28 Burst results for "Antipsychotic"

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
FDA clinical trial failures

Science Magazine Podcast

06:03 min | 10 months ago

FDA clinical trial failures

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Charles, pillar. He wrote an investigative feature on SDA's serious decline in protections for patients and for data integrity. Hi, Charlie Hey Sarah, I'm not sure everyone knows that FDA has oversight of clinical trials. What exactly is this agency's role with respect to human trials? The FDA is vast agency with many responsibilities, and in this case, it has two elements of control over the quality of trials. One is whether patients are properly protected during the trials in also whether the data generated from these trials is reliable in his in keeping with the important goal of the FDA of approving drugs and devices that actually were but as you. Found in your investigation, the FDA enforcement has been light-handed slow moving and secretive. You give us some examples that you found shoddy clinical research practices, poor record-keeping that you came across in your dive into this one example that comes to mind as a organization in Utah that is a contract research organization that does clinical trials on behalf of drug companies. This isn't orgainzation that had enormous problems spanning almost decade problems with informed consent problems associated with conduct, its trials that called into question the integrity of the data in also the safety of volunteers these trials for serious kinds of drugs, end devices, including opiates, antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, drugs for Alzheimer's and threats and. Other pretty serious ailments. What we found in looking at the FDA evaluations is that there were really serious problems that the agency itself warned the investigators might constitute for scientific misconduct, significant human subjects, protection violations, and perplexingly despite for investigations, the agency never cited this Organization for anything beyond just saying look, you're doing a bad job here. Now, never a warning letter never required any changes in the procedures. It never insisted that the principal investigator change operations in a way that would save our patients and data I just want to emphasize how important it is to protect people involved in clinical trials. Medical Experiments on human beings. and. There's a long history of unsafe practices in the bad old days. There were a lot of abuses of human subjects these days. There are pretty stringent requirements that there be informed consent of the patients who are participating in these trials that there be a very rigorous review of the trial so that these patients are well protected. The FDA looks both that the investigators and the Institutional Review Boards called I IRB's that are responsible for overseeing these experiments and what they often learn is that not just our the investigator's making mistakes or hindering their experiments in a cavalier or unsafe way but also the investigation process the review of that by the IRS. Is often not very adequate in the IRBE's themselves perhaps are run amateurishly or in a way that does not protect. Patients were the quality of the data that's generated by the experience. This is an investigative piece you've spent almost a year gathering information. What kinds of evidence did you collect well to basically every public source of data that the FDA publishes associated with their review of trials in? So that includes summaries in their various databases online. It also includes warning letters, which is when serious mistakes are made. They might warn the investigator or the I. R.. That they've got a problem that needs to be fixed, I also looked at the inspection reports that were available through the freedom of information, act on hundreds of these cases these are pretty difficult to obtain because the reports are only available under the foia in as a result, it can take weeks months sometimes years to get access to them. So what I'm trying To convey here is that this is a very difficult process. The actually lured what happened in the FDA's evaluation of these organizations because oftentimes they do not announce publicly what happened what about the drug companies that hire these institutions to carry out this research when there's really agreed just problems going on the worst case scenario is that a clinical scientist who was doing? These experiments can be disqualified from future research. This is for someone who has broken the rules and such agreed sway that they've endanger patients that they've intentionally submitted false data to the FDA here to the sponsor of the experiment. When that happens, there's no doubt that the companies who sponsored the specific experiments that were found to have been either fraudulent or so badly. Flawed those timed they're informed of it. The problem is that many times even those experimenters their long history of research is just sort of a black box. No one looks back to see him. They made similar egregious errors or conducted experiments that were tainted by fraud.

FDA Investigator Sarah Principal Investigator SDA Charles Alzheimer Charlie Utah Fraud Clinical Scientist Irbe IRS
FDA clinical trial failures

Science Magazine Podcast

06:04 min | 10 months ago

FDA clinical trial failures

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Charles, pillar. He wrote an investigative feature on SDA's serious decline in protections for patients and for data integrity. Hi, Charlie Hey Sarah, I'm not sure everyone knows that FDA has oversight of clinical trials. What exactly is this agency's role with respect to human trials? The FDA is vast agency with many responsibilities, and in this case, it has two elements of control over the quality of trials. One is whether patients are properly protected during the trials in also whether the data generated from these trials is reliable in his in keeping with the important goal of the FDA of approving drugs and devices that actually were but as you. Found in your investigation, the FDA enforcement has been light-handed slow moving and secretive. You give us some examples that you found shoddy clinical research practices, poor record-keeping that you came across in your dive into this one example that comes to mind as a organization in Utah that is a contract research organization that does clinical trials on behalf of drug companies. This isn't orgainzation that had enormous problems spanning almost decade problems with informed consent problems associated with conduct, its trials that called into question the integrity of the data in also the safety of volunteers these trials for serious kinds of drugs, end devices, including opiates, antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, drugs for Alzheimer's and threats and. Other pretty serious ailments. What we found in looking at the FDA evaluations is that there were really serious problems that the agency itself warned the investigators might constitute for scientific misconduct, significant human subjects, protection violations, and perplexingly despite for investigations, the agency never cited this Organization for anything beyond just saying look, you're doing a bad job here. Now, never a warning letter never required any changes in the procedures. It never insisted that the principal investigator change operations in a way that would save our patients and data I just want to emphasize how important it is to protect people involved in clinical trials. Medical Experiments on human beings. and. There's a long history of unsafe practices in the bad old days. There were a lot of abuses of human subjects these days. There are pretty stringent requirements that there be informed consent of the patients who are participating in these trials that there be a very rigorous review of the trial so that these patients are well protected. The FDA looks both that the investigators and the Institutional Review Boards called I IRB's that are responsible for overseeing these experiments and what they often learn is that not just our the investigator's making mistakes or hindering their experiments in a cavalier or unsafe way but also the investigation process the review of that by the IRS. Is often not very adequate in the IRBE's themselves perhaps are run amateurishly or in a way that does not protect. Patients were the quality of the data that's generated by the experience. This is an investigative piece you've spent almost a year gathering information. What kinds of evidence did you collect well to basically every public source of data that the FDA publishes associated with their review of trials in? So that includes summaries in their various databases online. It also includes warning letters, which is when serious mistakes are made. They might warn the investigator or the I. R.. That they've got a problem that needs to be fixed, I also looked at the inspection reports that were available through the freedom of information, act on hundreds of these cases these are pretty difficult to obtain because the reports are only available under the foia in as a result, it can take weeks months sometimes years to get access to them. So what I'm trying To convey here is that this is a very difficult process. The actually lured what happened in the FDA's evaluation of these organizations because oftentimes they do not announce publicly what happened what about the drug companies that hire these institutions to carry out this research when there's really agreed just problems going on the worst case scenario is that a clinical scientist who was doing? These experiments can be disqualified from future research. This is for someone who has broken the rules and such agreed sway that they've endanger patients that they've intentionally submitted false data to the FDA here to the sponsor of the experiment. When that happens, there's no doubt that the companies who sponsored the specific experiments that were found to have been either fraudulent or so badly. Flawed those timed they're informed of it. The problem is that many times even those experimenters their long history of research is just sort of a black box. No one looks back to see him. They made similar egregious errors or conducted experiments that were tainted by fraud.

FDA Investigator Sarah Principal Investigator SDA Charles Alzheimer Charlie Utah Fraud Clinical Scientist Irbe IRS
New Schizophrenia Guidelines

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

03:44 min | 11 months ago

New Schizophrenia Guidelines

"Lot has changed since 2004 when the APA the last road practice guidelines on schizophrenia this September and twenty-twenty. They updated those guidelines and here's a few of the key changes. There's less emphasis on divorce pushing between the conventional or first generation antipsychotics and the second generation or a typical perhaps because the Katy Trail put an end to the notion that the newer ones are better tolerate or the older ones are more effective, but the guidelines do Place greater emphasis on clozapine. They recommend clozapine after a patient has failed to respond to two trials of a guy psychotics and they Define failure of response meaning less than a 20% response and unlike the 2004 guidelines. They don't require that one of those trucks. Else be with the first-generation antipsychotic. They also recommend clozapine first line for a number of patients, which when you think of it is a lot of people with schizophrenia, those are people with suicidality problematic aggression and potentially with tardive dyskinesia. That doesn't respond to other options. The guidelines do go into great detail on how to treat side effects to antipsychotics. They list metformin as first-line for weight gain and metabolic syndrome and they list the vmat2 Inhibitors two of which are like ft approved and one of which are not all is first line for tardive dyskinesia. That's one area where I might differ from the guidelines they seem to emphasize these FDA-approved treatments, which actually have a fairly poor number needed to treat and not-so-great tolerability and are extremely expensive at $80,000 a year and they give real short shrift wage. Other options for tardive dyskinesia things like ginkgo biloba extract Keppra and amantadine which were actually given more emphasis in the neurology guidelines wage in several places. The guidelines give Credence to the idea of checking blood levels on antipsychotics to see if the patient is actually taking them a lot of authors of advocated for this and the fact here is that you just don't know if the patient is taking it even though the blood levels of most antipsychotics don't correlate with any therapeutic level except for clozapine where the therapeutic effects are greater above blood levels of 350. It's still useful to check them before moving to clozapine because you don't know if the patient even took the medication that you gave them too often. They don't and perhaps the biggest and most welcome change here is the emphasis on psychosocial therapies while they were recommended in a more generic form in 2004 here they recognized A whole host of specific psychosocial programs for people with schizophrenia so they can get their lives back. Here's one that was striking to me. They recommend that all first episode page be treated and something called a coordinated Specialty Care Program. These are things that have been researched since 2004 and shown to improve outcomes. They are team based programs incorporate both medications along with education resiliency training family therapy and vocational rehab sounds like a full pallet of what people need when they're going through them first episode too bad. These programs are hard to find but they're starting to Institute the more public Mental Health Centers and some academic centers have them but helpfully the guidelines do give you a reference to free resources where you can train your staff to start one locally

Clozapine Schizophrenia APA Katy Trail Metabolic Syndrome Mental Health Centers Amantadine Metformin
"antipsychotic" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:24 min | 11 months ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"In the early nineteen nineties about half of US patients with bipolar disorder took lithium now, , it's closer to fifteen percent and the use of antipsychotic says more than doubled to fill that gap. . A new survey reveals what patients think about these newcomers. . This was an online survey of two hundred US adults who by their own report were diagnosed with bipolar one disorder and had taken an antipsychotic within the past year. . Era Paul was the most common followed by Qu- Pina Spirit Own Olympian and Larizza on there are others that fell off after that. . Overall people were satisfied with the efficacy but dissatisfied with the tolerability ninety, , eight percent had at least one side effect on the NS psychotic and most of the side effects were not trivial. . Ninety two percent felt the side effects had a negative effect on their relationships. . Patients were embarrassed by the side effects. . Particularly, , anxiety weight gain followed by involuntary spasms or movements and trouble concentrating. . I'm reminded here of Dr Magas Warning in June twenty nineteen issue on side effects that patients are not likely to put up with a side effect that they find socially embarrassing. . The side effects that bothered people the most worrying Zaidi with gain and feeling like a Zombie or having no emotions And the rates of these three burdensome effects were large in the seventy percent range. . ANTIPSYCHOTIC side effects carried over into all areas of life family, , romance friendships, , and work. . Thirty to fifty percent felt that the anti psychotics impact their job sixty to seventy percent felt that the bipolar symptoms impacted their job. . So from the patient's point of view, , the side effects are a little better, , but almost as bad as the disorder itself in the workplace. . The bottom line while the PDR can tell us what side effects to expect surveys like this. . Tell us just how damaging those side effects are. . And the numbers here are much higher than what we see in the PDR. . What's unclear is whether lithium or the Anti convulsants would raise the same level of complaint in

bipolar disorder Qu- Pina Spirit Own Olympian US Dr Magas Lamotrigine Zaidi Larizza Paul
What Patients Are Saying About Antipsychotic

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:24 min | 11 months ago

What Patients Are Saying About Antipsychotic

"In the early nineteen nineties about half of US patients with bipolar disorder took lithium now, it's closer to fifteen percent and the use of antipsychotic says more than doubled to fill that gap. A new survey reveals what patients think about these newcomers. This was an online survey of two hundred US adults who by their own report were diagnosed with bipolar one disorder and had taken an antipsychotic within the past year. Era Paul was the most common followed by Qu- Pina Spirit Own Olympian and Larizza on there are others that fell off after that. Overall people were satisfied with the efficacy but dissatisfied with the tolerability ninety, eight percent had at least one side effect on the NS psychotic and most of the side effects were not trivial. Ninety two percent felt the side effects had a negative effect on their relationships. Patients were embarrassed by the side effects. Particularly, anxiety weight gain followed by involuntary spasms or movements and trouble concentrating. I'm reminded here of Dr Magas Warning in June twenty nineteen issue on side effects that patients are not likely to put up with a side effect that they find socially embarrassing. The side effects that bothered people the most worrying Zaidi with gain and feeling like a Zombie or having no emotions And the rates of these three burdensome effects were large in the seventy percent range. ANTIPSYCHOTIC side effects carried over into all areas of life family, romance friendships, and work. Thirty to fifty percent felt that the anti psychotics impact their job sixty to seventy percent felt that the bipolar symptoms impacted their job. So from the patient's point of view, the side effects are a little better, but almost as bad as the disorder itself in the workplace. The bottom line while the PDR can tell us what side effects to expect surveys like this. Tell us just how damaging those side effects are. And the numbers here are much higher than what we see in the PDR. What's unclear is whether lithium or the Anti convulsants would raise the same level of complaint in

Bipolar Disorder Qu- Pina Spirit Own Olympian United States Dr Magas Zaidi Larizza Paul
"antipsychotic" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"The first point is you know Rates are still high. If we look at the patients with the serious conditions that would require an antipsychotic. I, mean, the rate should be around you know two percent or something, and still we have a significant number of patients that are getting these drugs that shouldn't be. So you know relative success, it's just that it's relative and it really doesn't mean anything for the for the patients and families who are suffering for the inappropriate use of these drugs, and then the other thing I wanted to point out is that the data. Sort of raise some questions because the way that cms calculates the data are they removed the short stay nursing home resident and they removed people with psychosis diagnosis from that calculation. So the report you know, we point to the fact that there has actually been an uptick in reporting of of the falsifying of psychosis diagnoses to avoid the surveyors, and so if you exclude those people from the calculation, you have a significant underestimate on which is why our numbers are substantially higher than those reported by the National Partnership and CMS. Okay let's let's get more on target relative to the report and let's go into if you could step us through what exactly did the trump administration do when it took off his relative to regulatory oversight of use of these meds in. Post Acute. So I I want to paint sort of broader picture, which is one of right? You know regulatory reduction. The administration has been touting their patients over paperwork campaign, which is not specific to nursing homes at sort of you know cross cutting around. The all of the different providers in Medicare, and so you know every time they issue a rule they talk about what they've done to reduce the burden on providers So that sort of part of this, but I think specific to this particular report. The important thing to highlight is the trump administration eliminated on you all the Obama era per day finding practices that were implemented in July two thousand seventeen, right. So if you have a fraction, you're find every day until he remedy that. And what the trump administration did was they issued a single fine instead and that you know in the case of inappropriate anti psychotic citations that was accounted for two thirds of all citations in that space you know I, I think the Kaiser. Health. News. Had A report that showed that average aggregate fines on nursing homes. That endangered or injured residents dropped from forty one, thousand, two, hundred, sixty under President Obama class year in office in two thousand sixteen to Twenty eight, thousand, four, hundred, five in the period between April twenty, seventeen and March two, thousand, eighteen, and I think that's really one of the important points to raise here in the context of this report and how he saw the rates of citations decrease under the trump administration. Okay thank you, There is some discussion about the interaction between the committee and cms you do site the fact that the chairman Neil wrote a letter on this matter to cms in seven eighteen or July eighteen he do make nor the fact that cms never provided the committee with a written plan to reduce use to reduce falsified diagnoses..

psychosis Obama Neil Medicare chairman President National Partnership
"antipsychotic" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. . Kosovo. . With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. . ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. . Dr Dole and welcome to the program. . I David thanks so much for having me. . Please call me Rachel. . While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, , of course, , the podcast website. . In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, , thousand seven, , the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. . Unquote. . Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. . For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. . Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. . Regarding off label use of these drugs, , eleven years later, , Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. . How. . Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. . The report found in two thousand, sixteen, , , seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, , for example, , Sarah. . Quel. . Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. . The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, , seventy, , nine, , thousand, , long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. . Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, , polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. . Committee. Heard . this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. . Close quote. . This is my third related interview. . In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. . And in February, , eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. . With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. . So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate <hes> neatly into the specifics of the report. . What did the report find regarding <hes> the extent to which? ? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. . David. . So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, , which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, , has implications for patient safety and and health <hes>. . We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. . So that's about two, , hundred, , Ninety, , eight, , thousand, , six, , hundred, , fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication <hes>, , and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated <hes>. . So specifically, , we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. . So that's kind of the. . Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration <hes>. . So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, , fifteen, , twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, , seventeen to twenty eighteen, , and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. . So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. . So you know. . I. . Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation <hes> we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, , seventeen, , twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. . Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's <hes> regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. . So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, , can you give an approximation of the cost? ? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, , mean, , this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. . I don't remember offhand. . Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got <hes>. . About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, , thousand, , twelve constituting roughly three, , hundred, , sixty, three, , , million part D plan payments that year <hes>, , and of course, , there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs <hes>. . So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement <hes> understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. . So it's it's fairly substantial. .

FDA Dr David Graham Rachel Dolan Dr Dole US Human Rights Watch Nursing Home Facility House Energy and Commerce Comm Diana Zuckerman Hannah Lamb Rispler Richard Mollet Sarah Executive Director Long Term Care Community
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

"Today on sixty seconds side. What cocaine tells us about? Depression come starts now in this study in Cardoso and colleagues followed five hundred eighty five patients who appeared to have Yuna polar depression on the mini structured interview when they followed them up later after an average of years twelve percent had converted to bipolar disorder. The risk of conversion bipolar was three and a half times higher in those with a lifetime. History of cocaine use although they were careful to ensure that these new bipolar patients had mainly as our hypo mania during times of sobriety they admit that cocaine can cause persistent changes in the brain. That may mimic mania even during abstinence. The results are in line with prior studies. Which have found that even after rigorous testing every year one in twenty five people with depression convert the bipolar. The same rate they came up with and that substance abuse increases the risk for example. There's a large epidemiologic study where Jules xts and his colleagues found that co Morbidity Between Depression and Substance Use disorders was entirely explained by mixed features whether those mixed features occurred as part of full bipolar or a bipolar spectrum disorder like the Dsm five depression with mixed features people with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. More likely to present in a mixed state and more likely to respond to anti convulsants or atypical. Antipsychotic Stendhal

Bipolar Disorder Depression Cocaine Jules Xts Stendhal Yuna Cardoso
Comorbidity with Schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

06:22 min | 1 year ago

Comorbidity with Schizophrenia

"I'm Rachel Star withers here with my co host gave Howard in this episode. We will be exploring Komorowski having another health condition. In addition to Schizophrenia Co Morbidity is associated with worse health outcomes more complex complex clinical management and increased healthcare costs occupational therapist and host of the podcast occupied brock. Cook will be joining us to discuss sways that. He works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues. Rachel Co Morbidity is one of those things that it happens in all illnesses but but specifically we're talking about how it relates to managing living with an acknowledging schizophrenia. Can you give us a little more background. On Co Morbidity Come Morbidity is his the presence of one or more additional conditions co occurring with a primary condition and for our show the primary condition we are focusing. Focusing on is schizophrenia. How Co Morbidity is classified in mental health vogue gets like really confusing? So if you have schizophrenia and depression and is that two different things or is that schizophrenia. With a negative symptom of depression or is that schizo affective disorder. That's where things start to get like like a little bit hairy as what's a whole separate disorder and then what's a side effect. Others are like anxiety panic disorder post traumatic stress disorder obsessive obsessive compulsive. It's estimated that depression occurs and fifty percent of patients with schizophrenia. I personally have the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Yeah and depression. It's important to understand why we move through this episode that there is a difference between a symptom of an illness like for example. You can have a cold and a symptom of having a cold is a runny nose so you don't have the co morbid disorder of a cold with a runny nose. And that's that's a very bad example. And I know that every general practitioner who listens to our the show like Gabe no full disclosure. Didn't go to medical school but we're really trying to talk about the things that are vastly different from schizophrenia. We're not even necessarily talking about schizophrenia. And depression or schizophrenia anxiety. We're also talking about schizophrenia. And physical health traits and trends. That people with schizophrenia. More often than not have in higher rates than the general population schizophrenia has been described Bob. The life shortening disease and physical core morbidity accounts for sixty percent of premature deaths that are not related to suicide. In People's Oh schizophrenia. WE HAVE AN INCREASE RATE OF DEVELOPING GLUCOSE REGULATION ABNORMALITIES INSULIN resistance and type two diabetes and of course now some of that it's going to be attributed to lifestyle factors which will come back to but a big part is the side effects of antipsychotic medications. If you've ever been on different medications occasions you've definitely learned weight. Gain even with Diet and exercise is really hard to avoid my weight's going up and down throughout the years and I've have always been active to some degree whether it was fighting doing a mud runs like I've always been a very active person and I mean I weighed seventy pounds more than I do right now at one point and it's important to point out that for your career as a stunt woman being physically in shape is a requirement so when you say that you have always been active you've been active at a level different from the majority of the population. You're talking about a planet fitness membership. Here this is part of your career to earn a living and to be paid to do the stunts that you have been so successful at doing and it's it's not so much just even stunt just being on camera for different things unfortunately my looks kinda matter and you set yourself up whenever whenever you're doing Internet things for horrible commenters and that's been rough of just hearing the things people will send like all this fat you know on and on has been definitely really hard just dealing with other people's responses and while we're certainly not saying that it's more reasonable to have your weight commented on if you quote deserve deserve it. It's important to point out that your lifestyle change your medication. Did you were still eating the same working out the same exercising exercising the same. You're still just as active. The only thing that changed as your medication but your weight shot up and and again I want to be very very clear. It's not okay to insult salt people's looks or weights if they gained weight because they cake but we do want to point it out right. Your level of activity did not change you. You made no lifestyle changes. You made a medication. Change to manage schizophrenia. And as you stated gained seventy pounds even though. That's the only change that you made. Patients with schizophrenia are more likely to be obese than the normal population. And if you have long term schizophrenia you are three times more likely to develop diabetes than the general population. That's a lot three times more. I was like Oh wow when i read that it makes sense because like I said I it was so much of it was out of my control like I was doing everything I could and I was still packing on weight and that did not help the depression in part one of the things that I thought was interesting. Rachel as you talked about whenever you were given a new medication. The very first thing that you google was the name aim of drug and weight gain. That was your primary concern will why is that. Why is that your primary concern because there seems to be a lot more important things to worry about? You would assume that I should care more about my mental state but at the same time I fell and I still feel that I can only fight so battles trying to maintain a mental state of being able to go to work and live a life at same time. I don't WanNa be like gaining and gaining and gaining anyway because that affects those exact things me trying to live life me trying to. I don't WanNa say make friends dating things but it does it. Does it like like changes different things. And it's like I can only fight so many battles till the point that it just becomes overwhelming

Schizophrenia Depression Rachel Co Rachel Star Komorowski Cook Howard Brock Google Gabe Rachel BOB
"antipsychotic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A common approach to understanding basic aspect of human nature like the desire to help. Other people is the study people and whom that desire is missing and psychopaths are exactly such a group. So they are characterized by a lot of things. But some of the most consistent findings about them is that they're very bad at recognizing fearful facial expressions. So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation, they doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex, call the image. Delilah that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear has people who have lesions in this area show. Very specific selective deficits in recognizing other people's fear. And what is the middle? Look like in psychopaths. So and people who are psychopathic it tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than that of healthy people. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation and the della when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic dont. Okay. So that was your baseline. And then what was your theory that you came up with? Well, over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else. Yeah. Psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exists on a continuum where you can people the very far end to our maximum psychopathic, and then people who are just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly psychopath. Great. But that continuum suggests that might be only half the equation. It might be the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other hand, you have people who are anti psychopathic who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually caring. And so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic their brains would look like antipsychotic.

Delilah twenty percent
"antipsychotic" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on KCRW

"England Journal of medicine NPR's, Richard Harris reports every intensive care unit nursing counters delirious patients like Brian a forty seven year old man who had been admitted to the ICU at Vanderbilt University Medical Center with a failing liver when Dr swing through on a recent morning on their daily rounds. Nurse Lindsay Smith, recaps Brian's rough night, he is completely disoriented this morning, even tell me his name, mobility wise. He can move all of his extremities. He's tried to get out of bed. Several times this morning. We ended up having to restrain him because the mittens were not sitting over his hands in his confused delirious state. He doesn't realize that the IV lines are actually providing. Him much needed medicine. He has to IV's those are switching positions because he's keeps pulling them out. Let's go see Dr west in the team head into the room. He's concerned about bringing this man's delirium under control if it persists. It can greatly increase the risky will suffer long term problems thinking. And remembering Ryan Healy, how're you doing? Amar? What's the main thing bothering you today? Brian can't seem to make sense of the question. He persists full of that me fingers. Hold it up with your hand. Brian can't follow that simple command. Either. Either these has these are signs of delirium many doctors would give him a powerful antipsychotic such as Hal doll or a related drug called a praised on the assumption. For decades is that these drugs could treat delirium in some surveys up to seventy percent of patients get these anti psychotics in the hands of very good doctors at extremely good medical centers. And so that means translation worldwide that millions of people are getting these drugs to treat their delirium, but that medical practice was based on tradition. Not solid science. So Dr alien his colleagues ran a formal clinical trial involving more than five hundred patients to see if the drugs actually worked patients with delirium were split into three groups one group got the most powerful anti psychotics. A second group. Got what's called an atypical antipsychotic Zyprexa? Don't a third group. Got placebo. Oh, says the drugs made absolutely no difference. Neither group had any detectable reduction delirium coma they stayed in the ICU the same amount of time. They say it on the mechanical ventilator the same amount of time. They didn't get out of the hospital, and he soon or one way or the other and there's really not not as strong evidence in this entire best Gatien that this aggressive approach to treating delirium with antibiotics, which is commonplace in usual care. Did anything for the patients? Yes, the drugs can compati- down, but they don't treat delirium. This is huge. Dr Julie bar at Stanford University is helped craft guidelines for appropriate drug use in the intensive care unit. Providers really need to think differently about managing delirium in their patients in the ICU that a pill or an injections, really not a magic bullet for this devastating illness. Both she and advocate for a more holistic approach to treating delirium by getting patients off drugs and off breathing machine. As soon as possible and getting them up and about as soon as they are able Richard Harris NPR news. is all things considered from NPR news. Hey listeners. I am Justice in this week on Donut me, I'm getting down with black gay Reiner. You heard me talking to Chuck Hayward in Jericho? I just hate when I hear, you know, I'm darker skin. And I just never saw anybody that look like me on television or movies when I grew up those people. No. Heller? They complaining that people feel that I hate the people have to feel fine. Don't Abby on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Five forty eight a KCRW with more of all things considered to come on. Steve shiitake is next hour on the program thousands of migrants, traveling in a group denied President Trump's claims that terrorists are traveling with them. The group says it is fleeing crime and poverty in hopes of finding better life north of their borders. You're going to hear more about it coming up on this program and again tomorrow morning as well on morning edition. Why can't Mexican officials stopped those folks who were coming north and what will the US do if and when they arrive at the southern border that story tomorrow plus net. Flicks is betting another two billion dollars a new programming morning edition tomorrow with cherry Glazer till nine on KCRW. There's a microphone there Holly. As we move on with the news. Don't knock yourself out. Well, you know, the flailing sometimes the flailing you your hands. It's the my. Anyway, what's happening in traffic right now? Well,.

delirium Brian Nurse Lindsay Smith KCRW Vanderbilt University Medical Dr west Reiner Ryan Healy England Journal of medicine Dr Julie bar Richard Harris Amar Richard Harris NPR Holly US NPR Jericho Hal doll Flicks
"antipsychotic" Discussed on What's Good Games

What's Good Games

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on What's Good Games

"Yes. So people are also concerned about that. I mean, I understand it. It's a wild, wild west. We're starting to explore some uncharted territory, and it's going to be fascinating to see how this impacts the industry going forward. Yeah. I mean, I think we're starting to get to the point where we are all aware is humans that we don't own software because games have shut down and gone away and you've spent money on them like there's an that's just part of the ecosystem. Now, at this point, it's just something we we live with and you can sit there and like be like all the good old buyers. But. There was good and bad to that too. If game shift broken, they couldn't fix it. So that's straight you ladies. He not only that there was no such thing as games of service like that doesn't exist. No. So yeah, this will be definitely interesting and I'll keep my I on adjust for industry sake, but for me as a personal consumer is probably not something that I would use because I I like what I'm doing all ready. I don't see any change it. So all hold hands when we'll get through this together now that it's going to be difficult thing to get through experience it altogether. All right. Stammer mouth is still now you've got the next one to. Yeah, yeah, of course. So Seattle police launch an antipsychotic program. So this is by Nathan Grayson of taco. I love him. Okay, swatting I think we can all agree is pretty much the shittiest prank. A person could. I wouldn't even call it a prank. Oh, that's if you can even call an action that might lead to someone's death bring out argue, no, you can't. Somebody calls the police in accuses someone else often someone who's lives dreaming of an in-progress crime. So heinous that swat team shows at the door with unpredictable consequences. Late last year, a twenty eight year old was killed as a result of this. So as police continue to struggle with this issue that Seattle police department has actually taken some proactive measures as spotted by ars Technica the Seattle PD now has an official swatting resource site that encourages streamers or anyone else who feels like they might be in danger of getting swatted to create a profile with data management service and fly yourself as having swatting concerns. Once you've done that police should handle any calls about you that come their way with extra care. So a nine one. One caller would take. Call taker receives report of critical incident, reads an explanation of how the system works on Seattle PD's website while ensuring first responders dispatch to that call for service as quickly as possible..

Seattle Nathan Grayson ars Technica official twenty eight year
"antipsychotic" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Good morning, Frank liberate the WCBS Maryland news. With the news at six thirty one the suspect in, the deadly shooting Florida video game tournament was twice hospitalized. For, mental illness divorce filings from the parents of twenty four year old David Katz of Baltimore show cats. As, another adolescent was for -scribed antipsychotic and. Antidepressant drugs for troubling, behavior A former Baltimore police Commissioner criticizing. An independent review boards conclusion that city detective Sean suitor killed himself Kevin Davis. Believes the police department stepped up efforts to reclassify, the case from a homicide. To a suicide because of their, frustration over not being able to solve the killing as Senator John McCain is remembered around the, country, citizens and politicians alike from both sides of the aisle continue offering, condolences to the McCain family and. Celebrating the life of the eighty one year old maverick, of the Senate for McCain campaign manager and family spokesman. Rick, Davis says to his knowledge President Trump will not be present at the funeral reporting by and large Came to that conclusion regardless of whether that was a conclusion administration or come to whether that was a request by the the family I'm not going to get into any level of detail but the fact that that had been sort of litigated already I think is, enough to know that the president will not be as far as we know. Attending the funeral that's just a fat became will, lie in state of the. Capitol rotunda later this week before, being laid to rest of the US naval academy in Annapolis on Sunday The death of Senator McCain shadowing Tuesday's primary contest in Arizona loaders are. Picking candidates to replace McCain's seat mate in the Republican party primary contests are also being held in Florida and Oklahoma I'll look at sports coming up in a moment Do you remember me sure you and, your husband were moving to another home you tell me wave my arm like I was scattering seed. I remember everything disappeared yes it did just like that. Just like that this is where we have to It's beautiful Elise look at all the junk they left behind point to what you would like to. Disappear ma'am you don't want me to waive. My, arm again only if you want everything to disappear I have to do. Is point all you have to do. Is, point well let's start with that broken..

Senator John McCain Baltimore Kevin Davis Florida Sean suitor Republican party Maryland president Frank Capitol rotunda David Katz Senate US Elise Annapolis Trump Arizona Rick
AT, State Department and President Trump discussed on Jeff Ward and Ed Clements

Jeff Ward and Ed Clements

01:18 min | 3 years ago

AT, State Department and President Trump discussed on Jeff Ward and Ed Clements

"Said he believes North Korea. Has not taken the steps, necessary to denuclearize today's State Department briefing spokesperson Heather Nauert said department continues to, believe that Kimmel honor his pledge to denuclearize Kim made a. Commitment to President Trump on June the twelfth. He said that he would denuclearize his country the secretary has, had subsequent conversations as has the State Department and we do not believe. That that position has changed in any way the government says a judge ignored common sense when he allowed a merger of AT and t. and Time Warner to, go through in a seventy three page. Brief the DOJ claims the ruling, by judge Richard Leon was. Clearly erroneous saying ignored fundamental principles of economics the government says the combined AT and t. and Time Warner would give the company the power to suppress competition, in a statement Dallas-based AT and t. says there is. Nothing in that brief That should disturb. The original decision Robert Wood NewsRadio KLBJ attorney. General Ken Paxton announced today one hundred ten million dollar settlement. With pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca over the company's false and misleading marketing of antipsychotic. Drugs Syra quill and the statin drug Kress store in violation of Texas Medicaid fraud Prevention Act the state says AstraZeneca said the two drugs were safe for certain, populations and Medicaid but they were.

AT State Department President Trump Time Warner Astrazeneca Heather Nauert North Korea Ken Paxton DOJ Richard Leon Kimmel Medicaid KIM Kress Robert Wood Secretary Texas Fraud Attorney
"antipsychotic" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Really well done scientifically and they're basically saying there is no studies that are well done for the treatment of hiccups despite that we treat hiccups everyday if you think something works then just do it yeah why not try it i mean what's the harm in biting eleven within repay if you think the cure for hiccups jumping up toll buildings it's probably not a good yeah that's learn you would stop hiccuping would you stop a little things would you and the medications that we give just so you know if you come in asking for one of these just so you know they're nausea medicines but they're also antipsychotic medicines shoes yes just so you don't go and often they're given by injection and i think it's just that you just stuck me with a needle and the in the frantic nova one and then it forgets to hiccup not that it's dangerous to give someone anti psychotic i don't want to give that impression but be that is that is like the medicine that we're giving you just so you know it seems a little like overkill because i don't know what a psychotic antipsychotic medication is so it's like i'm gonna give you antipsychotic medication for hiccups that seems a little like i don't know if i need that i'm gonna go do this bend over the t the beautiful thing about medicine is when you'll psychotic and we give you a medicine it's an antipsychotic to stop the psychosis but if your nosy added we give you an anti nausea medicine it's the same medicine and if you go hiccups we're going to give you an anti hiccup minutes saying we're gonna cut it so naturally after talking about hiccups you're also probably worried about farts can we get to the phones i want to get to the farting freudian slip you know let's talk about gas coming out of place i feel like i got far right now i won't though because we're in a very close ball race it's a little warm burping and farting have a lot of things in common right sure scat s coming out of an end gi end of you deserve medical term for burping there is and it's not belching it's called called agitation eric tation what is it air rook tation rook titian e r u c t a t i o n rotation can you use it in a sentence please i am irritated that you're spilling baylor okay so so why does this happen well you've got guess in you in your intestines and it's got to come out from somewhere how much gas do you think that you have in your gi tract at any given time between like you're your burping gas in your parting like right now let's say just from your mouth all the way down there's gas that's living in your intestines right okay how much do you think is in you know how much is it me eight hundred seventy litas floated continuously lake again at all times i think you're supposed to burp right to like sink to the bottom something like that yes willie wonka chocolate factory how about fifteen hundred million that's a lot yeah i was thinking there's a lot of spaces in crevices i could probably fill up a lot of gas before it starts like it's gotta come out well okay so i i needed practices by saying this is not based on excellent data there was a study in the nineteen seventies for six argon gas and put it in someone and then they saw how much gas came out and what that gas consisted of trying to determine how much it was not argonne great and so then therefore that's how much gas is in you and says it's not awesome data but but in that study they say they said that it was about thirty two two hundred mil leaders or cc's of gas at any given time less than a coke full of air i don't believe it it's a.

"antipsychotic" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on KPCC

"To the experience with cancer patients saying it was so successful here why are we preventing patients from getting these kinds of drugs and it would seem that pretty pharma would be well positioned for that they were perfectly position they were developing a drug that would become the flagship drug of the pain management movement and that drug was called oxycontin oxycontin was a nuclear weapon it contained large amounts of a narcotic called oxycodone which is part of the opioid family of drugs which also includes heroin and morphine so it was a pure powerful narcotic that was many many times stronger than any pain reliever that had preceded it on the market it seems like it would be very hard to get such a powerful drug that the nuclear narcotic as you've described it passed federal regulators will check came up and purdue came up with a brilliant strategy based on the nature of oxycontin itself traditional narcotic painkillers drugs like percocet in vicodin lasts for four hours oxycontin lasts for twelve hours the content in oxycontin stands for continuous so oxycontin was essentially a long acting version of painkiller and the concept that purdue presented to the fda was simply this because it was a long acting narcotic it would have less appeal to people who like to abuse painkillers because they like to get a quick hit and in late nineteen ninety five the fda approves oxycontin and as part of that approval they give purdue a unique marketing claim that the regulators had never given to any form a suitable company before and has the claim that essentially says that oxycontin because it is a long acting narcotic it is believed to pose less of a risk for abuse and addiction than traditional opioids so purdue creates this drug oxycontin the fda approved and it gives the company this kind of soft and big us claim that the drug is believed to be less addictive than other narcotics and then what happens essentially they take what is an equivalent claim and they turn it into an absolute claim doctors were wrong in thinking that opioids can't be used term so they train their sales people to go out to doctors until doctors that oxycontin will not cause abuse and addiction we used to think they'd stop working all the patients would become addicts that it's a totally unique drago safer drug a better drug now find that these medicines are much safer much more powerful much more versatile than we used to think and we feel that they should be used much more liberally for people with all sorts of chronic pain essentially what purdue is doing is taking what have become standard marketing techniques for everyday common drugs cholesterol lowering drugs diabetes drugs erectile dysfunction drugs.

oxycodone heroin painkillers purdue morphine twelve hours four hours
Here’s what’s next now that the FDA has approved a cannabis drug for seizures

Masters in Business

03:40 min | 3 years ago

Here’s what’s next now that the FDA has approved a cannabis drug for seizures

"To masters in business on bloomberg radio my special guest today is thought harrison he is the founding partner and chief investment officer in cb one capital a hedge fund that invests in healthcare wellness and so let's talk a little bit about cbd can we call that that instead of my mangled the word what is cbd and what's it good for well cbd in and of itself as an antipsychotic right so it's a calming influence and taking a step back canal in talking a little bit about the science because this is really the thrust of what's the most important conversation about cannabis right now and what most people are missing is the wellness side so everything that's alive whether it's a dog a cat a plant fish a human being has what's called an endo cannabinoid system right and this was first discovered in the late eighties and early nineties it's the most ubiquitous network of receptors in the human body okay and what they found is is the founding cannabis are identical in action to the endo can avenue is that your body produces now in other words these are things that are getting you high this has an impact on the biochemistry of the body well about ten percent of kinabalu aids will produce that euphoric effect ninety percent or non all of them are anti inflammatories all of them are therapeutic right so what they're finding out now is that by looking at the end of avenue it system you can now target receptors in your body with certain canal across a wealth of indications for wellness right now we might partner warranted falco night and i'll tell you his story but we spent a lot of time talking to scientists and genealogists and the mosaic that was painted for us effectively was over the last hundred years we've gone from hunters and gatherers to desk jobs sure and we've gone from organic foods to processed foods trans fats and chemicals and certainly heredity plays a part but as you get older your body stops producing these under kavanagh's case in point the runner's high everybody always thought the runner's high was endorphins false the runner's high is eight yay which is an endo cannabinoid it's identical when action to thc this is all frontier science remember still a legal to test cannabis in the united states so all of this is happening is elsewhere israel in italy germany overseas right but what they're finding now and you might you sure you saw the gw pharmaceuticals epa dialects drug we have a position in gw but their rapid dialects drugs reducing seizures in children by fifty percent cutting them in half so they had their fda expert panel a few weeks back and they got a standing ovation on top of a thirteen to nothing unanimous decision so this is going to move forward which is significant demonstrates medical efficacy the da is going to have to reschedule and that's going to open up the pipe in our show let's talk about asthma alzheimer's cancer epilepsy parkinson's what else is on the list for things that cbd can actually make a difference either in the quality of life out or and potentially finding a cure for these diseases the answer is that his frontier science so we don't yet know the scope of the wellness early but it's not just what i'm saying cbd and thc or or sort of the main players what everybody associated with cav is lots of other chemicals a ton of minor can noise you think that people reminding for bitcoins and that became crazy wait till people understand how valuable these minor can have hr cbn as sleep eight t h as an appetite suppressant this is all all coming through the pipe right now is.

Founding Partner Bloomberg Chief Investment Officer Ninety Percent Fifty Percent Hundred Years Ten Percent
UK to review medical cannabis policy as Canada plans imminent legalisation for all uses

Inside Europe

04:35 min | 3 years ago

UK to review medical cannabis policy as Canada plans imminent legalisation for all uses

"Just a just during the week the uk government said it's reviewing its bomb on kind of a space medicines after medicinal cannabis oil was was confiscated from a boy with epilepsy who was later hospitalized with seizures a lot of countries are looking at legislation to legalise cannabis products what's what's behind that push you must remember that the vast majority of people who use cannabis for range of medical conditions and fortunately conventional medicine has has failed them and that's no fault of conventional medicine that's the way the world medications some of them work some of the dealt work many people have source kind this as a relief from the symptoms and in some cases it's been dramatic improvements in medical conditions as you say see people have been seizure kids been seizure phrase results taking count of soil treated things like multiple sclerosis chronic pain particularly effective in chronic pain and so there's a huge huge push now to use a product that is seems to be very safe and certainly far safer the many conventional medicines in terms of its side effect profile so weedy i don't know what the delay in this is to be honest i think i know what's behind the delay is unfortunately people still can't separate out the recreational use of cannabis on the medicinal use of cannabis every time i hear the word medicinal cannabis by detractors they talk about kind of psychosis this is completely separate issue the chance of them abusing thus i am getting mental illness but the idea that it'd be misused in some way our diverse or whatever is nonsense h c i mean how is the taken ice of the medicinal cannabis it's an interesting kind of distinction here between cd and thc is that it doesn't have any psychoactive properties for thc till's thc the psychoactive the people who recreationally use cannabis largely exactly cpg is meant to have actually antipsychotic properties and pain relief properties i'm actually cbgb's not illegal and see that he's actually been sold in sort of hemp shops and nobody breaks it all by by but a lot of research is is now on the wipes clean canada around getting the mixture of cbd and thc rice in terms of relieving symptoms of many conditions so thc remember in far lesser concentrations that won't be an enormous joined seems to be walk is people most medicinal relief there's a lot of companies who will sell sell cbd oil and they'll exporters around europe so if somebody was to order that into airland with a very low level of thc is still going to be a problem down stop they will be they will be prosecuted i mean simon harris who's the health minister in ireland he he could use some of the arguments that he used for the abortion referendum in that people are doing this anyway so let's legalize made up punch a number times i south it's interesting you've made the point people are doing it anyway quite rice and it really saddens me to think the people actually are breaking the law by actually trying to get symptom relief for for medical conditions and found equation it's inhumane and i think it really kinda needs to change and i think it will change and if you look at the reports in the uk today i think they're looking at changing because i think i think the there's a little bit of a groundswell now even people who don't particularly like cannabis as a drug or don't like illicit drugs an old fashioned jails i think they're beginning to realize now that the that the law does you know medicinal cannabis in some way we'll be a gateway into kind of wider drug use i think that lies really been mcgovern from the priority medical clinic in dublin thanks for joining us on inside europe thank you one of the world's biggest populations of child soldiers lives in the democratic republic of the congo about thirty thousand children are forced to serve armed groups of soldiers sexual slaves and laborers that's according to unicef lisa bryant caught up with one former child soldier at a new piece for forum in the french region of normandy which is not far from the d day beaches of world war two.

Cannabis UK
"antipsychotic" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Day it follows almost fifty cancelled flights sunday and hundreds of delayed flights the dallas based airline has been scrambling to inspect all of its planes after a passenger was killed last week investigators believe cracks in an engine fan blade ultimately led to the explosion which hurled debris at the aircraft and shattered a window in a statement over the weekend southwest said it has tried to keep disruptions to a minimum as it works to complete the inspections on friday the faa gave the us airlines twenty days to inspect the aircraft that has the type of engine that exploded for npr news i'm met largely in austin accord in belgium has convicted the sole surviving suspect in the twenty fifteen paris attacks on separate charges sala armed islamic and a co conspirator were convicted of attempted murder of bilgin police officers in twenty sixteen as they tried to escape at least three officers were wounded optus llamas jailed in northern france awaiting trial on the paris attacks that left one hundred thirty people dead you're listening to npr patients with dementia who are living at home or in assisted living are increasingly being prescribed antipsychotic drugs this is according to a new study from the aarp public policy institute npr's anna jaffe reports antipsychotic drugs are intended to treat serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia bipolar disorder they're not approved to treat dementia and come with a warning that they can increase the risk of death in older dementia patients the aarp study used data from medicare advantage plans from twenty twelve to twenty fifteen in the beginning twelve point six percent of dementia patients living at home or in assisted living were prescribed antipsychotic drugs by the end of the study period use of the drugs had increased more than six percent at the same time nursing homes lowered the number of dementia patients receiving antipsychotic by about a third largely because of federal government program i kn jaffe npr news nicaragua's president.

dallas us belgium france paris nicaragua president faa npr austin bilgin aarp public policy institute anna jaffe six percent twenty days
"antipsychotic" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Other people really liked to be around the at a goofy fensive humor and big dreams for his life he like music and art and he wanted to be an architect but his opportunities were limited because he was undocumented so so bring us up to the time he was placed in an immigration detention center in georgia what had caused him to be put in the immigration detention you know how old was the what was up to at that point yeah well he was twenty six years old he had mental health issues and it's mental health appeared to really deteriorate in the last six months to year of his life he had been hospitalized twice for mental health issues and he had been convicted of three minor crimes marijuana possession petty theft and charged simple assault that police papers described as an unwanted hell he gave a woman he had been serving a twenty two day sentence in raleigh north carolina for those his crimes when he was transferred to ice custody and it's clear from your reporting that jimenez had some serious mental health issues or the people of detention center aware of that they were aware of it they knew that hit been prescribed an antipsychotic drug and documented that they knew about his history of prior suicide attempts think didn't exactly respond to his mental health issues as they should have i mean first of all hit really rough time into tension he was beaten up by another detainee and placed in solitary confinement for that before it was discovered that he was the victim hadn't fought back and when he entered attention he was given just a quarter of the dose of the antipsychotic drug that he'd been prescribed before he was detained and he had called out by his behavior and by verbal requests or mental health care but he didn't appear to get what he was asking for what he needed.

georgia theft north carolina jimenez marijuana assault raleigh twenty six years twenty two day six months
"antipsychotic" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Other people really liked to be around the at a goofy fensive humor and big dreams for his life he like music and art and he wanted to be an architect but his opportunities were limited because he was undocumented so so bring us up to the time he was placed in an immigration detention center in georgia what had caused him to be put in the immigration detention you know how old was the what was up to at that point yeah well he was twenty six years old he had mental health issues and it's mental health appeared to really deteriorate in the last six months to year of his life he had been hospitalized twice for mental health issues and he had been convicted of three minor crimes marijuana possession petty theft and charged simple assault that police papers described as an unwanted hell he gave a woman he had been serving a twenty two day sentence in raleigh north carolina for those his crimes when he was transferred to ice custody and it's clear from your reporting that jimenez had some serious mental health issues or the people of detention center aware of that they were aware of it they knew that hit been prescribed an antipsychotic drug and documented that they knew about his history of prior suicide attempts think didn't exactly respond to his mental health issues as they should have i mean first of all hit really rough time into tension he was beaten up by another detainee and placed in solitary confinement for that before it was discovered that he was the victim hadn't fought back and when he entered attention he was given just a quarter of the dose of the antipsychotic drug that he'd been prescribed before he was detained and he had called out by his behavior and by verbal requests or mental health care but he didn't appear to get what he was asking for what he needed.

georgia theft north carolina jimenez marijuana assault raleigh twenty six years twenty two day six months
"antipsychotic" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Guess have been missed using powerful antipsychotic drugs to control residents the pursuit of longterm residence the given antipsychotic drugs have dropped okay which is a good news but even though decreases were reported we still have issues of the um antipsychotic usage as being used for people that can let's say get up or the combative etc and according to attorney kelly bad the edge the numbers of this happening should be zero they she is attorney for the aarp foundation they are engaged in civil court cases keleki nursing all medication practices she contends that the drugs are frequently used for the sedative a fact and not to benefit the recipients now elderly people with dementia do face a higher risk of death if they are overly sedate it they can't uh you know uh work the respiratory centers like weekin as easily so for example if you sir deaths from central africa were you stop breathing for some of us younger people we may wake up or if if we have let's say obstructive apnea look we'll light wake ourselves up somehow we'll have that ability to do that an older person who's very sedated may not so the emphases group long when he campaigned was reinforced monday with the release of a detailed report by human rights watch urging federal state authorities to take tougher measures against improper use.

attorney kelly aarp africa
"antipsychotic" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Kenmore square area after the patriots loss though eagles fans were obviously it a better booed this philadelphia fed were attends collagen boston spoke to wbz tv and there's quite pleased with the outcome on from jersey my dad's from south jersey born and raised eagles fan i just face sign him i've never seen him so hot new for my lows for those who root for the patriots however this was not the way the night was supposed to end all set celebrate like vote the serbs zack did it boston police were out in force with roads blocked off ready for possible celebrations but with the patriots loss and some rain the night ended fairly quietly ben parker wbz newsradio 1030 in other news this morning a warning to facebook users about of video circulating that depicts child pornography norfolk da michael moore says those who receive the video should delete at amary port the incident to both facebook and local police video features task taxed asking users to share it with friends in order to help identify the perpetrator law enforcement is already aware of the video and a federal investigation is ongoing under report says antipsychotic drugs are being used less in nursing homes the centers for medicare and medicaid says a use of the powerful drugs drop from about twenty four percent in 2011 twounder sixty mm percent last year umass medical doctor jerry gore with calls a decrease dramatic but says nursing homes might be finding other medications that sedate patients without drawing the same level of scrutiny as antipsychotic wbz news time is six fifty two and with the entertainment report here's kiss one awaits billy kosta pants gorge go bella jaguar i have one final conference call this morning talk about the patriots loss last night no doubt address malcolm butler and why bought lowers bench last night lady gaga cancelled the remainder of her european tour still suffering from chronic pain and john stamos' god married to his pregnant fiance over the weekend and her hotel room was robbed of over a hundred fifty thousand and stuff with the entertainment report i'm billy conn after the matti show on kiss 108 views that affects you cut jobs his past list alive right hanna congressman jim mcgovern industrial who wish glenridge rda middle class gift ruled and the pork imports was the one good thing and do nothing good about learning the red wilted in the goal was.

gaga congressman medicaid ben parker wbz tv Kenmore square jim mcgovern matti billy conn john stamos philadelphia malcolm butler billy kosta pants jerry gore medicare facebook michael moore patriots
"antipsychotic" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Pulp fiction and 1994 thurman reportedly told a the winds dream threatened her career if she spoke of the incident weinstein admits to making a pass at thurman but he denies the sexual assault thurman is no one of more than seventy women who have accused of 65 your weinstein of sexual misconduct mark mayfield wbz newsradio 1030 a new report says antipsychotic drugs are being used less in nursing homes this centers for medicare and medicaid says a usaid the powerful drugs drop from about twenty four percent in 2011 to under sixteen percent last year umass medical doctor jerry girl wits calls a decrease dramatic but says nursing homes might be finding other medications that sedate patients without drawing the same level of scrutiny is anti psychotics advocacy groups say the use of antipsychotic drugs is still excessive wbz news time now 522 a movie that came out almost two months ago is back on top at the weekend box office not since titanic has a december released topped the weekend box office in february until monday seven weeks after opening jumanji welcome to the jungle is back at number one earning another eleven million dollars over the weekend it's now grossed more than three hundred and fifty million in north america alone making it one of sony's biggest hits ever sonar last week's numberone one runner the death cure drops to second taking in just over ten million dollars in a sluggish super bowl weekend the horror film winchester was the lone new wide release it opened in third with more than nine million dollars in ticket sales i'm ben thomas news that affects you cut jobs had his pastoralist allied lighthanded congressman jim mcgovern is the wish generals you're in the largest ruled in the morgan horse was the one good ch'ng and do nothing in the slowest two point of my nose michael rates for four boys in the news watch never stops wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time five 23 traffic and weather together the subaru retailers of new england allwheel drive traffic.

weinstein thurman assault medicare north america sony jim mcgovern mark mayfield medicaid usaid ben thomas congressman eleven million dollars nine million dollars ten million dollars twenty four percent sixteen percent seven weeks two months
"antipsychotic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Information from them right away so i just one stephen uh crystal could you it's the stage about this issue of antipsychotic drug use in nursing homes or why it seems to me proliferating and then we'll speak with olga a little bit about what people are doing about it great so as uh most of us now who have family members who are struggling with this problem uh uh people living with dementia oftentimes have uh uh distressing symptoms of agitation or or uh or or or or shouting or or uh uh wandering around other kinds of uh symptoms that are hard hard to to manage and the nursing homes that are not always adequately staff uh there has been a history of using antipsychotic drugs which are not in indicated by the fda for this purpose to help manage those symptoms uh but it's been identified as a significant safety problem the the the the fda a has uh uh a black box warnings on the on the drugs for that purpose which uh which means that there is a significant safety problem and there is an increased death rate in uh income residents are other older people uh with dementia in the community for that matter who receive these medications so this been a national campaign for safer uh dementia management that uh that works with uh with with patients to to find other strategies for managing these behaviors in this national campaign has uh actually had quite a bit of uh quite a bit of affect uh with a thirty five percent reduction in anticipation hotic um prescribing our team has been looking at the way that states a nursing home facilities uh have been working as part of this camp pain for safer dementia care so uh our team has been doing exciting work in understanding from through state case studies facility case study sue looking at data uh what the uh uh what did the the levers spy wits jeff facilities are are are able to achieve safer dementia care six say he's provided us with that uh there were two more deaths per one hundred with people antipsychotic treatment uh.

fda thirty five percent
"antipsychotic" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:54 min | 4 years ago

"antipsychotic" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In his room and we've been shown zero footage of em carrying anything through the hotel let's just flat out bazaar why there had been multiple reports of possible accomplice accomplices but we've not been shown a photo or video footage of him in the hotel lobby hotelcasino has more cameras than a federal prison the truth is is this attack should be the most well documented crime in history but for some reason we're not seeing the footage and that just needs to be addressed in the footage needs to be released because what's going to happen is more conspiracy theories are going to be coming out this is enabling people from isis to alex jones to come up with their own claims for what drove paddock to commit his crime how do we not know what his motive was how do we not know every single detail that happened at least in the casino despite what we don't know there is no question that this man was deeply disturbed since the early nineties the number of people treated for depression has tripled in america the number of people on antipsychotic medicine medication is greater than that a survey by the national institute the mental health found that an astonishing 46 percent has at least one kind of mental illness forty six percent from two thousand to two thousand ten the suicide rate among americans 35 to 64 increased thirty percent for men in steven paddocks age range that number goes up by fifty percent at of every one hundred thousand men in the fifties and sixties thirty we'll kill themselves guns are not the problem we are something is wrong and we know it because we see evidence of it everywhere it's not the devices that we hold or the guns that we have or don't have there's something wrong inside we are experiencing a tidal wave of mental illness in this country and we've got to get proactive in dealing with it so what is it you can do well house your own family i got up this morning and i saw facebook post from a friend of mine delilah the radio show host she posted on saturday that her teenage son had committed suicide he been struggling for.

hotelcasino national institute alex jones america facebook forty six percent thirty percent fifty percent 46 percent