35 Burst results for "Apache"

Ultra Long Time Series

Data Skeptic

02:21 min | Last week

Ultra Long Time Series

"My name is a foley counter. I work with essentially neurosis. They'll finance and economics in beijing. China background statistic computing and nowadays we focus on forecasting ways a lot of skill of data on distributed systems. So i haven't yet had the chance to interview anyone specifically about distributed time-series. It seems like that would be some extra challenges because the data sequential what happened before relates to what happens next. How can you spread that across. Many machines disputed hampshire is is just time is that alcohol. it can't be billions of observations. Historically we build up statistical models based on assumptions the narrative and other assumptions those assumptions do not work on distributed system and the industry like apache spark actually defacto standard for data processing and the the street people star a huge amount of data on distributed systems. We how to make a model that really works on sack disputed system and we have to work on their language to make our forecast more robust bus on his outer series. Yes spark is naturally a good choice to us because it's such a good reputation and a lot of reasons to look at it for big data solutions. But it's not obvious to me that it's necessarily the right choice for time series because it's not really baked in right. They've moved more and more towards like a sequel style and data sets. Are there any technical challenges to implementing time series via spark. And if you consider all single time that's fine but if you think about what we are doing we are streaming tate. Data is like times commun- out like water like re-re coming up now. You're really need nonstop system to process in the whole system. They simultaneously and without much delay that demand for temps is forecast in and out to claim that i think a lot of people agree with me nowadays arteta pam because we collect data. We always have the time stamp. So that's a windy. Temperatures for distributed systems. And there's a new challenge. I think emmanuel areas like atmosphere electricity and adi and other domains

Beijing Hampshire China Tate Arteta Pam Emmanuel
Where Juvenile Detention Looks More Like Teens Hanging Out

70 Million

01:31 min | Last week

Where Juvenile Detention Looks More Like Teens Hanging Out

"A group of about three dozen excited teenagers listening to an announcement by apache county judge. Michael lethem this'll be something that'll be here for decades and you've got so it's early fall. Twenty seventeen in. This is the grand opening of saint. John's first center dedicated to teams. Letham is introducing. the people will be running it. Victor more news here pretty much every day as well as victor in polar smiling facing the energetic teens their probation officers in other words they work for the county but they dress in civilian year t shirts jeans baseball caps because they've been tapped by judge leith them to run this new facility the loft legacy teen center. It's a county run resource and activity center in the small town where kids often can't find much to do or people to talk to. It was like right at the end of my freshman year into the summer of my freshman year. I heard about it. I was like. Oh that's cool. I didn't think anything of it. I didn't think it would be this. Cool hannah wilkinson was there and then i walked. Tv's there's pool table. There's all this cool stuff for kids to do and it was really exciting.

Michael Lethem Letham Apache County Judge Leith Loft Legacy Teen Center Victor John Baseball Hannah Wilkinson
How to Improve Site Speed With Andy Schaff

How I Built It

02:12 min | Last month

How to Improve Site Speed With Andy Schaff

"Andy how are you today. I'm doing well. Thank you for having me my pleasure. Thanks for coming on the show. And i'll just say right off the bat that i'm really digging. This is not a video podcast so for the listeners and he has a very Looks like a very complete record collection behind him So maybe we'll talk about that in build something more we'll see. We'll see where the conversation takes us. But before we get into any of that really Andy why don't you tell us a little bit about who you are. Which do particularly what does development architect mean. Yeah so it's It's a contributor path with portent. That i've been on for a long time. Now i've been working with porn since two thousand and four and and i didn't start off being an expert with site speed or really being an expert at all Over you know over the years of doing lots and lots of client sites and and you know failing in some aspects and learning and improving in the technology's changing i've i've you know worked up the expertise to get to where i'm at now And what that means. I'm more back end focused. But i implement everything that happens on the front end. So you know the term full stack. Developer gets thrown out a lot. these days. how many true full stack developers are actually are I would consider myself a little bit more of a full stack implementation engineer. Like i i don't you don't want me doing your css. Because i'm not trained in it right. But i understand how it works. I can set up the preprocessing workflows and things bat nature. But my expertise is more on i create environments that that make site super fast Working with the various caching technologies and configuring. The web servers like engine nexen apache to make those sites run very quickly or at least give the really good server response time which is a backbone of of a lot of fate speed

Andy
"apache" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

07:12 min | 4 months ago

"apache" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Apaches, head of the National Institutes for allergies and Infectious diseases at the NIH and the NIH. This especially his institute has given money to a group of US researchers who collaborated. With researchers at the Wuhan Institute. 70 things have been called in the question at this point, but I mean, the more on these things with Dr Palocci are less conspiratorial. And unless along, you know, even covert origin conversations and whether there it's at all possible that any U. S dollars would have made their way to fund what eventually was Cove in 19. I think the bigger issues for the average person simply come down to flip floppy nine. Guidance. How many times over the course of time did we hear changes and the onset you we had our top Health care officials they were seeing. What about mask? Well, you know, they really aren't that effective. You needn't worry about it. And then Oh, my gosh, If you don't have your mask, I mean, that's it right. So that type of thing I think has been most problematic that, along with what often has seemed like a degree of partisanship that enters the equation, with one doctor Fauci as well, but here to talk about The growing distrust based upon some recent Zogby pulling is Mary Holland from the president of Children help defense and marry. It's It's good to have you your thoughts about the the crisis in confidence that many Americans are feeling about the National Institutes of Health and specifically, doctor Fauci. Thank you, Brian. Yes, I think the flip flops has been very distressing over the course of what is now an endemic over a year of these various restrictions related to Cho vid. But this recent Zogby poll found that 57% of Americans agree that agency capture is a real and serious threat to our democracy. In other words, a very significant majority thinks that maybe our health agencies including and I H and the Centers for Disease control. I really serving the pharmaceutical industry and not the people and the fact that a majority of people think that really does suggest there's a big problem. Right. People have higher faith in Dr Fauci as an individual, but the institutions people are really questioning. Well, and you know, it starts with a W H o. I will never free. I honestly believe that the pandemic never happens if the World Health Organization on January 14th doesn't tweet out that The virus is not communicable amongst humans. That in the trigger the response of countries around the world and how they were going to deal with this thing, So at that point, the World Health Organization lost all credibility. I think with people that were paying attention And Mary, You know whether you had the talent use of the world that just took that at face value in incorporated that into some of the original policy and some of what was advised to the president, the United States. Or, you know Or not, You know, the bottom line is they did blow it from the beginning, didn't they? Oh, I think the World Health Organization has not accounted yet for its role. They just did a whitewash kind of investigation of the lab. And I'm very happy to see in today's newspaper that President Biden has ordered a new investigation of the origin of the covert virus within the next 90 days. So that's actually now suggesting that the US government is at least questioning the World Health Organization, which is long overdue. The World Health Organization for sure Has been a corrupted agency from the pharmaceutical industry for some time. And Mary is the president of Children. Health defense. What is your greatest concern with all of this mistrust? Well, I think we're creating a very polarized environment right around masks and around vaccines and around this kind of medical around the tests and around medical coercion, And I fear that the coercion is likely to be T grow greater. And I think you know the polarization is going to be very difficult the stores and institutions and schools Now that they're saying, this is the vaccinated section. This is the unvaccinated section. We're creating a new case system. Based on something that is irrational, right? Vaccines don't equate with health. Necessarily. They don't equate with immunity. People who have had cove it maybe have better immunity than somebody who was vaccinated. But we're creating. Ah, whole new global infrastructure. They're creating a culture of vaccination. And this is very troubling. Not everybody. You know, thinks that this is the right health choice for them, And we're particularly concerned for Children because in the school Little context around the world. It is possible today under the laws that exist to mandate vaccines and basically to make an education Unavailable to Children who don't take these compulsory vaccines. So this is a very, very existentially question. We don't have a complete picture of what these vaccines do. Many would say they're not even really vaccines there injections But we do know that over 4000 reported deaths have occurred in the U. S. Over 157,000 reported. Injuries have occurred, and we know that those air growth undercounts So these air not you know, this is not sugar water. This is not a sugar pill. These are very serious medical interventions with a new tent with new technologies that have never been used on a wide scale before. Currently there. No Vaccines that have been approved to the U. S. For those under 12. I have wondered, you hit on something that I've wondered about which is. Will schools try to go the mandated route once they're available for all ages, and that I think that we we know that historically, that's been the case, Brian, you know, there's there's no marketing costs, and there's basically no liability. So Children are always the targets. This was unusual because these these products came out through emergency use authorization. They had to wait to do the clinical trials on Children. They're currently doing clinical trials on six month old or 11 months old, but the real target of getting everybody to do this is going to be in schools where they can reasonably easily. Tell this given past president Where's the whole adult population at the lot harder? It's a good conversation and appreciate you taking the time to have it with us and more to come. Mary Holland, the president of Children, Health defense. And rest assured, that is something that we will say on top of now. My Q and a of the day is rather protracted because there's a lot that needs to be discussed here. It is about critical race theory that plays off of this critical race theory being taught as anything but a theory. Every day. I feature a listener Questions sent by one these methods. You may email me, Brian, my did I harm media dot com You made parley or tweet me at Brian. But radio and today's note was simply this. Why are you afraid of.

Brian Mary Holland World Health Organization Wuhan Institute National Institutes of Health NIH January 14th Mary 57% Palocci Fauci U. S. I H Centers for Disease control Over 157,000 National Institutes for allerg 70 things Cove today Children. Health
"apache" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"apache" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

"In searched.

Unlocking the Power of Data Lineage in Your Platform

Data Engineering Podcast

02:12 min | 4 months ago

Unlocking the Power of Data Lineage in Your Platform

"Hostess tobias macy into today interviewing julian ladonna about lineage new standard for structuring meta data to enable interoperability across the ecosystem of data management tools. So julian can you start by introducing yourself. Hello i'm jillian. I guess. I've been working in the big data space for the past. Fourteen years studied at yahoo building platform on top of you and in a study contributing to open source project like the and that's how i joined the twitter data platform team. They are steady up at she parkway project and that led to contributing to the launch of the aba chiro project that you're on and morrison t i with the architect for the up a format. We work after that. I studied dedicated. Which i'm this show now and so you've actually been on the show. This is your third time now. So you were on to talk about your work with apache parque. And you're on with doug cutting. Who was the creator of astro. So that was a good conversation. And then you're also on talk about your work with marquez. Which is a natural transition to where you are now with. Data can which building on top of that platform so for folks who listened to the marquez episode. I don't know if you want to. Just give a quick recap about where that project has gone. And maybe what you're building on top of it with data again before we dig into open lineage. So you can from. When you build data platform it quickly becomes evident that she need an equivalent of service oriented architecture retro data pipelines like people consume data they produce data and by default israel egypt visibility. Where they did is coming from awards going and so we need to understand. We consume the data that we produce and how they impacted by the changes were may be doing and we understand where they did is coming from that. We're consuming how it's being maintained in deadwood right so that leads us to start the marcus project at we were so you building the data platform at work. That where's the need for. How do we understand in an organization where they are many teams that consumed produce data. How do they understand how they depend on each other. In our things change. That was a missing piece in the open-source ecosystem

Tobias Macy Julian Ladonna Marquez Jillian Julian Morrison Yahoo Twitter Doug Egypt Israel
"apache" Discussed on The Storyteller

The Storyteller

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"apache" Discussed on The Storyteller

"My friends to the storyteller. Were you'll find first. Nations people from across native north america who are following. Jesus christ without reservation. Today we'll hear more from allen early. As san carlos apache from eastern arizona we pick up for allan left off having his violent nature and the trouble that followed him because of it. Sometimes we fought. We step people one time. I was walking down the road. And i saw men punishing his little boy. I don't know what he did or for what reason but he was hitting him with a stick. So i went over there. I told him to leave his boy alone and he just told me my own business. So i attacked him with my knife and i stabbed him several times into body and then when he turned around and look at me real close. I step him in his right eye. Cut his eye out and this one of some of the things i did and you know because of that. I was in jail for a long time. I was a regular into the jailhouse. And they try to do everything they could to work with me. They took me to counseling. They sent me away but they're always wasted. I could get out one time. I drinking intoning. I went home in the middle of night. Somehow i got home. And i got to fight when my dad my mom would say no. Don't do that guess in trying to stop me from fighting with my dad. She told me that leader. You had a twenty two rifle. And i hit my mother over the hit and she said you turn against me. And you said i'm gonna kill you. You hit me over the head nets lasting. I remember she said but because of it later on Got caught knows. I was in jail for a long time. I was on drugs. I was on alcohol. I couldn't stop. I promised a travel judged a federal judge. If they would go easy on me and allow me have mercy on my case and that would be free. I told him. I will make every effort to go back to school to better myself and not come back into this facility but you know i couldn't keep my words. I was very deep with alcohol. Drugs and activities of the wrong way. I begin to escape from jail. I did some things on the reservation. You teeters stabbing fighting. I get behind bars and escape. Escaped ten times and i go in in the village with my friends. We kick in doors at night where they sell liquor alcohol i would break in. We would break. Sometimes i gross their money. Their whatever. alcohol is available. We take people became afraid of creative. The gang i hit and they wanted us put away. I heard that a lot of people appeared at tribal council meeting and they asked to tribal council to call on federal authorities to come on the reservation to look for me and find me and put me away forever. Don't want allen early on the reservation. He's dangerous do something about it. And so that's what they did. It was ordered the police and the hilo in graham county would come together to look for me and the rest me away. Chase me run on the reservation for over a year. I remember one night. I came home from out of town. I came to the house where my mother lives. I went inside and there was a table insight. And she said sit on. Give you something to eat. Just as i sat down and started to eat. I heard something out site. It sounded like somebody was walking. Somebody kicked something out. There was noise outside. And i jumped to my feet and i look out the window. I lift a curtain. I look outside. And i saw the police were come in. There was a flashlight. We over there outside the gate. And i told my mother police and i put up this tall over the food. I was eating many years before in the house where we were. I've cut a hole in a corner. Where if i was ever trapped in that house i would run through that little hole. Get away from the police. And so i remembered that and i went to that it was still there. I open it outside of that wall of the house. I had three fifty five gallon barrel sitting together tight together against the house and these barrel had a big hole in where you can go outside and sit and in high end there. So when they came to the door and began to knock on the door i went through that little hole. I went into that. Little ken outside and i sat there quietly in. The police came in this search. All over i was told they look under the bed. They look into the etiquette and everywhere and they said he's not here and they went out left. They didn't know they never found me. That night that i was sitting in the can as a young boy. I built a little place. A little House up in the tree. I used to go there and spend the night there. And i was up there one night and the police were looking for me. They came surrounded the house. I was watching from behind him and they went into the house looking for me. They couldn't find me because i was in debt tree. I couldn't sleep sometimes at night. When i was hiding when i was running from the law even during the day i couldn't sit still.

Today eastern arizona ten times allan Jesus christ first twenty two rifle one night three graham county over a year san carlos apache one time fifty five gallon barrel one north america allen years several
"apache" Discussed on The Storyteller

The Storyteller

04:55 min | 5 months ago

"apache" Discussed on The Storyteller

"The reservation sometimes but anyway Being in tucson. I ran away from school. Which is guys. We were under streets at night in tucson taught me. They used to carry a long piece of chain to fight with carry knives. I used to wonder why they carry nights later. Found out that you can defend yourself with an east to show me how to hit a person where to step in. If you get into a fight how do you make your own knife. There will really kill somebody. And i learned these things a lot of things day taught me and so i got into the habit of drinking. I like going out with them and many times. We got pickup in the city. And i end up at tucson county jail and been in an auditor and started to miss school there in to sound so they let me go from there. They told me you go home. Because you're not serious about going to school. So i went back to the reservation coming back on the reservation. I try to share the things i learned about being with a gang fight fighting others on the streets and on the reservation the evil idea of fighting hatred and bitterness against non members of the tribe groove us as we congregate together. We went out at night. We used to think that we're patrolling the reservation. We used to say well. We're trying to protect our pupil in our ways but because of that i got in trouble with the law. Sometimes we fought. We step people at one time. I was walking down the road. And i saw men punishing his little boy. I don't know what it is for. What reason but he was hitting him with a stick. So i went over there. I told him to leave his boy alone and he just told me my own business. So i attacked him with my knife and i stabbed in several times in the body and then when he turned around and look at me real close. I stabbed him in his right eye and cut his eye on this one of the some of the things i do and you know because of that i was in jail for a long time. I was a ridler into at the jailhouse. They try to do everything they could to work with me. It took me to counseling. Sent me away. But they're always wasted. I could get out. Allen may have been able to find ways to get out of jail with that. Couldn't keep him from coming back. you see. His heart was not right with god. And that's not just allen's problem that's the human condition god tells us the heart is deceitful above all things and desperately wicked who can know it. I the lord searched the heart and test the mind to give every man according to his ways according to the fruit of his deeds. God tells us that the wages of sin is death but not just physical death but eternal judgment my friend. We really don't want to give what we deserve. God doesn't want that either. So he sent his son. Jesus christ to be the acceptable sacrifice. Our sin whoever puts their trust in him will be forgiven and have life that lasts forever. If you would like to know more please visit our website without reservation dot com and click on the tab new life. You can also write to us at the storyteller. Po box one thousand one. The msci minnesota five six six one nine. We're also on facebook at without reservation. If you want to take the storyteller with you be sure to download our app. Thanks for listening and remember. The greatest story took place at the cross for the wages of sin is death but the gift of god is eternal life through. Jesus christ our lord. There's more to alan story so be sure to join us again. Next time as we listen to the storyteller..

Allen allen facebook tucson one thousand Jesus christ minnesota five msci one time six one com nine dot
Biden Administration Resumes White House Council on Native American Affairs

Native America Calling

01:39 min | 5 months ago

Biden Administration Resumes White House Council on Native American Affairs

"The biden administration announced thursday. It will restore the white house counsel on native american affairs. The mountain west news bureau savannah mar has more at a meeting with tribal leaders. Earlier this month secretary of the interior dub holland promised a new era of nation to nation relations between the federal government and tribes to do that right. We must engage tribal nations with an all of agency approach. The revival of the white house counsel on native american is a step in that direction. It will bring together leaders from across the federal government to coordinate services policies related to tribes with input from tribal leaders themselves. Gabe aguilera is president of the mescalero. Apache tribe. He calls this. The latest of many early indicators that the biden administration takes its trust responsibility to tribes seriously. Our voice is going to be respected. And we're going to have input on issues that's gonna help country or improve native country or could hurt any country council was first launched under former president obama but went dark for most of the trump years. Gale small is with the university of montana's american indian government policy institute and a former northern cheyenne councilwoman. She says that hampered pandemic response in indian country at critically important that discounts along native american affairs really steps up their efforts to assist us in further responding to the pandemic but also rebuilding. You know economic recovery house. Joe kerr on indian reservation to council will convene next friday with secretary holland serving as chair for national native news. I'm savannah

Biden Administration White House Gabe Aguilera Federal Government Holland Gale Small American Indian Government Pol University Of Montana Cheyenne Barack Obama Joe Kerr Secretary Holland Savannah
Apache Stronghold files appeal as Oak Flat land swap scheduled to take place in March

Native America Calling

03:49 min | 7 months ago

Apache Stronghold files appeal as Oak Flat land swap scheduled to take place in March

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez a prosecutor in northern california's going after five indigenous activists who toppled the statue of sarah last year in protest of the catholic mission systems. Founder they all face. Felony charges but community groups are calling for the charges to be dropped christina honest reports. They're called the indigenous peoples day five. The group of indigenous women and two spirit activists are charged with felony vandalism toppling. A statue of unique perot sarah on indigenous peoples day. Twenty twenty right out front of the mission san rafael in marin county california carina gold is leader of the confederated villages of luzon aloni one of the tribes and slaved into the mission system. Unique perot sarah founded. She's calling for the charges to be dropped. Our tribal people have been the objects of genocide here in california by the catholic church since the inception of california the hippo sarah. The statue that was taken down in october is a A symbol to california native people and to many other indigenous people about the genocide that happened on our lands when the catholic church. I came here despite the catholic churches history of genocide against native americans. Some of its members demanded. Marin county's district attorney at a hate crimes charge against the activists but more than fifty community groups and seventy five thousand petition signatories are demanding. The charges be dropped. Noting the nationwide reckoning with symbols of oppression. I'm christina honest reporting from san rafael california for national native news. A nonprofit advocating for the protection of oak flat. A sacred site in arizona is appealing a federal judges decision to not temporarily blocked the project that will turn the land into a copper mine and gibson from arizona. Public media has more than nonprofit apache stronghold is one of a few groups that sued to stop a congressionally mandated. Land swap of us forest service land which includes oak flat to resolution copper. A subsidiary of international copper company's attorney. Luca goodrich is representing apache stronghold in the appeal. He says the federal government plans to transfer the land on march. Eleventh of the government has actually destroying a centuries-old sacred site and making their religious practices. They're impossible and so. This is actually really an easy case. When it comes to finding a substantial burden on religious exercise their challenging the judge's order that said the land swap wouldn't be a substantial burden on the apache people's religious practice among other things. Goodrich says he expects the courts rule before the march deadline for national native news. I'm emma gibson. The national congress of american indians winter session kicks off this week. Which is being held virtually. Ncaa president fon sharp delivers the state of indian nations address. Monday tribal leaders throughout the week. We'll interact with federal officials white house representatives and us lawmakers tribal leaders are laying out priorities for the air and developing plans to work with the biden administration and congress cove in nineteen and the confirmation hearing for pollen for interior secretary are among top agenda items the likud ray-ban defoe gibb way in wisconsin is holding mass covid nineteen vaccination events planned for the next seven wins days the tribes clinic vaccinated more than two hundred community members at its first event last week. The vaccines are open to eligible tribal members. Eighteen years old andover. I'm antonio

California Antonio Gonzalez Perot Sarah San Rafael Christina Sarah Catholic Church Northern California Luzon Marin County International Copper Company Luca Goodrich Arizona Emma Gibson Gibson Fon Sharp National Congress Of American Federal Government Goodrich
Apaches object to Forest Service review of huge copper mine

Gaydos and Chad

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Apaches object to Forest Service review of huge copper mine

"U. S. Forest Service released an environmental impact statement statement today today that that paves paves the the way way for for the the creation creation of of one one of of the the largest largest copper copper mines mines in in the the U. U. S S resolution. resolution. Copper Copper plans plans to to mind mind land land east east of of Phoenix Phoenix that some Apaches consider sacred and have been working for years to protect environmentalist accused the service of trying to push it through before President Trump leaves office. Forest Service now has 60 days to transfer land known as oak flat to the international mining company. Rio Tinto.

Forest Service Copper Copper Phoenix U. President Trump Rio Tinto
Indigenous people fight oil development

Native America Calling

03:37 min | 10 months ago

Indigenous people fight oil development

"This is national native news on tonio. Gonzales which people are seeking to stop development in the coastal plain of the arctic national wildlife refuge in alaska a sacred place foundation of their culture and way of life though seeking to protect the area are concerned about caribou other wildlife and the environment bernadette dementia with which is steering committee. This week in a statement said they'll never stop fighting equal you know. We don't allow anybody to tell us how to live to do this week. In federal court tribal plaintiffs represented by the native american rights fund sought a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to prohibit the trump administration from approving seismic exploration and issuing leases in the coastal plain proposed to begin in january supporters of the sale including politicians seek jobs revenue and energy independence in minnesota indigenous and environmental groups are continuing to demonstrate near the mississippi river in aken county opposing construction of the end bridge line. Three pipeline this week. Nearly two dozen people were arrested. The star tribune reports indigenous and environmental groups have been giving daily updates on social media showing people standing in the way of construction including tree-sitters saying they're protecting the water and the environment they're calling on the state's governor and president elect joe biden to stop line three. The company says replacement of the oil pipeline is in dire need supporters. seek jobs and economic boost. Regulators approve the final permit on december first indigenous and environmental groups and some minnesota tribes are seeking court action as construction is expected to ramp up tribes across the country are continuing to receive cova. Nineteen vaccines this week. Five red lake tribal council members of minnesota volunteered to be the first to get the vaccine on wednesday red lake hospital. Healthcare workers will begin to receive vaccines along with staff and elders at the nursing home. Tribal leaders are working with the hospital. On vaccine plans for tribal citizens as they become available other tribal leaders are also volunteering to be among the first in their communities to receive a covid nineteen vaccine when dina league would chair of the white mountain apache tribe in arizona was vaccinated this week on wednesday. She said she feels fine. Other than a sore arm academic pueblo in new mexico began covid nineteen vaccine shots for healthcare workers. Wednesday the mescalero apache tribe in new mexico. Receive vaccines in the afternoon to vaccinate doctors nurses and other hospital staff president gave aguilar encouraged the community in a video message urging people to stay vigilant in taking precautions as they anticipate to get vaccines for the community in early. Twenty twenty one of the community. We came together. you know. we're not. We're not done yet. But i'm very proud because our numbers show for it. We're we're all doing our part to stay home. Our numbers dropping. You know for a for a few days in october numbers were like twenty a day. I think for this out to summit two a day maybe five you know. I'll be more thankful when he home. Zero tribal health programs. Urban indian organizations are getting the vaccine through the indian health service or states more than three hundred programs are on the ihs cove nineteen distribution list according to the indian health service tribes in alaska are working with the state. The tannen not chiefs conference in fairbanks alerted the community wednesday. The pfizer vaccine arrived and was being put in a freezer to store until ready for distribution.

Bernadette Dementia American Rights Fund Aken County The Star Tribune Minnesota Tonio President Elect Joe Biden Arctic National Wildlife Refug Red Lake Tribal Council Gonzales Red Lake Hospital Dina League Alaska Mississippi River Cova New Mexico White Mountain Aguilar Arizona Fairbanks
Three Arizona counties reenter substantial spread status for COVID-19

Mike Broomhead

00:44 sec | 10 months ago

Three Arizona counties reenter substantial spread status for COVID-19

"Coronavirus in patients are expected to exceed our July numbers Any day. Now this comes is 4928 new coronavirus cases were reported this morning and 73 new depths. Just over 18,300 diagnostic tests were processed overnight. Big movements in the Corona virus Reopening benchmarks released today. Re Arizona counties, Apache Navajo and you have a pie have moved from moderate to substantial spread and five more counties or just a week away from also moving to substantial. That means virtual learning models are recommended for schools and businesses could see more restrictions over last week, the Health Department said it would work with businesses to determine the best course of action. Six of Arizona's other counties are in the red in two of the three benchmark categories.

Apache Navajo Arizona Health Department
City of Houston launches virtual Native American museum

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:48 sec | 10 months ago

City of Houston launches virtual Native American museum

"Houston has launched. Its first virtual native american museum. Catherine liu says it comes after city. Council's recent vote for an indigenous peoples day. According to the two thousand ten consensus the houston region is home to about sixty eight thousand native americans from all tribal nations now. The city has a platform to celebrate and educate the public about indigenous histories. The virtual southern plains museum and cultural center in houston was launched with a ten thousand dollar grant from the mayor's office for cultural affairs. Visitors can learn about american nation's through renderings of art artifacts and videos. The museum is hosted on the website. Apache museum dot. Org museum organizers hoped the virtual space will eventually lead to a physical venue for indigenous collections. And catherine lou in houston.

Catherine Liu Houston American Museum Southern Plains Museum Office For Cultural Affairs Apache Museum Catherine Lou
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 1 year ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher
Arizona governor signs proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Arizona governor signs proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzales Arizona Governor Doug ducey announced Tuesday. He signed a proclamation to recognize October Twelfth Twenty Twenty as indigenous Peoples Day on the Federal Columbus Holiday Emma Gibson. With Arizona public media has more the proclamation came after state Senator James Sita Pash Loci, and a youth led advocacy group Indigenous Peoples Initiative called for the change. Dylan Baca the group's president who is White Mountain Apache and Navajo says indigenous. Peoples Day acknowledges accurate account of Christopher Columbus's violent legacy. This holiday is significant for me because it works to try to eliminate the stereotypes in stigmatisms associated with indigenous peoples and Tribes Paschall K. called on Governor Ducey in. June. During President Donald. Trump's visit to Phoenix to establish the state holiday using his executive powers. She now says she will introduce a bill to permanently changed the holiday in the twenty twenty one legislative session. For National Native News I'm Gibson the Navajo nation is returning to fifty seven weekend lockdowns. Stay at home orders due to a rise in positive covid nineteen cases on and near the reservation. Tuesday's announcement comes a day after top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci praised the tribe for lowering numbers crediting the tribe strict covid nineteen measures which were enforced for. Months some of the orders including the fifty seven hour curfew were eased. But during virtual town Tuesday Navajo nation. President Jonathan Nez had a stern message for residents to stay vigilant Nez, a cluster of forty or more positive cases traced back to travel and spreading the virus during social gatherings which are restricted on Navajo land, and so we're going to have to. Slow everything down we're GONNA have to stay at home orders because we don't know how far. This has gone out in. Contact, with other people, the new cases were reported in Arizona and new. Mexico the tribes also asking residents to avoid areas in Utah, considered hot spots for the virus. NATO advocates encouraged young people to engage in the voting process on national voter registration day. Barb Hartselle works with the LAS, Vegas Indian Center on the native vote she talked about investing in native youth by using traditional teachings and connecting them with issues native youth face today, really taking like arc additional routes in how we carry ourselves in is important to us and being able to invest in our youth in meeting them where they're at and letting really understand though it seems so big and so massive or maybe. It doesn't seem important at all. It really does determine a lot of things like it really determined just how far come from grandmothers and mothers generations to wear. We'll go with their next generation. Hartselle took part in a national congress of American Indians virtual gathering, Tuesday along with tribal leaders and native women in office. The organizations nonpartisan vote campaign focuses on education registration getting out the native vote election protection and data collection according to NCAA I an estimated one point, two, million, American, Indian, and Alaskan native people are unregistered. Five Indian country bills were passed by Congress Tuesday and sent to the president to be signed into law the bill's address missing and murdered indigenous women, self-governance business, and economic development, and legislation to nullify a supplemental treaty for Tribes on the warm springs reservation. There are seven bills currently pending in the house which ranged from education to water rights and veterans. Issues. I'm Antonio

Arizona Indigenous Peoples Initiative Antonio Gonzales Christopher Columbus Twenty Twenty Barb Hartselle President Trump Congress Donald Trump Senator James Sita Pash Loci President Jonathan Nez Federal Columbus Holiday Doug Ducey President Donald Emma Gibson Dr Anthony Fauci Dylan Baca Ncaa Phoenix
Mescalero Apache officials praise COVID-19 response, urge residents to stay vigilant

Native America Calling

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Mescalero Apache officials praise COVID-19 response, urge residents to stay vigilant

"The National Native News Antonio Gonzales officials of the Mescalero Apache tribe in new. Mexico are asking tribal citizens to remain vigilant and taking Cova nineteen precautions as more state restrictions begin to left Mescalero Apache President Gabe Aguilar in a video message to residents on the reservation says the tribe and its citizens have done well following tribal health and safety measures tribe has learned how To react when we receive a new case, you know when this first started to hear people test positive one, two or three. We kind of got a little frantic. We kinda got low excited know how are we GONNA do? How are we going that we? Really? Didn't know how to to take care of individuals that are positive. But now. Here we got one case. We just know what we gotta do. We know our job we move forward we isolate individuals. And then we we actually get them help for food water and We get them all checked in contact tracing Aguilar says, the tribe has not had many new cases in recent weeks adding it's not time to let the guard down in July the tribe close the reservation and some businesses after positive Cova nineteen cases nearly doubled a matter of days since testing began in March the lockdown lasted fourteen days and was lifted a few hours early after tribal officials deemed the response successful as a Monday officials say there are four active positive cove in nineteen cases in quarantine, and there have been a total of sixty seven positive cases on the reservation. And, indigenous lead twelve hour virtual voter registration drive was held over the weekend a coalition of Twenty six native groups organized the radicalized the vote event which included a number of speakers, dance and drum groups, individual artists, community leaders, and culture bearers from across the country elder and native advocate. Eighth Spotted Eagle talked about using voting powers to enhance tribal communities protect native ways of live spotted Eagle talked about her run for office in South Dakota which she did not win but says was still impactful with the registration of sixteen hundred native people. We actually had influence in the county vote. I could have one but winning wasn't important. We won by representation by showing up have executive agency and actually working together because on the night of the vote, the people were calling and they were saying, we have not seen at many Indian cars pulling up to the voting place that made me feel like we did win we did win after all. So we're making our story stronger. We have had so many have nots but now is the day that would this self agency where moving to get away with the colonial concept is to embrace and replace. So. If you do not show up to vote, you have been erased. And another vote is going to replace you the twelve hour lineup promoted getting out the native vote in twenty twenty and also to increase political engagement of native people for years to come. Cove nineteen has added Challenges for native communities including halting in-person outreach efforts. The radicalized the native vote online campaign includes a portal where users can their voter information and network with other indigenous people this election year. The Rapid City Journal reports and impeachment hearing will take place on the Pine Ridge reservation in. South Dakota for lawless Sioux Tribal President Julian bear runner over allegations. He had inappropriate contact with a seventeen year old bear renner not comment to the newspaper. The hearing is set for September fourteenth. The council reportedly voted in August to suspend the president and hold an impeachment hearing. I'm Antonio

Mexico Gabe Aguilar Eagle President Trump Antonio Gonzales Cova South Dakota Rapid City Journal Renner Executive Pine Ridge
Joseph Lubin on how JPMorgan's Quorum will fit in at ConsenSys

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Joseph Lubin on how JPMorgan's Quorum will fit in at ConsenSys

"Today's guest is Joe Lubin founder of consensus and Co founder of Cerium? Locum? Joe. Are you. Thanks for having me on? Consensus made a big acquisition this week and also got some investment congratulations. Tell us your big news. So. Consensus. Has Been Working with P. Morgan for quite a long time more recently. To discuss how we might work together more intimately and change the nature of the farm project of corn is. Essentially, blockchain infrastructure platform the J. P. Morgan created based on be a theory, go clients, and. the use it. For their application needs. So they build a bunch of applications blocking applications on quorum awhile ago they decided that it may be didn't make sense for them to be a blockchain protocol company consensus. has now acquired that project. We are essentially the stewards of that open source project the. Merging it in terms of technical roadmap with their own enterprise at Theorem. Which are based on Hyper Ledger Basou as so we are providing support for quorum We are building out the roadmap and and quorum now constitutes consensuses enterprise offering a whether. The client chooses hyperloop Basou as the foundational element or Gif of foundational element were excited to offer A. The first time, really a fully comprehensive enterprise blocked blockchain solution including developer tools, security audit tools. Customer, success, and support sophisticated cloud configurations which are coming and a bunch of applications that the that sit on the foreign. Platform. JP. Morgan has made a significant strategic investment and and JP Morgan. A sizable client of consensus and for listeners who aren't aware hyper leisure-based Su is an enterprise three client that consensus built. So if death is kind of like a software version for the public chain than. Hyper Electric Zoo is is. Similar but for enterprise software. Just, a little bit of detail without getting too much into the weeds so Both these enterprise theorem solutions have two layers. Layer One is hyper ledger basis, which is a Java a theorem client which connects to may not a theorem. WHAT'S A full-fledged? A client ended also has enterprise at their amalgamations and on the formerly JP Morgan side death is a slight modification of the go their client So it doesn't it's not currently able to connect to may not in that's been important to us to enable hybrid. To be, created so private permissions. Systems in with roughly the same client the also connecting into not the layer to solution for both of those platforms which are now all called warm is called Orion that sits on top of hyper hyper. Ledger. baisu provides confidentiality of transactions to a subset of actors and to Sarah The J. P. Morgan built does the exact same thing? On JP Morgan side. So the ultimate configuration of the quorum client will see to Sarah which is a Java based Apache to licensed a confidentiality solution It'll sit on top of hydroelectric, which is also Java based in Apache too. So maximum permissibility in terms of licensing. So no no real concerns. There were a small number of institutions that went that comfortable with the GPO licensing of the death gone. and. So getting into this licensing is getting a bit into the weeds, but as far as I understand patchy to enables private companies to make contributions to these open source. Along the. And keep them for themselves without having to contribute them back when she was. Sort of like being able to keep their secret sauce and as you mentioned J. P. Morgan will be a customer of consensus is going forward. So what will or what are they using quorum for? The publicly announced applications are there interbank information network which has north of four hundred financial institutions around the world and it is it's essentially messing layer similar to what swift does JP Morgan I believe has around four thousand of financial institutions in their correspondent banking network. So one could imagine that all of those organizations and perhaps more will eventually end up on I. SO consensus. Supporting. That network and consensus is also supporting. J. PM coin, which is a a stable coin solution so that that's a separate network The JP Morgan is built on one. JP Morgan. Is If you do a little research they're hiring very aggressively in blockchain of they've made it very clear very public that they're doubling down on blockchain and enterprise theorem. So It is very exciting for us to be a significant part of that and it's exciting to see JP Morgan. Build up properly a whole bunch more applications on A. And for the acquisition of Ram, are you only? The Corum Open source code base or while the Corum team from JP Morgan also be joining consensus. To, the core team is heavily engaged with us for at least a year. To facilitate. Transition and two were working together on on a shared roadmap that we've defined and will continue to the fine together I can't say much more of a detailed nature about that right now but we are working intimately with those people.

Sarah The J. P. Morgan Jp Morgan Hyper Electric Zoo Joe Lubin Hyperloop Basou Cerium Founder Co Founder RAM Apache Developer
Indigenous Artist to Artist,  Adapting To Pandemic & Daring to Dream

All My Relations Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Indigenous Artist to Artist, Adapting To Pandemic & Daring to Dream

"Pam is a talented Laguna Pueblo and Apache Metal Smith who likes to push boundaries and expand the definition of what is considered native art. He came to fine art jewelry through the world of body piercing and learning to make his own jewelry there, and he now uses materials like titanium and complex. Processes to produce creative modern jewellery that reflects his cultural roots right now, he's working on these incredible titanium feather earrings that are colored brightly using some fancy submission process or something but they look like something a futuristic native warrior woman would wear and I absolutely love them. So he starts by telling us how Cova has deeply impacted the Indian art community. Everything started happening in the march timeframe right. So we had the heard show that those of us that were able to to participate in that we had that, but you could sense something was coming right I mean the attendance wasn't as high. And Man shortly after that is when the ish just hit the fan right like states are down like for for those of us here into Pablo's like the Pueblos shutdown really early I mean fast. Yeah. Just like straight up no visitors and then and then you really started hearing The reaction by organizations, riots swire. Then put out the notice that like we're going to postpone Indian market. There are number of other shows that I do outside of the native art market. Those shows are being canceled. A potentially had a museum opening like a Solo Exhibition slated for this year from the heard museum that gets postponed. So like all this obvious postponement like really happen rapidly right at the very beginning which I will say I'm very grateful that happened. Then because you can now plan right we're no longer we're not reacting to what's happening and I think that's what's really made. A transition in a sense a little more thoughtful and a little more purposeful because essentially I think all of us in the native art field we were I would argue to say we were one hundred percent or one hundred, very high percentage, right like eighty to ninety percent reliant on shows for revenue generation, and as you go into March and April and realize your entire year. Is Gone like there's zero opportunity i. think everybody really just dug deep and really started to think okay. How am I going to get through this? You know especially for those of us who are fulltime artists I, mean I've been full time for over twenty years. It's It's. So. So I think I think with any with any culture. That's. been resilient for centuries right. You're native population is really taken taking the bull by the horns in developing either innovative ways to to change their revenue dynamic oranges using what they already how which is. I think the case for most of us through social media these days right I mean being able to push out to get the word out to say, Hey, look, this is what I have available and I think more importantly there has been a lot of. Empathy in the sense that people within within the native art community and I think even a much broader sense those that collect art or are fans of makers that realize it's like if something is coming out right now the only way to acquire it as online. Right, there's no shows. So so I think you're seeing the dynamic by dynamic change a little bit more.

PAM Laguna Pueblo Apache Metal Smith Cova Pablo
The Ancient Ones

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:18 min | 1 year ago

The Ancient Ones

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries I'm your host kit chrome. Today we're GONNA take a look at a mystery at mystery at least as deep as Amelia earhart. What happened to the honesty Indians? The honest are originally from Siberia during the Ice Age what became native Americans crossed over a land bridge it appeared because of the low sea level. The Ana Sasi tribe eventually settled in what is now era sonal well, maybe not how they were a native American culture flourishing in southern Colorado and Utah and northern New Mexico and. From about one hundred ad whose descendants are considered to include the present day puddle people I dug a little deeper and discovered that the name on a Sasi means ancient wants doesn't make sense. The Apache were given that name Apache by their enemy if it's true that the. Came over from Siberia or existed in what is now American southwest around one hundred ad as some speculate than it is doubtful that they would have called themselves the ancient ones but what's in a name and what happened to them? This was not some small tribe in the eighteen eighties when many of their dwellings were found on the face of Mason, they were dubbed cliff-dwellers. Many of the dwellings were over six hundred feet up and built into sheer cliff faces. Some were a dozen stories high and consisted of over eight hundred rooms. There were grain rooms rooms for dining rooms for sleeping today's and estimated that the on Sasi numbered about thirty thousand, one theory dates, their disappearance between six hundred and thirteen hundred ad again, what happened to them perhaps like the Mayans they migrated were simulated the Zuni, the Hopi Indians? Oh, today believed that theory one Hopi elder explained about a thousand years ago. The elderly reportedly said, the Pueblo was visited by savage strangers from the north. The villagers treated the interlopers kindly but soon, the newcomers devastate their farms and that is why they began to build their homes high up in the cliffs. Okay. That explains why they lived in cliff dwellings still what happened to them? Where did they go contemporary scientists think that life was pretty good for the ancient ones why then did they end up abandoning their magnificent agriculture and permanent homes to migrate hundreds of miles and seemingly lose their cultural identities and Hopi Land Suny. And the Pueblos the upper real `grande, oral histories of the Hopi Zuni Pueblo people as well as scientific findings suggest that the exodus from places like Jaakko and Mesa Verde may have been. Family by family or clan by clan and may have occurred over a hundred years. Scientists suggest that things like poor sanitation should pass. An environmental degradation may have caused on Sasi to move think for a minute of a cliff face village six, hundred feet off of valley floor with eight hundred rooms where the residents for maybe five hundred people where did the sanitation factor play out? It would have been an awful long descent to use a local capital unlike the hokum people to the south on a saas he did not build huge irradiation canals on a Sasi diversion and collection of national precipitation was not irrigation in the usual sense in general their dry land farming. On the natural blessings of rain and runoff melting snow often they helped mother nature by building check dams, terracing hillsides. So locating fields near the mouth of royals springs one of the largest of their water conservation efforts was a five hundred thousand gallon reservoir at Mesa Verde after poring over dozens of documents and stacks of books I realized that no one has come up with an answer of what happened to the thirty thousand plus on a saucy unlike a lot of ancient civilizations left scrolls and etchings on the walls on saucy left nothing. So where did they information? We have on these cliff waller's come from to Colorado. Cowboys are said to discover the magnificent cliff towel structure at Mesa Verde. On a bitterly cold day in December eighteen, eighty eight, the male members of the ranching family soon became amateur archaeologists, digging gathering selling pottery weapons, tools, and other artifacts mostly to museums even without formal training, they were able to identify major distinctions in the pottery they found and conclude that different sites were occupied during different time periods in the late twentieth century the melting of more sophisticated scientific techniques and contemporary native American Indian knowledge has dramatically increased. Our understanding these people for some time many scientists have gone about their business privately evaluating physical evidence and police seen theories about the long gone a Sasi scientific speculation about the mysterious disappearance of the builders of the cliff dwellings continued to the current era.

Mesa Verde Ana Sasi Siberia Sasi Colorado Hopi Zuni Pueblo Hopi Land Suny Cliff Waller Amelia Earhart Cowboys Mason New Mexico Jaakko Utah
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 1 year ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Demonstration celebrates statue of Spanish colonizer taken down

Native America Calling

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Demonstration celebrates statue of Spanish colonizer taken down

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez. A statue of Spanish colonizer juande Altay was removed in northern New Mexico hours before a planned protest, but that didn't stop members of grassroots, native groups and their allies from demonstrating off state road, sixty eight north of the city of Espanola surrounding huddle immunity. Stare at. The Red Nation three sisters collective, demonstrated outside the monuments wall, calling for its permanent removal as county officials decide the statues. Fake speakers used a megaphone to talk about the monument, sitting on traditional Pueblo homelands and recounted the atrocities. The conquistador committed against Pueblo people the. Ball and everyday bubble resistance is the reason public people are still here because resistance is traditional. The group then cross gates onto the grounds. Where the statue stood as deputies watched nearby, demonstrators climbed on the Monument Mount, saying a handwriting song and Red Paint was hand printed on the plaque, own yacht as name. Jennifer Marley has long been involved with the red nation, not a protest. It's a it's A. It's a celebration and also a chance to inform people. About this history entered mind people that the struggle is not over that this is of many victories that we will continue to have and that the work continues, and we must go on. The Red Nation has advocated for the removal of names and symbols of Spanish conquistadors around new. Mexico. The group was instrumental in the University of New Mexico Seal Change, which depicted conquistador frontiers, men. They also led the way in ending pageantry, depicting the re entry of Kista door NC on affay. Monday's event drew some opposition. Shots could be heard from cars, a few voices expressing differing views from the crowd and oncein across the street read all lives matter a slogan which has been associated with criticism of the black lives matter movement, meanwhile in Albuquerque shooting occurred at a demonstration Monday night, as people called for the removal of a statue police are investigating and reported early Tuesday morning. One person was in critical condition. More demonstrations are being planned including one in Santa, fe. The White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona is increasing safety measures after a rise in positive covid nineteen cases, Christine Trudeau reports the White Mountain Apache tribe reached one, thousand, two, hundred and fifty nine reported positive covid, nineteen cases, which according to travel chairwoman Wendy newly. GATEWOOD is likely due to an increase in testing and contact tracing the tribe is on stay at home orders with an eight pm to five am curfew and has closed non-tribal citizens and tribal members, not living on the reservation. Recently, the council passed a measure that anyone found in violation of safety. Restrictions would be ineligible for a one thousand two hundred dollar emergency relief payment from the tribe safety restriction measures are crucial to. To protect elders says chairwoman, league, Gatewood, as they are the most vulnerable to the virus. We will never in our lifetime care of an actual. Distri of I lived in a wiki up. I had to ride a horse to town. Because we had no car, we traveled in a wagon. We hiked on foot. Those types of stories. We're not going to hear that anymore. And the language they know the tradition culture heritage, the importance of who we are the tribal us one of their hotels as a quarantine, isolation site and plan to purchase additional modular units for quarantine housing. They are in need of item donations like facemasks, hand, sanitizer and cleaning supplies for quarantined homes. I'm Christine Trudeau. I'm Antonio

Red Nation White Mountain Apache Tribe Christine Trudeau Antonio Gonzalez Gatewood New Mexico Juande Altay Mexico Espanola Monument Mount Pueblo University Of New Mexico Jennifer Marley Albuquerque Santa Arizona Wendy
"apache" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"apache" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"The answer surprisingly is no. We're actually not surprisingly at all if you take a moment to think about it The problem is if you ask this question to me. I don't know how to turn on an Apache helicopter like I don't know of a button with a key. Fob that you keep with you like I have in my car. I assume there's some sort of pre check sequence Apache helicopters I'm betting or not. Actually that easy to turn on and or fly so if you have an Apache helicopter an infinite ammunition and infinite fuel. You still need a pilot. I'm pretty sure Apache helicopters have a two man crew on the flight so I think they have a pilot and gunner and. I'm pretty sure they have a maintenance crew. So just the helicopter by itself even though you have magical infinite ammunition in magical infant fuel. You don't have anyone to utilize it. The most important part of the Apache helicopter is probably the pilot and the crew. What would make more sense would be to repurpose the infinite ammunition and you could sell it to other people and then repurpose the fuel. Maybe even in use that fuel to create a new society and in that New Society you could become the dominant force probably economically in the world. Because you have infinite ammunition I've do is wait for technology to get to the point where you actually could use that infinite ammunition and honestly you could do it peacefully by being the person in control of the infinite amount of fuel the secondary thing. Let's say you do have the pilot so you've asked me and I just happened to be an Apache pilot and I have a twin who could also be the governor who has the exact same skill. Set His me. One Medieval army wouldn't be that hard to be so. Could you beat a medieval army with an Apache helicopter infinite AMMO and fuel? No I could not and probably neither could you unless there is significant number of Apache helicopter pilots. Who Listen to this podcast core question? How should an employer show their employees that they care and in brackets besides higher pay? So if I'm gonNA rewrite this question what's a cheaper way to retain staff the problem here is that this business in business people On the business side management side. They always WANNA make emotions part of it. Part of their business transactions but they want that to go one way. They want you to feel loyalty to the company. The actually don't want the company to feel any sort of obligation of loyalty to the employees. So they need to cut you. They should be able to cut you casino. It's just business but you as a worker there. You should care about the company. You should be loyal to company. So this is a very classic. Catch twenty two management issue because if this is just business then the only way to show that you care is more money because that's the only way you're really going to improve your employees lives. So let's say you come up with free drinks in the staffroom. It is cheaper than higher pay but that as an employee of Your Company. That doesn't actually improve my life at all. Yes might get addicted to caffeine of some sort. I might start getting diabetes later in life because I've had all these free drinks while I'm at work but that actually doesn't improve my life and it doesn't really show you cared shows that you're trying to impress upon me the idea that you care but if you really cared you would pay me more money. Give me the soda money which I could then use to improve my life now. The concern here is it goes far enough. I improve my life in some way I get more education. I learn more skills now. Maybe may become so valuable that. I'm more valuable to another company. Now you have to pay me even more money to get me to stay. The thing that employees need to remember is that companies do not actually care about you. It is just business. You should treat it the same way so I when I go to work it's not like I'm Anti Business Anti Corporations. I think they serve their purpose than I served my purpose for them. As a cog in the wheel but the day my company stops paying me is the same day I stopped showing up. I don't have any sort of loyalty to the company that goes beyond that you hear about big corporations and they have free food and they have free naps and you can come in and you can leave when you want and have all these perks but every one of those perks designed to get you to stay at the office longer. They're not gonNA pay you more. Oh we get free foods. You don't have to go out for food so you can stay in the office longer. Oh you can take a nap during the day so you can stay later at night. That's not for your benefit that is holy for the benefit of the company and like even things like free drinks that's to make you feel hopefully some sort of emotional obligation to the company. Well they've given me this free stuff so I should work harder but that is at the end of the day irrelevant. You do your job. You should be doing your job. The best you can. And that's actually where. The employees often fails employees often want to coast by doing the absolute minimum and then feel like they should get treated really really well but a lot of employees who demand raises. They really don't deserve the raises but then the company often doesn't give raises to the people who do so here. We start going in sort of a circle. How should an employer show their employees that they care you should pay them a fair wage I and if they accelerate their jobs you pay the more money because this business and at the end of the day? This is all about money. The reason you pay them is for their performance. So if you care about the performance you should pay them equitably for that effort so I got a message about double standards. I've made a couple jokes about having a son and a daughter and the double standards that I inherently immediately is the way I treat my son in the way I treat my daughter overall is quite equitable but I feel more protective my daughter when people say that's a double standard on fair. And you shouldn't do that but honestly the joke answer is that I would put my daughter in a cage and the first boy you comes around the house. I'm just going to murder him straight up and then my son can go out and do it every once and he can stay out all night and everything like that. That is a joke but the base of the joke. There is a kernel of truth. I am certainly more protective of my daughter than I am of my son. I'm thinking that's probably going to continue on into life and people would say you know treating them differently is wrong and I actually disagree and the reason I disagrees because society as a whole treats boys and girls differently and my job is apparent is to prepare and protect them from the real world. It has nothing to do with how I would like society to be. It has nothing to do with how I think people should behave what I have to do. Hope for the best and then prepare them for the worst so I think in the case of women in young girls especially society as a whole is very manipulative and my daughter needs to be prepared for that and his best I can. I need to protect her from that. Now I hope that in the future of course the world changes improves and everything gets better. Everything's wonderful and everyone's treated equally and fairly and there's no more manipulation in the world but realistically speaking that is going to happen so I need to prepare my kids so until society as a whole starts treating men and women completely equitably double standards are a necessity and they have to be in place because you need to prepare your kids differently for the different challenges. They're going to face being different people. Here's a very interesting question. I was sent to me by. Somebody listened to the PODCAST. They didn't want their name connected to this question. Which already makes you a bit suspicious. But whatever I'm quite happy to use your name or not new username or whatever needs to be done. The question is how to Vampires get erections a secondary question. How can they produce babies vampires. Let's do the first part I then. Fires have been sexualize. D- throughout all the novels and stories that I read them into vampires are sexy It has to do with the neck biting. I'm sure more than anything else. And they drink your blood. And that's very intimate. There quite often shown as being hypnotic they have sort of mental powers. They can hypnotize people. So that's sort of how you feel when you first fall in love with someone and often times when they show them sucking blood they show. It is almost being a pleasurable experience for the victim. This would that imply that there is a sexual element. There's actually a lot of sexual sexualization in the whole Vampire mythos but that would imply that the male vampire gets direction. And how does he do it? Because he's dead? Vampires are on dead There are cold and our hearts are not beating so if their hearts beating there is no blood flow if there is no blood flow than there is no erection for the male vampire which means he is de facto unable to actually have any sort of intercourse since vampires are magical beings the fact that they're moving around it all shows that there's something else going on because the fact that they're moving around without blood flow or a heartbeat means that their muscles are activated in the different way. Maybe they are consciously forcing blood into those spaces with some magical ability. They could do the same for their member by it to move the same way. They're forcing all their other muscles to move. So I'm guessing at this point. We're just talking about magic. So since magic makes their muscles move could make pretty much anything on their body move. So that's how they created the question for me then is do they actually feel sensation through their skin? do they receive sexual pleasure in the same way as humans because they seem to take a great deal of pleasure in the actual consumption of blood that seems to give them actual pleasure.

New Society Apache caffeine murder
"apache" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"apache" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Know that's not a cent on Apache shop to take who's going to get paid yeah put them out of work maybe we'll get some better solutions are good and bad we didn't meet again and and the and the politics it's easy for lend to sit there and standpoints like everybody's got to be out of work here I can say everyone's going to be at work thanks Paul cliche Hey Michael real quickly we mentioned that the wearing your answer whatever that if you'll use it you gotta do it if you got to do it that's why this rule around here all right here's I mean here is what it is some judge said if you owe it to all the lawyers they're doing virtual self the court room you have to wear pants when you go on soon well Natalie told us that from the day one we wear pants a judge in Broward county name Natalie Vacca and Joe just did a story about people needing to wear pants when they go get the mail yeah people and they'll put some place they're going out and are under way to get the mail you got to have pants on what we need to go back to work for folks if nothing else put on pants I mean exactly right nothing is frame better than when we were little frames of Hey let's get some news Hey good morning to you Joel Barlow what's up morning land morning Michael Hey when you're in public you're gonna have to wear a mask in New York governor Cuomo has made the order it's effective tomorrow and he says no fines at the start anyway people one force it does say to you if they're standing next to you on the street corner where's your mask forty in a nice New York kind of way the nice kind of way he says it will apply in stores crowded subways mass transit in anywhere that you can't maintain that six foot distance from others a disturbing discovery at the Andover sub acute and rehabilitation center in Sussex county New Jersey congressman Josh Gottheimer says cops have discovered seventeen bodies in a small morgue hearing from so many local residents and people family members there source you know who are scared they update their they're worried about their loved ones cops received an anonymous tip after they became suspicious when the people at the nursing home ordered a large number of body bags in New Jersey by the way the death toll now above three thousand governor Murphy gonna announce today whether schools are gonna reopen but admits doesn't see that happening he doesn't see any large gatherings in New Jersey for the foreseeable future whatever that may mean Murphy says the curve continues to flatten but they need help with this social distancing rules a lot of people in New Jersey kind of still ignoring that yeah I was on the ground yet another Democrat who wants to keep the economy shut down amazing well I don't think they've got it under control in New Jersey and Jeff president trump says the U. S. is passed as a nation past the peak delicious some guidelines today for the states to re open he says some states could reopen before even his target date of may first others may have to stay closed a little bit longer lot of sales leaders yes that may be another statement comes back to haunt them that we're past the peak I'm not I'm not sure that's true but you know well so this is this is on the table I mean even the governor he governor Cuomo put out his chart yesterday showing the the peak you know coming down the the salary elder out job you know when land once the peak to happen November November election day yeah that was awesome that's yes what's going on listen we still having over seven hundred deaths today in New York and yes the number of people checking into hospitals and I see you are down but you were ignoring the fact that other states are on the rise and will continue to continue to be on the rise so to make a statement say we're past the peak I'm just saying that maybe a premature statement that's all all right finally here most Americans got their twelve hundred dollar stimulus check deposited into their bank account yesterday now now now yours Natalie she was worried yesterday she was relishing a bank account every two minutes now but I realized I've paid the IRS the past two years so they probably don't have my direct deposit so you're gonna get a check with the president TriNet Lucia friend that okay okay what would a collector's item waiting I'm waiting for my call well here here how they gonna spend the digital bank current says that sixteen percent go spend it on take out and delivery fourteen percent going to transfer the money to other people either to help out a family member or friend or to pay somebody back nine percent say they're going to spend at the grocery store another nine say they're going to go to the ATM and just get the cash out five percent will buy video games and four percent say they will pay bills what about then it's up to about fifty percent job the rest are going to keep in the bank account okay I'm planning on just bring him back to the IRS for next year so well that's probably true all right thanks show coming up next the governor says put on those masks it also like to see baseball this summer is that possibly gonna happen during challenging.

Apache
"apache" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"apache" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Advanced American military equipment including Apache and MH sixty Romeo helicopter they also discussed a partnership to fight a surgeon illicit sales of the pain killer fentanyl Vanessa Bryant files a wrongful death complaint seeking damages over January's helicopter crash that killed her husband Kobe their daughter Gigi and seven others were spotted Tom yamas says there have been questions over whether the pilots to blame since the fog was so thick that day for the NTSB has said there is no evidence that there was a mechanical failure all of this will come out in a court of law the destination is on going pioneering NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson whose career was highlighted in the movie hidden figures dies at the age of one hundred one after that isn't active well what's they tell the story if you read between the lines we did the math yes Johnson was portrayed by Taraji P. Henson in the film about trailblazing black women whose work helped put a man on the moon astronaut John Glenn personally ask for John to double check the computer's calculations for his own flight with a pencil and a slide right that's exactly right what an amazing woman all all three of them what did you what a great story five minutes after six it's time to weather traffic picture we're doing every six minutes this morning you're not going to be surprised stay with us W. S. beat your oldest propellers has of late as most accurate and dependable forecast and there are seven on the mileage meter for today fog in some areas of the stray light shower ending early this morning mostly cloudy high around sixty six lows tonight forty four to forty seven tomorrow valuable clouds and sun only a thirty percent chance of an isolated light showers high fifty six low thirty one Thursday mostly sunny and cold high forty six low twenty nine recover your forecast for today some morning fog gonna stray light shower ending some decrease in clouds in S. during the afternoon and a high around sixty six currently forty eight I'm meteorologist Kirk Wallace ninety five point five W. SP so let's check in the morning drive again triple team coverage begins with my American hurry in midtown Atlanta ga all lanes are being held temporary rattler to move multi vehicle crash completely off to the right seventy five eighty five north about a tenth street exit to fifty things are really stacking up out of downtown Atlanta headed north toward the varsity Peachtree Piedmont are alternates to surface streets further up eighty five northbound crashes but working in two left lanes on the ramp eighty five north north seventeenth street Bagley practical regular air traffic that song starting to stack into the ride on five seventy five south had to pass a little river but no delays in on seventy five south that's still a good ride through Cobb county on time four hundred south leaving the north point mall area down to Lenox square mall northeast mark Airbus run three sixteen westbound awhile back before Riverside Park with a crash ramping from three sixteen west eighty five south eighty five filling up a little bit before after Pleasant Hill road make mealtime easier with Bob Evans side dishes like mashed potatoes and mac and cheese made with real milk butter cheese and potatoes get Bob Evans at your grocery store it'll be love at first bite this more body by.

Apache
"apache" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

09:26 min | 2 years ago

"apache" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Coming at ya every single day if you are a brand new listener i suggest going going back to the beginning i know i start out rough but i get better and better as i learned the dictionary and it's it's a journey we're going on together i word for this episode is apache capital a. p. a. c. h. e. this is a noun from seventeen zero three one a a member of a group of american indian peoples of the southwestern u. s. to any of the athabasca languages of the apache people all athens baskin i think i pronounced that correctly is spelled AT h. a. b. s. c. a. n. the three definitions are not capitalized so here we have three eight a member of a gang of criminals especially in paris that's interesting three three b we have these synonym ruffin r. u. f. f. i a. and a patch ian is an adjective or a noun next we have a word that i'm afraid i'm going to pronounce incorrectly it is spelled a. p. a. n. AG and it could be either appanage or appanage i'm guessing those are the two most likely pronunciations but it is a variation of the same word but with two peas instead of one and of course because it is a variation of another word it's not telling me how to pronounce it because i could just skip ahead to the actual word and find that out but that's not really how i'm doing this podcast next we have operato APA apa r. e. j. o. this is a noun from eighteen twenty eight a pack saddle of stuffed leather or canvas a pack saddle is all one word and this is an american spanish word opera rayo next we have the word apart it's the first form of to this is an adverb from the fourteenth century one a at a little distance synonym is tried to keep apart from from the family squabbles one be away from one another in space or time as in towns twenty miles apart to a as a separate unit synonym is independently as in viewed apart his arguments were unsound to be e so as to separate one from another as in founded hard to tell the twins apart three excluded from consideration synonym is aside as in a few blemishes apart the novel is excellent for in or into two or more parts to pieces synonym is coming apart at the seams now we have the second form of apart it's an adjective from from sixteen eighty one we have these synonyms separate and isolated as in those athletes are a breed apart to holding different opinions synonym is divided apart and this is a noun now we have apart from it's a preposition from seventeen twenty four the definition is other than and in that case van is t. h. a. n. not not h. e. n. and then we have the synonyms besides and except for now we have apartheid a. p. a. r. t. he h. e. i. d. this is a noun from nineteen forty seven one racial segregation specifically a former policy let's see of segregation and political and economic discrimination against non european groups in the republic of south africa to we have these synonyms uh-huh separation and segregation as in cultural apartheid or gender apartheid vis is an afrikaans word taking the word part which is the same in english plus the suffix hide eighty ide- which means hood h. o. o. d. this is obviously a very big deal if you're not familiar with it it's definitely something to look into and be aware of the host of the daily show trevor noah he grew up in south africa in the nineteen eighties and his parents were mixed white and black a european a an african however you wanted describe that and so technically because of apartheid he was illegal it was illegal for his parents prince to have a mixed race child and so he had to be very careful about being in public very sad story i think he wrote a book about it and i've heard a couple couple of interviews with him talking about that a little bit so i i highly recommend that i'll see if i can find an interview on youtube or something and put that in the episode description next next we have the word apartment it's a noun from sixteen forty one one a room or set of rooms fitted especially with housekeeping facilities and usually least as a dwelling to a building containing several individual apartments apart mental is an an adjective now we have apartment building it's a noun from eighteen forty five a building containing separate residential apartments called also also apartment house now we have apartment hotel it's a noun from eighteen seventy four a hotel containing apartments as well as accommodations for transients next we have apathetic it's an adjective from seventeen forty four one having or showing little little or no feeling or emotion synonym is spiritless to having little or no interest or concern synonym in is in different and then a synonym for both definitions is impassive i m. p. a. s. s. i. v. e. apathetically pathetically is an adverb next we have apathy a. t. h. y. it's a noun from fifteen ninety four one lack of feeling or emotion synonym is impassive nece to lack of interest or concern synonym is indifference this is from the greek apathetic or apathy his which means without feeling and that is from combining a plus pathos which means emotion and there's more at the word pathos next we have appetite a. p. a. t. i. t. it's a noun from seventeen eighteen ninety four any of a group of calcium phosphate minerals occurring in various colors as hexagonal crystals as granular masses or in fine grain masses as the chief constituent of phosphate rock and of bones and teeth especially calcium phosphate fluoride bride so no this is probably not the word appetite you're thinking of which has two ps and maybe it's an e. instead of the second a i'm not sure and i'm not gonna go look but this is a different word the etymology says this is from the german appetite which is from the greek passe say again pronunciation bad and that means deceit d. e. c. e. IT next we have a pat soroush it's is a noun from a eighteen seventy eight and we have these synonym brontosaurus i thought we got rid of the name brontosaurus so maybe maybe we replaced it with a pat soroush but if that's the case i kinda thought that they would have just gotten brought to source out of the dictionary altogether and then there would have i've been a description of an patta sawers here but this is combining the greek apetit which did we just read that deceit that's what we read an appetite it's the looks like it's the same word with the same accent on the e- plus the word soros which means lizard so does that mean a lizard that deceits or maybe we were deceited by this lizards bones which we called brontosaurus but it's really an i don't know i'm going off the rails all right next we have a PB all caps this is an abbreviation for all points points bulletin you've probably heard this on a cop TV shows or films next we have a PC and i think this will will be the last word for this episode it is all caps it's a noun from nineteen fifty to an armored vehicle used to transport military military personnel we get ABC from armored personnel carrier the word of the episode is going to be apartheid because is in my mind.

pat soroush u. s. ABC ian paris r. u. f.
"apache" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"apache" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Brought to you by Walmart there's nothing like meeting face to face and there's nothing like zoom to make that happen don't let you connected do business across town or around the world zoom ties together all of your communication needs into one easy platform for video conferencing phone calls group chat webinars and your conference rooms connect easily from anywhere your mobile phone your laptop for conference room zoom is how business gets done get your free account Xoom dot com today need happy with them hi folks may colonel Sanders had to do a little ditty called mac and cheese ball five dollars. and she told. mac and cheese. I won't give me I mean noodles. making the part about the cook in Apache just try my new mac and cheese ball five dollar Phillips a KFC regular conduct in a time only registration that text so we have here on ninety seven point one wash FM he what are you doing Saturday September fourteenth from three one eight Santana moss formally of your Washington Redskins without Peter Bondra formerly of your Washington Capitals they will be at the grand opening of the new **** store in Tyson's Saturday September fourteenth from noon to three and yes you can take photos you can score autographs gets inside the merchandise all yours while supplies last and while you're there enter to win exciting electronics for the home and for on the go like the pope magnify Max as our sound bar home theater system or the.

apache
"apache" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"apache" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Season. Switch. With me. To soak his. Different. Q. Ultimate? You get so. That. So. Brad brawl what we watch things. Fab. The money. Get. And kick it to the beach. Sticky. You get so. Guy. That you say she claims. Right. Compensation and Apache. Rocking. Alternate. Get some. When what we watch it. So fab. Money. Brawl when what we watch. It. So. Money money. So. So. Our style. This performance. It's going to be Shulga at our sold out kiss. FM Wayne Tango job rose sucker on kiss. Hugh. Follow.

apache
"apache" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"apache" Discussed on The CyberWire

"So I I I think it's really worthwhile to acknowledge that. However, having said that I something that has that we are. Currently researching the underground economy is, you know, threat actors they are like I said the underground economy. It's it's an organism adapts. It moves. They are in recognition at how. How well organizations do protect for example, you know, was not long ago that you could simply go to your Bank with your username and password. Right. So threat actors were regular selling a username and password and the U R L to log into and an threat actor could have had a heyday with that how ever today these organizations tend to protect with with variable systems area bowl so threat today are actually not only selling the credentials. They're also selling the variables of your environment of your machine itself. So for example, if I were to go to my finance Titian, they're going to look at perhaps my browser or an MD five hash in my browser. They're going to look at perhaps maybe cookies that I have on my system or or patching level or the resolution of my screen, and they're gonna make kind of pre decision. About me prior to ever successfully putting in my credentials that if if my environment doesn't sensually match the known variables of of these credentials. They're going to step up challenge me and threat actors have you know, they've gotten wise to this. So now in these underground economy dark markets, they're actually selling not only the credentials, but they're selling the users environments, the variables along with the cookies, the, you know, all of the settings and they package it up and just a a small web browser extension that you load therefore you can by pass the step up challenge, which to me is absolutely mind, blowing that's Christian lease from info armor. The Apache software foundation's urge users of struts. Two point three point three six to update. The Commons file upload library to avoid a remote code execution. Flaw.

Apache software foundation
"apache" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"apache" Discussed on Security Now

"Well, known, long known bug in Apache struts was leveraged to expose the personal details of its one hundred and forty, seven million consumers at an eventual eventual cost to them that is equifax of six hundred million dollars. So that was an expensive patch to skip. Well, we're back again as we know Apache struts is a is widely used by enterprise. As globally last year, it was estimated to be in use by sixty five percent of the US fortune one hundred companies you you who who use it. It's it's a Java based framework who use it to build their web applications. So today we have a new remote code execution flaw which allows attackers to remotely commandeer web servers. I've got the two links in the notes, a group named similarly, SE m. l. e. security posted today does on the twenty second. So last Wednesday, they said today, the Apache software foundation announced a critical remote code execution vulnerability in Apache struts. They say a popular open source framework for developing web applications in the Java programming language application. Developed using patchy stretch are potentially vulnerable. The vulnerability and I looked at the c. I had to do a double take because we here we are at a CV twenty eighteen hyphen one one, seven, seven, six. So into the five digits of of the common vulnerabilities and exploits database was identified and reported from the assembly security research team, which works to find a report security vulnerabilities in widely used open source software organizations and developers who use struts are urgently. Advised, please everyone. He'd this this time urgently, advised to upgrade their struts components immediately previous disclosures of similar critical vulnerabilities. They're just saying, sort of rhetorically, have resulted in exploits being published within a day. Remember that's what happened last time at within. A day. There was proof of of a concept and then scanning began within a week of of this thing going public. So that that that started last Wednesday, pudding, critical infrastructure and customer data at risk..

Apache software foundation US equifax six hundred million dollars sixty five percent twenty second five digits two links
"apache" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"apache" Discussed on The Changelog

"Talking about, hey, I just contributed to this project or I built this project, but in reality because the culture is a little more, we just do stuff that we don't which onto go around. Like, you know, I guess I wouldn't say bragging about it, but sure we're just really, it's the cultures a little different. But in reality, a lot of people at AWS contribute to sewer, sprint since we've contributed some mossy qual Lennox, Apache ado patchy Tomcat we've contribute back to a lot of the other projects that we've used and we've even created our own projects and they're open sore. Well, things like Apache mix net blocks AWS, simplify, which we'll probably talk about in little. We have a few dozen projects that we've created as well. And then we have a bunch of repos that are kind of like sample projects that are kind of more aimed at showing people how to use ourselves. So there are a little more self serving. I wouldn't say they're like open source in the sense like we're creating something for anyone to use in those in those projects, but we do have those types of projects as well. It's interesting. You say that because I can't remember who coined the phrase or the the idea of like how to be successful on the internet. But the general advice is do cool things and then tell people about it. It's actually true like, and and the second part is just as important as the first, which is why you know people who are good at talking about what they do are often more successful on the internet because you have to tell people what you're doing. And yet it's for some of us. It's very difficult if feels boastful. Right? And we are just naturally not going to go out there and tell people, but if you don't do that, nobody knows and there's not success to be had. And so in certain ways, sounds like at least what you're saying they're AWS has been doing open source things, but not necessarily telling people about it. And so maybe that's why that that's stigma was attached for well, is that an instructive thing? Or is it something that just doesn't happen? Like is someone at AWS saying, hey, you know, we'll do cool stuff. It just don't tell anybody about it..

AWS Apache
"apache" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"apache" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Yeah at is true will always together so jimmy jimmy liz always trying to keep a class together and really the one of the lifeblood of the classes and one of the biggest events for an apache group is the first time you shoot in your gunnery so the very first time you get to shoot and you feel that the power of the aircraft and all that pretty cool fires we don't training there too expensive so so but the thirty millimeter is a very first thing we shot and let's for anyone that doesn't know that's a pretty big rounded it shakes aircraft you'll feel it and somehow you know we had we shot i'm not gonna say how but he procured some of the showcase seems that we shot there and at the end of flight school at the very end he got everybody their first round they fired and had an customer graves with their ip's named instructor pilots name each student's name with a call sign and a little apache on there and turn them into a second i'll get a screen shot would be really good for it for radio this is a good section for the podcasts of kitten yeah there you go cool that's awesome yeah so it's a is just a great guy really would go above and beyond for anybody and symptom just tele chill chila man just be abril annual wall make it through it'll be fine you have those kind of guys that really step up like really take them the like the occasion and really embrace it in that showcasing is a perfect example of looking at other people before yourself because in reality if you're taking brass off the range you could get in trouble for that shit when i get caught.

jimmy jimmy liz apache instructor
"apache" Discussed on Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"apache" Discussed on Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

"Like apollo or redux or any of these sort of libraries they have different local storage in caching systems that you can just sort of plug and play in and make sure that you know let's say a user goes off and gets information about something and well that information's not changing the next time they're getting it so why are you going to get that information again so utilizing though some of the stuff is going to prevent a extra again extra requests but extra time it takes to get that information from an api your things going to load faster and users aren't going to have to sit and wait while it makes redundant request for you yet that's pretty good and also on the server site you can turn on whether you're running like an apache server or engine x over you can also turn on like aggressive caching of your images and of your jobs gripping your css and what that will do is every single time that your browser requests something they'll go oh i actually had downloaded this javascript file before i don't need to to make that round trip i'll just serve it up from the cash that can be a little bit of a pain when you're trying to invalidate the cash and that's generally why people put hashes in there css and javascript files where you might have scripts dot b e four nine seven dodge s and then when you need to validate that cash then you just change the script name to something totally different and then the other kind of cheap cheap way that you can do it as you can just do a question mark v equals one like you can put a little query pram on the end of that will also bus that cash.

apache
"apache" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

Defensive Security Podcast

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"apache" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

"That you know you just kinda slip through the radar later that they don't they don't make it onto the radar yeah and this goes back ted asset management and vulnerability management in so many other things that can come into play their app so you anyway so let's see so we'll move on to that to the apache of the apache software foundation blog statement which i agree was very interesting and you know the the uh the do say they're very sorry to hear that echo facts was breached in you know they're they are pretty clear in in saying it's not very clear what version of streit's was was involved was it the old one or was it the new one in it by the way you know if it was the old one that means they didn't patch and if it was the new one it means it was at zero day but by the way that's all it assumption that it was threats in the first place right which we don't fully no and then they want oh god i was gonna say they also caught on a flight because this particular vulnerability was as been present echoed for nine years yes exactly those of exactly was going to say that they there has been a lot of my kind of a lot of rocks thrown at both equi facts and the apache group that this vulnerability was nine years old as as though your people have been sitting on it for nine years.

streit zero day apache group apache nine years zero day
"apache" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"apache" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Agrarianism oregano transition was who specialist acknowledges that the move on air so let's dive into let's talk about apache gimmicks net never the hit one for pecchia mixing it is it's i highly programmable portable and skiable opensource deep learning framework julianne let's let's unpacked that what does that really might yet so it's quite a mouthful to be honest and so let's let's try to be as simple and and pragmatic as possible so so first of all it's so it's an open source project that's really really super important because on appropriate theory tools you know can be useful but when it comes to when he comes to machine learning and gpus running there's a research community and the local community out there and everybody in it's a fastmoving feel everybody wants to contribute and improve so so it's opensource you can find the the sources on get up it was started in a in a couple of universities i know i think it's sir carnegie mellon melanin and i believe the university of washington the might be wrong that will end and basically what he does is that it allows you with a high level api to build in train neural networks in what i say high level a i i mean it it doesn't take a lot of code i mean i've got some examples um uh that i thought of published on on the on my blog in an hopefully ensure that legally drunk at n literally in maybe 50 lines of coat a widow i use by phone but you could use you know other languages like rrr plus plus or even matlab and few wore in let's a 59 of code you can build a train a anura let work which is a in which is crazy i mean in a when i was a younger engineer noor let works were were the stuff of science fiction to be honest and end at inuit never thought would be able to do that with that little code really so you can just grabbed those sources from guetta um a look at some of the examples uh you know forty fifty nine of code.

julianne noor apache university of washington engineer guetta