4 Burst results for "Apn Patrick"

Who pays for the tech to survive climate change?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:49 min | 3 years ago

Who pays for the tech to survive climate change?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management. Learn more at ultimate software dot com. Ultimate software people first and by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device, click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com and learn more and sign up for your free trial. We're going to survive Lima change private money and entrepreneurs have to get game from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. We're continuing our new series on marketplace tech called how we survive about. How technology can help us adapt to climate change. And here's the thing about that. It's expensive the UN puts the total cost to society at fifty four trillion dollars at a minimum by the end of the century. So arguably what we need now is money to create innovative technologies to help survive. The worst effects of warming Jayco is managing director of the private equity firm light Smith group, a firm that's hoping to find an invest in some of those technologies, and he says there aren't many others like it. I think it's one of the earliest attempts to try to look at of teaching resilience as an investable opportunity. Most money so far has gone toward mitigation trying to reduce emissions and improve energy efficiency or toward recovering from disaster. And the bulk of that spending is driven by governments or nonprofits if you look at the global tracking of climate finance lists and five. Two six percent of all finance in the climate universe can be tributed what's called agitation or climate resilience. And so far the private sector has almost no skin in the game. But co says the need for funding is staggering three hundred billion dollars a year by twenty thirty in developing countries, alone and only growing so on the one hand private money is going to have to step in without being able to harness the flow of private capital from the private sector. We're going to face a much much more challenging experience with the effects of climate change flowing through over the next several decades and potentially the next several generations. And on the other hand, there is money to be made from companies that can come up with great solutions and scale them. Our rule is to find companies like that with great management teams already growing that can then be excel rated in their growth that will generate better returns for investors and also a better outcome for society. Okay. So but next question, what do you find co says he's looking at two possible catego-? Oris for investments, which he calls. Macgyver. Maclay? Macgyver used what he had to get out of jams. Looks like it might be Thurmond, Bob. So that's climate intelligence. Like, we talked about earlier this week or things like artificial intelligence for modeling risk to buildings and real estate. Then there's taking technology. We already have transferring it to different parts of the world, and scaling it. Up like, drip, irrigation or drought resistant seeds or cheap. Internet connected sensors for water metering but more available and cheaper. Now. Marnie MC fly from back to the future. Could use tools from you know, the future to change things. And so that means investing in entrepreneurs with crazy, moonshot ideas or materials, we haven't invented yet or just innovative ideas. I say distilling clean water from the air at any house or school or building anywhere on tomorrow show will look at a little macgyver and a little MC fly. And now for some related links. If you are not already you should totally subscribe to make me smart. The other marketplace podcast that I'm on with KAI Ryssdal. We did a crossover episode this week about climate adaptation with Solomon Hsiang, a professor of public policy at firstly who studies the economics of climate change adaptation, and in my opinion. It is a great episode. Jane brought up this really interesting idea of opportunity cost related to add up tation and resilience. He said that basically because of climate change the cost of just survival is getting higher, whether that's hardening infrastructure or disaster recovery or building new seawalls or AI sewer systems, and that leaves less money for other things in our society, like schools or firetrucks or the tech innovations that will need to make life easier or even possible over time other interesting reading on money and climate change last month to central. Bankers wrote an open letter about climate related financial risks. And how in fact climate change is a severe threat to the global economy. And I just learned there's a Sirius XM radio show called knowledge at Wharton, which probably also makes you pretty smart and on the most recent episode two professors from the university of economics and business talked about that letter and the potential economic impacts long term, and I really want this series to be focused on solutions in kind of a hopeful way. But in slightly bummer news earlier this week. It was confirmed that global carbon dioxide levels have hit their highest number in human history at four hundred fifteen parts per million. Scientists say that was probably last the case around three million years ago when sea levels were at least fifty or sixty feet higher and the Greenland and west Antarctic ice sheets. Probably did not exist so solutions, then I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN Patrick in Santa Cruz. California wrote to us to say marketplace is an essential element in his life. And that we're helping make him smarter through high quality thought provoking and informative journalism to join Patrick and supporting what we do. Please donate online today at marketplace dot org. Thanks to Patrick and all the marketplace. Investors who make our work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share, an award-winning wireless presentation system with click share and your meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device. No more awkward small talk or wasted time as you wait. For tech problems to be fixed. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

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How internet 'echo chambers' lead to faster radicalization

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:49 min | 3 years ago

How internet 'echo chambers' lead to faster radicalization

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by wigs N a premier platform bringing private markets to the public get access to tech unicorns like Uber. Airbnb and more sign up for free today at equities N dot com slash tech. And by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, Sunpro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech. The internet is a perfect delivery system for a poison. That's his oldest humanity from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. This week on marketplace tech. We're looking at how a troll becomes a terrorist. How people are recruited and radicalized online through social media, and what companies can do to deal with it fatality. Mogadishu is a professor of psychology at Georgetown back in two thousand five he published a paper called the staircase to terrorism which was an exploration of how out of millions of disgruntled people in the world of very few rise up. This metaphorical staircase and commit violent acts in the real world. He says radicalization isn't new, but the internet can make it faster and easier. I asked Mogam what motivates people to take that last step to physical violence? Well, it's a slow process sometimes, but it can also be rapid. But the key issues are that's individuals feel that they are being mistreated that they there is injustice in the world particularly nowadays through the internet. An echo chamber is developed and 'isolation takes place. So that this group radicalize is and the radicalization takes place in relation to other groups. It's what I call mutual radicalization and gradually. They get to a stage west one or two of them are ready for actual violent behavior. It sounds like what you're saying. Is that not only is the internet particularly good or not only is it particularly ripe for this type of behavior. But that in fact, as online communities become radicalized, they they radicalize each other like they upped the ante absolute the this is becoming the norm. And we'd see this in politics. We see it in extremist ideology. So that there is a relationship between the? These radicalizing movements and the internet, and this is taking place in the wide context of globalization. You know, you you've said that the latter stages of this radicalization staircase are somewhat rare. But do you see this becoming this process becoming faster or more common? Yes. Definitely becoming more common in the sense that the mutual radicalization taking place the probability of more individuals moving up to that final level of the staircase increases, and this is very much related to the type of migration taking place around the world, and the kind of leadership coming through now is quite different from what was taking place ten years ago. I wonder how can companies individual companies and platforms combat this. Radicalization process on their networks, the lodge corporations media corporations have a duty to take on this challenge. They have the tools available. They have the technical means to do this. They have to get more serious about controlling hate speech. They have to get more serious about controlling echo chambers, and influencing echo chambers. Fatality Mogadishu is a professor of psychology at Georgetown. He has a new book coming out called threat to democracy, the appeal of authoritarianism an age of uncertainty tomorrow on the show. We may wish that big tech companies could just make this all go away. But that isn't as easy as it sounds. And now for some related links. You'll find a link to the professors paper on our website, marketplace, tech dot org, and CNN has a good piece this week about this topic of online radicalization, and what big tech platforms can do about it. They spoke with a terrorism expert who says simply taking down extremist content, just shifts the content and the audiences to smaller platforms think of say the chat app gab, which is a favorite of Neo Nazi groups, anti-semitics racists and conspiracy theorists. The expert said algorithms shouldn't amplify extreme content for a start. But if they know it's there, they could actually redirect people to forums with different viewpoints for even therapy resources. It's a super interesting read in the UK. There's actually a startup called moonshot, which is trying to intercept people lower on the staircase if you will by targeting them with what they call. Off ramping campaigns basically messages that direct them to more positive content, and they can even intervene online to connect potential extremists with offline health, and like I said, we'll talk more about this tomorrow. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Patrick in Santa Cruz. California wrote to us to say marketplace is an essential element in his life. And that we're helping make him smarter through high quality thought provoking and informative journalism to join Patrick and supporting what we do. Please donate online today at marketplace dot org. Thanks to Patrick and all the marketplace. Investors who make our work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by send pro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech.

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Amazon knows what we buy, and it's turning that into a huge ad business

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:47 min | 3 years ago

Amazon knows what we buy, and it's turning that into a huge ad business

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace and buy evident from identity verifications to background checks and everything in between businesses can run accurate and comprehensive verifications easily and securely on a single platform all while minimizing exposure to users personal information. Learn more by visiting evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and get started today, that's evident ID dot com slash tech. Amazon's information about what we are buying is turning into a really good ad business from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. You're how there's this sense that if Amazon gets into your line of work, you're in trouble. Well, Hello digital advertising. Amazon has been slowly building up its ad business. Leading brands target ads to people on Amazon dot com, and it's other sites like the live streaming platform twitch IMDB, which it owns and Zappa Zappa's. And then, of course, all across the web. And it's pitch is simple. Amazon is telling advertisers that the best predictor of what you the consumer are going to buy is the stuff. You've already bought a report out today from research firm emarketer says Amazon has been a distant third in digital ads behind Facebook and Google and is starting to look like a dangerous third Monica Pierre is senior forecasting director for emarketer. So over the next year, we expect to Amazon will cross over the fifteen. Billion mark. Meaning that it's definitely gaining share on the top to add selling platforms, both Google and Facebook and gaining over ten percent share in the market, which which will be quite a feat. When we think about not even being, you know, five or six percent in the past couple of years, and then tell me about the data advantage or the the data play that Amazon has I mean, it seems like it's taken people a long time to realize the potential power of Amazon, including maybe Amazon from a business perspective the power of Amazon, knowing what you buy exactly it. And that's really the true differentiator when we think of Amazon and in its competitors. Really? You know, Google certainly knows what we've searched for and Facebook definitely knows what we've liked who are connected to but Amazon. Will know what we bought and for advertisers that are selling products, that's really helpful to know. So this, of course, does rely on any e commerce at business relies on your data. Amazon has a lot of trust right now in with a lot of consumers at a time. When people are getting more mistrustful of the advertising yuko system and how much information it gathers is that a concern for Amazon at all that consumers might say. I didn't know you were gonna use my information this way, right essentially, it comes down to ease of use. And whether the customer is getting what they've asked the platform for and so such as it is with, you know, other platforms Google as long as you're returning the search results that that you're looking for consumers are can be quite forgiving about sharing information. So that's an opportunity, of course for Amazon. On. But it is something that consumers will start to think more and more about the question becomes whether advertisers. See that as a risk math, Monica Pierre, senior forecasting director for emarketer. And she says this realization that real time information about what people are buying might lead to successful ads who thunk right is also pushing other ecommerce companies such as wal mart to build add businesses too. And now for some related links as it happens. Bloomberg had a good story over the weekend about WalMart. And it's add ambitions, you can find that on our website. Marketplace tech dot org. One thing. It says is that WalMart actually has more US customers than Facebook Google or Amazon combined, but just hasn't figured out. How to take all that good information about what people like to buy and turn it into money, but Amazon's rapid growth in terms of advertising, certainly offering a new model. In fact, the story notes that target's grocery chains like Kroger and other brick and mortar stores are starting to make the same pitch to advertisers about how useful their data is for selling ads that get people to actually click and buy it's a super interesting development because it tells you that the race for who's going to win the internet era is definitely not over even though it feels like Facebook and Google have a lock on the whole thing. Sometimes I mean, advertisers are a mercenary bunch. They're looking for something called conversion rates that is the thing where we actually click and by. Instead of just ignoring ads, and if they start getting better conversion by buying out space from WalMart or target or Sears or Domino's pizza. Then all of a sudden Facebook and Google don't make so much money after all, and they're not so invincible, of course, Amazon could just end up being the most invincible of all. But either way the story is not yet written and it's possible that a new chapter is just starting. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Patrick in Santa Cruz. California wrote to us to say marketplace is an essential element in his life. And that we're helping make him smarter through high quality thought provoking and informative journalism to join Patrick and supporting what we do. Please donate online today at marketplace dot org. Thanks to Patrick and all the marketplace. Investors who make our work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Tokyo. Athletic making shoes for running walking, fitness and recovery off featuring their economy chromato- box, natural fit and low drop platform. Do your body a favor and visit towpath letting dot com slash tech. Enjoying others who've done their research. Get ten percent off your first pair using promo code tech at checkout on towpath letting dot com T O P O athletic dot com. Promo code tech.

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Your next TV will very likely be internet-ready

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:09 min | 3 years ago

Your next TV will very likely be internet-ready

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by hot cloud storage. If your company is thinking about moving data storage to the cloud, then you need to think about Sabi, it's less expensive than just the maintenance on your current on premises storage. See for yourself with free unlimited storage for a month. Go to Assab dot com. Click free trial and use the offer code was Sabi. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation when it comes to mobility, more and more businesses are turning to planet, m Michigan is home to the largest concentration of auto related engineers in the nation as well as various all road and all weather autonomous testing centers. The learn more had to planet m dot com. Planet in Michigan where big ideas and mobility are born. The only reason anybody's buying a new TV is for the internet inside from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. All this week. We're partnering with c net reviews talking about the big trends in consumer technology. One of those trends has been that televisions which used to be in the pipedream category. Holiday gift ideas, are now more in these stocking stuffer price category television prices have been in free fall for over a decade and manufacturers have tried to keep people buying with gimmicks. Like three D And ultra high resolution four K, which does look great. But there still aren't many shows or sports being broadcast in four K as a result TV prices just keep getting lower. And the only thing that is getting people to buy them is streaming David Katz. Myers editor at c net covering TV's and home theater. The biggest growth this year. We've seen with Roku TV. So these are inexpensive televisions. Made by companies like TCL, high sense from China that a pack in this easy, smart TV system that Roku has almost perfected where it's just a bunch of absolute just like an iphone actually on your to your TV screen, and you. Do you jump in an ethics and Hulu and Amazon get right to your shows. And it's all with one simplified remote on the TV more and more people are using the systems built into their televisions, and Roku is kind of the ascendant one especially with this millennial audience that, you know, getting their first TV and can only for to spend a couple hundred bucks on these things, and they really are that cheap in a lot of the screen sizes. So TV's used to be a major investment, they're a lot cheaper now. And I wonder what that means for the TV market overall which has struggled, right? Yeah. The TV market has always been this. You know, cutthroat no margin kind of business. You know, you can get a fifty five inch TV for three hundred bucks. You can get a thirty two inch TV for one hundred twenty bucks, you know, in those used to be big screen sizes. And now, they're kind of the medium range in the profit growth. At least in the TV market is in the sixty five seventy five super big TV's, the United States. So that's kind of where the larger brands are focusing their efforts. Meanwhile, the TV's that are really selling really well are in that fifty five inch range, and they're they're just getting cheaper. What's happening? I know you also cover home theater, where's the growth happening there? A sound bars are really where it's at one of the coolest things we've seen this year is the integration of Alexa, into the sound bar so poke for example, as a sound or with Alexa, literally built into it. And you can just talk into thin air and say turn on my TV or, you know, volume mute those kind of things which is really useful. A nice merging of the smart home speaker with the entertainment system, I love that direction. Sonos also has a product that works in the same way little more expensive. So I think we we've said in the past seen at that. Every speaker is going to be a smart speaker really soon that trend meaning voice control speaker with Alexa, or Google assistant is certainly going to take hold with all these products because it just works beautifully for music. David katz. Myers editor at c net covering TV's and home theater tomorrow. We'll all hopefully be. Eating Turkey or tofurkey or some other delicious foods with our loved ones. And we'll be talking about a surprising trend in shopping this year, the kids these days kind of want computers. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN, Patrick and Santa Cruz. California wrote to us to say marketplace is an essential element in his life. And that we're helping make him smarter through high quality thought provoking and informative journalism to join Patrick and supporting what we do. Please donate online today at marketplace dot org. Thanks to Patrick and all the marketplace. Investors who make our work possible. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation our world is becoming more hands free. Thanks to planet, m that will also include the future of transportation, Michigan has the most comprehensive autonomous real world testing under every road and weather condition and leads the nation and patents relating to navigation and smart mobility to learn more, visit planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where big ideas mobility are born.

Michigan Alexa David Katz Sabi ALI Michigan Economic Development Patrick Myers Editor Sonos Hulu United States Santa Cruz China TCL California Amazon