done although gaining a single pound or two over. The course of a year isn't going to make a big difference in your health gaining thirty or forty pounds over the course of your adult lifespan can have a significant negative impact. On your risk of diabetes heart disease cancer and other conditions related to obesity such as knee pain and sleep apnea so what drives this weight gain in middle age. There's long been an assumption that this seemingly universal trend is due at least in part to a slowing of the metabolism in midlife. We've all been told that our bodies engines simply reva little faster when we're younger and that there's not that much that can be done. If we want to avoid gaining weight through midlife we're going to have to spend more time exercising or adjust our food intake to compensate for this inevitable slowing of the metabolism. Now if you refuse to go gently into this good night you can find all kinds of special diets workouts and supplements promising to goose up your middle aged metabolism to the extent that any of these actually succeed in boosting your resting metabolic rate. The effect is likely to be quite small as i've said before trying to lose weight by boosting. Your metabolism is like trying to row a boat with a butter knife. You're going to be rowing for an awfully long time. Without moving very far but a new study is during all of these assumptions about midlife metabolism into the blender researchers used a sophisticated technique called the doubly labeled water method to measure energy expenditure in a diverse population of over six thousand people and these subjects ranged in age from newborn to ninety five years old and they also came from a wide variety of ethnic backgrounds and cultures and the results were almost exactly the opposite of what our observations might have led us to believe not surprisingly are metabolic rate is highest when we're babies it peaks at about twelve months of age and then declined steadily until we reach early adulthood but then our metabolic rate is remarkably stable from age twenty to age sixty. There is virtually no slowing in

Diabetes Heart Disease Cancer Reva Sleep Apnea Obesity Rowing
"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

"<Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> are not <Speech_Telephony_Male> grace you <SpeakerChange> know <Speech_Telephony_Male> i <Speech_Male> while we have <Speech_Male> a good night bad <Speech_Male> night like yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> so make other <Speech_Telephony_Male> bad night's sleep you know <Speech_Telephony_Male> and but <Speech_Telephony_Male> like to sleep on <Speech_Telephony_Male> your street and as well <Speech_Telephony_Male> as meeting <Speech_Male> during sleep <Speech_Telephony_Male> back because <Speech_Telephony_Male> he obviously pushes everything. <Speech_Male> Don't <Speech_Telephony_Male> sleep on. your site <Speech_Telephony_Male> is grew. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Got these <Speech_Telephony_Male> pillows to <Speech_Telephony_Male> stop. If i'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> torn you know <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> just <Speech_Telephony_Male> one <SpeakerChange> show everything you <Speech_Telephony_Male> know what to <Speech_Male> do. <Speech_Male> You really have <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Telephony_Male> you <Speech_Telephony_Male> go. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I jogging <Speech_Telephony_Male> two or three times a week <Speech_Telephony_Male> though just to keep exercise <Speech_Telephony_Male> in. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Which is it's <Speech_Telephony_Male> it's good fares <Speech_Male> cardiovascular <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's all <Speech_Telephony_Male> this stuff. They told <Speech_Telephony_Male> exercises. You can do <Speech_Telephony_Male> to straighten your tongue <Silence> or even know <Speech_Male> detroit <Speech_Telephony_Male> number souza's <Speech_Telephony_Male> all these things you can do as <Speech_Telephony_Male> well to straighten all the most <Speech_Male> you know you <Speech_Male> know. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Share yeah. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I just went. You'll everything. <Speech_Telephony_Male> he was obsessed. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Whatever you whatever. You've <Speech_Male> done <SpeakerChange> its <Speech_Male> work lead. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Yeah yeah. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I have a <Speech_Telephony_Male> friend that had it is <Speech_Telephony_Male> very very <Speech_Telephony_Male> bad and he his whole <Speech_Telephony_Male> jaw recess. <Speech_Telephony_Male> That's so bad <Speech_Telephony_Male> he had us. you know. <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> you know what they had <Speech_Telephony_Male> to break his jaw and <Speech_Telephony_Male> move forward <Speech_Music_Male> and ring <Speech_Music_Male> pretty. Put <Speech_Music_Male> it back in you know. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> walked for him <Speech_Telephony_Male> anyway. You don't really <Speech_Telephony_Male> extreme <Speech_Male> to get <Speech_Telephony_Male> done. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> i couldn't <Speech_Telephony_Male> believe when they seem <Speech_Telephony_Male> hostile <Speech_Telephony_Male> happens you because <Speech_Male> cpap dan. <Speech_Telephony_Male> He said i to get <Speech_Telephony_Male> jal recess <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> bad for some <Speech_Male> people. You know all right <Speech_Male> these would you. You've <Speech_Male> got it chile under <Speech_Male> control <Speech_Male> attending voted <Speech_Male> man. <Speech_Telephony_Male> No problem <Speech_Male> appreciate the call. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much. That's <Speech_Male> trevor call <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> sleep apnea <Speech_Male> so for. <Speech_Male> At <Speech_Male> least he's got the dental. <Speech_Male> No and <Speech_Male> if you exercise in <Speech_Male> bits and pieces <Speech_Male> hope bad it can get <Speech_Male> his body <Speech_Male> had to get the whole. <Speech_Music_Male> Your <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> corks ninety-six six fm.

"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

"It's a moscow that you wear when you go to sleep. It pushes a front of air into the firings. Not all the way into the lungs. You're not being ventilated. But it's mechanical splints to help you to open your airway. When it works. It works incredibly well and for some people. It's a remarkable change very very quickly very comfortable detroit to sleep when all. That's the problem. Actually the adherence is very low and we now know from studies that you need to probably have it on for six to eight hours effectively throughout the whole nice. So that's gonna prove difficult if you wait during the night maybe go to the new comeback. People don't put the machine back on turnover. Yeah just just place it on the wears. Yeah there are other devices some people. It's the anatomy of their airway. So they have short lower jaws and so linking him with a dentist. You can get a device that you wear it nice that pushes your jaw forward pulls that front part of your airway forward and again for some people that works remarkably well and his reasonably straightforward. Yeah yeah i mean. Do people ever have to have a surgical intervention or is there such a thing. Yeah surgery was coming. Maybe a few years back. It's now tends to be sort of country indicated it can cause more trauma surgery is common in children and in fact sleep apnea is common and children. Although age is a risk factor for us we tend to think of older and obese individuals especially men as you say quite common children but there tends to be because the airway can become crowded so often surgery is good there to take out the tons of tissue that may actually be addressed. Because they're having a lot of repeat infections yet but can often actually alleviate sleep apnea that they may not even know that had surprising element of compensation can is the number of women that can have as you say particularly pre. Menopause postmenopausal. Yeah so once the hormones change around that period What we see is affects on breathing and affects then that Provide less cardiovascular protection. Estrogen the major female hormone is really quite protective for the cardiovascular system throughout life but the sudden loss of estrogen put females at risk and then sleep apnea seems to present. What about the same incidences as men in other words very very common and they're now at quite a high risk. Leslie what i would think. This is for whom i think this is particularly. Problematic is those who don't live with anybody to tell them. You are snoring too much. Or i don't like to sound people alone for example who don't know they've got a problem. How their body will alert them to it. I expect yeah. So i guess it's back the first point we had about the how how sleepy they are. If they feel their mood. If they feel that there might be other telltale signs in fact even going to their gp they may have high blood pressure. That may have issues with diabetes or prediabetes. We know that.

moscow sleep apnea detroit apnea Leslie diabetes
"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

"There's no flow of air and so it's actually silent and we may recognize it in individuals who snore. They often have periods between bouts of snoring. That are completely silent and it could be the breathing as resumed and that would be a good thing but of course it's a problem if breathing has become obstructed and there's no flow so now what we have we do not wait. Go pitt. that happens. Yeah so that's the problem. Of course you actually have an arousal from sleep. It might be from a deep stage of sleep to a lighter stage of sleep so i don't awareness of us or even people who would sit up bolt upright wake up but then fall back asleep again so the waking up is good because it restores the airway and you breathe but now what we have is that sleep apnea breathing. Disorder ends up actually becoming a sleep disorder. It ends up disrupting sleep. And that's probably the first sign people who have really excessive sleepiness during the daytime. Yeah yeah like. I think possibly more men. Maybe i'm wrong here but possibly more men are in time to snore kind of by default. You're quite correct. It's much more common in men but actually that's only true if we look Up until about the menopause period and women so around the peri menopausal period. Those numbers are equivalents. And now it's actually a big problem for women. The the incidences as high. I in women as men but the cardiovascular consequences one of the problems with sleep apnea is it can cause high blood pressure okay and it can therefore for cause heart failure in the long term and the risk of cardiovascular events in women actually now becomes higher than men. So how would. I know if i loved ones snoring. Or how would they know if my snoring was something to be looked into. Yeah good question often. That's where it's first reported. It's the bed partner. The individual themselves is sort of a really unaware of the condition. Although if you look if you look at the daytime behaviors. There's many cardinal signs that kinda give it away if you witness and individuals snoring and then periods as i said have complete quiescent silence. But if you watch them. They're actually breathing really vigorously. They're making the effort to breathe. But because the airway is collapsed. They're not actually effectively. Breathing can be tricky to determine. That's actually what the sleep specialists will do. As instrument the individual and definitively determined us but often it's something that will be witnessed a bed partner was say that's exactly what happens. I've seen that happen. And then the individual rows either a body posture change or the return of the snoring and the appearance of the airway but only for that cycle then to continue again something. That happens hundreds of times. Over the course of a nice in assumes that it's dangerous if left untreated. Yes absolutely absolutely so. We know rather sobering facts that untreated severe sleep apnea shortened life expectancy. It's pretty much determines now that it's causal for cardiovascular disease causes over hypertension and we know that hypertension whatever the cause hypertension is gonna lead to heart failure but a host of other things one of the problems with sleep disruption joe sleep disruption by any calls is that it impacts our whole physiology. It's going to impact on our mood or cognition or metabolism and pretty much sleep apnea starts to affect every organ of the body..

apnea hypertension heart failure sleep apnea cardiovascular disease
"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

05:09 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

"Last question. What do you envision for the future of your sleep department. And what will you do to achieve. I don't know what the future holds. you know i. I know that we want more. You know I would like to see our department grow by another person I think there's part of me that thinks. Liz wants to slow down a little bit. But there's also a part of me. That knows that. Liz has some. I hate saying. I don't want to say it this way but liz has some shortcomings in herself. She's not the best person that getting out there and being you know the outgoing person to go out and do the marketing. But she's so good when she gets one on one one on two or three with people so good at that You know it was surprising to me. Actually how many comments we get from patients and how she's connected to patients and also part of the challenges when we're we're moving into a realm where we're doing enough devices per month where getting out becomes problematic but because i gotta be honest. That's problematic because liz is not prioritizing and scheduling it. If she scheduled it should go out and do it and probably also frankly speaking is. It's a long process to earn referrals. And you got to go through the pain of going through that. It just takes time but i think a couple of areas that we can do better We can earn more referrals from physicians. Because i do believe we have one of the best sleep workflows in mark in our market area. We're very friendly to medical insurance and we provide great care and great products to our patients. And we don't let money get in the way we try to work with our patients to get a good result Another area that. I think we can do better in or be more involved in his direct to consumer. We've done very little direct to consumer marketing with intention and purpose of building our sleep apnea department. So i think our potential is to double. I don't see any reason why. We can't reach fifty device ballpark per month I think that's very doable. I think to do it. We will need another person with slightly. Different skill sets But very similar skill sets and we will need to invest some time and money into the marketing part of it and part of the challenge for me in all of that is. I've got a lead. That because i got to lead the charge i got to put the resources to it and i gotta keep on top of it to see it through in. That part has been hard for me. Because i'm Frankly speaking distracted by three dentists a lot because that is an area that i wanna spend more time in and do more with. Because i do help i. I do love working with other dentists and helping other dentists succeed in. Frankly speaking i probably love him more than doing dentistry. But i still do dentistry. 'cause i got to pay the bills and We have a practice. And i wanna take care patients and i need to test bed to do some of the things that we're trying to get you guys to do so. Hopefully you enjoyed this episode Focused on sleep apnea common questions that we've gotten If you could send us additional questions we kind of compile those you can go to s. t. bone dot com. You can visit us on social media. You can leave comments. You can call eight five five three three two two two eight five. That's our toll free number to register for courses but if you have questions you can just call mayor there. And if she's really good at what she does she'll convince you to sign up for a course so again. That number is eight five five three three two two two eight. I thank you guys everybody for listening. Thank you for being a great listener. Thank you for raising the level of dentistry. If you do me a couple of favors a number one Help spread our message By leaving us reviews on itunes and google and telling other people about podcast. We'd like to see we're going to make a concerted effort in two thousand twenty two double listenership and then the other thing that you can do is you can help. Let us help. Help us help you by continuing to attend three dentists promote three dentists on social media when others are asking about where great training for implant programs are remember. We do live patient implant training here in the united states. We have a phenomenal. In my opinion one of the very best implant training programs very best sleep apnea training. Quite frankly very good at almost all of the things that we do. Because if we're not i wanna cut it out. I don't wanna be a part of something. That's not as good as it can be. And most importantly where practicing dentists living in the real world facing the same struggles that you do. We're here to help you and guide you to achieve your best possible for the for the current term and really help you see what's possible in the long term so thanks again and we'll see you back next week. Thanks so much for listening to t-bone speaks with doctor tyrone agarwal remember to keep striving for excellence. And we'll catch you on the next episode..

Liz liz apnea google united states tyrone agarwal
"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

09:30 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

"It doesn't make a team want to do that. Nobody wants to be the person always doing something to somebody that they hate. So we've moved to a point where basically the only physical impressions we taken. A practice are relying impressions for some of our full arch a work and some More complex restorative cases. Where particular lab. That i work with doesn't do digital but i like their work enough for specific cases That we take traditional impressions in those situations other than that. We're pretty much all digital are night guards. Our sleep devices are implant guides A whitening trays. You know everything is all digital in fact we take digital impressions on new patients as baseline records. But that's a different discussion for another day. And if you want to hear more about that send us some questions about what you want to hear more about in terms of bringing that in and what that's meant and what the pitfalls and stuff are there but so i recommend That you have a modern digital impression machine to take full art sleep apnea impressions the prime scan the it seven hundred the five or the three shape three and four. Those would be the four cameras that i've experienced and seen people use. I'm sure there's other ones out there. I apologize if i didn't bring up your religious Impression material of choice. But that's where we're at with that. Oh fun question. I quite quite frankly disliked this question. But what are your top appliances in y number one Let me say a couple of things. I firmly believe in a digital device perspective. I only use devices that are made digitally not on digital models but made digitally cat designed and they're either milled or printed using digital technologies and the reason. I like that is for a couple of old one They're made of great materials. That seem to last longer. I've had my digital device for four years now and it looks great gay from four years ago number two. They're smaller and thinner. Because it's not powder liquid acrylic. It's a factory pure material so they're able to be smaller. They look better. They don't look scary to your patients. number three. They fit phenomenally just seeing so few remakes and fit issues and you know patients complaining that the too tight or too loose with just seeing such good results and along the same lines. They deliver fast because they fit so great. So which are my favorite devices and uae so go to device right now in our practice which won't apply so. I wanna make disclaim here. This won't apply to every practice out there my go-to devices. The opti sleep made by seacat. Now i don't know why they continue to do this. This is something that you'll have to talk to them about. But i'm sure there's some politics involved And obviously good reasons but to make an opti sleep device you have to have seacat air software to be able to send it to them so that means you have to have a seacat air software. Cbc and a digital impression to be able to make the opti sleep device. It's the device. I use personally. It's a great device. It's nicely milled. It has a a plastic rods. That don't stretch In and it's a great device. Okay we've really been very pleased for many years with the opti sleep We've reached a point where we do enough volume that financially. It makes a lot of sense for me to use the up to sleep as well which is certainly a consideration for me. I i don't want to lie about that. I do pay for. Don't get me wrong But we do have reached a point where we have a lower fee for that my second device and probably my most recommended device at this point. would be the pro solemness ego device and it is a slightly flexible milled. Dorsal fin device And we've recently started using this probably about eight months ago nine months ago. Somewhere in that ballpark and have been super pleased with it. It is also very petite very thin. One of the nice things about the dorsal fin is. There's no potential stretching with with of the bands which we haven't seen with up to sleep just for just for clarification And it's a very nice device. The flexibility makes it fit nicely. They're able to not have to make it so tight and with their previous prominence device. You know very nice device but one of the concerns. We had or comment issues we had is that it felt tight because the acrylic went into the embrace space With its design so with the eva would not seeing that as well so For those starting out for those in the digital world is also digitally fabricated device. It's milled That is my number one device of recommendation at this point in time in all these things change i want to be very clear about that The negative i see with the pro psomas yvo is that it's expensive i. It's north of six slightly north of six hundred dollars Which is you know. Frankly a lot of money in my opinion But they make a great device that saves on chair time and Quite frankly all the other devices are pretty close to the same price anyway So that's why we continue to use it and frankly we wanna be committed to using great devices in our practice The third device that we have used in a practice is the vaunt from some nomad. It is a dual layer milled device. It has a hard outer layer with a nice flex material on the inside phenomenal fitting device for our patients who have lots of dentistry. That were worried about their old dentistry. Like lots of crown. Pierre prosper patients. That's device of choice is to go with the avant because that flex lining is fantastic. It's very comfortable and it works very nicely The other advantage. That i think the avantis over some of the other devices with its drop design. I it does allow a lot of lateral movement so that the patients that have our heavy grinders side decide brookshires. They have a tendency sometimes to feel that they're locked in with bands that are too tight or with the dorsal fin devices. That they don't have enough room to move side to side. So sometimes we moved to the avant in cases like that the only negative. With the avant. And i've experienced. Personally we've had some patients Make mention to it is that they're strap their little bar thing. They use a does stretch over time. I think it's an area that if they asked my opinion they need to make some improvements on it because overtime i've seen my my strap stretch almost millimeter or so and that can be the difference between having good effectiveness and not quite as good effectiveness. So hopefully some nomad will figure out a solution to that In the coming future but other than that. It's a phenomenal device. A new one. That was starting to use and recommending is depend. Thera and panther has a traditional. It's it's completely different from all the other ones which are milled. Devices and panther is a. I believe it's some type of printing nylon So some type of additive mechanism where they print in nylon and so it's a white device compared to clear a pink. Pink is avant but it has almost impossible to break in. It's a very nice device. That has flexibility that fits nicely They make two different versions with the panther they make version that has The plastic rods on the side. That don't stretch like the opt sleep. Those ones have not stretched and they also now make a dorsal fin version of the pen. Thera that has a dorsal fin. And one thing that's different in their dorsal fin compared to the prominent dorsal fin the pro solemness dorsal famous changeable. you actually change The device itself as the patient wants to move forward and they provide you three millimeters afford movement in case fee whereas the panther has a different mechanism that allows you to have a single device that moves the forwards and backwards. So those are the you know the main devices that we use recommend again. I'm sure i've missed some out there. But i wanna be very clear all of these devices on the upper end of cost there in the five six hundred dollar ballpark range But they are very sturdy. Very proven devices That.

apnea Pierre prosper Cbc
"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

"They have. To have some competence in clinical care they have to have some willingness or competence in the front office business side of working with medical insurance and working with coordinating offices and got to be organized. Because there's a lot going on there's lab work. There's prescriptions from physicians. There's third party reading. There's there's a lot going on. And i'm not trying to dissuade you from wanting to get into sleep apnea. I'm trying to set reasonable expectations for you about what it takes and it's important to set those expectations with your team members. Now the truth is. I didn't set those expectations with liz. And that's probably why my first person didn't work out the way. Liz did because liz went with the punches because frankly speaking i didn't know you don't know what what's involved until you get to the end of the road until you reach quote unquote the mountaintop or whatever. It may be so looking back. I can tell you some of these things But going back for years. I didn't mention any of these things as i just said. Hey would doing this. It's important to me. I don't want to fail. And let's make sure we make this work and let's work together And that's kind of that kind of bringing into this next part of it. And i think you know the question is digital impressions isn't important doesn't matter what brand take so. Look i always say this. Because i firmly believe this. I don't believe this is the way you should do it. But i firmly believe this..

liz apnea Liz
"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

07:33 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

"It for you in the comfort of your own home and so we made it very simple for them and i think doing that and of course getting them educated having them go through the programs with us which is why we encourage a lot of dentists that come through our program to slowly but surely send their team members back to the program or to take the online version of the program So if you're out there and you like hey. I want to give my team on board then consider online program. It's the exact same program but available online format where all of your team members can watch it. You can do it. You know a lunch break at a time as a group. There's lots of different ways of doing it. The other area that i really struggled with was leveraging medical insurance in fact i was so focused on medical insurance that it was a it wasn't it was like a damn i mean it was it was who's like just holding the lake there and it wasn't a speed bump it was a damn because then we would. I would talk about medical insurance so much to our team that they brought it up to the patients and then the patients. Oh well let me see what my medical insurance covers. And then you know maybe a cover. Something maybe doesn't and quite frankly the truth is they don't really tell you what they cover a. Don't cover a how much it is. You got to kind of figure that out with experience and having done enough cases. So that really became a hiccup for us at the same time. It was also a positive for us. Because i chose to go in network with some of the medical insurances so that we could be available for patients but allowing medical insurance to be a major talking point with patients really proved to be a hiccup the first year year and a half especially with my team members especially because you from the from the department in terms of getting them referred over to our sleep champion which will talk about here in a moment but that really kind of put up a wall and then our team members would say well you know maybe insurance covers all of it and that's the worst thing you can possibly say you know just All of those things because really the answer is they should do something about this. Whether insurance covers it or not Or the answer should be. You know we're going to do our best to maximize benefits that you may have. The first step is. Let's get tested. See what's going on and then we can look into your medical benefits if that's necessary. You know so those are the kind of the main areas was holding onto or expecting referrals. getting my hygiene and clinical team on the front and aboard to create awareness. And then leveraging or over leveraging medical insurance to where it became a hiccup and another point about medical insurance that just popped in my head. Outsource this you know. Don't try to do this in your office. I know it sounds easy and i know sleep apnea relative. Speaking is one of the easier claims but just outsource said the medical insurance makes you jump through so many hoops and just let a company do it. That knows what they're doing that has dedicated team members to it and just let them do it. So that's kind of where. I see where we got stuck the most enough for step workflow in quite frankly most common areas that we're seeing out there once people can Complete our training and kind of go from there so question number two was. Did you imagine being this successful. How did you know. Liz would be the one to sleep champion. And what advice would you give to offices that are looking for a camp. Find asleep champion. Well you know look. The competitor in me wants to say we're not quite successful yet But generally speaking we're probably in In the sleepworld in the top five ten percent of the number of sleep apnea cases. We're doing annually. Certainly would not anywhere close to what i think are potential is but I didn't really expect it to be successful. I didn't expect it or anticipated to really take a full-time person to do it to reach that level But i'm very proud and pleased. And i think it's taken an entire village of people to make it happen And in the follow-up question. How did i know. Liz would be the one. I didn't In fact Initially i had hired someone else to be that person to lead our sleep program in that person didn't have the flexibility to go with the flow of working through it and kind of trying different ways. That person didn't have a very very talented person with that person. Didn't have wasn't committed to me in my opinion Wasn't committed to doing what it takes staying late sometimes. Having to kind of go back and forth and liz has been with me. She's my at this point. She's my longest tenured team member. She's at thirteen fourteen years now And she's been doing sleep dedicated for three to four years at this point. And you know the mistake i made was going outside I should have gone to liz front. Maybe would have worked better. Maybe it would've worked worse. I don't know but the reason. I think liz worked is because she had been with me for eight years at the point. She trusted me. She'd seen us bring in new technology and work through the bumps and bumps but to get it to a point where it was flowing smoothly bringing implant dentistry. She had we had a level of trust with each other that we had each back That we weren't going to take advantage of each other That the hard work we had to put in the beginning would pay off in you know after we got through those lumps and bumps you know so so you know. I'm a little bit lucky in that way. But there's a little bit more than luck. I i really needed somebody that was going to go with the flow. I in terms of trusting me and going through all of that now. What advice would i give to. Offices that are trying to develop a find a champion. i wouldn't sugarcoat what the position is It's a combination of front office and back office. It's nothing they've trained for in dental assisting school front office cooler hygiene school It requires being a key. Contact point for Outside referrals for patients for laboratories for other team members they have to get along with people they have to be able to really work with people they have to understand that they are. They are referred business in other words. They're dependent on referrals whether that's referrals from other physicians dentists hygienists within their practice. So you have to cultivate referral business. That means sometimes you have to go out to lunch with people that you're trying to attract to refer to that ultimate. Sometimes you have to go to lunch with your hygienists to kind of keep them. You know motivated to continue. Send you patients. So i think that that is a very important part. They have to learn some nuances of medical insurance. Because you're going to have those conversations with patients you know. They have to learn how to schedule. People have to learn how to accept money and work through financial arrangements. Gotta learn all of these things you know. And then of course as clinical component they have to be able to take impressions and bites and deliver devices which i personally think is the easier part of what we do. I think the harder part of it all is is the managing and leading people And i think that's important so you.

apnea liz Liz
"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"apnea" Discussed on T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

"Like to send in your questions and this week we've compiled several of our sleep apnea questions. And i'm going to be focused on walking through some of the common questions we've gotten on sleep apnea and then Kind of That's going to be our episode So let's go ahead and get into this week's episode. So i'm back after that quick cough clearing there but i think it's important to set a kind of basis of where we're coming from on sleep apnea you know i i started doing sleep apnea in two thousand seven. It was a hot topic. Two thousand eight actually. It was a hot topic at the time on the dental internet forms. There wasn't social media at that time and everybody was succeeding with it. And i said oh my god i gotta do it and so i jumped into sleep apnea with minimal training. I you know. I did get some training But i kinda was just listening to all the chatter on social sorry on the internet forums. And i kind of just jumped into it. And we had mild success and mild success means we did ten fifteen maybe twenty devices with any like an eighteen month period but we never picked up steam. We never had momentum and then so kind of just died away after about two thousand ten. We really literally stopped doing it. Other than when. I made myself asleep device. And i'm not even sure we made any devices at all for four or five years and then in two thousand fifteen or sixteen. I heard a podcast with aaron elliott. And i said you know what i need to get back into the dental sleep medicine game and invited erin out to north carolina to train our team at the same time we decided to go ahead and invite some other people to get training and that really kind of jump started getting back into sleep apnea and then you know over. The next six months. I think a lot of it was a mindset issue. Is that. i really decided that. I was going to not just copy. What others are doing really found a way to make it fit within our practice. And that's why we really developed a four step workflow and for those that have listened to webinars. I've listened to us talk about it before or even attended some sleep apnea training programs. Four steps are diagnosis so Four steps awareness diagnosis financial and then treatment. And the first question we get is. Where do i find myself. Where do you find yourself getting stuck in the four. Step lurk. Workflow when you started. And how did you overcome that. Well if for me. I'm gonna look back at two ways of looking at this. I'm going to look back at two thousand seven eight time period and then i'm also going to look at the two thousand sixteen time period when we restarted sleep in the first place i got stuck was before we even got into the workflow and that was hoping and praying and depending on referrals referrals into the practice because so many people out there talking about you should never treat sleep apnea unless they referred by sleep physician all of these things and i frankly speaking. I don't necessarily believe that. I believe there are certain. Patients shouldn't treat without coordination of care with sleep position. But i think quite a few patients where you can start the process. So i think the first time i was really dependent on referrals waiting for referrals i was letting them dictated and the referrals will also a hindrance on the out pro pot processes well because then i would refer patients out to get sleep studies and they would never show back up or they never even went to get those. So what we what. We advocate and teach now is that we want dentist to do screening within their practices within their hygiene pool. And we want them to help their patients move forward with therapy from that part and of course it does include sleep physician but living in that medical model world where everything dictated by the physician was a hindrance in the very beginning and that was probably the number one hiccup i had restarted was getting past that mindset now when we get into our workflow awareness awareness really falls a lot in the model that we teach on the hygienist and the front office but i struggled with in the beginning getting hygienics on board with talking about sleep apnea and i used to think about. That wasn't that they be. I thought that they didn't believe in it. Or they thought it was a you know money game for me and really what it turned out to be as they weren't educated and they weren't comfortable talking to patients and they especially weren't comfortable with when patients said no or gave pushback or when the patient said yes. They were confused about what to do next. And so what happened was is people. Have a tendency hygienic. Especially but all people have a tendency to do. What's very comfortable to them. From the moment they walk into hygiene school that taught to clean teeth. And that's what you do and so when you bring in a new product like sleep apnea then. They have a tendency to hesitate to converse with patient. Because they don't wanna look dumb in front of them. In case the patient asked the question And then they hesitate if the patient says yes because then they don't know exactly what to do so what overcame that was simplifying for a hygienist and really for me that was a matter of saying. Listen i just want you to focus on four medical conditions that occur that are have a high likelihood of of patients having co conditions of having sleep apnea. I want you to talk to him about the aware. just make them aware we scripted. What these four things were. In the conversation around those four things to help the patient understand why that could be related to sleep apnea and then we wanted them to ask the patient to take a test and then we made it very simple this two ways. We can take a test in our office. One in our state you can dispense the home sleep test here from within the practice and you can walk out with it today or number two we can refer you to a third party service that will do.

apnea aaron elliott erin north carolina
Philips Recalls Ventilators and Sleep Apnea CPAP Machines

Papa and Lund

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

Philips Recalls Ventilators and Sleep Apnea CPAP Machines

Facebook to Add a Podcast Player and Recording Tool

podnews

01:44 min | 8 months ago

Facebook to Add a Podcast Player and Recording Tool

"Has announced a sensitive new audio features including a podcast player within the facebook app. According to facebook's founder mark zuckerberg has been considerable. Thought put behind the feature. One of the things that we found is that there are one hundred and seventy million people on facebook who are connected to a page. That's four podcast already. So they've expressed that they want to get updates from the podcast. They wanna get that content. We just literally don't have a format today for that page or people wanna share podcast. It put that out to the people who wanna follow that going to build that they're the creator tools for people doing podcasts to share it but then on the consumption side an experience where you can just discover that and feed. Start playing it. Put it in the background. Maybe go to a different apnea. Keep playing or multi task do different kinds of stuff so podcast obviously a big thing already. But but i think just unlocking the ability for people in creators to share long form content. There's going to be pretty valuable. The initials r s weren't mentioned in the release nor in zuckerberg's interview facebook's also announced live audio rooms available for facebook groups and public figures for the live audio creators will be able to turn alive conversation into a podcast for everyone to listen to later says the company he'll be able to charge for access or accent tips. Using facebook's digital currency stars other announcements from facebook include new audio creation tool as part of the with automatic noise reduction music and effects soundbites. We'll be short form creative audio clips. Which will be able to record or clip from shows. All audio will be automatically captioned for accessibility

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Apnea Zuckerberg
Facebook To Add a Podcast Player and Recording Tool

podnews

01:05 min | 8 months ago

Facebook To Add a Podcast Player and Recording Tool

"Facebook has announced a sensitive new audio features including a podcast player within the facebook app. According to facebook's founder mark zuckerberg has been considerable. Thought put behind the feature. One of the things that we found is that there are one hundred and seventy million people on facebook who are connected to a page. That's four podcast already. So they've expressed that they want to get updates from the podcast. They wanna get that content. We just literally don't have a format today for that page or people wanna share podcast. It put that out to the people who wanna follow that going to build that they're the creator tools for people doing podcasts to share it but then on the consumption side an experience where you can just discover that and feed. Start playing it. Put it in the background. Maybe go to a different apnea. Keep playing or multi task do different kinds of stuff so podcast obviously a big thing already. But but i think just unlocking the ability for people in creators to share long form content. There's going to be pretty valuable. The initials r s weren't mentioned in the release nor in zuckerberg's interview

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Apnea Zuckerberg
Why Do We Need To Solve the Obesity Epidemic?

Mind Pump

01:38 min | 8 months ago

Why Do We Need To Solve the Obesity Epidemic?

"Why fix the obesity epidemic and it is an epidemic. I know that they named it. Officially an epidemic in the late nineties but obesity been for a couple of decades before that was only really in the nineties. It they said okay. This is an epidemic and it's growing it's been growing ever since so why even solve it. Why even look at this issue and say what are the things we can do to fix this problem. Well there's a there's a some big reasons Number one the health risks associated with obesity alone are tremendous it dramatically increases your risk of all cause mortality. So being means that you're much more likely to die of any reason at all but to be more specific. Your risk of type. Two diabetes goes to the roof heart. Disease goes to the roof. Stroke goes through the roof. Gallbladder disease goes through the roof. Osteoarthritis goes up quite a bit cancer. You know some recent studies atribu consi- literally say that you could just by not being obese. You could reduce the risk of like seventy five percent of cancers okay so just being obese increases your risk of cancer sleep apnea is another one. So is it big problems now. A lot of people might say well. That's personal right. If you're obese. Then it's your your own issue. And i i get part of that. But here's the truth. It literally no joke if you look at obesity and you look at all the things that are connected to obesity. It threatens to bankrupt. Modern

Obesity Gallbladder Disease Cancer Sleep Apnea Cancers Diabetes Stroke
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 9 months ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
Amazon reportedly developing radar-equipped sleep apnea tracker

This Week In Google

02:17 min | 11 months ago

Amazon reportedly developing radar-equipped sleep apnea tracker

"Radar sleep apnea tracker so this is actually like so solely tight. Go for you here. Google's project solely also uses millimeter wave. They radars well to detect gestures. Pretty close what this is doing again. This i don't think this is creepy. But it is important to understand how this works. It emits the signal and it when it uses that the bounce back to see what you're doing and it's basically what amazon's doing that's worth noting is that it's created an algorithm to watch how you breathe now that's obviously machine learning because you yes. It's not something you could say. Well if it goes that's snoring. It has to kind of you you have to put a bunch of sleepers in front of. There's about not breathing. it's not doing the sound. i think it's it's sense. I understand it is exactly. It's it's looking at some part of either the rise and fall of your chest or the way your head jerks back and see air breath. I wonder think about how a bat uses sonar right or think. How literally how it works. You're throwing you're throwing the rif signal outright in it it runs into something it lets you know. I ran into this. This is what that looks like in the algorithm. They figured out that they they're running against this is there they know what the pattern of sleep apnea. Looks like right for that raider. Obviously with having done a lot of training yes yes this is not something you know you wouldn't necessarily know how to look for sleep apnea before you head into this. This is a big push for amazon into health tech We talked about the halo. Fitness tracker They did kill there. Haven effort the health insurance effort with p. More do they ended up in a buffet. Yeah they did that. Oh we really thought they were going to start get into the health insurance business that's interesting. They did just launched their pharmacy service. Though right if you you can you can send them your prescription. And they'll fulfil it kind of like. They're not lease in jets anymore. Either day actually bought by the jets by the

Apnea Amazon Google Haven Jets
The Secret to Better Sleep

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:04 min | 1 year ago

The Secret to Better Sleep

"Is so let's talk about nighttime breathing during sleep and what the differences of breathing through your nose versus breathing your mouth. And what that has to do with our our oral health. Right. Yeah it ends. The same of this talk we've been having his. Teacher important will take taught me something very important about what we need, how fade our bodies and that the crucial nutrients your body will tell you when you're missing the critical factors. Bottom and nutrient needs the thirst in the mail and the first nutrient that your body needs. You can only go minute without it is oxygen and so. In mouth, we can see when not breeding with delivering enough oxygen to our our body and how this translate to add dental health is that as we mentioned before when agile is done developed promptly when we have been narrow up gloomy have risen, tasted done fit that's the back of the magazine and mandible the upper low joel the done developed that is by definition airway space, and so what that does is it pushes us into. What I like to call survival braiding, and what happens is that we are designed to break through the nose and there's some very deep. Raisins for that. In that in the nose, we released nitric oxide which mixes with the air goes into our lung and increases blood flow and pushes auction right throughout the body. Now, when we have crooked up-to-date and the hi pal, we have nasal sinuses that have a low of volume and we don't breath around knows as well as we would when we have nice and central wide jaws. Lovely Watch faces. So what happens is that we learned to break through Mao and this is delivering coal unfiltered there. That's alert air immune system gives us things, Swanson's and Adenoids but what happens is we don't deliver so oxygen and the most crucial part of this is that the mice hungry that the patio body requires auction is the brain and so when you're a breathing correctly, you're starving your brain of oxygen. And so this can happen through the day. You'll bring me through the mail seventy, five percent of the time. Your brain isn't getting enough oxygen. But when you go to sleep, there's one thing you have to do, and that's brief and deliver your brain oxygen and the reason for this is that when you go into deep levels of sweep, your brain is depending on your breathing pattern to take your nervous system into his. Level sleep that then allows himself to clean now and so oxygen and braving patents or what control that. So if you have the small crowded mouth with and you not comfortable with Nicer braiding, you'll then pushing your brain into survival mode during during slate and so as you mentioned, sleep apnea sleep apnea is the most the most severe form of this condition of airway and oxygen deprivation, and that's when we posed. During slave to ten to twenty seconds, the You Count Ten to twenty seconds in you on your hand. That's what people are doing up to thirty or forty times the not, and that's your brain in deep distress, and so this is how we increase the risk of Alzheimer's Disease Dementia and mental decline because we're not giving us a brain opportunity to regenerate and to replenish itself with the the crucial nutrient on. And where I was sharing earlier in the interview is that we typically think of like the you know if anybody has a family member or know somebody diagnosed with sleep apnea we typically think of somebody as. Being usually quite overweight. The one of the things you started noticing and hearing about from some of your colleagues is that there's a whole group of younger. Men But especially women that were coming in. With sort of these symptoms of anxiety like waking up in the morning with anxiety and Tell us how that also relates to this breathing through the nose versus breathing through the mouth. Absolutely. So when we started to talk about the spectrum sleep disorders, now we see obstructive sleep apnea is at the very very severe and but what they found in the nineties at Stanford, a Research Co. Christian. Gilmer found that there was a group who've is patients that's showed positive results for a mandibular advancement splint, which is a dental sleep device. That didn't that were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and what he did was he called it. New. Syndrome called Airway Resistance Syndrome and it's not a recognized medical term yet. But there are many many studies and lots of research out there showing that people with upper airway resistance, syndrome, which is exactly what it sounds like. It's an airway that has more resistance. So Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome is characterized by an increased pressure in the airways and. How this happens in the body is that when we sleep your muscles relax and that increased pressure is detected by the Brian is receptive at the back you threatening the Airways the tell the brain what the pressure is. Now we have a small bone structure and the muscles relax. What happens is the brain is constantly being sick these precious signals and it relates to a choking response. So the brain has been sent into fight of what? Response, and so this is a survivor when these wackle survivals sleep, and so what happens is that your brain will respond by pushing the Joel Ford and so the most common sign of Airway resistance in Jeremy Teeth grinding and we say this in the Dental practice busy look. But what happens is that people may not even notice that they have the syndrome. You know they slave they wake that I feel that rested. It's because your body doesn't get to reach date levels

Upper Airway Resistance Syndro Airway Resistance Syndrome Joel Ford Alzheimer Gilmer Swanson Stanford Research Co Brian Mental Decline Disease Dementia
How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

The 3:59

10:49 min | 1 year ago

How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

"What exactly does the Smart Ring Do, and and let's start with what its original purpose is, and what it was marketed for initially sure, so the has been around for two years and never got to review. It was one of these things I meant to, but it is a it is. A fitness rang health ring much. Much like the ring made by motive years ago, it checks heart rate it contract sleep it contract motion and activity, but it also tracks temperature. The temperature sensor is the interesting part because there aren't any other wearables that do that, but it's not necessarily the temperature sensing. You think it can't give you like an actual body. Reading of like you know what hundred point seven or whatever? It's a relative temperature that's. Night to show temperature fluctuations plus or minus degrees Fahrenheit. That's mentioned. Just show your changes in your baseline, so to speak, and so how is it being used as a early warning system for covid nineteen? Now been working with a couple of research teams UCSF has a study that you can opt into in the APP. That's been going on for a while. That's asking people to log You know their own moods and symptoms to try to study correlations. That's similar to what other companies are doing trying to see. If there could a way could help connect to symptoms and krona virus, but those researchers are seeing that you can with with the temperature capabilities see signs of illness symptoms a couple of days in advance of when you would normally perceive them. That could line up with the couple of day. Lead time that people believe might might be you know a symptomatic spread period now I'm not a another doctor. My research scientist from talking to researchers working with this and I've been I've been really curious about what that could actually mean. Another research team at Rockford Neuroscience Institute West Virginia University. Has Been Looking at trying to create a health forecasting APP that they have in place that they're using with with frontline workers and seeing if you could provide you know a couple of day pre forecast of whether you're likely to be getting sick. And built on a similar idea of using temperature mainly as a way to pick up ways that you're you're readings are hinting towards the sign of sickness, but not necessarily a sign of coronavirus, just a sign of sickness general from what they perceive. They claim it's like eighty nine percent. Accurate in predicting so far signs of upcoming sickness that will be when you get a coronavirus. You know that's when you get tested. That's when you would maybe. Go into work in some future world where we go back to work, and you know the reason why folks might be more familiar, we're now is because NBA players are supposed to be wearing them as they. Get set to kick off their their special. BUBBLE SEASON DOWN IN FLORIDA. Yes so NBA players have been wearing this of chosen this this wearable. OPT in program and. Coaches that that can look at the stats get kind of a distilled subset of the stats that aware of the ring, now like the consumer version would get so I see all these different pieces of information. There is a respiration. There's heart rate variability temperature these are estimated again. A couple of those key factors of four of them were pulled out and turn into a risk score. That idea is that if you seem like you're, you're scoring significantly high on that, you would Pull yourself out. Get Kobe test, and that type of thing. But you. You get something like that on the on the order APP itself. There's a score, the kind of shows like a whole bunch of factors and talks about like you know Harry feeling today. It sometimes it correlates with our. I feel sometimes a dozen so. Same thing asleep scores but it will let me remind me of like how I'm sleeping. And how much I'm you know? Both bedtime in some element of restiveness, how much I can do about that is is the other thing, but that the NBA is using again is kind of a pre screening tool for those who were bubbling Brian. So you're obviously not an NBA player, Sarah Scott, but how how are you using this? And how does that differ from what they're using this for? As as Early Warning System, yeah, so again as curious and I've not been doing any of those those things and I'm not using any advance APPS. I'm just using the consumer version and seeing what it's like so I just live with it. I've been wearing three months since late April. All the time and what have been noticing is that a lot of ways I don't notice anything because I. Just live my life, and then I check the APP in Awhile, and it says okay. This is sleeping and I tried to make myself sleep better, but like a lot of sleep tracking things. I don't act on those things as well. They should still go to bed super late, even knowing do. But the temperature thing is mostly been fluctuating around the same thing, a little down a little, if I who knows I, haven't knock on wood. I haven't gotten sick over this period. If I had actually gotten sick or perceived something that might be kind of interesting so hard to tell in that vacuum, but. I just wear. It will give some testing with it and I'm curious. I don't think it's it wouldn't replace a fitness watch because it's not as detailed as that and the one thing that the ring is, it's totally invisible with how it shows stuff. It's this nettle ring with no readouts doesn't buzz no buttons and you'd have to check the APP and also if you don't know if it's running out of batteries on the seven day battery life. Until you check the APP where you get a notification from your phone, so there's times where just went dead, and then I had like five days of no readings because I forgot to charge it, which is not ideal if you want a wearable, that's going to help provide early detection for people in a future workplace so that that's one challenge with it. The other thing is talking to the researchers and thinking about what would we all be doing with this? The NBA is bubbling now in a world where you go back to work and have some sort of you know wearable screening tool, which is what people are imagining. Its Eye, contact tracing unit everyone to opt in. And that means rock varner sciences. He was also trying to build towards. Maybe eventually a ways like at that would show ideally like where signs of potential illness popping up through crowdsourcing, but much contact tracing that requires people to participate and right now you still have questions. People are still refusing to wear masks so I mean. The. The degree to which you get people to all agree to wear wearable. Seems extremely optimistic and then when you deal with things like public. It adds all sorts of other complications so an office. Could all agree to do it? But how do you? What do you do in the larger world? I think those are questions. It still hadn't been worked out because the systems are only as good as everyone else's reporting, and just to be clear that this is not a cheap option. This is not cheap solution. Right? Like how much does this thing go for? And how easy is it the by one? The pretty easy to buy, and they're not that cheap there four hundred dollars so. Yeah the falls line with with. Your standard good smartwatch or Apple Watch or thing like that, but you know it's made like titanium plastic on the interior and It's it feels nice, but that's a lot of money, and I think some people will really like it because it's convenient. Enter praying and not a watch Some of the researchers also pointed out that a doctor's and frontline workers don't like wearing rings because they're not good that the germs could get in there. LEXIE! Shoes she's wearing. It didn't like it because of swelling and for exercise, the ring didn't feel ideal was uncomfortable for her and you have to get fitted. You have to get a particular size on the ring. They send you a sizing kit, so if your size changes, that's not great. A watch is adjustable, so there's a lot of things that are weird about it, but I think. It opens interesting questions about what temperature could possibly do. On, wearables in I'm really curious, what will pops up after this? It seemed like from your experience that made you call it somewhat invisible and the data I mean how ultimately how useful is this data? Have you used it to change your life for because you sort of hinted that that you looked at the data? then. It hasn't really changed anything, but like ultimately is this useful? In terms of changing my life. No, because you're right. You know this reminds me of like the talk. I had with with Kevin Lynch on Apple. Watch and apple could be making a lot of decisions on this to why they're only doing. Certain elements of sleep tracking. You know they're just doing the bedtime. Wake up is they claim that the rest is not actionable? Now they call so it could be that apple isn't fully develop the rest of the tools to their liking. But I think that's true in terms of when you get sleep scores like on this. What do I really do with like that? I didn't rest well enough you. There's really not much you can. Do you try to get to bed earlier? Maybe try to take it easy. Me could try to like take on yourself, and that's what the APP recommends like. You know you're reading the scores. Great. Go do it today, or it's not great. Take care a little bit today and I think that's interesting. So in that sense did change the way I would perceive some days I go. Hey, I'm not a great readiness score. just be a little easy on myself. What I know that just waking up and just feeling like crap. Probably you know I think some of these things correlate with how you would normally feel. Feel anyhow, if you're a self aware, but I think the getting back to work thing, the bigger question which is like you know I hate to even leave with that in the story, but it's what people think about about the possible Kobe awareness. I can't yeah for me I'm I you know I? Pi- blood pressure. I'm not going to put myself at risk going out. Out in the world, even if there's a sliver of it and then if I don't know that the APP, the rest of the world is behaving in a responsible way. Then I don't want to put myself there and that doesn't have to do other a wearing ring. It's like so the hard part. There was a halo over everyone's head. That said you know yes I. I am using the device I. Am I am part of your network? Then that's bubbling I. think that would be. That might be a different story, but again. None of these data things that these research programmes are absolute yet. These are all experiments, and all the researchers things a tip of the iceberg, so look how long people have been researching sleep and possible signs of. OF APNEA. or All. These research programmes with wearables they can go on for years and the NBA is very much an experiment. We don't know at all how that's going to turn out

NBA Apple Ucsf Florida Research Scientist Rockford Neuroscience Institut Kobe Sarah Scott Apnea. Harry Rock Varner Sciences Lexie Kevin Lynch
Men Hired for Sexual Fantasy Broke Into Wrong House

The Erick Erickson Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Men Hired for Sexual Fantasy Broke Into Wrong House

"In an adult fantasy God. Wrong to men with machetes. Entered the wrong house in New South Wales Australia before quickly. Realizing their error one of them has now been acquitted of intern home. Armed with the weapon in July nineteen is a media report. They had been hired to carry out a client's fantasy of being tied up in his underwear and rubbed with a broom. The judge concluded the facts of the case or unusual. The role play was arranged over facebook by a man is Griffin New South Wales. Who provided his address? He was willing to pay five thousand Australian dollars. If it was really good the judge said however the client moved thirty miles away and did not tell the two men. They entered a house on the original street of the original address when the resident notice a light on his kitchen at six fifteen in the morning he assumed it was a friend who came by daily to make morning coffee when the men called out the name of their client. The resident turned on the light removed. A SLEEP APNEA mask. He was wearing. It was vinny saw them standing above his bed with machetes which they appear to have brought props for the role play when they realized their error. What are the pair said? Sorry mate and shook his hand and left the the two men in drove to the correct address where the client noticed. One man had a great big knife in his trousers and asked him to leave the weapons in their car. The client then cooked bacon eggs and noodles in a short time later. The police arrived at the property found the machetes in the car and arrested the bear. The judge ruled. The evidence did not suggest the men's actions were intentional. They carried the machetes. Either as a prop or something. To use that fantasy the fantasy was unscripted and there was discretion as to how it would be carried out a lawyer for terrence. Leroy one of the accusers said it was a commercial agreement to to tie up and rub a semi naked man and his underpants with a brown. Three was was not with intent to intimidate.

New South Wales Australia South Wales Facebook Intern Terrence Apnea Vinny Leroy
Chicago - Boy, 12, marks youngest COVID-19 death in Cook County

Steve Cochran

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago - Boy, 12, marks youngest COVID-19 death in Cook County

"The twelve year old Chicago boys the youngest person to dive covert nineteen cook county medical examiner's office says Ernesto goose mon was pronounced dead early yesterday at a local hospital the primary cause of death listed as pneumonia caused by cope with nineteen viral infection with asthma sleep apnea and tooth disorder listed as contributing factors whose phone was seven years younger than the next youngest coronavirus patient in cook county the victim a nineteen year old man from south suburban Riverdale died April tenth for respiratory failure and covert nineteen

Chicago Pneumonia Cook County Riverdale Ernesto Goose Tooth Disorder
"apnea" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"apnea" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Apnea hello and the Pentagon says a twenty two year old soldier from North Carolina died in a rollover accident in Syria the department says specialist Antonio mora Wilmington died on Friday while clearing roads according to military officials about seven hundred fifty US troops are located in eastern Syria reddit presidential hopeful will participate in a town hall on fox news this evening fox's tiny J. powers has the story a week before the Iowa caucuses the fox news channel is hosting a town hall with democratic candidate Pete looted judge it's the second fox town hall for booted judge the former mayor of south bend Indiana other twenty twenty democratic candidates who have taken part in fox news town halls include senators any club shark first Angela brand and Bernie Sanders as well as former hud secretary Leon Castro this evening's town hall will air live on the fox news channel at seven o'clock eastern time a J. powers fox news good morning register endorsing senator Elizabeth Warren for president the editorial board writing she is not a radical she is a capitalist but she wants fair markets with rules and accountability the Iowa caucuses begin the February third music's biggest night getting under way on Sunday but not without some controversy boxes Michelle Pelino reports the Grammy awards are here although this year the show will air following a week of ups and downs dear Dugan who heads up the show was fired and in response she filed a discrimination complaint Alicia keys hosts this year with music star list heading into the night with eight nominations the flutist rapper and singer is up for album song and record of the year Billy I wish and will not as X. follow with six Ariana Grande's back in the mix this year with five and her first nomination and the album of the year category for thank.

president Billy Alicia keys Grammy editorial board senator fox secretary south bend Indiana US Ariana Grande Dugan Michelle Pelino Apnea Elizabeth Warren J. powers Leon Castro Bernie Sanders Angela brand
Orasis Developing Eye Drops as Alternative to Reading Glasses

The Bio Report

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Orasis Developing Eye Drops as Alternative to Reading Glasses

"A lot. Thanks for joining joining us. Sure thank you to speak with you. We're GONNA talk about presby apnea. Why many of us need reading glasses? When we age in your efforts to to develop a corrective I dropped to treat the condition? Let spart presby what is it. How does it manifest itself? How does it progress? Okay sure so presby. Opium is an age related phenomena and basically the the loss of ability to focus on near objects so and and resulting in the loss of ability to date today that that that are associated as we you know reading from near for example reading the screen on your smartphone reading and menu in the restaurant etc and it happened you to them graduates declining in the elasticity of the Lens. I am So he can natural aging process usually starts roughly at the age of forty five. Sometimes even it'd be earlier ends. It's progressives with years so you know you start with a Houdini your smartphone at And as far as possible you move into a increasing the font of the screen and eventually inevitable to us and some devices I says or any other to you improve your vision and the most common one so far has been reading that but there are many other I am a turn now be developed and and I want them One more thing which is important to to mention about press bulimia. It's almost inevitable and eight out of every ten people exceeding the age of forty five. We'd eventually have press the opium real and global phenomena you have almost two billion people with press bianca worldwide and About one hundred and twenty million people in the US and the numbers continue to increase significantly Quite a big phenomena. You're developing -veloping and I dropped to treat the condition this CSF one what is the one and how does it work. Okay so indeed the the product that we have developed its pharmaceutical eyedrops eye drops currently codename. CSS One and and basically the way we walk org we walk through a what is called the pinhole thing I would drown create. What is called a pupil dilation so we constrict the pupil but to a very limited amount because if you constrict your pupil too much it may may create a negative nominal so the pupil constriction that we were able to achieve creates what is called the being held effect which increases the depth of field? And this is what eventually improve the New Vision. So that's actually a very common an and concept in optics of the monarchy but really the the patient as we have or `this you firstly. We're able to find that sweet spot that reaches the right amount of pupil manipulation which enables a superior improvement of your New Vision without any compromise on on other elements and his vision ninety Asian or visual field. That's maybe because by am too much of a pupil constriction so that is one major airman in our innovation and that one us that we have a combination of existing and well-studied good morning causing are dragging a product that enabled. Not only eventually when you look at the whole package you see not only superior new movies really improvement but it also comes with several other important elements such as very fast onset of action long duration ration- of action is very comfortable feeling when you are reinstated droves and finally very safe and told her world product product these eventually quality of life product and safety. NFC Safety and twitter ability are always important and especially when you refer to quality of life so that was achieved through using existing in west studied more nichols but moreover using. I'm very very low concentration. So basically inaction the Aura seasons if one

Opium United States Twitter NFC
Lakers vs. Rockets score and highlights

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

03:26 min | 2 years ago

Lakers vs. Rockets score and highlights

"For socks seven ninety in Houston you get rockets rap after this one Michael Connor we'll have that for you scuffs things going on with the rockets is they've now made it halfway through this and be a seasonal that'll do it for us tonight here from Toyota center our onsite engineer David over our statistician Peter Unger producer on the network is Bob Ellie production assistant BT do a great job as always were broadcast partner Craig Akron I'm out of what's your final score tonight Lakers one twenty four rockets one fifteen rockets back at it Monday afternoon four o'clock tip with the thunder will join along the network at three thirty good night everybody it's Houston Rockets basketball has been presented by Toyota let's go places by AT and T. TV without NBA league pass is just kind of TV don't just guided TV direct TV call one eight hundred direct TV call one eight hundred direct TV be here all season long as your rockets take on the best in the NBA on the Houston Rockets radio network twenty twenty National Basketball Association all rights reserved Houston this is a network control signing off we now return to your regularly scheduled programming off be sure to take care of yours I personally recommend going to the low key center to get all of your levels checked that's where I got my levels checked they make it quick and easy no T. center offers a comprehensive health assessment exclusively for men most health insurance is accepted and even verified for you call today to a one seven eight nine six one one seven two a one seven eight nine six one one seven four go to low T. center dot com low key center reinventing men's health care equal opportunity is the cornerstone of the American dream being employed gives us the confidence to be financially independent we feel useful and respected but what if you were one of the eighty one percent of adults with developmental differences who do not have a paid job join the centrist foundation and supporting autism speaks best buddies and Special Olympics and creating pathways to one million employment and leadership opportunities for this talented community visit delivering jobs dot org to learn more Hey I got noticed lack of energy motivation and drive I'm talking to you guys it could be low tea or something else like sleep apnea or even low thyroid start your new year healthier with the quick and easy health assessment at low T. center they treat more than low T. including sleep apnea low thyroid and more it's covered by most health insurance and if you've been feeling tired grumpy have weight gain and loss of muscle column to a one seven eight nine six one one seven or go to low key center dot com low key center reinventing men's health care diabetes high blood pressure anxiety meds everyone's on them if your a fifty year old male maybe a bit Porky and you may even have type two diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred Bucks a month called term provider speak with big blue at eight hundred four four four twenty thirteen big little find a term life policy for you even if you have type two diabetes are overweight or have high blood pressure term providers helped thousands of people like you would think they can't afford term life insurance to buy a million dollars of affordable term life for you all you need to do is call Beyglu an eight hundred four four four twenty thirteen who will

Houston Michael Connor Rockets
Slimmer tongues may be key to alleviating obstructive sleep apnea

Lars Larson

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Slimmer tongues may be key to alleviating obstructive sleep apnea

"Of all the things that might keep you up at night concerned about having a fat tongue is probably not one of them and yet Tom fat maybe depriving you of sleep at least that's what a new study says the average human tongue way is a little more than two ounces a bit more for men and women like most other parts of the body that can accumulate in your town especially in the back near your throat and according to this study in the American Journal of respiratory and critical care medicine people with overweight tongues are more likely to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea the author of the study says this seems obvious but no one looked at this before she says it's especially true for people who are generally overweight the study says if tongue fat goes down so does the risk of sleep apnea something to think about well you're drifting off

Tom Fat American Journal Of Respirator
A Fat Tongue May Be Blocking Your Airways While You Sleep

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

A Fat Tongue May Be Blocking Your Airways While You Sleep

"Research is in the United States have discovered that losing fat from your tongue may hold the key to stopping snoring overweight people are now more likely to have a disorder known as sleep apnea which is associated with loud snoring and noisy breeding for the Perot XP has more details in a study of sixty seven people treated for sleep apnea who had lost body weight scans suggested it was the reduction in volume of tongue fat which prompted improvements in their sleep the researchers say the last spot on the tongue the less likely it is to collapse and block the Airways during sleep sleep apnea can affect people's quality of life by leaving them exhausted and stressed during the day the Pennsylvania researchers say there may be many people with fatty tongues who are at risk of the condition who are not obese they know what to find active some low fat diets could specifically target fought in the tongue ABC news

United States Pennsylvania ABC
Charges dropped against 6-year-old children

Mitch Albom

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Charges dropped against 6-year-old children

"Prosecutors say they're dropping charges against two six year old students who were arrested at a Florida elementary school last week by the same officer Riske Flores reports one the children's grandmother is speaking out about her specific incident of course his grandmother was shocked that she was upset because she says that the six year old girl suffers from sleep apnea and they're trying to get that under control meanwhile on Thursday she gets a phone call from the little girl's charter schools saying that the little girl had had a temper tantrum and that she had been arrested by

Florida Elementary School Officer Riske Flores Two Six Year Six Year
Struggling Fitbit Adds Subscription Service, Launches New Do-Everything Watch

Business Wars Daily

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Struggling Fitbit Adds Subscription Service, Launches New Do-Everything Watch

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney beaus. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p._b._a. Dot com slash b w daily <hes> <hes> uh from wondering i'm david brown and this is business wars daily at the start of a new week happy labor day friends for those of you who have a smart watch. We have a question. How necessary do you find. We're betting that you just might leave the house without it sometimes but that your smartphone phone is always with you that sound familiar well the makers of smart watches or on a quest to make them just as essential to our everyday lives as our smartphones are and to do that apple and rival fit have been transforming their watches from relatively simple fitness trackers into potentially life-saving digital health devices. You may have heard our story in february about fitbit and apple watch users who said their lives were saved when they're smart watches alerted them to very fast or very slow heartbeats and they sought medical help will now fit bid is transforming its devices into accessories that do everything from tracking your heart rate to your weight loss to your sleep and beyond last week it announced a new ten dollars a month subscription service called fitbit premium. The service offers workouts access to health coaches and personalized health reports but you can and bring to your doctor. The company also announced the next version of its smartwatch the versa too in a humorous ad campaign called. What else could they do. Fit bit implied that diversity versity can do pretty much anything. One of the most significant changes is that you can now talk to the versa using amazon's alexa voice technology the fitbit ad campaign shows users ranging from herod workers to sweaty exercisers commanding the versa to to delay a meeting call up a spotify playlist ensured that they're entree really is begin even provide conversation fodder for a first date. The implication is that the verse two is essential to helping you get through your days as the campaigns punchline. The versa too can do virtually everything you could want but it can't predict whether you'll get a second date. The two hundred dollar our watch will go on sale. September fifteenth behind the humor is a serious likely painful transformation of fitbit strategy for the last couple of years the price your apple watch soared word in sales while fitbit's business struggled analysts say shoppers were willing to pay higher prices for more features including apples e._k._g. App and a fall detector hector up against such tough competition fitbit has had a tough time. Its stock price was down to less than three dollars. A share prior to this announcement so fitbit's bits leaders are attempting to morph the device maker into a software and services company that will generate profits from subscriptions starting with the new fitbit premium sure sure the initial service offers consumer wellness services but i wonder whether fitbit's devices and future smart watches from all companies will continue to be seen as fun consumer boomer trackers or were they'll cross the line and become outright medical devices after all fitbit promises that subscription service will eventually help you manage of chronic conditions like diabetes heart disease high blood pressure and sleep apnea and fitbit claims all of the data you'll be able to track will help your physician improve. Move your care as fit transformed from a hardware company into a software services maker. It's prophets are taking a hit but overtime. Fitbit won't just just be more help centric business. It's likely to become financially healthier too <music> from wondering this is business wars daily. Hey listen if you like our show. Hop on over your favorite podcast app. Give us five star rating truly helps other listeners by this and we are so thanks for listening. I'm david brown will be back in this episode is brought to you by centro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk has never been simpler than with centro online from pitney bowes with simple online line is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats packages right from your p._c. And you were back to business in no time. Try it for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale but only when you visit p._b. Dot com slash v._w. Daily that's p._b. Dot com slash b w daily.

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