17 Burst results for "Antony Johnston"

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:21 min | 3 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Question <Speech_Male> of finding <Speech_Male> what works <Speech_Male> for you and <Speech_Male> then doing everything you <Speech_Male> can <Speech_Male> to ensure <Speech_Male> that your able <Speech_Male> to work <Speech_Male> in that space <Speech_Male> and able to replicate <Speech_Male> that kind <Speech_Male> of space that <Speech_Male> working area <Speech_Male> whenever you <Speech_Male> Sit down <Speech_Female> all stand <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> Just to play devil's <Speech_Female> advocate for a minute. <Speech_Female> Is there ever <Speech_Female> an argument for <Speech_Female> chaotic working <Speech_Female> style. I mean <Speech_Female> talking about serve. <Speech_Female> People <Speech_Female> like punters <Speech_Female> thompson. These <Speech_Female> people who are perceived as <Speech_Female> very glamorous <SpeakerChange> and also <Speech_Male> very talented. <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> ira hunters. <Speech_Male> And i don't <Speech_Male> think he's actually the <Speech_Male> best example <Speech_Male> of that because <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Male> he cultivated <Speech_Male> this persona of <Speech_Male> being <Speech_Male> the wild <Speech_Male> man and as you <Speech_Male> say a bit category <Speech_Male> but the fact is the <Speech_Male> hunter s. thompson wrote <Speech_Male> for hours and hours <Speech_Male> every day. He <Speech_Male> was a very very <Speech_Male> disciplined worker. <Speech_Male> It was <Speech_Male> just everything else around <Speech_Male> his work <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> was rather <Speech_Male> less disciplined. <Speech_Male> Joey say <Speech_Male> i was asked. This question. really <Speech_Male> about francis bacon <Speech_Male> as well because his workshop <Speech_Male> was completely <Speech_Male> chaotic and <Speech_Male> obviously he was a genius. <Speech_Male> I don't think <Speech_Male> it's very <Speech_Male> difficult to argue. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> being <Speech_Male> organized will make you <Speech_Male> a better <Speech_Male> writer because <Speech_Male> you can't make <Speech_Male> that comparison. There's no parallel <Speech_Male> universe <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Male> we can compare <Speech_Male> you know. Being <Speech_Male> organized being disorganized <Speech_Male> and see what <Speech_Male> work comes out of it. But <Speech_Male> what i can say <Speech_Male> without <Speech_Male> a shadow of a dots. I mentioned <Speech_Male> earlier. Is that <Speech_Male> since being <Speech_Male> organized. Getting <Speech_Male> myself together. <Speech_Male> I have produced <Speech_Male> more work <Speech_Male> than <SpeakerChange> i would have <Speech_Male> otherwise. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> i'm a big believer <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> as a writer especially <Speech_Male> or any kind of creative <Speech_Male> but certainly as a right of <Speech_Male> being prolific actually <Speech_Male> makes you better <Speech_Male> because the only <Speech_Male> way you can truly <Speech_Male> practice <Speech_Male> is <Silence> to <SpeakerChange> do it <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> anthony. I hope <Silence> you change my life. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well like i said. <Speech_Male> Let's not oversell these <Speech_Male> things. But i certainly hope <Speech_Male> that i can help <Speech_Male> you <SpeakerChange> know. In one or <Speech_Female> two areas <Speech_Female> the organiz <Speech_Female> writer hard to stay on <Speech_Female> top of all your projects <Speech_Female> and never muscled <Speech_Female> line is published <Speech_Female> by bloomsbury. <Speech_Female> It's by antony <Speech_Female> johnston <Speech_Male> and thanks so much. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> for having me. It's been a pleasure. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> You've <Speech_Female> been listening to monica. <Speech_Female> Reads thanks to <Speech_Female> the production team of <Speech_Female> nora whole charlie <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> phil mccord and <Speech_Female> louis allen <Speech_Female> georgina godwin. <Speech_Male> Thank <SpeakerChange> you for <Music> listening.

thompson francis bacon antony phil mccord monica louis allen georgina godwin
"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"You do all sorts of things. Does this work across all of those different areas. Yes absolutely and that's partly why came up with this method. Because i do work across all those different media. I don't think i would be able to work So much across all these different media. If i wasn't organized if i didn't have everything together as it were and i should say i'm not perfect. Sometimes i do allow things to get off of me and our. I've taken on a bit too much hair. Or i've not giving myself enough time to really do the best job that i could on this particular gig but certainly i wouldn't have been able to do all those different things if i wasn't fairly organized if i didn't use this system to keep track of into stay on top of all my deadlines and schedule do you ever have that thing with as a project that just absolutely dreading and you cannot bring yourself to start it once you do. It's probably quite easy. But it's that initial thing have to start this thing that i just don't want to do. And how do you conquer that. That happens to me. I would say all the time but yes i mean just as susceptible to that as any other writer. It certainly has happened to me. That's eight is something that's i mean. Nobody enjoys it. But that is where my a philosophy that i call just right comes into place and that is based around the maxim that any writing is easier to revise by even the worst writing in the world is it is easier to revise that than it is to ride in the first place and so i subscribed to a theory that if you just write anything even if it's terrible even if you know it's dreadful even if you're not enjoying it just get the words down on the page then once you've worked through the first draft. They searched zero draft. As i call it you can then go and revises and all you're doing then he's making it better so that's a much more enjoyable process and you may well find as so often happens. That's when you come to reread it. You realize that actually wasn't as bad as you thought it just felt bad at the time partly because you weren't enjoying doing it but this again comes down to discipline and Having that sort of determination to get through the initial draft. Because like i say from that point on all you're doing is improving it and who doesn't love. I speak to so many writers one question. I often ask. Them is what they're listening to when they right. So for instance unlike as it may seem elif shafat listens to heavy metal and other people listen to music. That's relevant cups to to the work that they're doing well something that just comes some ambient musical something. Do you think that that's a good idea or is that just yet another distraction. No i think that's a a completely personal thing. I listen to music all the time. While i'm writing and i actually don't think it's that unusual for somebody to listen to heavy metal. Because i do that as well. I listened to a lot of Called drone black metal. While i'm working that's rather nishi s But i also listen to lots of classical lots of movie soundtracks. Lots of techno ambient. Brian eno. And or tech kerr and people like that. I mainly listened to stuff either without lyrics or in the case of the black metal without discernible lyrics Because that means that yes it's the words aren't distracting me as i'm writing but no i listen to music all the time because music.

elif shafat Brian eno kerr
"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:58 min | 3 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Easy. And i make this point again in the book you have to. You do have to put in the work. This isn't a silver bullet. You know this isn't trick that you can pull an everything's wonderful overnight but if you put in the work you will get benefits out of it. Speaking of going to the gym. What about the opposite of that snacking whilst writing. I'll just have a cup of tea. I'll just have a sandwich. That's fine so long as you don't use that time to yet check facebook on your phone or all. Gs check my email. That's the thing because you know we all have to do that. You know we have to walk our dogs or we have to go and make a drink or crop something tweet. That's fine but wall. You're doing that let. Especially if you're a fiction writer the best thing to do is to let your brain simmer on the things that you'll writing at the moment because you often find in those moments that's when solutions to problems will come to you and it's a bit like getting in the shower. That's always when you suddenly realize you have the answer to a problem. That's been nagging at you. Same thing can happen while you making the tea or you're walking your dogs or whatever but it won't happen if you pull out your phone and go and check twitter right so i mean my mistake then probably is that. I've been trying to do. What i think is called the pomodoro metric where i work for forty five minutes and then for fifteen i let myself catch up on emails and tool the rest of it and i guess one's ones losing one's train of thought at that point it's fine to have a break but not to go off and do something else. Exactly i mean i. I don't like the pomodoro mad. I'm afraid i know people who use it. I know screenwriters who work in what they call. Sprints which is basically the same thing they say okay for the next thirty minutes. I'm going to do nothing but right in the reward for that. Is that at the end of it. Allow myself a ten fifteen minute break to go and do something else. If it works for you then. I wouldn't advocate changing on a big believer in continuing to do things that work for you. If you not having a problem with something like that then don't change it. Stick to what works but if you are having trouble focusing something light pomodoro tecnique. I don't think will help you because as you say it. Does it builds in distractions whereas again. This is mostly for fiction writers rather than nonfiction i would think but for fiction writers. The last thing you want is interruption. You want and need often sustained lengthy periods of time. Where you're doing nothing but thinking about your work fiction and you know writing down whenever you can rather than deliberately interrupting your own train of thought which again for a fiction writer. I think is kind of just not a very good idea. Now you have worked across many different genres. You started as a graphic designer You adopted anti harvard. Says alex rider books into graphic novels. You've written video game scripts. I mean you're a fiction writing..

facebook twitter alex rider harvard
"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

03:43 min | 3 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Probably what you're like at the moment but this is what you can be like a few put the system into practice so without giving too much away because obviously we all have to buy the book what are the basic tenets of this the basic tenets are take control of your calendar and your schedule and plan in advance and then put into practice a system that enables you to avoid distractions by taking everything that you need to remember putting it into everything non writing. I mean that you need to remember putting it into a system that will remind you when you need to know about those tasks that you need to carry out and thereby clearing your mind so that when you sit down to write the only thing you're thinking about is you'll writing which in itself is enough to fill anybody's brain. That's one of the points i make. Is that when we all writing. We are already juggling. Dozens of different trains of thought and trying to put things together and trying to use our imagination to the fullest and organize our thoughts into a story or a piece of journalism or whatever the last thing we need is more non writing stuff using that space in our memory as it were and so yes the basic principle of the system. I mean there are many parts. Obviously the basic principle above all others is get everything else out of your mind so that when you sit down to write. That's all you're thinking about right so once you've got a system that reminds you to pay the gospel by dog food or whatever honey then a void. The monday scourged and that is of course intrusion not only digital intrusion not only from emails but but as a writer and somebody that may need to research just endless kind of deep dives into the internet. That is mostly a matter of shia disciplined. Unfortunately that is something i mean. There are software solutions to this. There are certain plug ins and applications. You can buy that will effectively shut off your internet for a period of hours And thereby literally prevent you from going online those a quite extreme. But i do know people who use them you know. They work But mostly yeah. There are always ways to get round that sort of thing and so mostly. It is a question of being disciplined and having the willpower to say no. I'm not gonna do that and recognizing if you if you do if you kind of fall off the wagon were recognizing that you've done that and fixing it and not beating yourself up going okay. I made a mistake. They're all you know. I'll go back of switch off my email or whatever and try a game and what you find sunny. What i found is the that becomes much much easier. Partly because when you do that the reward you get which is the. Obviously you're writing goes a lot better. You are more focused. You get more writing done on. The writing do is better. you realize the benefits. It's a bit like the gym. Everybody hates going to the gym. Even people who regularly go to the gym like myself hate going to the gym. We'll hated but we do it. Because if you go regularly after a few months you start to realize okay. This is actually worth it. This is having an effect. And even though i don't like doing it. The benefits outweigh the displeasure. If you like from going and it's much the same word staying of social media not checking your email doing your best to ensure that you're not interrupted by the real world while you'll writing..

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

03:23 min | 3 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Monica reads. I'm georgina. godwin my guess. Today is anthony johnson new york times bestselling writer and podcast. His work spans multiple genres from books. Too graphic novels video games. One of his most notable works graphic novel. Coldest city went on to be adapted into a hollywood blockbuster called atomic blonde starring. Charlie's the ron. His latest book is the organized writer. How to stay on top of all your projects and never miss a deadline which is probably something right or not we could ooh reading.

anthony johnson georgina godwin Monica new york times hollywood Charlie
"antony johnston" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

11:04 min | 5 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on THEMOVE

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"antony johnston" Discussed on Gaming Ride Home

Gaming Ride Home

01:49 min | 9 months ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Gaming Ride Home

"You know why. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Here's <Silence> what released today. <Speech_Male> Project <Speech_Male> warlock <Speech_Male> a game. I actually <Speech_Male> talked about a few days ago <Speech_Male> is out today <Speech_Male> on switch. <Speech_Male> It's an old school. <Speech_Male> Doom inspired <Speech_Male> shooter that has <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a bunch of magic <Speech_Male> in it along <Silence> with bullets. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Samurai <Speech_Male> showdown, the <Speech_Male> twenty nineteen reboot <Speech_Male> of the Classic <Speech_Male> Neo Geo <Speech_Male> Fighting Game. Series <Speech_Male> is out today <Silence> on the windows store. <Speech_Male> It's a <Speech_Male> solid game as <Speech_Male> far as I know, but it's. <Speech_Male> It's not the most exciting <Speech_Male> release. The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> game kind <Speech_Male> of already on pc <Speech_Male> by way of Stadia. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Beyond blue <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> out today on Xbox, <Speech_Male> one playstation, four <Speech_Male> and PC, <Speech_Male> which is <Speech_Male> a very pretty <Speech_Male> game about exploring <Speech_Male> the ocean, <Speech_Male> it is a little <Speech_Male> reminiscent of Asu, <Speech_Male> another <Speech_Male> very pretty <Speech_Male> ocean exploration <Speech_Male> game, but <Speech_Male> this one looks a little more realistic, <Speech_Male> less <Speech_Male> abstract. <Speech_Male> It has <SpeakerChange> some really <Speech_Male> great looking Wales. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's it for <Speech_Male> gaming news today. <Speech_Male> Yesterday <Speech_Male> I reported on <Speech_Male> Dead Space Writer <Speech_Male> Antony Johnston's <Speech_Male> series of <Speech_Male> tweets teasing <Speech_Male> something <Speech_Music_Male> for today's <Speech_Music_Male> playstation five. <Speech_Music_Male> Many <Speech_Music_Male> think. <Speech_Music_Male> Something to do with dead <Speech_Music_Male> space which I certainly <Speech_Music_Male> wanted to <Speech_Music_Male> be, but I'm <Speech_Music_Male> thinking. It's probably <Speech_Music_Male> something new <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that will be able to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> boast from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the writer of dead space. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Maybe <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by the time you're <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening to this, we already know <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> what it is, but <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> pretty much <Speech_Male> right. After I <Speech_Male> published yesterday's <Speech_Male> episode, I was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> double checking. Show notes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> links and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stuff like that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> where I had links <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to Johnston's tweets. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it looks like he <SpeakerChange> deleted <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them all. All <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the tweets that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> were teasing whatever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reveal is happening <Speech_Music_Male> today and <Speech_Music_Male> we're winking at <Speech_Music_Male> people about dead space <Speech_Music_Male> are all <Speech_Music_Male> gone. So who <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> knows what that's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all about? If <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you have corrections, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just feedback in general, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> feel free to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

Antony Johnston Writer Asu
"antony johnston" Discussed on Pass It On

Pass It On

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Pass It On

"We're going to learn more about How we set expectations at home. I mean talked about boundaries. But it's also when we have multiple people working in the same house. You may be coming into an environment where you have a partner roommates or parents or whomever you live with. Who have been working from Hala Ready. And you're invading their space and you need to negotiate that you can't just plop the laptop that and say okay honey here. I am in You got to move over there. It's going to be a negotiation and I think having conversations ahead of time however abrupt. This is happening for people taking the time to sit down. Figure things out and saying this isn't the way it's always going to be. We have to start this way if it doesn't work readjusted because we need to make it work for whatever period of time is to come magic's who got the idea of finding space. Who got the idea of setting some rules and expectations around how you blamed your home? Life New York. Forget from separate next in the book you've got a section and learning remote tools and obviously we're not going to go into exactly what those tools would be on this podcast but it's worth maybe having a conversation bite. The kind of expectations are reasonable to have arraigned video conferencing and teleconferencing systems and digital systems. That you might be unfamiliar with and being able to think about how we can anticipate what those friction points might be in high to high to work around them. I think that's a great thing because as I was saying earlier I think a lot of people have never been in a situation where they're doing video with other people. Maybe ever maybe a little facetime or other kinds of WHATSAPP or other sites of. I don't know if the kids do that. What whoever does that talk you you doing. Some kind of a one to one too many one. You know many many face conversation but socially or for gaming or something like that but this may be the first time people professionally have to do something where they're in a meeting and I was doing a video meeting I should say and I was doing a contract job a few years ago and we were using Zoom was relatively new then and it was I think forty to sixty people would be at the stand up meetings we had and they're actually run really well and you can see everyone's face and I just thought this is the weirdest thing to have this many people but it actually was kind of a cohesive thing with so many of those people working remotely there only a few people in that organization in any central office and I think it did. Help US communicate better. So there is that advantages. You may wind up communicating with people. You never have before they're always been email or phone or something and you may wind up in these video. Chats I think you set up a space a little bit again. That curtain idea is also useful to set up a background for yourself. If you're using SKYPE SKYPE has a button. You can click that blurs your background. Which is kind of cuts? You out around You may want to get There's this hilarious thing. It's like a peacock fan that you can velcro onto the back of a chair and it gives you kind of A. It's like a game of thrones style without the sword. Just a big background behind you. So when you're close up with the cameras the blue background or green background behind you so that people don't see the rest of your house. I've hung hooks in my ceiling in the basement. So I can hang a curtain or a backdrop and backdrops for very cheap. I just bought actually for for fun. Podcasting I bought a Just today I got it because I'm doing more of it. Twenty dollars you know so seventeen. Eighteen pounds It's a backdrop of old book bindings like bookshelves and things like that. It looks like I'm in some ancient library. It's very cute. It's photo printed. It looked surprisingly good. A little out of focus on the camera So that may be part of the professionalism thing is. What do you want to see how people see behind you? You're set up with a good Mike. Let's say good headset. So you can be heard and you have to think about if you're a person who wears makeup. Do you want to put up make up for this? Is that part of how you feel professional or how you want to present yourself to the world. Do you wind up trying to figure out how to get your hair cut. All the hair salons are shot as they are in Seattle right now. I'm looking at a little a little afraid with my. I don't know that much hair but it standing on end So these issues people have had a face before and it can be daunting and some people don't want they have social anxiety or they simply don't want to be engaged video conferencing and they may be told they have to be told as part of the job. You may have to communicate that that disease and may be able to negotiate only doing audio or doing very little of it to a quite difficult thing to negotiate as some people may have perfectly justifiable reasons not to want to have. The video turned on on their laptop. Whether that's to do with their personality or their situation and we shouldn't judge that but I did see some narratives around and it's quite true using video does give you an opportunity to use. Non Verbal cues right if you're all if if there's any more than two or three or four people in a group. Coal is quite hard to to to interrupt each other and crosstalk against each other. And you got the you know just saying you've got that going on. If you can have video then you can raise your hand or you can indicate otherwise that you want to take the floor or otherwise and it's worth having somebody In such a chairperson role to a ringmaster Analogy to tame what's happening because otherwise it can be a bit of a free for all and you. You don't have the same fluidity of conversation that you have in a face to face conversation. We were also going to be craving Most of us I would never want to say everybody because everybody has their different A neuro types and different needs and different social needs. Some people do not like the people they work with. Some people loved the people that work within socialize with them are missing that time during the day after outside of work so this video conferencing for some of us will serve as an additional bit of socializing that we're not gonNA get and his estate may come and go that we get to see other people to some extent in person or not. Video is not a replacement for in person communication. I think that we we know that. And you know we've been talking to our kids about like you really need to get out and see people and then this happens. Oh great just use your video conferencing tools and the kids are all over it. They know how to use skype and zoom and facetime and other tools. The Kit your kids may be able to by the way. Teach you how to use these tools better than any other resource out there because they often use You know This tools on smartphones and tablets and sometimes hitters and know the INS and outs and I I think it might be a great opportunity if you have kids. Who who do that are the right age to help you? accustom yourself. They can even be good about getting you up so you look if you want to look a little better if you WANNA present yourself a little better it makes you happy not other people for yourself. Your kids might be able to help you with that to an as worth thing as well that I'm guilty of this myself thinking of videoconferencing as a of a transactional thing. We have to set up a meeting and a video conference about this. You could just use it to to to do a fifty minute. Coffee Break Right. You could just use it to literally hookup socialize with colleagues or far flogger family or whatever. It doesn't have to be a particular reason for it so whether that's My mother-in-law leading up story to my daughter over facetime over. That's you gathering ranges virtual water cooler with some of your colleagues just to chew the fat. We'll we'll leave. That tying for people who Is Say they will miss those opportunities to sort of blow off steam and you know try and reestablish the new normal and having a continuity of those kinds of conversations you would normally have as you prepared. Coffee are going to be really important to have to think about these tools as purely business productivity to lose weight exactly and you know some people this is harking back earlier section but I really think most people benefit from a second monitor or even you can use an IPAD as a second monitor with various software as well. If you're using a Mac you can use an android tablet with windows other systems. Lots of ways. You can use repurpose a tablet as well as just getting a second monitor it. You got a second monitor. Some people do office cooler and this may become even more common where you set up a window. Maybe it's zoom window or something where there's a lot of video going on everyone's muted. It's off to the side and it gives you gives you the sense that people are around so that you're not as isolated for some people that's torture for other people workgroups. They may decide to do it because they're in such consultation and people may Unu- themselves as they need to raise a point. You may working separately. Allegri every twenty five minutes. You break your activity. You Chit Chatter or up to each other. What's going on for five minutes? There's all these strategies you can do that you know again. You have to think about yourself as an individual. Don't expect say to you. Video conferencing has to happen. Your boss May tell you this but no-one should advise you. I should say the video conferencing is good for. Everybody always works. It's absolutely necessary but for many people maybe most people I don't know seeing the numbers or we haven't seen Some form of is going to help you with homeworking It can also help you. In the social circumstances we talking about too is as you get familiar with video tools video conferencing tools. And you have it before. Then you may wind up using them and other social circumstances too great so the two more sections in the book. The next one is about pacing yourself about saving some Some rules that mean. You're practicing self care and that you're sitting at your work day in a way that makes sense for you. We've talked a little bit before. But what does this section of the cover but it's kind of how you take care of yourself inside of a new work environment and this advice I would say would work this part of the book it. I think any time that you're setting up a homework environment would work. It's actually strangely. The one normal. The book is whenever you start a situation which you are generally separated for other people and working. You're inclined to either under international say underwear but you're inclined to not understand the pattern of you work when you start. Because it's so different so pacing yourself as both about figuring out what the best way to What distractions exist that you should eliminate Antony Johnston is a terrific Writer writes graphic graphic. Novels is a mystery novelist. Science fiction novelist he had a great tip. And it sort of obvious when you hear it but someone has to say it to you which is if your job doesn't actively involve answering email. Why is your email program open or notifying you all the time and I thought? Gosh you know I do that. My job is an answering email. Why am I demand driven? I should change my own behavior Because my elbows being being being I get notifications so even things as little as that where maybe in an office. It's part of your workflow but you want to focus more One of the common techniques focusing is to eliminate distractions. Turn off everything. That's going on your computer. Put it in or phone device. Put do not disturb mode. There's even software called. Freedom is a well-known package available.

Hala Ready facetime partner New York Seattle Mike Antony Johnston Writer
"antony johnston" Discussed on TeeVee

TeeVee

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on TeeVee

"What she's so angry and frustrated in that moment it's like it's that's a I if you haven't seen broad church. She shows a lot of colors in that that that she doesn't get a lot of chance to show in in doctor. Who BUT THIS SEASON. She's been able to let some of those out and Yeah she's great it is. It is a really really good performance and talk about that level of difficulty to to. How do you interpret how you the first woman to interpret this part on TV? And she's She's figured it out like she's she's done. A great job actually is really. I would like to know like because reactions to the previous season were mixed. I would say I mean I had some problems with the writing but I thought she was. Great through your. She wasn't one of my complaints about right. But you know they've they've improved. I think on pretty much all levels the from previous season two this season. I just want to know that said well you know. We should reference more bore previous doctors and things like that. Did somebody have that kind of calculating conversation of will that will you? The question of was a reaction or was this always the plan. Yeah the and that's what we don't know and I suspect we may I say never but I suspect we won't know until some years after chip. Noel has left right the role of show. When if ever feel comfortable talk Reich feel comfortable talking about it but the the question is did he want the show in general to be more like last season you know? Kill the leave the past behind killer if you have to sort of style or any reacted and said okay fine you want law nerds here you go or was this always the plan to go. No I WANNA do this master plan and have the infinity of doctors but to get away with it. I I need to completely break with the past. I mean when when he's being interviewed on stage by one of our friends asking Kelly in ten years or so. I suspect this is the kind of thing that will only ever find out kind of whispered in. It's like the story that we've heard about how And again I think I've said this on a podcast before but it's it's generally known that Steven Moffat was ready to be done and and they were ready to Hire Chris. Chip null and ship no had committed to broad church season three and so they essentially hired. Chris and went back to Stephen Moffatt and said please. We need one more year and he was like all right. And that's why that last year with bill and all that it's it's fun and I like it a lot actually but the previous Christmas episode and all that that was that was supposed to be Stephen Moffatt stepping away and then the end did not let him go. And that's and I imagine it'll be something like that where it'll just kinda come out in dribs and drabs somewhere about like. We'll never really know exactly the truth about it but I do. I'm fascinated to know whether it was this. A course correction was always the plan and if it was a course correction. Why was it made? When was it made but Who cares this was the way whatever I mean I think from the. I think the turning point for me was the dialect episode the resolutions episode. Because I think that was the first the first one that I had no complaints at all about and then since then it's been pretty solid. Well they're coming back because as we saw at the very end credits for this episode dot. The doctor will return in revolution of the DALEKS and that again will be presumably holiday special. They did they did. Shoot it as part of this block and then and they're not going to shoot next season until the fall which means we're looking at a long time Before they come back which is. Don't get me started on that. Their inability to do they want to do ten episodes a year. That's fine but I'd like ten episodes a year not ten episodes and the special every eighteen months which seems to be what they're capable of right now on love that. Don't let that kind of nuts. I didn't know they weren't even shooting until I think so. I don't think they're shooting at the one of the great things that this episode will do. Is it's going to have ripple effects where everybody starts to realize that these assumptions they made about doctor who? Canon now can change We'll see more and more of it as we were sitting here talking. I thought well now. My interpretation of the whole Jon. Pertwee era is that the powers that be a gal afraid decided that they needed the doctor to be an operative again and didn't care that they had promised him that they would you know or her. Promise them that they would wipe their memory and put them back in and let them alone or whatever. They're like no. The doctor was very effective. We'RE GONNA go back there like that color like anything you want to color with these revelations you can do it now which is fun and yes also all of those brain of Morbus images on the screen that were members of the production team or now canonical doctors. So congratulations terrance dicks. Belay terrance dicks. He is the doctor after all and big finish. Get to write an infinite number in filibuster. That's Great I. I loved again so on the nose but I loved that line from the doctrine. This absurd where Jodi yesterday. I've have you ever been limited by who you were before just lights so on the nose but just encapsulates the attitude towards her as the doctor so brilliantly? Joe Martin says that line I think to Jodie whittaker right is no I thought she said it's the master. No I I I think. That's Joe Martin. Jodie whittaker in the Matrix. Have you ever been limited who you were? I don't know you're right. You're right so it's the doctor as Joe Joe Martin's doctor speaking to Jodie whittaker doctor saying you've always been able to be you and that doesn't change because there were more of you than than you thought I was getting. I was getting get mixed up with when Jodie says to master. Yeah you know. It doesn't let me. It makes me more. Yes No. You're absolutely right. And the master is banking on this. Being w live destroyed you write. This information is destroyed. You and she's like no start now. Does actually it's strength and love that so there's a couple of questions so we have whereas the doctor actually from what is the division Which regeneration is roof? And Are we going to see more roof because if if Ruth is pre Hartnell? Dan Jodie whittaker isn't going to regenerate into roof which was one of the theories and also. Where is Jack Harkness? Because like you go in Joan Barone. He did like fifteen minutes. I was expecting a payoff. And that's well I should also. He wouldn't see him the rest of this season and that was accurate. That could be a very legal legally accurate way. Say You won't see him this season. Yeah I do yeah I also have. I'm just going through my mind. Things like Matt Smith being an old man and saying. Oh well I'm not going to regenerate again and then be teaching the time lords to give him extra generations and all that and I'm thinking now they were just there shining on 'cause the doctor can get I assume at this point. What was this series says? Doctor is not a time. Lord and can regenerate infinitely. Yeah so they said they had a little snigger to themselves and said Yeah. Sure you've got another you've got another twelve. Give it a go. I agree with you the questions about whether we're actually see the doctor again. Because if she is pretty hartnell difficult to justify making a series and its spin off blah blah blah. But just the mere fact that she exists in Canon has been on screen and even she only now lives on like the eighth doctor as a Cornucopia of big finish productions. That's still better than not having her. If I ask I had to put money down I would say we will see her again and we will hear much more about the division and the work that the doctor did buddy. We'll see her again as a as a guest in a psychic. Show a multi. Doctor Team up episode. Where you know to ask. Don't do this or whatever and pull in her as anybody. Anybody they want now. Even one of the production crew from brains are mobile. They can come back around. Philip Hinchcliffe can come back in and they can also then they can finally cast hugh grant or whatever and say well. He was one to back actually had to do. Was the whole Tom. Baker's reappearance using an old face. Yes thing line which can tie. It's all Ya yeah. I do think that now the gift that Vegas Waxwork doctor who show runners give to future. Doctor who renters is more open space for them to drop other things if they want to. That's part of their their. Their gift is more empty spaces. That could plausibly be filled with other ret cons in the future. It's great all right. Well I think we've reached the end of this discussion and the season but it was a lot of fun. We are going to do. they'll be a main incomparable series. Wrap episode coming up in a little bit and then the flash cast will return sometime with the revolution of the dialects. Whatever that is they spend. That's what it is. I'm sure it's dollars. Take Spinning classes. Yeah that's right. What if you a time Lord inside a dial? Oh no no but until then Antony Johnston thank you for talking about who is this season. You'll very welcome Jason. Thank you for having me on. This has been. It's been fun to do mainly because this has been overall one of my favorite seasons Tivo sometime. Yeah I I was worried going in but it has been a really fun ride James Thompson as always you for being a part of Dr who talk with me. I'd like to thank you and I'm glad I got to do both hearts of a two point. It's nice and thank you dear listener for being out there and listening to the Doctor. Who FLASH CAST? We appreciate it. It's a lot of fun to do. And it's also a lot because we have to watch the episode right away and we have to talk in.

Jodie whittaker Joe Joe Martin Steven Moffat Chris Canon Antony Johnston dribs Jack Harkness DALEKS Noel Reich Matt Smith Kelly Philip Hinchcliffe big finish productions Pertwee hartnell Jon Jodi
"antony johnston" Discussed on TeeVee

TeeVee

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on TeeVee

"Doc Doc look back to the doctor who flash CAST JASON SNELL back with you here to talk about season. Twelve twelve episodes six practice and joining me from. We're forming two points of a triangle across the globe is Antony Johnston. Hello Hello Jason. I'm so relieved that this was overall a good episode because often last week take off really jealous Erica and Steven got right to the flash past because obviously last was so good in so many years and I was really it because let's be honest. It's not unknown. I was really dreading this week. would be a complete let down by comparison. So I'm very happy it wasn't I mean and I agree with you. We'll get it out of the way right here. I was relieved as well. The same feeling which is Not that I don't have some quibbles with this episode but it was good episode like if that other episode hadn't happened And this was episode five. I would have said look at that like because I haven't loved I love the first you know for you episodes of the season but this one I feel like is almost the archetype I think of what Chris chip no wants doctor who to be which is it looks great. It's globetrotting there's action. There's lots of dialogue. There's lots of. It's actually good. I think funny jokes and there's a and and it is. I think true doctor whose history it has a point which is it's sort of educational and couching the educational aspect of it and they kind kind of social aspect of it in science fiction like all of that. I actually think like yeah. I see what you're going for here and I enjoyed it. I thought it was. The pacing is amazing. Right like the the number of scenes and shots and locations. Even though it's mostly South Africa it's still is locations the by the beach and they're in the city and all of those things like there's a lot in this episode and it moves so fast I really enjoyed it. What some of that gets to one of the very specific the reasons that I liked this episode? which was the in media res- opening but I wish I if you're right that this is more the archetypal all kinds of episode chip? No wants to do. I wish he would. Yeah I really really wish they would because the first twenty twenty eighty five minutes of this episode were almost flawless from only as as so often happens with who it was only when we started to get to the resolution of why this thing was happening and how we were going to solve the problems suddenly it was like then okay. Things started to fall fall apart but up until that point it really was almost flawless. It's so well directed and yeah like I say one of the very specific things that I liked about it. Just just because this really appeals to me and the kind of on just the kind of stories alike but also specifically the kind who are like started completely comedia- res- adventure already happening And so we get to see the companions. 'cause obviously we always see the companions onions in comparison to the doctor and then not as competent as the docks who because who is. That's Kinda the point of it. That's how it works but because we're a step further down the chain as it were and now we get to see the companions through the lens of people who don't even know that doctor. The doctor exists. It's like their own companions right right but they suddenly also appear as if they're highly competent well-informed knowledgeable daring. Aaron do adventurers which was really Nice. Made a nice contrast but also yeah just the fact that barreled through with people going wait. Wait what's going on companions and like Yay. There's this thing going on. We haven't got time to tell you. Yeah it just really that together with the direction which was very horror movie like almost. I'm sure that was deliberately with you. Know because of the kind of episode that it was trying to get across this feeling of dread and and You know impending doom was really successful. I thought I mean absolute all credit so the DP the camera on the director. Everybody involved in that really set the mood. Yeah I agree completely the the way the story gets told they did TAC. There's a moment of the very very very end of last week's episode where there's like. Oh there's a thing it's weird it's happening on three continents we should go do and that it's funny because that basically provides this episode with all the setup you really need and the gap is the boring boring stuff that we don't need to see. which is I'm going to drop you off here and I'm going to drop you off here? The audience will learn that along with all the characters that they find in Peru Madagascar and Hong Kong. And you know whatever that store is where the the the cop on the edges rest is rugby-tackling shoplifters and I just yeah you're right. It puts the companions in a in greater positions. Because they're the they're the doctor they're the positions of authority authority. It uses the fact that there are three companions right like I know. It's sort of Ryan's over here and Graham and Yaser over here but like the splitting them all up and then the doctor's got her mission like I thought that was really good. They mentioned earlier but I want to say it again shooting in South Africa like yes. I I love that Dr that that Black Mirror episode that semi eighties that is literally the same shot the the same mountains. It's in Cape Town right like whatever but it looks so good and it's varied enough on a doctor who budget that this like. We're in we're in Madagascar Asker. We're in Hong Kong. We're in you know in the in Peru were in all these places and like it feels like a globetrotting adventure. Sure in a way that I like doctor who to feel I. I wanted to feel like the doctor can go not just anywhere in time and space but also anywhere on earth and have in this case like because we have a target here and they don't even need to show it like they say doctor. This thing is happening in Peru and she just POPs up and the load people onto the CARDIS. Let's go back to Hong Kong load people off of the artists and the and like I loved it. I kind of love that it ends up being kind of the doctor and the crime solving gang and they keep collecting people as they go and yeah I thought it was. I thought it was really fun. And that the added characters made it that much more fun than that it really like the scenes and locations. And you're right the first half hour basically. I thought this is perfect. This is this is fun and looks great and is taking me on an adventure. And that's what I want from doctor who wasn't Hong Kong. There is no way that that street was it was. It was a narrow street and there was they Hose down the roads. Do when it's night and the roads are hose down because they look better and all that but it was like you know that. Yeah okay. That's fair but that beach each relative. That looked really good beach but what you said about them not explaining non over explaining what was going on the star. Because it's like you say set it up at the start of sorry at the end of the previous episode. That's I mean you know who all too often it does explain probably too much to spend too much time explaining things that we can kind of figure out now some of that. Obviously he's because it is a family. Show you go Barry Mind. They're all going to be young kids. What Jin sometimes you know? Yes you're going to need to sort of help to bring them along for the ride but but at the same time I really appreciate when. Sometimes they don't do that and they're just like yeah you'll figure it out you know you've seen this kind of thing before you've watched the show before we know how it works folks you'll figure it out it's fine and I that helps them create a more mature style of storytelling. The I really appreciate shape and as I understand why they can't do it all the time but when they do do it and the and they pull it off then it really works I think yeah I don't I I don't necessarily need and you're right. Maybe maybe is necessary from time to time but I don't necessarily need the all right. Everybody where where should we go. Why don't we go to this place? Kirk Doc oh here we are everybody. Let's go out. Oh here's a strange person. I wonder what's going on. Oh there's a mystery will be solved and here. None of that is necessary. The mystery is being solved. Everybody is on the case and instead as an audience member I love because it really doesn't make any sense and you're trying to put it together of like wait a second so there's the spaceship and the astronauts texting that he needs help and which doesn't really make any sense but whatever and how does he have a cell phone with him and he's not? There's going to be a twist right that it was that it was a bait that it was lured by the aliens to get for some reason that cop out to Hong Kong. Yeah no maybe there's a dropped scene there where he explains that he tried to escape and stole a phone and then they dragged him back and they didn't want to show him before that but it is never explained but still. It's like the hiker the two bloggers who go to the river in Peru and there's garbage everywhere which again and it's not actually a weird thing that's happening. The garbage is not the aliens the garbage is the humans who have turned this beautiful natural thing into a spoiled location location which is part of the message of this episode. But still it's like what does this mean and then Ryan pops up and meanwhile one of the one of the women is gone and then you know. There's the the the mystery of of the sailor floating face down in the water and Madagascar. And what does that mean. And how and this episode goes really deep where there I had literally no idea I was like. Are you ever going to resolve the story. Because I felt like we got about forty minutes out of fifty with very very little idea of what the resolution was going to be an all the whole time I was thinking to myself. This resolution is going to be really abrupt because they have run out of time and like literally there is a moment where the doctor stands there and we see her thinking which is it can be good but it also can be very spur three after Colin scrapie and ex positional and. I can't decide where this episode falls down but we're she's basically like oh it's plastic caustic. It's like okay and and there's an aunt's reference and she's there's a funny me laugh and it's followed by come on brains move it along and Graham says did she say say brains with slamming. There's that time later when she's when she's like you are only in this episode once we're literally just straight after it's been on but when she's I think at gunpoint from the scientists and she says like Oh wait half off all all that one cycles oh like you say very stagey very theatrical bar this is this is the kind of quality that you look for in adopter. Ada Ask somebody who is going to be playing. That character is somebody who can pull that off. I haven't say doctors do that. They all it's part of the character is part of the show. You've gotta that'd be able to sell that. Yeah that's actually the moment that I was sold on David tennant in his first episode. There's that moment where he tastes the blood on the alien spaceship spaceship and he goes. Oh blood control I remember this. I haven't seen this for years and I was like okay. I believe I believe that. He's the doctor now..

Hong Kong Peru Kirk Doc Madagascar Ryan Graham Antony Johnston JASON SNELL Chris chip comedia- res Erica David tennant Madagascar Asker Cape Town South Africa director Aaron Steven
"antony johnston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:48 min | 2 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"People would still believe that Madonna is too much Christina queens, talking about her like hits in the past tense, Christine and the queens there and Chris releases on the twenty first of September. And she set to take it on a massive world tour later this year. My guest today are Antony Johnston the writer and artist are crumbs Atari Okram Christine was talking about how geology in terms of singing in both French and English. How many languages do you? Navigate in Lebanon, most of Lebanese people, speak French Rb can English whether they speak English better than French or French better than English is besides the point, but they can be gate to three and all those communities culturally distinct, then I mean, do artists become known in Arabic speaking circles or in the Anglo will fame circles without necessarily crossing over. There is a truth to what you're saying. Yes. There is a cultural. Let's say cultural traits that that leaves a Mark on you, if you're a francophone or anglophone or Arab phone, what are you a more anglophone francophone? I want you see I would have thought because your work is incredibly visual that you can cross all and beyond. I hope that's a wish. You're you're you're brought back to who you are culturally for sure. Yeah. What about you? Anthony, we were listening to Christine and the queens talking about looking to Madonna the inspiration. I think this is something that's common to all generations that we look behind us and draw from what's greater. I mean is there such a thing as an original thinker? That's a really difficult question to answer. You know, there is a strain of thought obviously that will say there are no new ideas and nothing in the world is possibly new. I think that's not the case, but it does become harder. Especially in this saturated world of interconnectedness and media onslaught becomes much more difficult to have those original thoughts. I'm to then fight through the morass of entertainment to get those thoughts and ideas out into the world. But we do every so often somebody will come along and have a new idea. And take the world by storm. And that keeps happening, and I don't think it will ever stop, which is great. I'd like to know about new ideas, if you're listening, and you've got thoughts on anything we're discussing today. Do send us a message. You can Email the arts our at the dot co dot UK, all why not if you're using social media hashtag, it's BBC arts. Our you're listening to the arts our on the BBC World Service. I'm Nikki Bedi more books talk now because I turn to my studio guest here in London Antony Johnston who's graphic novel. The coldest city was transformed into the movie, atomic blonde. Starring Shalit's, the Ron, and my friend daddy moss. And by the way, I love lovely management. Oh, he's fantastic. But I also loved the movie I'll tell you lots of reasons why if you're interested, but let's talk about your new book because it's a cyber spy thriller. And it's the first in a series with Bridget shop at the center. It's called the. The X four year code, and it does actually incorporate encrypted messages in computer coding, so Bridget works for 'em. I six six is the British Foreign intelligence service. And she's a hacker in a small department called a cyber threat analytics and then she accidentally uncovers the possible existence of an international terrorist. Plot is Antony hacking something it's we know it's a crime, but Bridget is actually employed as a hacker. And it's something we know very little about most of us. How do you know so much I know so much because I am quite simply a nerd I grew up just at the right age to be there at the door of home computing, and I've always been fascinated by them icon as I said before write computer, code and hackers really are employed by intelligence services all over the world to. To what extent and exactly what their duties are within those services is not something that's easy to find out unless you're embroiled within that. Well, but we know that hackers are being employed and used by these agencies. So that part of the book is absolutely not a fantasy. This isn't the first time you've written a central female character. What's the appeal of writing women to you? I get asked this a lot because. Yes through entire career. I have gravitated towards female protagonists, not exclusively. But certainly more than half of my work has that at its core. I think on reflection, and it's taken me a long time to reach this conclusion. I think it's simply because as an author I can be more emotionally honest with a female protagonist than a male protagonist women are and this is a cultural thing rather than genetic. Of course, but nevertheless, women are much more able to be honest with themselves and with others about the emotional state. And certainly in the context of a novel even more so than graphic novel. That is I think a vital part of engaging the reader and telling your compelling story. So Bridget was a Gulf and a hacker at school in university a bookworm, a lover of music is she you there are. Certainly elements of myself. All you the outsider and the nerd. Oh. Yes. On the golf elements as you alluded to earlier. Yes are absolutely drawn from my own experiences in the book. There are a couple of graphic pictures that are created with code. So I am now holding up one picture. What is this that describe what I'm saying to our listeners? So what you're saying is what we in the online world called Ascii, art Ascii. That's ASC here. Yes is the. The term given to the language set within sort of you know, when you type words on your computer Ascii art was made in the days of what was known as us net, which was kind of a precursor to the World Wide Web is sort of worldwide chat board if you like every letter takes up the same width of space on the paper. And so when you know that you can create almost like a sort of magic ice style picture of letters. But what is that? Oh, that's a wolf. So I think that's a wolf to other people have seen something completely different than I shan't. Shame them and telling you what let me tell you pay twenty six what creature is that in Ascii ours. That's a VW bug that you're looking at the car. This is fantastic. Right. Graphic novels and video games and novels, and they all take I would imagine different skills. They will they all exercise a different. Parts of the writers brain, I think he's how I'd put it. There are many skills that transfer put there are also specific skills within each medium that. Yes that only that medium will draw upon. So when we saw Shelley's the wrong playing your character in atomic blunt. The film is called atomic blonde. Were you happy with the way? She was depicted were you happy with the way like for. But if I paused atomic blonde there are beautiful moments in that fell. Yes, I feel like I'm looking at the graphic novel. Yes. Well, and that's mostly down to the director, Dave Leach and the cinematographer Jonathan sailor who are both amazing. I loved the film co-producer. So I was involved throughout the production. But also quite willing to let David and Jonathan and chalets and those people make the movie they wanted to make and I think she really got to the essence of the character. She looks different. To hire the couches in the graphic novel. Let's fine. That's really important. What she really got for me was the core and the essence of the character and that really comes across. So the explorer code is out. Now, it's published by lightning books, and it's the first in Anthony's Bridget shop thriller. Thank you, so much even more literature. Now, we spoil you on the arts. Our don't we Afghan born American writer colleague Hussein is best known for his international bestseller. The kite runner a moving novel turned into a movie and theater production which explores thirty years in the turbulent history of Afghanistan. The author was recently appointed a goodwill ambassador to the UN refugee agency. And as he told the BBC Samir armored. He's role is what influenced his new book see prayer, a beautifully illustrated short story about the refugee crisis in Syria. It was inspired by the shocking image of the three year olds. Syrian boy, Allen Kurdi. Who's drowned body was washed up on the Turkish shore in twenty fifteen? He and his family was Syrian refugees. Trying to reach Europe college, his any explained more. So I was asked to speak at a fundraiser for UNHCR the refugee agency in March of two thousand seventeen I was given about five minutes to speak and ever since having seen that horrific image of this young boy whose life was cut short at the age of three and seeing this his body in the hands of soldier who are no him with the name or sound of his voice or his laughter. I wanted to say something about that not only about that family and that and that loss, particularly, but also about all the thousands of other people who through desperate circumstances have had to abandon their homes and their communities and make these often lethal crossings through the Mediterranean to reach European shores. And so I sat and for about two afternoons, and almost in one stream one rush this story kind of declared itself and more or less produced. I was produced as the way it's more or less in the book. The book does have these beautiful watercolours the most striking for me was this image of women and children in bombed-out ruins did you research some of these locations from photographs or how how did you come to decide what elements to put in? And then how they should look did you talk to the straighter. Well, I gave a general road signs about what I was talking about the novel itself the book, I should say, which is short illustrated book just kind of gave. Some details now left the rest of the Dan. The artist Dan Williams, and I thought he did a magnificent job. Just kind of conjuring this Syria before are the siege of homes and before the war begins and in the first half of this book, the colors are beautiful yellow and red than green and bright. And then you see a shift too much darker colors in the second half. When the war breaks out. And suddenly this man who grew up in Syria has lovely memories realizes that his son like an entire generation of children from Syria, and my own homeland of ghanistan, no, only war and destruction and turmoil and you see this shift in palette you book is coming out three years since Allen's body was seen around the world. And we can all remember at the time. How it seemed to shock people into genuinely wanting to stop. But it hasn't. I wonder how far you can think about what impact a book like this might have. We might want it to have look the fact is things haven't changed all that much. In fact, they've gotten worse. Fewer people are coming to Europe. But they're dying at higher rates proportionally. And so I wanted to not only pay tribute to that family, and the the other families that have lost their lives are gone missing at sea. But also, I want readers to read this and remember how they felt when they saw that image. Let's remember our collective outrage or collective indignation. We when we saw that photograph, which was a poignant symbol, not only of the Syrian war. But of the unimaginable despair felt by so many people despair corn corners them into choices that to me are unthinkable to take the people you love, the most your children, your blood and to give your life savings to smugglers who have no regard for.

Bridget Antony Johnston Syria Christine BBC Madonna writer Anthony Allen Kurdi Lebanon BBC World Service Nikki Bedi Europe Gulf Chris UN UNHCR Afghanistan
"antony johnston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:54 min | 2 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Coldplay's yellow created for crazy, rich Asians. And that was still a Henry Golding talking to me crazy. Rich, Asians is out. Now, it's a lot of fun. It's also quite leasing I welled up a couple of times and the women are fantastic. My guests on today's arts our graphic novelist Antony Johnston who's here with me in London and photographer and artist are crumbs artery who is in Beirut studio. And we just heard Henry talking about the Easter eggs in crazy, which Asians phenomenon that really comes from the gaming world. I think doesn't it. So do you play secrets in your world? I do sometimes actually my novel leaks for ecoed is full of them. If your in the right subculture as it were. I mean, there are references to song lyrics, but there are also very subtle Easter egg references to club nights of the one thousand nine hundred ninety s and certain habits of Goths of a certain age scattered throughout the book acronym. We'll be talking about your work in a moment. But do you hide messages and place clues that might make somebody like me, feel brilliant? If I discovered them as a viewer. Yes. I think part of my work is about burying. Do things and hiding them. So in a way ticket withdrawing them from from reality. And that is for example, the time capsule I did for Documenta in two thousand twelve so what did you hide in the time capsule? My first paintings. I'm when when do we get to open this time capsule? We don't it's a permanent burial, the music and crazy rich Asians was incredibly important. Anthony, do you feel strongly about the soundtracks to films and two games? Which is a world you're involved in. What about your work? I am a huge music fan anyway, and a musician myself, I was very pleased to see when the coldest city McGrath oval was adopted two atomic blonde that it is absolutely littered with eighties music throughout the movie. It's an instant transportation of back to that time for people who lived through it. We've been asking you on the BBC World Service Facebook page for the food scene in the movie that you love the most. And why that's because as you just heard Henry Golding, and I were talking about the amazing food scenes will food porn is I referred to it in crazy with Jason's. Here's what you've been saying. Mark Gibbs says I'm the scene featuring the unfold. Ordinate Mr. creosote from Monty python's meaning of life. This is when a man if you haven't seen the film is eating more and more and growing bigger and bigger until he has one last whatever thin mint and basically explodes. Sorry. Spoiler alert mirror. Connerly says, oh, so many, but it has to be the assembly of the ingredients in the film that that's feast just a tiny bit of head of the cake of tears being eaten by wedding guests in like water for chocolate and Gonzalez in Rio de Janeiro says e pro love thanksgiving lunch, because it's what food is all about love Christopher Neiman. Who is in California says Tampopo, which was my choice. Heck pick has seen a lot of great bits in that movie. And he says his favourite is the sense say teaching his people the correct way to eat a bowl of Rahman. And if you want to continue and contributes to this conversation, just head to the BBC World Service Facebook page, and if you're using. Social media, just use hashtag BBC arts. Our you're listening to the arts are on the BBC World Service. I'm Nikki Bedi a crumbs artery over in they route. It's your turn to talk. So let me just tell everyone a bit about you and your work. I. U elevensies artist photographer and filmmaker who's represented Lebanon at the two thousand thirteen Venice Biennale and your works have been exhibited worldwide at MoMA New York at the pump produce center in Paris Tate modern here in London. He also co founded the Arab image foundation collection of over six hundred thousand pictures from across the Middle East North Africa and the diaspora so a crime, your film and artwork is based on how people represent themselves one of your most famous pieces. In fact, as a film installation called dance to the end of love, and it's made up of YouTube videos, uploaded by young men across the Arab world before the Arab spring, and they're singing and dancing. They're playing instruments. They're mocking about were you aware when you started to piece that together. Gather that it was going to be such an important piece of sexual history. No, I was thinking about the possibilities that YouTube provides me vis-a-vis other forms of more traditional archives, libraries or family albums. Quotes historian, because I operate as a historian in within the earth were one of the parts of the video, or your film installation has a YouTube video of two guys dancing. A one of them keeps falling back. He goes straight up again like a board. He bounces around. I can't get their movements out of my brain. It's so arresting do they know that they are now part of your film people like that. No, they don't know. They don't because I did not get in touch with any one of them. They want to be visible. I make them more visible and many of those by the way where shared by other viewers. So in a way people liked what they saw the shared it on their own profile as well. So there's a multiplication of sharing and I see my work as part of it. I absolutely love your most recent film the script it starts with a Muslim man kneeling to pray on his prayer mat? But he also has to toddlers with him in the room one is using him like a climbing frame. The other has a toy he's playing with various points. What are you saying in this film? This is a film that started with YouTube as well, one of the recent phenomenon YouTube is that you find people praying and their kids around them trying to seek their attention or attracted attention trying to climb challenging in a way the practice of prayer. So I mean, I was fascinated with these stories because they're very funny also. But as well as a human, and you rarely find interesting representations of religion, most of the representations of religion that you find on YouTube or out there are boring. Yes, Syria, reaching. Yeah. So I mean, I was I think it's beautiful, and I wanted to make it as an iconic piece most of the videos that you've seen on YouTube are made with a telephone and their lowest solution there. One take it's badly done. So I wanted to do with properly with proper. Editing with a good cinematographer. And I wanted to it to become the icon of the mainframe with his son. Well, thank you, a crumb. You're staying with us for the rest of the program. But if any of you listening have had your interest peaked, I'm show, millions of you have if you want to find out how you can see a crumbs work. We've put a link on our website. Literature now on the arts are and American writer. Madeleine Miller is fascinated by the Greek myths, she's a high school teacher of Greek and Latin so she'd need to be really latest book is a retelling of the classic Greek myth, the odyssey her previous novel. This some of achilles was also a retelling of Homer's the Iliad when she spoke to the BBC's James Nachtwey, she explained her lifelong love of the classics. I have always felt that these stories were incredibly real and the characters felt incredibly real to me since I encountered them as a child. My mother actually used to read to me from the Iliad and the odyssey, and I took these as children do as real people so imagining that into it was a pleasure. Even though it took me ten years, and as a classics teacher to high school kids who would obviously trying to bring these stories to life and explain the way in which these stories had been part of people's daily lives. They were the myths and stories that informed the way they lead their lives. Absolutely. And one of the things I love about being a high school teacher is oftentimes the first day of the year, the students come into your class. They know it's going to be a mythology class or an ancient literature class, and they sort of had this look on their face like this is going to be really bad. And it's really exciting to just tell them the stories and introduce them to the actual literature and just see them light up because these stories are so exciting, and they're big an epic compassionate, and they're filled with love and grief and students connect to them. I sadly, don't really believe that there was one person named or maybe there was someone named Homer. But he was just the best Bard of the generation who brought stuff together. But I don't think he was composing from scratch at all these stories had been around and been retold. And I think the piece of that that really affected me was the part of these. Stories are for everyone. These were the stories grandparents were telling to their grandchildren, and that people were really passing down. And so sometimes we look at the engine Greek literature me kind of put it up on a pedestal. And we see it as this holy untouchable thing where you have to have a particular type of education to approach it. But that is not where these stories started Madeline Miller, my guests on today's aunts. Our our artists are crumbs artery and thriller writer and graphic novelist. Antony Johnston so Okram possibly one of the most famous Arabic myths or sets of stories which has been reinvented is one thousand and one nights or Arabian nights, which has found its way into Japanese and western culture with tales like Aladdin Aladdin Sinbad, the thief of Bagdad, do we see any of that in Lebanese films, for example. Yes. I mean, there's an amazing film that has been inspired by thousand and one one night in Egypt not in Lebanon in Egypt where the like the Bollywood of of Arab cinema is the wife number thirteen as those are by fourteen hub in the in the sixties. It's a woman who discovered right after she got married that her husband actually, married twelve times before her and he divorced each one of his wife's right after having sex. So what she decided to do. And this is really an amazing film. Also from a from a feminist perspective. Read an amazing film what she decided to is exactly what Shiraz are did to Shahryar to defer her killing is actually defer having sex with this guy. So every night she would invent a pretext for not having sex. She teaches him like a big lesson in. In life. It's really one of the most significant I would not say a remake, but actually Asian of. Thousand and one night. We are all wanting to see that right now, Anthony comics have been created from myths, and they will create the mythologies if you think about we talk about the marvel universe. Don't we? So are these epic tales important to the graphic novel worlds. I think they are to an extent they inform. How these modern myths told there aren't so many direct adaptations of Greco, Roman myths, for example, but the the world of the superhero, which obviously dominates the market in comic books and graphic novels is very much informed by those Pantheon's. And by those old myths are to create the new myths of the heroes four sort of pop culture. Well, the very fact that it would be heroes, and there would be a nemesis hubris and all those things that we associate with Greek theater in mythology. Absolutely. Yeah. What about in the gaming world? Then I mean, all things inspired by. Myths and Arabian tales in that world because I know you lost about gaming. Yes. Well, right video games as well. And there are I mean, there are some. There's an aspect where it generally informs, the storytelling as it does with superheroes in comic books. But also the have been games have drawn directly upon those mis. For example, there's a long running series of games called the prince of Persia games, which are drifting to the one thousand one nights and draw on our bec- mythology and also a more recent series called God of war which began as a very violent reference to Greek myths and then after a series of games, they rebooted the series last year this time completely changing enjoying on north myths. And I think it's good if nothing else because it may encourage players to seek out those original myths an outcome, you own odds, of course, involves a way of retelling or reincarnating an existing work to talk about the present. So you're doing a similar thing in some ways on this too. It's rewriting of our lives and games and films..

YouTube BBC Henry Golding Antony Johnston Anthony London school teacher BBC World Service writer Lebanon Coldplay Nikki Bedi Middle East Beirut studio Persia
"antony johnston" Discussed on Upgrade

Upgrade

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Upgrade

"Or three people on the conversation it's worth doing above that you gotta pay on cast you've got to pay so you can look into it but i think they're great if everybody's got a computer with with chrome on it the the i will say the more people you get the worst gets because as much as we complain about skype the thing about skype is skype is a service that's built to be resilient it does a lot of things you send your files up and then skype is sending a mixed down version of the audio of the whole call just to you whereas something that's using a browser everybody's downloading a bunch of different audio streams separately which is more bandwidth intensive so if you've got five or six people on the call things start to fall apart really fast especially if somebody's got a a bad connection also skype does a lot of processing they take out background noise they level the audio volumes of everybody so when i talked to tim on cast i can hear he's quiet and i can hear a lot of background noise that that i never here when i talked to him on skype now it's there on the recording and i have to take care of it but skype can actually be a more pleasant conversation if you've got a large group of people because it's trying very hard to make audible behind the scenes so in the short version please try best used skype colts right like as what you released the wall should you should never do that it's it should be a backup but sometimes it happens someone have somebody who has a call it on an iphone or something it's like they can't record on their iphones so we'll we'll make it work but it's not ideal so i would say if you've got people who are tech savvy enough to record their own microphone and put it in a dropbox file or something like that afterward you don't you don't have to use castors castor you can just use skype because the end result is not going to be dischord or whatever 'cause you're not gonna use that audio you're gonna use the audio that you record yourself if they're less technical and you're worried about it i would say yeah use castors castor because you're going to get their audio file without them doing anything which is brilliant right with these limitations that doesn't sound as good and you can't have a lot of people on the call i would say you should still probably use something like audio hijack to record both yourself and them just in case something happens because that's happened to me with tv tm where i've had a browser crash and the file got lost but i was using audio hijack as my backup and so i still had it so that is you should always do the belt and suspenders thing but i think those apps are great and i especially think they're great if you've got guests or co hosts who are less technical and and you know they're just not going to do all the steps that you need if you've got guests allot i think it's totally worth it like that's the best thing ever you've got a new guest every week rather than trying to walk them through how to record you can't do that i recommend podcast guest guide dot com which antony johnston put together step by step instructions about how to get your guest to record their audio and then send it to you it's great but if you have a low confidence in your guest being able to do that in these browsers they literally just click click a link and suddenly you're talking and you press the button and suddenly everything is getting recorded and uploaded to their to the to the server of the of the service that you're using it's brilliant so those are your options you got lots of.

"antony johnston" Discussed on Upgrade

Upgrade

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on Upgrade

"Entertainment parts so that you could take the head off of one and put it on another one and you could they all fit in the same different vehicles and vehicles often would come apart and could go back together it's overstating it to say they were like what if you made action figures and vehicles that were like lego in the sense that the all of them could kind of be rebuilt in different ways it's probably overstating it but it was kind of like that and that was like when i was in first grade i will tell you that was the way that everybody wanted and it was pretty great wanted the microphones actually like do in was a comic or like a so issue became it became a comic after the after the the toys became such a wild success they made a comic of it and the funny thing is then the comic book lasted longer than the toys lasted the comic book lasted way longer and they've sense sense a kind of rebooted the new versions of the comic it's a migos intellectual properties now owned by hasbro i think and so they're talking about making a movie based on it which will be terrible because it'll be in the transformers universe presumably and they've got they've rebooted different versions of the comics but the original comic was my favorite comic book growing up and i did a whole episode about microdots on antony johnston's unjustly maligned podcast so maybe we can put a linked to that in the show notes but yeah that was my favorite my favorite my favorite comic book my favorite toys as kid wow that was actually really interesting i've heard you mentioned the micro bunch and i always you never knew what they looked like i was it was just a comic book i don't know if i have a recall you mentioning that they will toys like on the comparable like i have always hold you mentioned them and then because they are only used to mention on the incomparable i assume the tv show or coma quoque not toy line that turned into it because that's quite rare right that goes from toy tacoma it's usually the other way around right no this this was a that was the aira of virtue dicing tieins and all of that and so that's what they that's what they were trying to do there is we have a popular toiling and also i mean we have a popular space themed toy line star wars huge marvel comics looking for star wars like properties to turn into comics to tap into the market of kids who have star wars and interns out kids who love these space themed sifi fem d toys perfect and they got some they got some very good writers artists to work on that and strangely it actually outlived the the popularity of the toys because it was a good comic do they go great great question from mock if you would like to send in snow told question for the future just sent a tweet with the hash tag snell talk and it goes into a sheet for us to pull from future date thank you for that some follow up on span cooling abs so in osco upgrade last week we were talking about some apps to try and block those local span kohl's like local number spam calls and it just wanted to round up a few from from of gradient listeners who have gone out than they've done the work for us like jason ben recommended no robo so there's a i think you said you'd stopped using jason was out right yeah yeah i have used it occasionally i think one of the problems with it is that it struggles with the local exchange problem of like it looks like it's a local number it's not necessarily on a blacklist so i haven't tried it in a little while i have it on my actually have it on my landline that's that's through the cable company that the phone that i've had for twenty years they bundle no morobo with that so it's it's doing some it's actually pretty great because that's the phone number that has been collected and is on every phone spam list but i haven't tried it on my phone and then a couple more alan brad buff us something haya hate i wa way of coastal links today's will be in the show notes ed hughes's an app called wide protect and another brad likes exchange block as.

twenty years
"antony johnston" Discussed on The Incomparable

The Incomparable

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on The Incomparable

"To this has been scientifically proven that the eighties with the best decade in all of music interesting i agree with you drafting third will be antony johnston hello hello and just recall the old saying if you can remember the nineteen eighties you just want that no way something like that kelly gaumont will be drafting fourth hello hey steve lots will be drafting fifth by process of elimination steve random dot org gates you up yours random four for that also beep boop beep beep boop it's the eighties date it is and i will draft last because i am a gracious host so with that said we'll give you i will give you one other rule which is that this is in addition to these needing to be musical albums and not photo albums or comedy albums i will also say that album's already already picked last time in our album draft are off the board because they were already picked any previous draft and this also means yes in the nineties album draft that will surely follow someday albums from that we picked this time will not be eligible doubly because of course they aren't from the right decade anyway monte you are i with the first pick in the eighties music draft what do you have i'm going to start things off on super musical note with an album by the bad negative land allow i'm not sure the word band is the right word they're actually more kind of an audio collage performance art experiment in annoying the audience but i did see them in concert once which is something you say about bands so i think it's close enough they had to eighties albums that i listened to an awful lot escape from noise and a big ten eight place they also had a single they sampled u2 in casey kasem them and they got sued into oblivion with the albums and i'm going to go with escape from noise which is slightly more normal it's got several tracks and some of them are sort of musical unlike a big ten eight place half of which is mostly a description of driving from san francisco to contra costa county while bleeps in bloop s happen it's great though i love that album to the big single from escape from noise is a song called christianity is stupid which is mostly rearranged samples from a really weird movie called if footmen tire you what will horses do at that movie is christian propaganda and it's kind of rearranged into something that they call christianity is stupid spoke up and said given chris and there's a sort of a song called well it's about how many times owns they have in the soviet union the answer is eleven songs very clear about that says it a million times escape from noise was made by cutting and splicing physical tape and it must have taken them forever to make an i love it escape from noise nineteen eightyseven negatively i only know negative land from the u2 incident oh you should listen to a big ten eight place because you're going to recognize the landmarks as they drive over the bridge sure that sounds good choice i fun memories of negative land from back in the day so that's a good one that is you did you right they get if they got sued into oblivion for the youtube thing but they did definitely our label sold them out and the ban owed hundreds of thousands of dollars which it turns out being a performance our audio collage bad doesn't make you hundreds of thousands of dollars interesting they put out some stuff after that but they were not really able to continue in the same vein well that's what you get when you mess with casey kasem i think that's the lesson we learned or they learned parkway the hard way now back to the countdown james thompson what's your choice well i think we're going to have a continuing theme here of cutting and splicing physical types a lot of my picks are albums the i've listened to and they completely rewired to my teenage brain in some way and i think when i first had this album i vaguely knew who david byrne was from talking heads but i had no idea who brian eno us so i'm gonna go with my life in the bush of ghosts by the.

"antony johnston" Discussed on The Incomparable

The Incomparable

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on The Incomparable

"Exactly it's clearly influenced by what weimar republic yes but and that was why i didn't like it i'm fine with that i'm fine with all the boxes that are checks with inclusion diversity and all that stuff that makes it sound like i'm not but i am trust me but i just i like some of the characters but i didn't really care about anything that was happening in it which is a problem when you're reading a book that you don't really care like i liked the cyril and i thought he was interesting relationship with the the cabaret person but i didn't really care about what happened to him and if i think you're interesting but i don't care what's happening it it doesn't make it a compelling read for me yeah there's there's stuff about it there's like details the stuff the other thing that bothered me about it in in terms of the writing because i think i think the writing was shaky i think the characters are are clearly drawn and the relationships are clearly drawn but i think some of the writing style just didn't work for me like i said i think the opening is very hard to get through where she is trying to set up all of these characters and their relationships and it's a mess i mean just to be frank about it like i almost abandoned it and our friend antony johnston said i give everything one hundred pages and then if it's not working for me i toss it and i was about sixty pages in at that point and i said all right i'll give it one hundred pages and by the time i got one hundred pages i kept reading i was like all right it's starting to come together now but boy.

cyril antony johnston weimar
"antony johnston" Discussed on The Incomparable

The Incomparable

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"antony johnston" Discussed on The Incomparable

"Of resisted putting it on my list first because of that but i think that it is so extremely cinematic in terms of the the way that it grew and he composer from the beginning i feel like it would lend itself rather nicely a few other one also you know again full disclosure were all friends of antony johnston we all loved antony johnston you as a sure goal on just leave a line right here on this very never let's give him and i'm going to come as a movie doesn't mean he he needs to move all right yeah these are friends on the movie is you know i have a a mutual love of of some of some fantasy movies from the eighties dar chris told being one of them that influenced comic of his that is very much its own thing it is not past a should is not antony just doing his version of one of these properties and it is a book called a fantasy book with a weird creepy things that go bump in the night it is really exceptional i wish added gone beyond two volumes to this point he's not opposed to continuing it he has a lot more story to tell and loved it so more story i would love for him to be able to tell that more story by seeing it get optioned for a a really cool really awesome fantasy fantasy film series because there there is there's so much material there other really great current indy comic so another image book they'll that's what the james bond speier we're going is asian what if the secretary what if missed money penny we're really the radically most competent spy in the building and something went amiss and she had to solve everything to fix everything but it is some of the best work that edgar baker steve that thing and elizabeth bright wiser of done together and those three have worked on legendary issues of captain america so that's saying something fantastic spy series that i i i hope it's already in development somewhere.

antony johnston speier secretary america dar chris james bond elizabeth bright