20 Burst results for "Antonia Gonzalez"

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:45 min | 2 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by quantic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. The Indian arts and

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:10 min | 3 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. The U.S. Supreme Court is considering a challenge to the Indian child welfare act as the mountain west news bureaus will walking reports, some states, including Wyoming, are preparing their own laws if the courts deem ICWA unconstitutional. ICWA requires state courts to prioritize placing Native American children in foster or adoption care within their tribal communities. It was passed in 1978 in response to the large number of indigenous children who were being separated from their cultural affiliations. Those against ICWA say it's unfair discrimination against non indigenous people, but others, like Wyoming state representative landed Brown, disagree. He testified at the legislature in early March. I want to make sure that we step back just for half a second and realize that these are sovereign tribes. This isn't necessarily about the race issue. This is about granting those rights to the sovereign tribes, the Wyoming legislature recently voted to codify a corporate protections for native families. The state's governor signed that bill into law this week. Utah and Montana lawmakers have pushed to do the same, at least 11 other states, including New Mexico, have already done so. The court could make a ruling on ICWA as early as this spring for national native news. I'm will walkie in Laramie. The nation's fentanyl crisis is hitting American Indian and Alaska native communities harder than others, that's according to federal officials, Matt laszlo reports from Washington on efforts to stem the tragic tide of overdoses in Indian country. American Indian and Alaska natives saw a 39% spike in overdoses between 2019 and 2020. According to the CDC. That's because of the flood of fentanyl pouring into America. Things only got worse during COVID lockdowns as tribal leaders from coast to coast, no all too well. It's everywhere. That's Mark makaro, travel chair of Southern California's pachanga band of Indians. Overdose rates among American Indian and Alaska native women between 25 and 44 were nearly two times that of white women of the same age, according to the CDC, makaro says it's a travesty. What we see is fentanyl being put into other products that are unwittingly being used unwittingly causing debt and it's insidious. It's sickening that that kind of sociopathic activity is being used there if people are making money off of it and others. Native Americans and Alaska natives have historically suffered higher rates of substance use disorder than their non native peers. But makaro says fentanyl has made everything worse. It makes everything more acute because maybe folks who are going to die from casual or recreational use of whatever the substance was. But death is near certain when it comes to fentanyl. And so it is more dangerous. It's gone to the next level. The National Congress of American Indians continues lobbying Congress for more resources to fight the overdose epidemic. But with Republicans now in control of the House of Representatives, steep budget cuts may be on the horizon. For national native news, I'm at laszlo in Washington. This week, the U.S. Senate confirmed Patrice Kunis as the commissioner of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services administration for Native Americans promoting tribal self sufficiency and cultural preservation. The commissioner is one of the most senior Senate confirmed federal officials in native policy at HHS. The commissioner advises the health secretary on Indian affairs. I'm Antonia

ICWA Antonia Gonzalez Wyoming Wyoming legislature Alaska makaro Matt laszlo U.S. Supreme Court Mark makaro CDC Laramie legislature Montana New Mexico Utah Brown fentanyl Washington Southern California
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. Tribal leaders are watching the U.S. Supreme Court and bracing for the worst as a law intended to keep native children with native families is being challenged. Mount laszlo reports on the foundational rights leaders, including the speaker of the muscogee nation in Oklahoma, for the high court may strip away from tribes. Tribes are still reeling from last year's Supreme Court decision that greatly expanded the power state governments have over prosecuting non natives who commit crimes in Indian country. That case was Oklahoma, V Castro huerta, and it still haunts William Lowe. That's the biggest issue right now with us. And yeah, that's something we're concentrating on. Tribal leaders are now bracing for the upcoming court ruling on the Indian child welfare act of 1978, as the court decides whether an act aimed at American Indian and Alaska native children is actually discriminatory on the basis of race. Very. I mean, I'm pretty nervous because even with the now that the state and phrase can come onto a rose and in arrest our folks, that's the, with that decision being last time that's kind of what makes us even more nervous. Yeah. We look at that as our sovereignty too, and now this hit was really testing it. Mark mccarroll has tribal chair of the pachanga band of Indians in Southern California. And he's NCAA's first vice president. Like most native leaders, he's nervous. Though he's hoping the outcry from tribes last year will soften the court to their pleas. Andy's hoping Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, who served as a federal judge in the sprawling western tenth circuit, has more sway with his colleagues this year than he did last. You know, it turns into laws. We know it upside down. Right? So I know we know collectively that justice Gorsuch knows all about Indian law. I hope that his voice prevails enough to get a majority decision in their favor. I'm hopeful. But I don't want to be pollyanna either, you know? For national native news. I'm not laszlo in Washington. Lady Gaga, a popular artist, is a strong advocate for mental health. She created the organization called born this way foundation, along with her mother, around ten years ago, to make a difference in the lives of young people. Hanna bisset has an update on the foundation. Lady Gaga is a famous singer who has a platform that speaks about kindness, anti bullying, and awareness of mental health struggles. Her platform helped form the born this way foundation, whose mission began with spreading kindness. The foundation created a new advisory board of young people taking on the task of creating mental health resources, all of the board members have different educational and cultural backgrounds. Indigenous youth that's going to see me on there and the mission we're doing, they're going to feel heard and that sense of hope, right? That was river ward, who is a member of the minhwa and first nation of eel ground, and works as a prevention and outreach coordinator and is one of the 31 board members. Ward hones in on the importance of the board could have on making future changes to help heal generational wounds. We are here to help we're here to listen any indigenous people that might be struggling that there is support with love and care and understanding and that our voices will always be heard. The board is a yearlong term that is composed of people ages 15 to 24 years old. The board will create resources for communities across the world to utilize and emphasize kindness and understanding around mental health. I'm Hannah bisset. And a manton Gonzalez.

Antonia Gonzalez Mount laszlo Castro huerta William Lowe Oklahoma Mark mccarroll Justice Neil Gorsuch Supreme Court Gorsuch Hanna bisset Lady Gaga Alaska Southern California NCAA laszlo Andy river ward Washington Ward Hannah bisset
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:15 min | 3 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. Tribal college and university students from across the country were honored Tuesday night in Albuquerque by the American Indian higher education consortium, students were awarded for their skills and knowledge sports and arts after three days of competition in various events at the consortium's 2023 conference. 37 students from oglala Lakota college in South Dakota traveled to New Mexico. Don tobacco Frank is president of the college. She says, while students enhance their skills at the gathering, they learn valuable lessons back at their TCUs. The importance of tribal colleges and universities is to make that broader impact within the communities to really strengthen and build culture, the language to help reduce students who graduate in whatever fields of the tribal colleges offer in order for them to go back and work to feel their own individual goals. A majority of our students want to help return back to their reservations to help or through their own lens and help their people. Oglala Lakota college serves the pine ridge reservation and also has a satellite location in Rapid City and on the Cheyenne river reservation, offering degrees in business, social work, nursing, and other fields. Longtime leader of the Navajo Nation, Peterson's law passed away Tuesday in Arizona, the Navajo times reports. Zah was chairman of the Navajo council in the 1980s before becoming the first president of the Navajo Nation in 1990 when the tribe shifted its government system. He's being remembered for his lifelong advocacy for Navajo people, including encouraging young people to finish school and pursue higher education. He reportedly had complications with cancer and was 85 years old. Three yupik mushers from Southwest Alaska are among some of the most experienced racers in this year's iditarod, the 1000 mile sled dog race from anchorage to nome got underway Sunday. Former iditarod champey Kaiser from bethel finished off his 7th win of the Cusco quin 300, he's one of the racers to watch, as well as two mushers who've had successful past finishes, Richie deal of and Mike Williams junior from akiak, Williams has returned to the iditarod after taking a break from the race, bev Hoffman, a yupik musher, and a longtime Cusco 300 organizer has spent decades working to bring Alaska native mushers back into the sport, which in the early years of the iditarod had a crowded field of native mushers, later eclipsed by a well financed group of career mushers who could afford to train year round. Hoffman says it's rewarding to see the three mushers. I think all the chances are great. Mike was downplaying his own race scene that he didn't have a lot of training. But he's unreal well in the local races here. Pete and Richie last year they did real well and then and they have tucked dogs and the European one was on this route. Kaiser won the iditarod in 2019 and finished 5th last year, deal has run the iditarod ten times and finished right behind Kaiser last year in 6th place. Williams junior is running his 8th race of the iditarod this year's race has the smallest number of contenders on record, which Hoffman believes improves their chances for success, given their experience in not just the iditarod, but the Cusco quim 300, a 300 mile race on the frozen Cusco quim river. Our training is so tough out here. You just get hit with everything. Overflow. And I think that I'll better prepare these teams from this area. Hoffman says many past, I did a rod champs, came to bethel to compete to toughen up their teams. I did rod standings can be followed online. I did a rod dot com. I manton Gonzalez.

Antonia Gonzalez American Indian higher educati oglala Lakota college Don tobacco Frank Oglala Lakota college Navajo times Zah Navajo council champey Kaiser Cheyenne river Cusco quin Albuquerque South Dakota bev Hoffman Rapid City New Mexico Southwest Alaska Richie Peterson
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:34 min | 3 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Antonia Gonzalez.

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. After a years long battle, Congress updated and enhanced the federal violence against women act, but many tribes are still wondering if they'll see funding for its new provisions. Matt laszlo has a story from Washington. Under the updated violence against women act, which President Biden signed into law last year, tribes are finally allowed to prosecute non natives who abuse native women in Indian country. But many tribes are asking, where's the money? Frank stars come out as president of the agala Sioux tribe of South Dakota. We lack police force law enforcement resources on our reservation. Yeah. It's a lack of funding. So they changed the law, but they didn't give me the money to implement them. Well, we haven't seen anything yet, not that I know of. Democratic senator Elizabeth Warren wants to change that. She's pushing the honoring promises to native nations act. The bill has 5 titles aimed at what Warren says are 5 broken promises made by the U.S. government. Throughout the bill, we prioritized full funding for federal native programs. No more shortfalls. And the bill ensures that the funding going to Indian country is mandatory. Fulfilling trust and treaty obligations is not optional. First title or section of Warren's measure is focused on criminal justice and public safety. And it's mirrored off the special tribal jurisdiction included in the new violence against women act. Part of that section would fund travel justice systems. If tribes want them. It would also increase funding for sexual assault victims in Indian country. Warren says it's long overdue. Although this bill won't become law immediately, I think it's crucial for Congress to have legislation that says unequivocally. The United States has broken its promises and the United States must start making good on them. For national native news on that last low in Washington. Matriarchs of the occupation of wounded knee were honored as events marked the 50th anniversary Monday marked 50 years since the beginning of a 71 day occupation of wounded knee on the pine ridge reservation in South Dakota by members of the American Indian movement to draw attention to broken government promises and the fight for American Indian rights. Some of the women who were there shared memories during a panel discussion over the weekend, which was live streamed and hosted by the warrior women project, Madonna thunderhawk says she was in her 30s during that time and recalls how the event put native issues in the spotlight. I mean, every one of our nation's was represented, and that's, again, I felt that, you know, we're not alone. Locally, nationally, and internationally, because after wounded me, that's what the elders told us. You know, we've got the world's attention. We need to go further. Thunder hawk who says she's now an elder has continued her advocacy, including her time at standing rock, opposing the Dakota access pipeline. When I became an elder, I saw that that was a responsibility to show up and you don't have to say anything. You don't have to be on the mic, you just show up so those young people know you have their back. The event honoring women was held on the pine ridge reservation and provided an opportunity for story sharing and featured an oral history exhibit with wounded knee matriarchs. I'm Antonia Gonzalez.

Antonio Gonzalez Matt laszlo President Biden Warren South Dakota Congress Elizabeth Warren Washington U.S. government Frank warrior women project Madonna thunderhawk United States American Indian movement Dakota Antonia Gonzalez
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. The Alaska native community of tiona is pushing back on its inclusion in a local planning group that makes decisions about land management, but which they say formed without their input. Riley bored with K DLL reports. Is a remote predominantly native community on the west side of Alaska's cook inlet across the water from the state's population centers of anchorage and the kenai Peninsula. While the community falls under the purview of the kenai Peninsula borough, its culturally and geographically distant from the boroughs of their communities. That's one of the reasons residents are objecting to their inclusion in a new planning commission based on the other side of the inlet and the predominantly non native community of nikitsky. When somebody talks about that few of people determining that they'll have a huge voice and land planning for 3 million acres on the other side of the inlet this seems inappropriate. That's Steven, CEO of the ionic native corporation. He says the planning commission does not represent the residents of ionic and was formed without its knowledge by residents in the kiske, who wanted more of a voice in land management and permitting decisions. Proponents described ionic as quote nici's backyard, where its residents hunt and vacation. Says that notion is offensive. The villagers from Taiwan and some of our shareholders, they were highly offended by that because they don't see it as a vacation land. They see it as a land where they do their subsistence living and where they've been living for hundreds of years. It's not a vacation land in their eyes. It's their home. Some members of the boroughs governing body were sympathetic to tayo and concerns, but ultimately the assembly was split on whether to remove the community from the planning commission's boundaries. The assembly will reconsider the plan at a meeting tomorrow, where viscosity says ionic residents are planning to turn out and testify. Dozens of ionic residents and several native entities have already submitted letters in support. For national native news, I'm Riley bored. Doctor boo nygren has passed his first 30 days as president of the Navajo Nation, one of the largest tribes in the United States, president nigran says he's already fulfilled one of his campaign promises by lifting COVID-19 restrictions, fully opening the Navajo Nation. The tribe was still under COVID-19 mandates when he took office in January. We lift the mask mandate because I felt like it was about time, all the surrounding communities have reopened all the surrounding cities have reopened and we just precautionary and made it optional for people to wear a mask. Migrants says he's met with the governors of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, the Navajo Nation is located in the three states. He's also met with U.S. lawmakers and made his first official visit to Washington, D.C., where he attended President Biden's State of the Union. Those helping him lead the Navajo Nation in his administration are a number of Navajo women, including his vice president, veterans affairs director and chief legal counsel. Vice president Rochelle Montoya made history in January becoming the first Navajo woman to serve in the position. I think it's just my belief in just making sure the best people are in place and at this moment in time those types of people are in those positions. The Navajo Nation council this year also inaugurated a historic number of women, 9 of 24 delegates. Migrants says he's working closely with the council to address many of the issues facing the tribe from making sure federal COVID-19 recovery funds are spent to tackling infrastructure needs. I'm Antonia Gonzalez.

kenai Peninsula Antonia Gonzalez tiona ionic native corporation Alaska kiske Riley cook inlet boo nygren nici anchorage president nigran assembly COVID Steven Taiwan planning commission Washington, D.C. President Biden
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 4 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez, a collection of bills relating to Native American affairs were heard in the South Dakota Senate education committee this week. South Dakota public broadcasting's CJ Keane has more. Senator Sean Bordeaux is from mission South Dakota on the rosebud Sioux reservation. He brought four education bills to the committee this week. One, SB one 63 would allow the playing of indigenous honor songs at graduation ceremonies upon student request. Bordeaux says it represents an opportunity for meaningful reconciliation. I'm trying to build upon something that I think is an expression and opportunity for the state to stick out that olive branch and become a friend of our Lakota Dakota nakota people. Another bill, SB one 8 7 would require schools to provide lessons on tribal history. Bordeaux says it would include long sought after educational materials, the essential understandings. It's a curriculum that was developed for schools, elementary, for high school, to basically give people an understanding about our culture, rob Munson, executive director for the school administrators of South Dakota, spoke against one 8 7, arguing in favor of the current education review process. We currently have what I believe is a very good process in South Dakota. Although our social studies standards review right now, it seems to be a little bit in question and not truly where we believe it should be in a true standards review. However, I feel what is being discussed in this piece of legislation absolutely can take place in the standards review and should take place there. Bordeaux in response question the quality of the system currently in place, each proposal was ultimately moved to the 41st legislative day, effectively killing the bills. I'm CJ keen. Another attempt at replacing Columbus day with indigenous people's day has been introduced in the Montana state House, Montana public radio's Ellis Julian reports, similar bills, have failed. Over 15 states have holidays for indigenous peoples and several local governments, including Boseman and Missoula, have already passed their own citywide versions of the holiday on the second weekend of October. Democratic senator Shane murgo, a member of the confederated salish and Koenig tribes, is the bill's sponsor, and he said it's necessary to include the full breadth of history. To talk about the wrongs in our history, to write our next chapter together, to reject selective history and recognize the good, the bad and the ugly, so that we can learn and do better as a society. Members of the Montana American Indian caucus have carried similar versions of this bill in the last 5 legislative sessions, but they've never successfully made it through both houses. There were no opponents of the bill in the hearing, and over 30 people in organizations spoke in support. The committee did not take immediate action on the bill. I'm Ellis Julian. The greater Kansas City group, not in our honor and the coalition, Arizona to rally against native mascots, are protesting the Kansas City football team's name. The groups are holding a demonstration Sunday outside the stadium in Glendale, Arizona, where the Kansas City NFL team will play in the Super Bowl. Galene crouser, executive director of the Kansas City Indian center, is a member of not in our honor. She's traveling to Arizona for the protest in hopes having a larger audience at the Super Bowl will draw attention to the fight against India mascots. Having this larger audience worldwide stage to folks are going to be tuning in to this particular game, we're really hoping to shine that light on the fact that a tremendous number of native people are opposed to the mask adding and we're consistently opposed to it. The groups also want to see an end of the use of the tomahawk chop and chant at sports venues. I'm Antonia Gonzalez.

South Dakota Bordeaux Antonia Gonzalez Senate education committee CJ Keane Senator Sean Bordeaux rosebud Sioux Ellis Julian rob Munson Montana state House Boseman Shane murgo Montana American Indian caucus Dakota Kansas City Missoula Columbus Montana Arizona Galene crouser
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:55 min | 4 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I think there are very highly intelligent animal, highly aware of their surroundings and are going to do what it takes to protect their cups and their families. But we do see evidence of them losing that fight in we find a full skulls of full entire skeletons and vertebra and of younger cubs that didn't make it. Yeah, so. Okay. And Mary, you mentioned, you know, how healthy many polar bears are, how strong they are, but are you worried about changing climate conditions in the future polar bears? You know, what I see, I'm really blessed to say that I rarely see skinny polar bears. It's been many years since I've seen one. And I live really close to the beach, or on the beach of summer long, and if there's a polar bear and somebody posts on social media, we'll go see the distance and it's really been awesome to that's the first thing I look for when I see a polar bear. Is it healthy? Is it skinny? Has it been eating? Menthol is a relief to see big ones rarely ever do I see skinny ones and if I do it would probably be in the summer when they're swimming too far. When currents change in the ice goes in a different direction or dumps them somewhere. I've been really blessed to not see a lot of skinny polar bears. I see a lot of the commercials are promoting donate to this save the polar bears. We don't see those people around here saving polar bears. We don't really see a lot of skinny polar bears, but Allison is right. These bears are adapting. There is less ocean eyes. We see that during spring whaling and Hermann can talk about that too. But yeah, there's our adapting. Well, it's good news. Good to hear for sure. And we got to wrap up the show here in just a few moments. But Herman just a quick question about how far south do you do polar bear lived? Do you know that information? I don't know if they live there, but I've heard one being caught in which is about 70 miles inland. 70 million. Sometimes when they get lost. Okay. Well, folks, that is all the time we have for show day I want to thank our guests for what's been a really fascinating conversation about polar bears in New York. Join us next week for another lineup of discussions about indigenous issues and topics. Our executive producer is art Hughes. Our producers are Andy Murphy and soul traverso. Merino Spencer is the engineer. Show McFarland is the digital producer, Noah Dave's Moses, is the distribution director. Bob Peterson is the network manager for native voice one. Clifton Chadwick is our national underwriting sales director. Antonia Gonzalez is the anchor for national native news, Charles saver is our chief operations officer. The president and CEO of colonic broadcast corporation is Jacqueline seli. As if weekend, I'm Sean spruce. As people seek to know diverse cultures, tribal museums and cultural centers grow more popular, so the institute of American Indian arts who support this show now provides a master of fine arts in cultural administration, focused on social equity and support of cultural community growth this program combines administrative tools and techniques with socially engaged leadership, blending institutional skills and community outreach programming. Deadline to apply is February 15th at dot EDU slash MFA CA. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

Andy Murphy soul traverso Merino Spencer Noah Dave Clifton Chadwick cubs Antonia Gonzalez Charles saver colonic broadcast corporation Jacqueline seli Sean spruce Hermann institute of American Indian a Mary Bob Peterson Allison Herman swimming McFarland
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. The FBI has opened an investigation into government funded group treatment homes in Arizona that could be taking advantage of their clients as Arizona public radio's Ryan Hinch's reports organizers of the homes have allegedly targeted indigenous people in the southwest. FBI officials say the group homes based in and near Phoenix purport to serve adults with substance abuse and mental health problems organizers frequent flea markets, trading posts and medical centers to pick up clients who are often intoxicated or offered alcohol when the clients return to a functional state they don't know where they are or how they got there and have trouble finding their way home. As a result, local law enforcement agencies have received several missing persons reports. According to the FBI organizers of the home single out Native Americans from the Navajo Nation and other tribal lands in Arizona, New Mexico and South Dakota, the facilities reportedly receive government funding to provide mental health and substance abuse therapy, but often no services are provided. In addition, those running the homes allegedly tell tenants to change their ID cards to Arizona to receive Medicaid benefits and food assistance, which is used to provide for the residents, or as rent payment, FBI officials are searching for those recruited to the Phoenix group homes from January 2020 until the present time and ask they complete an online questionnaire, which can be found at the bureau's Phoenix office website. For national native news, I'm Ryan Hinch in Flagstaff. A partnership between the northwestern band of the shoshone nation, universities and ecological consultants is looking to restore the bear river massacre site. Amy van tatenhove has more. Over 150 years ago, the United States Army attacked a shoshone village in northern cash valley Idaho, killing nearly 500 men, women and children. In 2008, the northwestern band of the shoshone nation purchased part of the property in an effort to transform the site into a place of healing. Then, in 2018, the former chairman of the northwestern shoshone, Darren Perry, approached you test state university with a goal of returning the land to what it was like before the pioneers arrived. Despite years of ecological degradation, Rios Pacheco, northwestern shoshone spiritual leader, explains the site is still important ecologically. Today is still valuable. Because there are still resources there, but it's just that we're not taking care of the water coming into that place. That's always been plentiful. And we're not using the natural ways of filtering the water we're using other ways to rush that filtering process. Brad Perry, the vice chairman of the northwestern shoshone, details plans for the site. We received a little over $5 million from various agencies in the federal state and local governments. It will help our drought situation. It will help the situation and the great Salt Lake. Great Salt Lake is facing rapid ecological collapse as its waters recede and salinity level skyrocket. Historically, the bear river emptied into great Salt Lake, but with much of its water now going to agriculture, water from the bear river rarely makes it to the Lake. Other plans include planting native and medicinal plants used by the shoshone and creating high quality habitat for migrating birds. Conversion of incised streams to broad floodplains will bring back wetlands to the area as well. For national native news, I Mimi fantino. A trial is set to begin in a case against the United States by the oglala Sioux tribe in South Dakota over claims the government has failed to honor treaty obligations to provide adequate law enforcement officers. The tribe says the lack of officers has led to a drastic increase in violent crimes on the pine ridge reservation and contributes to the missing and murdered indigenous women crisis. The hearing is scheduled for Wednesday in federal court in Rapid City. I'm Antonia Gonzalez.

Ryan Hinch FBI Arizona Antonia Gonzalez Phoenix bear river Amy van tatenhove Darren Perry test state university Rios Pacheco South Dakota southwest Salt Lake Brad Perry New Mexico Flagstaff United States Army Idaho Mimi fantino
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. A Fairbanks Alaska jury returned guilty verdicts Thursday for a man who killed a young Alaska native woman in 1993 at the university of Alaska Fairbanks. Stephen downs was convicted in the rape and murder of 20 year old Sophie Sergey. Robin reports. Sophie Sergey had been a marine biology student at the university the year before. She returned to Fairbanks from her tiny yubi village of Pitt's point in far western Alaska. The last weekend of April, 1993, for an orthodontist appointment on the following Monday. She stayed in the dorm with a friend who knew her from their time together in native youth leadership organizations. She was last seen after midnight Sunday, on her way to have a cigarette. She was found Monday afternoon in a restroom down the hall. She had been raped and shot in the head. The defendant Stephen downs of Maine was never suspected of the crime until 25 years later, when DNA collected from the crime scene was partially matched to a profile in a commercial genealogy database in 2018, that profile was downs aunt, Alaska state troopers traced the genealogy to downes, who was living in the dorm that spring of 1993. Fairbanks superior court judge Thomas temple read the verdicts. Murder in the first degree of SF, we the jury find the defendant guilty of murder in the first degree of SS dated at Fairbanks Alaska, the tenth day of February, 2022, sexual assault in the first degree of SS, we the jury find the defendant guilty of sexual assault in the first degree of SS dated at Fairbanks Alaska, this 9th day of February 2022 signed by the jury four person. The victim's two brothers listened into the verdict's remotely from saint Mary's in the Yukon river delta. Older brother Alexei Sergei said in an interview that he feels relieved after decades of uncertainty. I'm pretty sure it's like now these days being a long life to you. Alexei Sergei said he forgave the perpetrator decades ago in an effort towards closure. I forget what he did to me. And I will never forget the judge scheduled sentencing in September, in Fairbanks, I'm Robin. Sports wagering for Sunday's Super Bowl will be in full swing this year, research from the American gambling association finds more than 18 million people plan to bet online in person at sportsbooks or with a bookie on the matchup between the Los Angeles Rams and the Cincinnati Bengals. The Navajo Nation will soon get into the sports betting action, the tribe is teaming up with the Seminole tribe of Florida's hard rock. They've joined forces to launch at the hard rock sportsbook mobile app in Arizona. John chapper is senior director of communications for hard rock digital. The hard rock sports book app allows you to play bets on all the major sports. We're great promotions, also live betting. So if you see your teams losing, I think you got a big comeback in store. You can jump in there. Major sports also some more niche sports. Soccer, you can do table tennis. Really just makes your game days a little more fun, a little more engaging and allows you really to connect with the product on the screen. Brian Parrish is the interim chief executive officer for the Navajo Nation gaming enterprise. Really excited about our partnership with hard rock with their sports book and hard rock digital. They have an excellent team and outstanding product. Their value systems and their goals and objectives align very nicely with ours. And so it was a perfect fit. Sports betting became legal in Arizona in 2021, the digital hard rock sports book is expected to be launched in the state this.

Sophie Sergey Alaska Fairbanks Stephen downs Alexei Sergei Antonia Gonzalez Fairbanks superior court Thomas temple university of Alaska Fairbanks Yukon river delta Robin Pitt downes American gambling association Maine saint Mary John chapper Los Angeles Rams Cincinnati Bengals Super Bowl
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. Tributes poured in on social media Tuesday following news of the passing of Clyde bell court, white earth nation, cofounder of the American Indian movement in the 1960s. He's being remembered for his advocacy on native issues and his dedication to the native community in the twin cities area in Minnesota. Winona laduke, native rights advocate, worked with belcourt and the American Indian movement in the 70s and was a longtime friend. She shared some thoughts about Bill court's leadership Tuesday night on the talk show native roots radio. You know what a great leader. That guy man, I mean, he just relentless. Talk about a history of decades. Of standing up for the rise of Indian people being fearless and courageous. You know, the sound of thunder, walking into a room, not be his name, come in thunder, you know? I mean, there's something new that, you know, he was gonna be standing for something that would matter. So just passing him a great leader and he had a pretty good run and we're proud to have known him. Family and friends say bell court died of cancer. He was 85 years old. Canada's indigenous services minister says Ottawa will be there to help the remote community of bearskin Lake in northern Ontario. As Dan, carbon chuck reports about half of the reserves 400 residents have COVID-19. And to native leaders have been calling for help. Bear skin Lake is a remote fly in community, and it's facing a severe COVID-19 outbreak. Leaders declared a state of emergency at the end of December, calling the situation a crisis. The community has no hospital, the only healthcare comes from a nursing station staffed by two nurses. Any evacuation takes more than three hours by plane from Sue lookout or thunder bay, a federal rapid response team with nurses a paramedic and two environmental health officers arrived on December 30th with the ability to test for COVID-19. Indigenous services minister Patti hideous says the federal government is there to help. We have 5 or so health professionals and other 32 being paid to help take care of essential services like chopping firewood delivering food. Whether it's other logistic issues, whether it's covering the cost of charters as I committed to the chief, we're going to be there for bearskin for as long as it takes with whatever it takes. But some native leaders say it's not enough. Grand chief Derek Fox says the federal and provincial governments need to acknowledge that bearskin is in crisis. And he insists they're not treating it that way. Hyde says Ottawa has committed more than a $1 million to help deal with the outbreak. There are other outbreaks in remote communities such as none of it, northern Quebec, and Labrador, some have banned all non-essential travel to and from their communities. For national native news, I'm Dan Carpenter. The COVID-19 surges impacting in person learning at Haskell Indian nations university in Lawrence Kansas as the spring semester is set to begin. High school leadership announced classes will start January 18th, but will be held entirely online for the first three weeks of school. High school senior Molly Adams reacted to the news. I think that's a responsible start. The armor con variant is spreading its dangerous, we shouldn't be in person. Even though I'd like to be in person. High school leadership will monitor the COVID-19 surge and will revisit holding in person classes in February, other colleges serving native students are also being impacted by the COVID-19 surge. The college of the menominee nation in Wisconsin announced this week, a one week delay to the start of its spring semester. Classes will begin on January 24th in a hybrid format..

American Indian movement Antonia Gonzalez Clyde bell court Winona laduke belcourt Bill court bell court bearskin Lake Bear skin Lake Sue lookout Patti hideous Ottawa COVID Grand chief Derek Fox Minnesota thunder bay chuck Ontario Dan Carpenter
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court a lower court decision stand that mcgirt versus Oklahoma is not retroactive, the oklahoman reports in 2020, the high court affirmed the muskey nation's reservation in the mcgirt ruling that the reservation was never just established. Criminal jurisdiction of major crimes involving Native Americans on reservations are handled by federal or tribal court, the state of Oklahoma has been trying to limit mcgirt, tribes say it's about sovereignty and have been working to implement positive changes in their justice systems. The city of Albuquerque New Mexico has scheduled community conversations this week involving the burial site at a city park, which is associated with the former Albuquerque Indian school. The public is invited to attend the meetings to provide input and learn about plans for the area at four H park, the city is seeking historical information on the local state and federal level, the city plans to investigate using ground penetrating radar, the results will be shared first with tribes and pueblos, and then with the general public. In September, 2021, Albuquerque mayor Tim Keller apologized publicly for the city's role in Indian boarding schools. The city says it's a step toward reconciliation and is working with the native community on recommendations to honor students at the burial site. In October on indigenous peoples day, Keller signed a resolution to formally recognize the burial site. Here's part of Keller's remarks during the event in downtown Albuquerque. We made sure I made it clear that as a city at least, we formally apologized for not only the way that was handled in the past. In terms of when we built the park, but also for the concept of these boarding schools that absolutely were wrong in every way, whether it was tearing apart families or racing culture. And so I want to just reiterate that apology on the city's behalf today. The city acquired the park in the 1970s and took over maintenance of land known to be the burial site of the school, the Presbyterian Church ran the school in the 1880s. It was later transferred to federal control and operated until 1981. The city has marked off a portion of the park and removed it from park uses. The site is open to pueblos and tribes for ceremonies and practices. The community meetings this week will be held virtually. COVID-19 was a leading cause of death among American Indians in Montana in 2020, according to a state health department report. Montana public radio's Aaron Bolton explains. According to a review of death certificates by the Montana department of public Health and Human Services, deaths among American Indian and Alaska natives spiked 36% in 2020 compared to the previous 5 years, largely due to COVID-19. The analysis shows the rate of COVID deaths among American Indian and Alaska native people in Montana, was over double that of indigenous people across the entire country. People identifying as indigenous in Montana account for about 7% of the state's total population, and accounted for 15% of the coronavirus mortalities in 2020, according to a state health department report. The state health department says there are several reasons for these disparities, including more multigenerational households among Native American families, lack of access to healthcare aimed at higher rates of underlying health conditions like diabetes and chronic lung diseases. COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death statewide in 2020. Four national native.

mcgirt Antonia Gonzalez Albuquerque Albuquerque Indian school H park Oklahoma COVID Keller U.S. Supreme Court Tim Keller Montana New Mexico Aaron Bolton Montana department of public H Presbyterian Church Alaska state health department
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Care of ourselves and eat each other. This is native America calling. I'm Andy Murphy. As the nation commemorates 80 years since the Japanese invasion of Pearl Harbor will take a moment to also reflect on the perspective from the indigenous people of Hawaii. The islands remain a strategic U.S. Military post, and the military presence before and since the attack has had deep and ongoing effect on the culture and sovereignty of kanaka moli. We'll hear about the native history around Pearl Harbor and efforts to reclaim the narrative right after the news. This is national native news, I'm Antonia Gonzalez. The Biden administration's infrastructure Bill has a number of key investments for Indian country, including broadband connectivity. A tribal educator in Nevada says broadband access is desperately needed in her community. Suzanne Potter has more. Lin Manning John, vice principal of the oahe combined school on the duck valley Indian reservation, says her community desperately needs better coverage and more bandwidth. In the building, we struggle with the Internet going out regularly because the kids are on Chromebooks and because of our location, which is a hundred miles from elko. It sometimes takes us a day or two to get our Internet back up. She says the area only has a single cell tower, and 90% of families have no Internet service at home. Rural areas often lack communication infrastructure because the customer base is too small to provide a return on the telecom companies investment, Manning John says the future of her community, part of the shoshone paiute tribe depends on better broadband. It can not be left up to the market. These kids have a need, Internet is just as essential as indoor plumbing and electricity. It needs to be provided on the scale that we do any type of public service. I'm Suzanne Potter. California assembly member James Ramos hosted a discussion Friday with tribal leaders, educators and students concerning California, Indian education, Ramos talked about the need for public schools to teach California Native American history. A bill he introduced in the legislature calls for state curriculum to include Native American history and culture to increase knowledge about California tribes and their impacts. Here's Ramos commenting on his bill during Friday's event in Palm Desert, which was streamed online. Working together as one body, moving together in a coalition, we're going to be able to make a change in the state of California. We have an opportunity as California Indian people through myself as being the first California Indian elect in the state legislature to push a bill, AB 1554, and it's called the California Indian education act that's going to start to focus on California's first people..

Suzanne Potter Andy Murphy Pearl Harbor kanaka moli Antonia Gonzalez Biden administration Lin Manning John oahe combined school on the du America Manning John Hawaii California assembly James Ramos elko California Nevada Ramos legislature Palm Desert
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. Tribal leaders in southeast Alaska are applauding the Biden administration's move to reinstate protections for the tongues national forest, but they warn that the administrative change could be limited to who's in The White House. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently unveiled plans to reverse a Trump administration decision to exempt about 9 million acres from protections that could ease logging and mining on federal forest land. Alaska tribe sued the federal government, saying, they were not properly consulted. Organized village of cakes tribal president Joel Jackson says the latest announcement is a positive development. His tribe had resisted efforts by the Trump administration and Alaska's governor to open more old forests to logging. But he says his village once permanent protections. You know, this has been a long fight since Trump and Ben Levi will return the road bush rule. Although it's a win for us to have a reverse at still what glue would hope for the long haul. A two month comment period is now underway that will begin the process of restoring roadless rule protections that places restrictions on development. The announcement will also include acknowledgment that the Biden administration will work closer with tribes whose homelands now make up the modern day tongues national forest. The New Mexico missing a murdered indigenous women and relatives task force hosted a virtual community education panel Monday when area of need advocates discussed as education for young people. Jessica get a Doc whom Smith is the education and outreach coordinator for the task force. She sees a need for education materials on the dangers of social media used by traffickers to recruit victims. They're really needs to be education on an accurate historical multi generational trauma. And what that looks like. And how that affects our youth and our children still today. And how that makes people more vulnerable to trafficking in ways to notice red flags and what, you know, especially with our youth to who are on social media and things like that. Because I was groomed into trafficking via Facebook. So I think, you know, that type of curriculum, that's really, you know, to the point like, hey, you gotta watch out out there. Regina Chaka is with the New Mexico Department of Public Safety, missing persons clearing house. Build those relationships with the children and let them know that we are safe that law enforcement is safe to speak to or how to speak to them being comfortable around law enforcement and really creating that listening environment. And I think that would that would benefit all around for the students for the families for the parents having community events showing up to community events with the schools and to build those relationships. The nearly two hour education panel also included testimony from families a missing a murdered relatives. Task force members address barrier solutions and resources, the task force was established in 2019 by New Mexico's governor. It includes tribal state and community partners. 5 tribes in Maine are working on boosting tribal tourism in the state, The Associated Press reports, they recently received funding of $150,000 from four directions development corporation. The wabanaki cultural tourism initiative hopes to create a tourism economy in the next decade. The funding will also help tribal members attend a program for community leaders to build tourism..

Trump administration Biden administration Antonia Gonzalez Alaska U.S. Department of Agriculture Joel Jackson Ben Levi White House Regina Chaka Trump federal government New Mexico Department of Publi New Mexico bush Jessica Smith Facebook Task force
"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I mean Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for.

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"antonia gonzalez" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Have had to shut down because of coronavirus outbreaks He pointed to states whose Republican governors have banned mask and vaccination mandates In states like Florida Texas Mississippi You see what happens when you are not led Why science and vaccines in any of the pandemic but you're led by ideology and politics They went off of COVID cliff As we stand here today Florida has 6 times more children in their hospitals than the state of California The pediatric hospitalizations in Florida 6 times greater than the state of California I mean the kids Nearly 69% of eligible Californians are fully vaccinated and other 10% have gotten a first dose California has suffered 67,000 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 Schools on the pine ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota are under a COVID-19 quarantine order Antonia Gonzalez reports The oglala Sioux tribe issued the order Tuesday citing an increase of positive COVID-19 cases the rise of the delta variant the number of students under 12 not eligible for a vaccine and the number of homes with multigenerational families Vice president elisha moss provided an update on social media Tuesday night saying the tribe is not on lockdown but the order is a temporary way to try and slow the spread of COVID-19 Please don't go to work please don't go to school This is part of it Why we're having this current school quarantine order is because a lot of these cases are in our schools and in order for us to get ahead of the spread and any public health emergency you need to contact trace So we can stop the spread Unfortunately it's getting to be a little bit much and there's a lot of schools and we know they all have their plans But we are going to work with those schools on their plans as we move forward The tribe has had some ordinances in place for a very long time which is some of those ordnance along with the school quarantine orders so you can reference those We can quarantine buildings So that is actually the official action that happened to date The order was issued after 21 new cases were reported in one day The ten day quarantine order goes into effect Wednesday The tribe is under orange risk while it continues with a number of COVID-19 safety guidelines for the reservation I'm Antonio Gonzalez Two dozen Republican attorneys general are threatening to sue if they proposed coronavirus vaccine requirement for as many as a 100 million Americans goes into effect the letter sent today is the latest in Republican opposition to sweeping new federal vaccine requirements for private sector employees healthcare workers and federal contractors announced by President Biden earlier this month The requirement to be enacted through a rule from the occupational safety and health administration is part of an effort to curb the surging COVID-19 delta variant The prosecutors led by attorney general Allen Wilson of South Carolina called Biden's plan disastrous and counterproductive and vowed to pursue legal action against the mandate attorneys general in Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas Florida Georgia Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Hampshire North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Texas Utah West Virginia and Wyoming have all signed the letter Idaho's public health leaders have expanded healthcare rationing statewide amid a massive increase and the number of coronavirus patients requiring hospitalization Idaho's largest hospital network asked state health leaders to allow crisis standards of care because the increase in COVID-19 patients has exhausted the state's medical resources Crisis standards of care means that scarce resources resources like intensive care unit beds will be allotted to those patients most likely to survive Other patients will be treated with less effective methods and to dire cases given pain relief and other care as they die I'd hope department of welfare director jave Jefferson called the situation dire He said there aren't enough resources to adequately treat the patients in the state's hospitals whether they're there for COVID-19 or for a heart attack or because of a car accident Japan urged people to get vaccinated and wear masks indoors and then crowded outdoors settings Healthcare workers in France face suspension from their jobs starting today if they haven't been vaccinated against COVID-19 Vaccines are compulsory for healthcare and emergency workers in France This was the deadline for those workers to have had at least their first dose of vaccine They face having pay suspended or not being able to work if they don't But a top French court has forbidden staff to be fired outright During my 90% of French medical and emergency workers already are vaccinated Russ Cullen reports from Paris The president's announced the move to introduce mandatory COVID-19 shots at the start of the summer for doctors nurses paramedics firefighters retirement home workers and people caring for the elderly in their houses More than two and a half million people in the health and care sector must from the 15th of September be able to prove they have had at least one shot of a coronavirus vaccine However one of France's biggest public sector unions has warned of a health catastrophe if the government suspends large numbers of health workers for not having had a vaccination Ross Cullen Paris The global covax effort to deliver COVID-19 vaccine doses.

Antonia Gonzalez Antonio Gonzalez Wednesday 6 times 90% France Biden Alabama Tuesday 21 new cases 15th of September Florida 67,000 Tuesday night Russ Cullen Alaska Louisiana jave Jefferson Georgia California
Montana joins Missing and Murdered project, Indigenous Women Task Force, and Navajo COVID surge

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Montana joins Missing and Murdered project, Indigenous Women Task Force, and Navajo COVID surge

"This is national native antonio gonzalez the confederated sailfish and kootenai tribes. In north west montana are participating in the national pilot project to improve coordination between agencies investigating missing and murdered indigenous persons cases yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas reports the us department of justice recently developed protocols for federal tribal and state law enforcement to work together more efficiently which the k- kt will adapt into a tribal community response. Plan that specific to the flathead. Craig couture the cs kt. Police chief says this plan will help. When investigations cross jurisdictional lines gives us each a piece of this puzzle to put together or we have input on how. We're going to do this. So when we come together is going to be seamless for the hand off on who's going to be the lead jurisdiction if it goes into multiple jurisdiction who follows up on that it gives us a better opportunity to solve these cases and to bring some of these people home. See chairwoman shelly. Says the tribal council met with federal state and tribal agencies on tuesday to start adapting the doj's protocols to fit the community find says the cs kt were motivated to participate. After one of their own. Germain charro went missing in two thousand eighteen and has yet to be found so very excited to roll up our sleeves next week can start working on these guides in these guys are designed to be versatile enough to fit into each individual tribal community after working with the cs. Kt in the coming weeks the doj plans to go through the same process with other montana. Tribes i'm caitlyn nicholas wisconsin's missing murdered indigenous women's task force met virtually for its first meeting friday to begin work. The task forces seeking to address abduction homicide violence and trafficking of indigenous women. The group's identifying solutions and gathering data tribal representatives elders law enforcement. Judges and state leaders are among members of the task. Force there will also be opportunities for public. Participation through workgroups updated public health. Emergency orders go into effect. Monday on the navajo nation as the try abc's a surge in covid nineteen cases. Stay at home. Orders are extended fifty-seven our weekend lockdowns are being re implemented and essential businesses will only be open on weekdays from seven to seven the updated orders. Come days after navajo. Indian health service medical and healthcare providers say the tribes now in the major health care crisis during a virtual forum last week. Health officials pleaded with the public to stay home and take precautions to help reduce the surge in new covid. Nineteen cases and hospitalizations doctor. Loretta christianson chief medical officer for the navajo area. Ihs says hospital resources are stretched thin. Sure you that we will provide the best quality care possible but if we all don't stop coverted we will run out of beds. We will run out of nurses and we will run out of supplies. So we're asking each and every one of you today to help us. Please don't travel please. Don't gather or attend any events we he's wear your masks in this includes with your family you need to continuously wash your hands or use hand sanitizer and you need to socially distance everywhere. You go as of sunday. The number of positive covid nineteen cases reached seventeen thousand nine hundred m15 the navajo area. Ihs has reported. Nearly all icu. Beds are at full capacity. And they have limited resources including medical staff and few options to transport patients to regional hospitals because they're also near capacity navajo health professionals and tribal leaders say the second wave of covid. Nineteen is more severe than what the tribe saw in april. And may i'm antonia gonzalez.

Antonio Gonzalez Craig Couture Chairwoman Shelly Germain Charro DOJ Montana Caitlyn Nicholas Caitlyn KT Yellowstone Nicholas Loretta Christianson West Wisconsin ABC IHS ICU Antonia Gonzalez
Native youth talk about struggles of mental health issues during COVID-19

Native America Calling

03:51 min | 3 years ago

Native youth talk about struggles of mental health issues during COVID-19

"This is national native news I'm Antonia Gonzalez native. Youth are warning US lawmakers in the midst of the COVID, nineteen pandemic Indian country is struggling to combat mental health issues, which can lead to suicide correspondent. Matt Laszlo has a story from Washington suicide rates in substance. Abuse problems in Indian country are always alarmingly high, but officials fear big spikes during the pandemic. That's in part because these summer months are usually marked by important native social events like powwows or canoeing few friends just to name a few. But most social gatherings are now canceled. The TASHA Gonzalez of California's Bishop Pie tribe is with the unity mission. Feels like. Has Been. Under all this in many younger travel members are confused especially, because many tribal communities haven't seen any coronavirus cases yet, Margot Vonda as a youth leader with twenty, five, hundred, twenty five. So it's been really tough time for them to grass that sort of new reality of staying home to keep safe from a threat that they can't see. Cutty Miller's CO president of the National Unity, council, he's a member of Washington State Swish Indian travel community, which he describes as a small tribe in a small town or their stigma, already surrounding people seeking mental health services. Part of it I think would just be like education. Everybody advocating that you don't have to go. You don't have a problem to go to the counselor. That's Miller and the others are asking Congress to increase mental health funding in the next corona virus stimulus package. For National Native News on that Laszlo in Washington the Executive Director of the National Council of Urban. Indian health says urban Indian centers have been hit hard and have many unmet needs to address Cova Nineteen Francis Curvier recently told the U. S. Commission. On Civil Rights, the federal government is failing in its obligations to native people living in urban areas despite the government's failures are facilities have done everything they can to keep their doors open for the patients who rely on them with or without the pandemic. She says urban Indian organisations were recognized by Congress in the nineteen seventies to assist with healthcare needs of native people living off reservations and native people who lack insurance often rely on. Others crea says many centers have not been able to keep up with the pandemic loading tests, equipment and other resources and funding, and does calling on the federal government to uphold its obligations. Leaders of the Cherokee chickasaw choctaw nation say more dialogue as needed on potential impacts of the mcgurk case, the US Supreme Court recently ruled. Congress never disestablished the Muskogee creek reservation, affirming reservation boundaries, which has led to tribal state and federal jurisdiction questions in a joint statement Monday. The tribes committed to more discussions with stakeholders and the public. The leader say the path forward requires collaboration. Collaboration with the Cherokee chickasaw choctaw seminal and Muskogee Creek nations. The statement follows proposal from Oklahoma's attorney general last week involving jurisdiction in a video message to tribal citizens, Cherokee, nation, principal chief, Chuck Hoskin Junior, said he spent the day listening to citizens and leaders, none of the leaders of the five tribes support eroding sovereignty or turning back the recognition of our reservations achieved through mcgirt. This isn't a stork ruling for Indian. Country and we would never ever undermine this monumental decision. On those points, we all agree leaders at the seminal Muskogee Creek. Nations were quick to disapprove of the state's proposal Friday and called for meaningful government government discussions. I'm Antonio

Muskogee Creek Congress Cutty Miller Washington Federal Government Matt Laszlo Antonia Gonzalez National Native News United States Tasha Gonzalez Covid Us Supreme Court Margot Vonda National Council Of Urban Bishop Pie Tribe Cherokee California Chuck Hoskin Junior Francis Curvier
Demonstrators voice concerns over spearfishing incident

Native America Calling

03:47 min | 3 years ago

Demonstrators voice concerns over spearfishing incident

"This is national native. News Antonia Gonzalez last month. A man shot off a gun near tribal spear fishers on the lake in northern Wisconsin for many that brought back memories protests over native spear fishing rights in the nineteen eighties and nineties. The man involved in the recent incident says he was shooting at a squirrel on his property, but is now facing misdemeanor hate crime charges. Some tribal members want tougher prosecution Ben Meyer explains the protest Monday morning in front of the violence. County courthouse was silent, but noticeable people like Shannon Retana held signs, demanding justice for tribal members and. And respect for treaty rights were tired of the hey. Tight racism is hatred and feeding, and allowing that to continue for so long is it's unacceptable and we're not going to stand for. We won't tolerate it anymore. On the night of May. Second Retinas and three others were practising their fragile protected right to spearfish for Walleye off reservation this time on little Saint Germain Lake on shore, sixty one year, old James Kelsey fired a shotgun. He says he was firing at a squirrel on his property Retana doesn't buy it, so that's why may shirt says he's not a squirrel. Now clearly, he's not a squirrel. He's a man. No one was hurt by the shots, but police arrested Kelsey that night he was charged with two misdemeanors, including a hate crime but Chelsea's attorney Steve Lucarelli, told me his client really was firing at a red squirrel on his property. These were two unrelated events. And assumptions of the meant that they are related. There's a reasonable explanation for what occurred. The attorney said he's concerned. The episode is being blown out of proportion, but Chelsea's bond includes restrictions on guns, alcohol and going onto tribal lands, the case comes against the backdrop of protests over the spear fishing rights of Ojibway tribal members which started in the nineteen eighties, and at times, became violent and racist. Britney lured all elected flambeau tribal member. Holding a sign on Monday says she had hoped the North Woods was passed those days I was just hoping that I would read about it in the eighties and never. Never really thought I had to relive it from national native news. I'm Ben Meyer and Eagle River Wisconsin the leader of a tribal group tackling transboundary issues as retiring Tis Peterman has led the Southeast Alaska indigenous transboundary commission since two thousand seventeen I work projects all my wife just said it's time to take time for myself. A few months after the commission was formed in two thousand, fourteen, the Mount Paulie mine spilled waste into British Columbia waters incoming executive director Fredrik Olsen says there are other minor activities that feed into Alaska's rivers and Salmon Habitat. Everybody already knows about Mt Holly about just a miniscule. Little. Blip on the map compared to read mine. Which is operating in a sticky river watershed right now. The Commission is working to address issues on both sides of the border. There's a lot more transboundary issues than mining. You know there's also this the cruise ships to ship waste. There's oil tankers. There's murdered and missing indigenous women. On an on Olsen has worked as the commission's outreach, coordinator and board chair. The US House Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior Environment and related agencies will hear about the healthcare response to covert nineteen and Indian country. A hearing is scheduled Thursday to gather testimony on the Indian. Health Service response and the use of emergency covid, nineteen funding witnesses include leaders from the Indian Health Service the National Indian health, board and the National Council of Urban Indian health. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Shannon Retana James Kelsey Ben Meyer Fredrik Olsen Chelsea Wisconsin Indian Health Service Antonia Gonzalez Attorney National Council Of Urban Indi Antonio Gonzales County Courthouse Saint Germain Lake Us House National Indian Health Steve Lucarelli Britney Mt Holly North Woods