4 Burst results for "Anthony Fennell"

"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

07:54 min | 11 months ago

"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

"Let's play a little sound association. Game anthony fennell here. Welcome to future taints. Okay these these the sound of the environment unless you live in this kind of environment which is probably most of us to be honest and this this is. The very familiar sounded ponticelli particularly in australia. A sound that still haunts many communities and then days not familiar perhaps will this is yet another sound associated with how increasingly fragile environment the sound of litigation and according to our guest today. It's a sound we're going to be hearing morals incoming news. I think the landscape of court cases around climate change is really changing rapidly. I mean you can even see in the last two or three years. We've doubled the number of cases that are being brought forward and it's not just in the developed world it's in many many countries. I mean colombia. India pakistan so the the very nature of what we're seeing is very diverse but it has at its core the idea that climate change is really pushing governments and corporations to implement their climate commitments. Professor jacqueline mcglade from university college. London and the strathmore university business school in kenya. So there's kind of different categories of these cases. Some are putting forward. The idea of human rights others are saying the government promised to do something. And you're not doing it. There are other cases that are talking about keeping fossil fuels in the ground in other words. Don't even allow them to come out. There's a liability issue around corporations so we see a huge variety of cases coming forward and being successful the other aspect. Which i think is fascinating is that it's across generations and this actually brings a really serious issue so often you'll see a lawyer representing a particular group who have that articulation. They can go to court and they know how to say but we've recently seen a lot of young people putting themselves forward as the next generation and it's had mixed results we had some court cases saying actually we can't legislate. We can't come in your favor because we're not convinced that it will actually determine the fate of people in future so there is a question in terms. it's called justiciability of weird word but it really talks about the right to be in the court case represent the rights of many. You mentioned human rights as one of the categories full litigation. What are the arguments there. How do you use a human rights argument when you're looking at issues around climate change. I'm sure by now. Everybody knows that climate is going to impact everyone and to a different degree. It will affect the health of people their access to food and clean water and so it's that combination of saying that climate change will impact our fundamental human rights to life to water to food and so on and that's how it is connected. Which types of courts are being asked to hear this type of litigation. Are we talking about a variety of jurisdictions. Absolutely i think in the us which has been some of the showcase trial so to speak. We've seen a number of cases being put forward. I find the ones very interesting. Though ones for example from colombia where they actually went to the inter american court of human rights and the court concluded in the favor so to speak of the state by saying that the state had an obligation to take care of their peoples and it was a matter of national. Survival is what that court said so that goes for a whole raft of countries. That come under their jurisdiction. Canada has had cases brought by indigenous groups where to keep their constitutional commitment to peace order and good government. They were challenged by indigenous peoples to pass lewis mitigated greenhouse gas emissions and. They said that if that didn't happen there would be tremendous psychological trauma brought because of extreme events and so on so that was important another one included for example from brazil where the government was failing to properly administer the amazon fund the mechanism that was set up to combat deforestation and the supreme court accepted that lawsuit last year and directed the government to actually provide information on why wasn't managing the fund properly so a whole change and a whole different way of thinking from the philippines south africa peru pakistan many many different kinds of cases being heard at supreme court level at local levels and increasingly at regional and even at the global level jacqueline mcglade at the university of melbourne. Environmental law rexburg professor. Jackie peel explains that diversity by drawing a distinction between what she calls first and second generation litigation so this is a way of understanding how climate litigation is developing the time and the first generation of cases where the ones that were largely by stone projects challenging different kinds of fossil fuel projects. Call ones call five path. Stations though usually brought on grounds challenging government decision making on planning and environmental grounds and they often and only had sort of incremental change of it. Melissa project focused the next generation cases that way saying emerging particularly in the last five years cases that seeking more systemic change and they're doing sides through arguments based on rights or uh seeking accountability of governments businesses more broadly full climate So as seeing cases like the recent case before the federal court where children were suing the australian federal environment minister saying that she in her decision about a call mani proposal needed to take account of the interests of feature generations where also saying said of cases that Being brought against business actors saying they have a responsibility to make sure that they're releasing appropriate information to shareholders invest of the bat halley managing climate risk so. Those cases are quite different than not sort of localized to a particular project. They more about how these myths and policy making is meeting the goals of ensuring sufficient action on climate change. And what can you tell us about the types of people or organizations that are bringing this next generation litigation to the cords. How do they differ from the previous groups. There are some of the same actors involved in both generations if you lot of litigation so environmental groups and advocates of bain at the forefront of both waves of litigation. But we're beginning to say more people entering the spice who come from a ride. Spec ran for human rights background or from a corporate and business accountability background. Also saying you tops of litigants imaging particularly those who might be participating in a class action where they seeking neither decorations that somebody is causing them harm or actually potentially in the future financial damages the loss they suffered as result of climate related events. Shell says it supports the paris agreement on plans to reach net zero carbon emissions by twenty fifty.

anthony fennell Professor jacqueline mcglade strathmore university business colombia inter american court of human pakistan university college jacqueline mcglade Jackie peel kenya supreme court australia India London government university of melbourne lewis brazil peru philippines
"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

08:48 min | 3 years ago

"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

"Fennell. Along highway Niro, the fine comics, it's first test propeller-driven to mobile, also flies or if you Prevert it the other way play in the doubles as a car top land speed one hundred fifteen. It's the great unrealized, drink engineers and technologists have been working on the flying costs instantly s- the non teen thirties. Slightest ration- is the autonomous Ed seat. Lubar is investing money in developing one so is Airbus. And so is the American aircraft giant Boeing Boeing's prototype. Had a test flight in Virginia. Just a few weeks ago. Flawed is probably stretching to beat it. Basically just lifted several meters off the ground and then landed it looks like a cross between a small airplane drone with five roses, an uncon- person might suggest the company is trying to reinvent the helicopter but Boeing c o. Dennis Muilenburg has certainly been talking up its potential. He he's at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos, the time of innovation is incredible right now. And it's it's great way for us to draw talent for the future. Engineer at Boeing your entire career. So you lived in breathed this. And you think a lot about the future? You think that sell flying cars will be here sooner than we missed. We see that whole front of what I call urban mobility, transforming right before our very eyes. We're building prototype vehicles. Today. We spent to be flying those vehicles within the coming year. We're also working with. Yeah. We'll be flying prototype vehicles. Absolutely. And we're working with the thirties. Like, the FAA is well on the regulatory framework just really important when you think about these dense urban environments where think about a future where you'll have three dimensional highways to relieve traffic congestion and help people operate more efficiently. Not only do we need new vehicles. But we need an ecosystem that will allow that to happen safely and reliably. So we're working on both the ecosystem the regulatory framework and the new vehicles all of that is happening now, and I would expect within the next five years. We'll see initial operational capability being field. How successful will the craft bay in helping to build the sold of three dimensional transport ecosystem that Dennis Muilenburg just mentioned professor colorady is an urban theorist and the director of the sensible city laboratory at MIT he's skeptic. Let me say I don't get me wrong. But I think we need to make a big difference between cities densely populated areas on one side. And then on the other side, you know, if you're talking about the countryside places, we better leader infrastructure in. I think the draws flying cars, and, you know, you type of flying vehicles would certainly have the role to play, you know, outside of cities or think about as a very interesting projects right now going on Africa does not much infrastucture existed influence, scientists can connect places I'll be very difficult to connect. But in cities, I don't really see that much and reason you give simple. Simple reason that's physics just to keep some weight up in the air the way, those you're away to my weight, then you need the energy in you need to generated although movement on whereas in generates of noise in this reason, why when you have just a few helicopters in city, everybody stares at the sky because of the disturbance they generate now magin if if instead of having three five ten helicopters, the same time, you had ten thousand hundred thousand so I don't think that is feasible in terms of k he densely populated areas. But I don't see it. You know, I think it's all about the Jetsons all dream of humanity. But I don't really see how this can happen in this think about in a city, that's just Manhattan in little on this side. You know, sometimes some of them will have an accident, and you know, all helicopter landing was banned in the central Manhattan after big accident happens if you decades ago, so tousands of these machines flying nice would be. Embarrass in streets. Why then do we have reputable VA shin firms like Boeing and Airbus talking up this this idea of flying old minded vehicles as a way specifically of addressing our congestion problems in cities. What know? Want to sell their machines detention market there. But I see this market outside of cities gain. You think you're seeing all the new technologies innovation that can help suburban transportation. I don't really see too much in cities. But you know, we'll see a few decades who was right in one sense. This is a little bit. Like the discussion around driverless cars isn't an automated cars we've been promised those for a long time as a way of changing out CDs, but we don't seem any closer to fleets of automatic cows. We've now major metropolitan areas to we hear of disagree with you. Because first of all self driving cars something very recent flying cars, we've been seen flying cars in nineteen thirties movie such as metropolis by free slang. We seen them in the jets on we it for like a hundred years in popular imagination and it never happened. Now in terms of self driving cars that she as latest two thousand five people could not imagine Getty of self driving car in cities. So something has been developed over the past. And fifteen years such the beginning was a famous DARPA competition in the early two thousand in the United States actually DARPA funded day it contests between universities to develop something close to a cell driving system for for the and any ten or fifteen years developing has been amazing and already today if you go to Phoenix sweets rubber taxes over eighty by one of Google's sister companies, and you can just call your up and go through the city. So I think it's actually very different story in I would say is closely. -ality autonomy is not just the black or white many degrees of Ptolemies usually people in research talk about level one two five in order to describe five being the most Thomas equal. You can think about vehicle that does everything can manage every situation you can sleep in the end of equal take you to your donation, but not yet at level five, but we are getting close in people. Some people think is going to be in three years in five. Or in ten years, but you know suit on we wear quite close today. Now think about the human driver, you know, if you are in the United States in the middle of the winter was a snowstorm sometimes we stop thinking about Singapore when it rains very heavily of cars stops, just because human drivers don't see anything anymore kindle cope with environment in the same thing happen to Thomas car. So today, for instance, rain and snow are some of the issues that not fully solved with autonomy. And then we'll get bedroom over time. But you know, they're the same issues that face a human driver is very important to have discussion that needs to experiment to try things. And then we can respond to some of those experiments. That's we cannot let our CD's evolve. You something seem to natural flew flew the official world how we can try new things in our cities decide which way to go. Now, what it was saying recently that you know, decades ago when you think about the digital revolution. I time it was spite easy because he Navision was happening say into lab Univation was. Happening physical space. So you could actually test you programs connections. You protest the internet in a white. It didn't interfere with everyday life today. It's in your world is nothing. More internet is internet of things. So internet has entered our cities our factories our homes is so what he wants to do experimentation. There clearly need to interface with citizens with equal. If you put self driving cars into the city, the fact that this is going to affect all of us. And so I think we need to find new ways of stand boxing really trying things and have also excited. People citizens who are happy to departed this and help shape tomorrow cities, professor Carlo Ratti from MIT the Massachusetts Institute of technology. We also heard today from Nick Newman at the Reuters institute for the study of journalism at Oxford University. And I've Sohrab the CEO and co founder of podcast and Olympics firm charitable, my co producer here at future tents is. Benefits. I'm Anthony Fennell. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the ABC. Listen up.

Boeing Dennis Muilenburg Boeing Boeing Airbus MIT ABC professor Manhattan Virginia DARPA Lubar Davos Fennell. Africa United States FAA Thomas Nick Newman
"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

"This is an ABC podcast. Streets congested with vehicles, but one of the world's largest aircraft manufacturers thinks it has the solution. It could be the traffic jam headaches of your commute. Brings flying car prototype, which the world's largest playmaker settlements. They achieved a successful inaugural test flight. I know it's idea that's been parted sci-fi for generations. But among technologists, it seems it still has come and see. Boeing so-called low stress mobility is competing with arch-rival Airbus and numerous other firms to introduce small cell flying vehicles capable of Bertel takeoff and landing it's a technological field. Sounds a lot like a helicopter to me. Hello, Anthony Fennell here. Well, future taints. Now one person who will know is Carlo Ratti, the director of the sensible city laboratory at MIT, the Massachusetts Institute of technology, and he'll join us a little later to talk about the potential urban impact of flying cars and also automated vehicles. I we're off to Oxford and the Reuters institute for the study of journalism, they have a report published called the future of voice and the implications for news. It's all about the potential of voice activated smart speakers, powered by intelligent assistance, think. Amazon Alexa, and Google assistant his senior research associate Nick Newman. What was saying is the moment of sort of lots of interest and hype around voice activated speakers in particular that growing credit quickly, but we know very little about how they're being used the platform selves of very secretive. About even how many devices have been sold let alone giving aggregated takes her about how for example that being used for news. And this is kind of important because that will so asking publishes to invest significantly increasing content for these devices. So what we were trying to do is essentially understand the situation today with early adopters. But also, what some of the barriers might be more people using voice. And specifically how these devices were being used for news. Are they going to be important in the news ecosystem on not the Reuters institute's report was based on user surveys in the US and Britain as well as focus groups in both of those countries and Germany what they found was that despite this -cation smart speakers are being used in a very basic way. Totally. Yeah. I mean when we asked people eighty four percent say that they using it for music and two-thirds say that it's the most important feature so sixty four cents cents most important feature early. One percent say news is the most important feature will though people. Are you know, saying give me the news Alexa, the news Google ferry? Few people think that's very important or finding much value out of it yet. And that was one of the main findings is actually and again when we went into people's homes as we use the news all the time. But then you can look at what's happening on their devices. You can look back at the history of what they've done maybe they accessed at once last Wednesday. So it's not yet. And I think there's number reasons for this is not yet becoming a sort of key device for news. We'll let's come to those reasons in second, but podcasts aren't being accessed via these voice activated. Speakers yet, either not significant numbers, according. Percents significant numbers. So we sort of got up this number different ways in the survey. Maybe ten percent fifteen percent said that they were accessing podcasts at least monthly through these speakers these of the owners, but actually if you ask publishes a new about one will two percent of their total traffic is coming from voice activated speeches Online's. Most of their traffic is still coming from all from district computers, and in terms of podcasts, and I think the reasons for that because Paul consequential personal thing and these really shat devices so the sitting there in the living room and quite often import cast you have very specific tastes that a specific to you may be back your passion or comedy, you like, whatever. So it may be the wrong device in their own place. And a lot of the podcast growth that we've seen young people particularly through headphones and out of home these devices, not yet out of home that is coming. They coming to headphones and cars, and so I think that is going to completely change the picture. But right now podcast is not from. Central so returning to the consumption of news. What you see what does the research tell you might be some of the reasons why there hasn't been a significant take-up today, we asked people in the survey. And basically people said thank you much news. Anyway from different sources. I mean news is just everywhere so complete different picture from twenty years ago when us was kind of scarce now, it's abundant it's in the air. It's kind of coming out through notifications on mobile phones. So it's not the people want more news. I think what people want is news that's relevant specific to them and in the right format. And at the moment a lot of the formats of this stuff is essentially just offcuts from radio. But the context is different. So people said, well when you say give me the news, Alexa, what we really want is is a minute summary and most of the publishers providing sort of five minutes, ten minutes, fifteen minutes, those guy we talked to New York who is a New York Times us, and he said just give me a minute. And he's getting the daily which. Which is the New York Times daily podcast, which is about twenty five minutes, and it's just a complete mismatch of expectations even though he's in the right grand? Now, you didn't just pick to news consumers for this research also spoke to eating leading publishes include. You have the Neil time and the baby say ABC, and the what do they say do do they see this is a potential new form of technology for the delivery of news and an Ave making efforts to try and work out how to tailor it to the potential audience. Absolutely. I mean, what you have to recognize these very early days, and I think pretty much everyone. We spoke to recognize that voice is going to be a really significant disruption to media and particularly to access to media the way in which we lax us voice is going to be an easy way to access the programs. You know, you love already it solves real problems. People have in the homes of picking up their phones. Trying to connect them then mobile phones to the television or the radio, whatever, I think, everyone recogni-. Is that? And if you're a broadcaster like ABC this is here today. So even though podcast not being used heavily these opping us as replacements for live radio today. So he spoke to the NPR National Public Radio in the U S nineteen percent of the online streaming for that system radio

ABC Alexa Reuters institute New York Times Google MIT Carlo Ratti Boeing Oxford Anthony Fennell Airbus NPR Nick Newman Amazon Germany Bertel U S
"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"anthony fennell" Discussed on Future Tense

"Conference in the US capitol organized by the Washington Post, the focus is on defense and Morton. Just to drill down. When you think about the future talk a little bit about how you see a transforming your business of military. Our and the guy in the hotseat is general Joe it chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff in our profession one of the areas that's going to really determine future outcomes is speed of decision making. So a is certainly relevant to speed of decision-making. If you think about cyberspace, a is critical to be able to implement effective ways of protecting ourselves in cyberspace. I don't think it would be an overstatement when we talk about artificial intelligence to say that whoever has a competitive advantage in artificial intelligence and can field systems informed by artificial intelligence could very well have an overall competitive advantage. I mean, I think it may be that important. I don't think it's something we can say definitively at this point. But it certainly going to inform. Warm in be the preponderance of the of the variables that would go into. Hey, who has an overall competitive advantage? AI will be a key piece of it. Anthony Fennell here. Welcome to future tents. A group of the world's leading scientists and tech experts, including physicist, Stephen hawking, an apple co founder, Steve Wozniak have issued a stark warning in open letter published today, they say or Thomas weapons systems was use artificial intelligence to select targets without human intervention should be banned predicting that was more than three years ago. And since that time the development of autonomous weaponry has continued pace when he begin to think about what a world would look like where militaries have deployed Atanas weapons in in large numbers. One of the dramatic changes that we're likely to see is the pace of battle exceleron pull Shari's. Our first guest today as we look at the influences speed on future conflict. He's the director of technology and national security at the center for new American secure. Thirty and then one of the drivers of military's pursuing. This technology is fear that others are doing. So and they'll have to do this just to keep pace. This was well captured I'm gonna paraphrase here, but a coat from former deputy secretary defense Bob work who said others build terminators, and they don't make good decisions as people, but they're faster. How do we respond? That's kind of colorful and slightly scary way. To look at the problem, which is that even if a ton of JV don't have all of the reasoning capabilities that humans hat in a variety of different contexts, maybe they don't understand ethical principles the same way, these are vitally important things. But if they're faster that pressure will loan drive lotteries to use this technology, but could also shift warfare to new domain.

US Washington Post AI Joe Thomas weapons systems Anthony Fennell Morton Steve Wozniak Stephen hawking director of technology deputy secretary Shari chairman apple physicist Bob work co founder three years