39 Burst results for "Anthony Fauci"

Fresh update on "anthony fauci" discussed on Financial Quarterback

Financial Quarterback

00:31 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "anthony fauci" discussed on Financial Quarterback

"But we have to understand. We're free. Six ft statue was made to honor Floyd, who was murdered in police custody in Minneapolis. June chief became a federal holiday when President Biden signed the legislation Thursday, celebrating the date when slaves in Texas finally received word that they would be freed in 18 65, the nation's top infectious disease doctor, making his case for vaccines at a Juneteenth event yesterday in Washington, D. C. Dr Anthony Fauci at a Juneteenth Community Day of action event to help the mayor promote new vaccine incentives for the district's large black population. There's no doubt African Americans disproportionately suffer from the severe disease leading to hospitalization and in many cases death, Fauci saying vaccinations will send the virus to a dead end when the virus comes to us. Sorry, Stop sign. You're not getting infected. And that's what vaccines do the district offering incentives for residents, including gift cards and chances of free airfare. Dave Packer ABC News, a man threatening people with a Taser and a knife inside Washington Square Park. Sparks a stampede that leads to at least one woman being trampled in New York Post reports The chaos unfolding around 12:40 A.m. Saturday with the 43 year old woman left bloodied after being knocked to the ground by park goers fleeing the area. She was taken to Bellevue Hospital after suffering cuts, scrapes and bruises, police arresting 42 year old Jason McDermitt of Manhattan, and he's been charged with menacing reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. It was not immediately clear why McDermott began waving the Taser David Folk. Thomas W. O R News. Tropical depression. Claudette continues to ravage southeast.

Dave Packer Jason Mcdermitt Mcdermott Floyd Texas Washington Square Park Thursday Claudette Manhattan Minneapolis Fauci Washington, D. C. Yesterday Six Ft Anthony Fauci Abc News New York Post President Biden June 42 Year Old
Dr. Marty Makary Discusses Covid-19 Gain-of-Function Research

WMAL Talk

02:14 min | 10 hrs ago

Dr. Marty Makary Discusses Covid-19 Gain-of-Function Research

"Is a compelling reason for us just on a scientific and medical basis to really know more about the origins of this virus isn't there Well, just like in, um, politics. There's Republicans and Democrats in science and virology. We have pro and anti gain of function. Research in the community is split. And the origins now and now that we understand what happened, and it's pretty clear. We have to bury the idea that gain of function Research has value. You know that Fauci has been out there parading that around in lectures around the country. Other scientists who are actually very good people. Good scientists. They have sort of underestimated the risk of creating a pandemic through this research. Now we have to officially end all gain of function research. And it's very obvious what happened over there, can you? It's obvious to you, but we still have a whole lot of deniers out there, most of them with advanced degrees Doctor just to follow up on this very specific issue here because Anthony Fauci has gone on record when challenged like why are we spending American tax dollars on gain of function research overseas in China, he said. It would have been irresponsible for us to not participate in that program. Can you respond to that idea? Well, Tony had a bad week last week. I think he He? You know he's holding on to this idea, and this is exactly what we have to officially dispelled forever. And that is that there is value in characterizing Corona viruses in animals. That was what the NIH grant was for. That was what the research articles cited and thanked the NIH for funding. That's all documented and that's what's you know published out there, so it would be. It's going to be very hard to explain that away. Why there's a million viruses in the world. Why do we need to figure out What their seat gene sequences are and how they mutate when if they cross over into human beings, which about 1% of them have Then we sequenced and we can sequence the DNA of the virus in about one hour, So let's just do it when it's a problem rather than risk creating a pandemic. That should be our lesson.

Fauci Anthony Fauci NIH Tony China
Fresh "Anthony Fauci" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "Anthony Fauci" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"It's also about love face right, right. And that is what the vaccine is about A message especially important as the Delta variant first detected in India is now reported in 49 States. Health experts believe it's on pace to become the dominant strain. It's a variant that is more easily transmissible. Potentially deadlier and particularly dangerous for young people. Natalie Brand CBS NEWS Washington Overall, more than 70% of adults who live in D C have gotten at least one covid 19 vaccination shop. But that is an average of Overall eight wards in some words have a lower percentage than others. City leaders are working to change that. A community core day of action has volunteers fanning out and trying to get residents to one of several vaccine clinic set up around neighborhoods east of the River, D. C Mayor Muriel Bowser and Dr Anthony Fauci to word of vaccination clinic at Anacostia High School. Where is what 8% have been vaccinated so far? Yeah, so it depends on whose data you look at, but we're only about 30 40%. And in some parts of the world age where we're below the city average. We're definitely to change that city residents at least 18 years old who get their first shot between now and July, 17th will get a $51 gift card from Visa free cars, Airline tickets, Even a year's worth of groceries are also being given out to anyone who gets that first shot. Your chances of winning are very, very good in Anacostia, John Doman w T o P News wall. Stay with us coming up on w T o p. D. C. Prepares for a couple of very warm days. It's a 34. Your favorite things feel made for you. Your education should too. University of Maryland Global Campus, formerly University of Maryland University College was made to serve the military and working adults like you Today we continue that tradition. By offering frequent start days so you can get started with convenient online learning that fits your schedule.

India $51 John Doman 8% D C University Of Maryland Univers July, 17Th Anthony Fauci University Of Maryland Global Natalie Brand Washington Anacostia High School 49 States Today First Shot More Than 70% First Visa Cbs News About 30 40%
Fauci: US to spend $3.2B for antiviral pills for COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Fauci: US to spend $3.2B for antiviral pills for COVID-19

"The U. S. will invest three point two billion dollars in a program to boost development of antiviral pills for cope with nineteen and other dangerous viruses that could turn into pandemics the cope with nineteen kills would be used to minimize symptoms after infection they're already being developed and Dr Anthony Fauci says the money will help speed clinical trials and give more support for research the program also aims to find new therapies for other viruses there are a few treatments that exists for many of the viruses that have what we call pandemic potential meantime the CDC says average daily new covert nineteen cases of the U. S. have hit their lowest point since the pandemic's early days and are down ninety five percent over five months Sager mag ani Washington

Dr Anthony Fauci U. CDC Sager Mag Ani Washington
Fresh update on "anthony fauci" discussed on WMAL Talk

WMAL Talk

01:09 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "anthony fauci" discussed on WMAL Talk

"Is the best of O'Connor and company that her Amber 80 from spectator is joining us all morning and keeping his company. Good to have you, as always, Amber. It's great to be here, and it's amazing how we've had conversations now, of course, is what we should have for the last year and a half about Covid 19 about issues with regard to our public health policies, not with regard to our vaccines, and we're finally getting so much more information about the origins of this virus, And it almost seems As we just mentioned with regard to the president's response to Peter do see there in Sweden that here in Geneva that there seems to be this this movement within the media and within certain people of politics to just move on. It's like, oh, the origins of the virus don't matter. And it seems to me that maybe it does in terms of preventing the next pandemic, and also, frankly, for more vaccine relief and treatments of this virus. I could be wrong, though I'm not a doctor, but Marty Makary is he's a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and also As a focus of the Bloomberg School of Public Health on these very issues on public health policy, Um, by the way, he's also the author of the Price. We Pay Really Good book about our health care system in this country, Doctor. Thanks for joining us, as always. Good morning. Great to be with you guys. We'll sort of complete that thought for me, will you Because there is a compelling reason for us just on a scientific and medical basis to really know more about the origins of this virus isn't there Well, just like in, um, politics. There's Republicans and Democrats in science and virology. We have pro and anti gain of function. Research in the community is split. And the origins now and now that we understand what happened, and it's pretty clear. We have to bury the idea that gain of function Research has value. You know that Fauci has been out there parading that around in lectures around the country. Other scientists who are actually very good people. Good scientists. They have sort of underestimated the risk of creating a pandemic through this research. Now we have to officially end all gain of function research. And it's very obvious what happened over there, can you? It's obvious to you, but we still have a whole lot of deniers out there, most of them with advanced degrees Doctor just to follow up on this very specific issue here because Anthony Fauci has gone on record when challenged like why are we spending American tax dollars on gain of function research overseas in China, he said. It would have been irresponsible for us to not participate in that program. Can you respond to that idea? Well, Tony had a bad week last week. I think he He? You know he's holding on to this idea, and this is exactly what we have to officially dispelled forever. And that is that there is value in characterizing Corona viruses in animals. That was what the NIH grant was for. That was what the research articles cited and thanked the NIH for funding. That's all documented and that's what's you know published out there, so it would be. It's going to be very hard to explain that away. Why there's a million viruses in the world. Why do we need to figure out What their seat gene sequences are and how they mutate when if they cross over into human beings, which about 1% of them have Then we sequenced and we can sequence the DNA of the virus in about one hour, So let's just do it when it's a problem rather than risk creating a pandemic. That should be our lesson. Ask you about representative Andy Harris, asking Governor Larry Hogan to suspend requiring public Maryland colleges from uh Requiring students to get the vaccine to return to campus. He says that you know you don't really need to get the vaccine anyway, because there are very low risk for being for having getting killed. Or, in fact, here's Congressman Harris on W. M A. L just yesterday, especially in light of the new information about myocardial itis, and it's a side effect of the vaccines when given to mostly young males. I think it's it's not a good idea to mandate these vaccines for otherwise healthy people who are very low risk of, uh, contracting covid. Do you think he has a point? Dr Harris. You know, he's a physician. I worked with him at Johns Hopkins. He's a very smart position, and he's onto something. And that is the requirement by schools and universities, too. Get the two dose vaccine regimen. That rule is going to hurt a lot of kids. It could even kill somebody because the second dose is where we're seeing this clustering of complications and they're real. They are real and there's a case. In the Midwest, where it's pretty obvious that somebody died from this second dose. So we have to recognize it's an individual choice. Natural immunity is real, and you can't ignore it, like our public health officials are doing when somebody had covid or natural immunity. That works in that counts. You can't just say I'll get the vaccine anyway, even though the vaccine could kill you, Um, I think I like I think people should get the kids should get the vaccine. If they haven't had just one dose, though, and it's an individual choice. Let's respect people. You know you have been an advocate of the one does policy really, from the beginning of the the vaccine rollout, and has this been studied enough? Are we giving enough attention to this? Because it certainly seems clear that that second dose does see Seem to be more problematic. That's where the warning signs seems to be. And also the first dose policy that other countries have adopted. Doctor McCurry, their numbers went down so drastically that it seems so logical to me. Why the push back? Yeah, Yeah, it is very logical. But, um, here here's just clarify in adults. What I've been advocating for is delaying the second dose because we were supply constrained. We could have saved many more lives. Tens of thousands more Americans could have been saved. If Dr Fauci is after Belinsky would have done what the UK did and delay the second dose to three months, effectively doubling our vaccine supply for for a couple months. Um, so that was a huge mistake. That was a terrible, tragic mistake in kids. What I'm saying is only do one dose. Don't even delay. The second dose. Just do one dose. Um, for this is the vast majority of kids..

Andy Harris Tony Marty Makary Sweden Geneva Anthony Fauci Peter NIH Harris China Bloomberg School Of Public Hea Three Months Second Dose Yesterday Last Week Johns Hopkins School Of Medici Belinsky Democrats Two Dose First Dose
Email Exchange Between Mark Zuckerberg and Dr. Fauci Included Trade Secrets

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | Last week

Email Exchange Between Mark Zuckerberg and Dr. Fauci Included Trade Secrets

"Here It is right here. Here's the email from Mark Zuckerberg. To Dr Anthony Fauci. You need to date folks. March 15 2020 12 18 pm That West Coast time doesn't really matter. Probably not. He says calls him Tony. They must be buddies, Tony, not Dr Fauci. Not Anthony. Not Dr Anthony. Tony. A tone like he's gonna go over for dinner, and I'm gonna have Connolly's or something. Hey, Tony. He says. Hey, listen, it's a Zuckerberg again from Facebook doing a series of livestream Q and A's with health experts and, you know, we need some authoritative information. I'd love to have you do one of these Q and A's. He said, could be a video We put out in the harbor different thing we distribute separately. But I think it could be effective as well. Talking about authority of information from reliable sources, was anybody you know, from the Trump administration that had alternate views to Dr Fauci. Given an opportunity by Zuckerberg to I just I'm just asking a question. Again, in case you're under the mistaken miss belief here. That Chuck Todd is interested in hearing both sides are getting to the facts he's interested in protecting Protecting like a praetorian guard. Dr. Anthony Fauci is reputation because, Fauci said, a lot of things that did damage to Donald Trump. That's his only purpose. We have the email right here. And the interesting about this. They think about this email is the redaction. Interesting about this email thing about this email is what's not in this email. Zuckerberg says the Fauci get ready. He says, finally, comma. You're waiting for the rest. Well, you'll wait forever because there isn't the rest. The redactions the whole paragraph. Finally, comma redacted. There it is right

Dr Fauci Tony Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Anthony Mark Zuckerberg Trump Administration Connolly Zuckerberg West Coast Anthony Dr. Anthony Fauci Fauci Chuck Todd Facebook Donald Trump
Fresh update on "anthony fauci" discussed on Around the House with Ken Moon

Around the House with Ken Moon

00:56 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "anthony fauci" discussed on Around the House with Ken Moon

"All in one. ABC News of Lionel Employees. Juneteenth celebrations nationwide marking the 156th anniversary of when slaves in Galveston, Texas, found out they were free 2.5 years after the Emancipation Proclamation. President Biden tweeted calling Juneteenth a day of profound weight and power at a Juneteenth event. Dr. Anthony Fauci made his case for vaccines in Washington, D. C. Dr Anthony Fauci had a Juneteenth Community Day of action event to help the mayor promote new vaccine incentives for the day. Strict large black population. There's no doubt that African Americans disproportionately suffer from the severe disease leading to hospitalization and in many cases, deaths, ouchy saying vaccinations will send the virus to a dead end when the virus comes to us. Sorry, Stop sign. You're not getting infected. And that's what vaccines do the district offering incentives residents, including gift cards and chances of free airfare. Dave Packer ABC News, This is ABC News. President Biden will host Israel's president at the White House later this month. Brazil has surpassed 500,000 coronavirus related deaths People took to the street demanding the impeachment of the president. The South Korean lawmaker claims a North Korean hacking group broke into a nuclear research center last month, The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute noticed unidentified user access on May 14th authorities they're still investigating. Are you primed for Prime Day? ABC is uni hard Amazon prime shopping extravaganza starts on Monday and smart shopping expert Trae Barge of true trade dot com says Black Friday type deals will be a plenty electronics..

Dave Packer May 14Th Monday ABC Last Month Black Friday Anthony Fauci 156Th Anniversary Abc News Amazon Korean Atomic Energy Research Washington, D. C. Galveston, Texas White House Emancipation Proclamation 500,000 Coronavirus Juneteenth Community Day Later This Month President Biden Juneteenth
Fauci Blasts 'Preposterous' Covid Conspiracies

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:15 sec | Last week

Fauci Blasts 'Preposterous' Covid Conspiracies

"Dr. Anthony Fauci is calling the attacks against him. Attacks on science critics are calling for his job after he was accused of changing his views on mask wearing in the origins of Covid 19. He told MSNBC he could debunk each of their conspiracy theories

Dr. Anthony Fauci Msnbc
US Increasingly Unlikely to Meet Biden's July 4 Vaccine Goal

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last week

US Increasingly Unlikely to Meet Biden's July 4 Vaccine Goal

"President Biden's been setting and exceeding goals in the pandemic fight but the U. S. is increasingly unlikely to meet his benchmark of having seventy percent of Americans at least partially vaccinated by July fourth at the current rate it won't happen about sixteen million people would need to get a shot in the next four weeks the daily vaccination averages down to about four hundred thousand a day still Dr Anthony Fauci things the U. S. we'll get there and if we don't we're going to continue to keep pushing saying the administration's pleading with speeds to boost their vaccine outreach efforts even as a new virus cases plummet CDC cheaper shell Wolinsky says the seven day averages now about thirteen thousand three hundred the first time that the seven day average of cases has been less than fifteen thousand since March twenty seventh twenty twenty Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden U. S. Dr Anthony Fauci Wolinsky CDC Ani Washington
"anthony fauci" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

22:57 min | Last week

"anthony fauci" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"I was honored to welcome to the podcast. Dr fauci it's become almost a cliche to say this is an unprecedented time. And i'm just curious given that you have lived through other pandemics worked in other pandemics. How much of. This feels unprecedented. And how much of. It feels eerily familiar. Well chelsea the only eerily familiar thing about it is the unpredictable nature of outbreaks. Where you just going along. And then all of a sudden something comes up it could be subtle the way. Hiv this month. In the next few days where commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the realization that we were dealing with a new syndrome. We didn't know what the microbe the pathogen was. We didn't even have a name for it back in june and july of nineteen eighty one having had. I guess i would call it the privilege in some respects but also the painfully experience of being involved in that from the very first day. That's sort of snuck up on you. It was low level below the radar screen. Then as we learn more about it we found out dealing with just the tip of the iceberg when we saw people who were very very sick not knowing until we had a test that we're dealing with something where they were literally millions of people infected so the fact that outbreaks are unpredictable. They come in strange ways. That's the common denominator. The difference with this that validates the statement. it's unprecedented. is that when you're dealing with something as explosive as this which has a couple of characteristics that. I have often referred to almost ironically years ago. What is your worst nightmare. Dr fauci people would ask me that five years ago. Ten years ago fifteen years ago. And longer i would always say it was. The emergence of a new virus generally jumping species from an animal host to a human that had two characteristics one that is extraordinarily efficient in spreading from human to human and two that it has the capability of a great degree of morbidity mortality. When you put those two things together. That's when you get my worst nightmare and that's exactly what we're experienced because we have not had anything like this in well over one hundred years since the historic influenza pandemic of nineteen eighteen so there is a very strong true element of this being unprecedented. At least in over one hundred years and dr fauci there's an adage in public health that are notable epidemics aren't now with the benefit of both hindsight and your decades of experience in pandemics. What do you think we could have done differently in january or february to help save american lives and save lives across the globe in some respects. It is not answerable because you could certainly have done things differently. If you new things differently so you can say to yourself in this country. What could we have done if we knew back in january what we know right now is the characteristics that i'm telling me would ability to efficiently spread from human to human the fact that fifty to sixty percent of the transmissions occur from someone who is infected but has no symptoms at all. We know anywhere from a third to forty percent of the people who get infected never develop any significant symptoms at all that would bring attention to any medical intervention so back then if we knew that we were dealing with in this country something as extraordinary as this in its ability to spread. We would have done something. That likely would have not been acceptable to the american public. Like when we had the first case in. i think it was january. Twenty first to say okay. It's here and then a few days later a week or two later it became clear that there was community. Spread it just air which means someone infected someone and you don't have the chain of transmission locked in. You don't know where the person got it from that. Being the case that means it's spreading in society beneath the radar screen if we had known its capability of spreading. We could have said. Let's shut the country down right now to prevent it. I think there would have been such extraordinary pushback to say. Well wait a minute what are you talking about. We have one or two cases you want to shut the country down. That's crazy so when you ask me a question what could we have done differently. Well now that we have five hundred ninety thousand deaths you go back and say well look what this has done. We may be could have prevented some of those really shutdown early and prevented the spread. But you know if you look. Throughout the world chelsea even countries that appear to have done well early on every country has gotten hit really badly even some of the asian countries now that we pointed to as models of their response are now starting to get into trouble including places like taiwan and singapore and yet nam and places like that who seemed to have done very well in the first waves. You made a comment that resonates with me is. How do you prevent an outbreak from becoming a pandemic. so. I don't think we're necessarily going to be able to prevent the emergence of new microbes. They've occurred historically for as long as before history even recorded it. History is full of them. But in answer to your question how do you prevent that from becoming a pandemic. and that's what we talk about lessons learned. What can we learn having gone through this. Where the united states was ranked by public health agencies as being the best prepared country in the world for pandemic and we got hit among the top three with brazil and india as the three worst in the sense of numbers of cases. And and dr batniji think that that is because we were prepared for previous pandemics in not future wanting. Where are we ready to fight the last war. Not the next war. I think it's partially that not completely. I think it was. There were things that went wrong early on in. That was the issue with the testing that we didn't have a testing system for a considerable period of time. And we were testing only symptomatic people. Because we're not fully aware that a symptomatic spread was really really very important so those are the things that i think could have been done differently. And then don't want to relitigate what went on last year but there are things that i think could have been done better. Although i live in new york now i grew up in arkansas and then moved when i was twelve to dc and it is heartbreaking to me. Dr fauci that arkansas louisiana tennessee mississippi so much of the south have vaccination rates. That are half of what we see in the northeast since you've had to communicate now over so many decades so many different public health challenges and also imperatives. How do you think we rebuild trust in science and especially trust in in vaccines vaccinations. That is something that is not going to happen easily chelsea. I think that we may have to find ways. And that's a complicated issue as you will know probably better than i do. It's a complicated issue of how you heal the differences and end the hostility. I mean i've been the object myself of a phenomenal amount of hostility. Merely because i'm promoting. What really fundamental simple public health principles that seems astounding that that would generate a considerable degree of hostility. But it is it is so. I don't think the answer is intensifying the hostility and pointing figures. I think the approaches to outreach to try and understand each other better and realized that we have differences but those differences should be the source of strength in some respects and not the source of chaos. So i don. I don't know the answer to your question is if it's a seemingly simple question with a complicated answer we've got to reach out to people and get them to understand that this is for their own safety their own health and also what i referred to as communal responsibility your responsibility to society because there is a thing called the chain of transmission of an outbreak and one of the very interesting and i must say quite unique aspects of sauce covy to in covid nineteen. Is that the same virus that has killed. Almost six hundred thousand americans makes many. Many people have no symptoms at all. Just doesn't bother them. I mean there's thirty forty percent of the people get no symptoms at all so that is in many respects on unprecedented to have that situation usually when you have something as potentially deadly as this it makes just about everybody a little bit sick. This is something where there are people who are saying why should i get vaccinated the chances of my getting into trouble of very very low. And they're correct if you look at the rate of hospitalizations of young people. It's zero it's small compared to the rate among elderly people and among people with underlying conditions. But there are a couple of things there that people don't fully understand you're not completely exempt because a lot of young people wind up getting into trouble statistically not nearly as many as the elderly and those with the line conditions but there's another aspect of it let's say you get infected and you don't get any symptoms at all and you say see. I got infected big deal. What's the difference the differences that it is conceivable and maybe likely that even though you got no symptoms that you would inadvertently an innocent. I'll use that word. pass it on to someone else. Who would then pass it on to someone else who would then get a serious consequence so there is a degree that have to consider of. What is my societal responsibility of. Not being part of the chain of transmission as opposed to being a dead end for the virus. So do you wanna be a dead end for the virus or do you want to be a situation where you're part of the transmission chain which would get other people in trouble but that's tough to get that concept across dr fauci. I never thought. I would say i wanted to be a dead end but yes here. I am like very happy to be fully vaccinated in a in a dead end. We'll be right back. Stay with us at children's national hospital. Everything we do is just for kids are top. Rank specialists are here for kids of all ages from babies who need help before they're even born to teens and young adults are pediatric work to diagnose problems quickly and thoroughly and use treatments designed exclusively for growing children with convenient locations. All across the dc metro area. Find a specialist. Today at children's national dot org slash stronger. Any college can make you on paper at penn college. We're more into looking good on steel and looking good on x-rays with looking good and code building and rebuilding vision and revisions and when it's all said and done you'll look good to everyone because the past might be written on paper but the future will be made by hand. Learn more at p. c. t. dot edu. I do want to ask about preparedness. Because i think probably a lot of people are now as we are vaccinating the country. I know a lot of people wanna put cove in the rear view mirror. Leave it in twenty twenty one not worry about it again but we know that the virus is not done with us until we have everyone vaccinated and we know. We need to learn lessons from this to help. Better prepare us going forward. So what lessons do you think we need to learn. And how do you think your work. The nih has to adapt. How do you think the biden administration has to adapt what concrete things have to happen to ensure we are better prepared for the inevitable next time. Okay so two components to my answer chelsea. The first is that when you're dealing with a global pandemic you have to have a global response. We're not gonna be safe on this planet until the pandemic is controlled globally. So right away. It is not necessarily a lesson but almost a mandate that we really need to help the rest of the world as as a rich country. Get this under control because if there's still viral dynamics somewhere even if we get this on the very good control here there's always the danger of the generation variants which then would make our protection somewhat tenuous even with the vaccines. That's the first thing when you look at the future. What lessons learned for the future. We need to also prepare in a global way. There was a thing called the global health security network of the global health security agenda. Will you have into connectivity. Among countries of the world good modern up-to-date communications sharing reagents sharing of of specimens continued good collaboration and communication building up in the local areas. The public health infrastructure. That would allow them to respond in quench when it breaks out in any given country because it's generally don't start spontaneously in twenty-five countries they generally start as a jumping of species usually not always from an animal reservoir to a human and then it spreads to the rest of the world. That doesn't mean that you gotta blame the country where it happens. It just so happens but you've got to have those countries prepared to be able to contain it. So that's the thing with preparedness. The other thing from a scientific standpoint is that we are very fortunate that we have made decades and decades of investment in basic and clinical biomedical research. Which has allowed us to do something. That's unprecedented to get a vaccine in. Which a virus was first identified in january of twenty twenty and then in december of that same year. Eleven months later to be putting vaccine into people's arms. That's ninety four to ninety five percent efficacious. If we were having this conversation ten years ago you would've told me. I was completely crazy thinking that that would happen. It usually takes us in years and the speed was not because we were reckless in doing things. In cutting corners the speed was related to the extraordinary amount of investment that was made of the previous decades in clinical and basic research so there another component of lessons learned we need to continue to make the investments in research that will allow us to have the scientific component of the response be optimal and fortunately for us. That's what happened with regard to the vaccines dr brought to you. You mentioned earlier. The global health security agenda which while it had antecedents for many years really got codified in the aftermath of a bola and of the united states saying what has happened in western africa is clearly a tragedy for people there but it is a danger to us here too and we do need to have more robust public health architecture and there and then that wasn't a priority for the trump administration but it wasn't really a priority for the world. I do admittedly have a little bit of a concern that once we are through covid nineteen. I worry we might lose. Focus on the need to build robust global architecture to help protect public health everywhere will chelsea. I definitely share your. And the reason i do is from my experience in that corporate memory for things that have been very very difficult in. The sense of responding in preparing is often short lived. And when you put this behind us we will be dealing with problems. That are real and present yet. It's difficult to get people to understand that the threat of an outbreak is perpetually a real and present danger so what we've gotta do as globe as as a planet as a community of nations is to just make sure we tell ourselves that when we get this under control that we've gotta say never again and mean it and never again means to really put the effort into the kind of preparation that will require considerable resources and even though it's tough to convince people to give resources to something that isn't happening now we've got a call back the memory of to nineteen twenty twenty and twenty twenty one because we started off in the beginning of this podcast. The fact is that this is really what happened to us. It just came out of nowhere and it just immobilized us for such an extraordinary period of time in a second year now. The economy has been wrecked by. This is sure not only here in the united states. Thank goodness where recovering now. But it's still a lot of people out of work. I think those kinds of memories should spur assan to make sure we are adequately prepared next time around one hopefully will spur us on returning to comment that you made earlier that i am vigorous agreement with it. We have responsibility to help. Vaccinate the world. And while i certainly appreciate president biden's commitment to donate seventy million doses by july fourth. We know we can't effectively donate our way out of this. So i am curious. Dr fauci think about the architecture that we really need to help protect public health globally while often. The focus is on surveillance and specimen collecting testing. What do you think it should be for vaccine research and development for example or the actual ability to manufacturer and to guarantee the quality of vaccines in the next generation. I'm with you one hundred percent on that. And that is referring to building up the capacity and the ability to do technology transfer. So that when you have an outbreak. It isn't only companies in switzerland. The united states in the uk but you have plants and companies and technology and the knowledge to do it in senegal and ethiopia and south africa and indonesia and brazil and chile. So that when you have an outbreak you do have the capability and that is building up. Not only the infrastructure of public health to do surveillance and monitoring but also the ability to respond at a global level to rely on. Donations is a quick immediate partial. Fix but the real durable sustainable fix now in the future is to allow other countries that generally don't have that capacity to be able to make vaccine in a timely fashion and not depend completely on donations from the rich country. The rich countries should donate if they have to but the real ultimate solution is to have a world where it's evenly distributed with his equity in opportunity to make your own countermeasures. In this case it would be vaccines and therapeutics. We're taking a quick break. Stay with us. Change the way you think about your home with home sense. The newest member of the homegoods family. They've got everything for your home inside and out home sense. Lets you reimagine every room with fresh discoveries furniture you bet rugs lots of them table lamps floor lamps chandeliers. Yes yes and yes. Plus there's wall. Art oversized mirrors enough outdoor furniture and decor to make your backyard. The envy of the neighborhood. Grab the melamine dishes. You've been looking for or that six outdoor set with same day delivery. You can have it today. Home sense is a new shopping adventure. Visit new fines arrive all the time. So everyday you'll find incredible savings on different must-have decor pro tip. If you see something you love. Don't wait because at home sense finds go fast. Get the brands. You love at prices that makes sense so you can make the most of your home for less. Take a virtual tour and find a store near you at home. Sense dot com after all the planning. It's happening your diy closet. Renovation is finally becoming a reality question is where do you put your things while you work tube smart. Has you covered with month to month. Leases and self storage solutions that make it easier to get organized online or in person getting self storage. It's convenient and fast and because diy renovations can easily go over budget. It's great to keep smart offering up to twenty five percent off your monthly rent cigarette by two before and hello to after with qb smart self storage visit cube smart.

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Fauci Asks for Medical Records of Wuhan Lab Staff

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:19 min | Last week

Fauci Asks for Medical Records of Wuhan Lab Staff

"Chief. Medical advisor is stepping up the pressure on china when it comes to getting to the source of the outbreak of coronavirus with. Who's report not seemingly offering a satisfying enough bouncer. Anthony fauci wants beijing to release a medical records of nine people whose illnesses might show if covert nineteen first emerged as a result of a lab. Leak wants to tell us more. I'm joined on the line from seoul by the china correspondent washington post even though a very good morning. Good afternoon to you. Good to have you with us. Hi thank you for having me here. What do what do we think that found. She wants to find out well Right now a lot of questions remain unanswered about what exactly was happening in wuhan in the days preceding the pandemic outbreak and one of these reports has been that some of the researchers at the wuhan institute of virology had fallen ill with symptoms consistent with corona virus in november. And so that's something that There have not been The on the chinese side. They have denied that this has happened. And what fao chea saying. Is that the medical records should be released so there can be independent verification.

Anthony Fauci China Beijing Wuhan Institute Of Virology Wuhan Washington Fao Chea
Conservatives Say Fauci Mislead Public, Call For Investigation

Purity Products

00:27 sec | Last week

Conservatives Say Fauci Mislead Public, Call For Investigation

"Familiar themes. He claimed the 2020 election was stolen, and he demanded that China be held accountable for the coronavirus. Some conservatives are calling for accountability. When it comes to Dr Anthony Fauci, they believe the nation's top infectious disease expert may have misled the public about the possibility of Covid 19 leaking out of a lab. Now he seems to be changing his tune and now certainly is also calling for a formal investigation. And I do

Dr Anthony Fauci China Infectious Disease
NYT Reporter Said Americans Acted Like ‘Selfish Pigs’ During COVID, Unlike Chinese

The News & Why It Matters

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

NYT Reporter Said Americans Acted Like ‘Selfish Pigs’ During COVID, Unlike Chinese

"A new york times writer called Americans selfish pigs. In comparison to average chinese citizens speaking of china of who behaved heroically amid the pandemic this a former veteran writer for the new york times. Not and this was in an email to anthony fauci in february twenty twenty as the coronavirus pandemic was just beginning to become An international news stories so By the way this is he was fired from the times but he worked for the paper for more than four decades. He wrote to anthony. Fauci and sad Let's see i was just watching the hhs briefing online and thinking about an article. I read this morning. And bruce aylward description of what he saw in china and a lot of videos. I've watched on the south china morning post website they're doing great coverage he puts in parentheses And then he says you know to china. They behaved incredibly heroically in the face of the virus. Twenty-five thousand doctors nurses went into wuhan to help knowing they might die and by the way meanwhile in america people tend to act like selfish pigs interested only in saving themselves. How can i afford a mask. Where's my vaccine this morning. I read an appalling article from alabama and He says this behavior is unacceptable from From americans it's interesting. I don't think it matters much. And i know we only have a couple of minutes left. I don't think it matters much from this. Nypd for you know. it's like okay. He wrote for the new york times now he doesn't anymore. But i do think it is indicative of this greater push that we have seen during the pandemic that i think will linger on which is to call americans who want to prolong their freedom. Who wants to make sure that they don't see their freedoms go away to call them selfish and they want to condition you to think that oh well just engaging in your own personal freedoms that you have. Because you're an american is in fact

The New York Times Bruce Aylward China Anthony Fauci Fauci HHS South China Wuhan Anthony Alabama America
Breaking Down the Wuhan Lab Leak Hypothesis, Dr. Fauci and Other Government Officials Involved

The Dan Bongino Show

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Breaking Down the Wuhan Lab Leak Hypothesis, Dr. Fauci and Other Government Officials Involved

"So it appears that there's some kind of and I'll get to this moratorium in a minute. The United States government has a moratorium on funding research that would make viruses more powerful. Gee, I wonder why we put a moratorium on that. Because we could create a whole bunch of really deadly viruses, and that would really suck. Sounds like the government finally did something right when they weren't doing something wrong. Hey, we shouldn't do research like that. But it appears a sub agency of the NIH led by Dr Anthony Fauci. May have approved this grant that went to this eco health alliance that eventually made its way to the Wuhan Institute of Virology, where it's believed. Now, this virus may have leaked from Mm. Oh, it gets better. Here's the third part of this daily caller piece again. They're talking about this Christopher Park, who was the State Department person who apparently did not want to open the Pandora's box looking into this stuff, according to this Vanity Fair report. He says Park was not the only government official to oppose pursuing the lab leak hypothesis, however. The Nano another until Vanity Fair that an intelligence analyst struggled to find a report written by officials working at the Department of Energy Lab that Anna must be a whistleblower. The Nano told the island he viewed the report is being intentionally buried within the classified collection system. Department of Energy officials then attempted to block State Department officials for meeting with the report's authors did Nano alleged okay? So just clearing that up a bit. We have funding paid to echo Health alliance through FAO cheese group there. Making its way around the moratorium against this kind of funding that makes its way to a Chinese lab. We think this virus may have leaked from, and apparently there's a report on it that the government's burying in its own classified system who's burying it? What are they covering up

Dr Anthony Fauci Eco Health Alliance Wuhan Institute Of Virology Christopher Park United States Government Department Of Energy Lab State Department NIH Vanity Fair Nano Echo Health Alliance Anna Department Of Energy Park FAO Government
Fauci's Emails Give Insight to Early Days of COVID Response

Sean Hannity

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fauci's Emails Give Insight to Early Days of COVID Response

"Says Chief medical advisor Dr Anthony Fauci can speak for himself about emails released under the Freedom of Information Act request. The emails have sparked backlash from Republicans critical of Dr Fauci. His comments on the possibility Covid 19 came from the lab. Asked about the emails and Dr Fauci, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said. He's been an undeniable asset and our country's pandemic response. But it's obviously not advantageous for me to relitigate the substance of emails from 17 months ago, House Republicans are calling for Dr Fauci to testify about the origins of the virus. President Biden has ordered intelligence agencies to expand their efforts in pinpointing how the pandemic began

Dr Fauci Dr Anthony Fauci Jen Psaki House Republicans White House President Biden
Dr. Fauci's Emails Prove He Knew of Wuhan Gain of Function Research

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Fauci's Emails Prove He Knew of Wuhan Gain of Function Research

"Today is the emails now. I'm going to take a different approach at first novel. Go into the more conventional. Take here it seems as if the washington post has decided to actually do a rare form of journalism. They filled out a freedom of information. Requests that foia a freedom of information act in fact. We talked about this at length on our podcast yesterday. That filling out a freedom of information act is one of the few ways to actually hold these tyrants these despots accountable so the washington post has now published thousands and thousands of private emails from dr anthony fauci. Some of them are rather boring and answering questions to celebrities and producers how he has time to do that not exactly sure thousands of emails. Just saying thanks then. There are some groundbreaking emails. Now before i get into these emails. I do not believe that this is all a coincidence. I don't believe the washington post would do this that some sort of a wink a nod a gesture. A point from ron clain. You see. I think that somebody wants dr anthony out she removed. I believe that and this is reflected in the emails. We're gonna get into it toys. Always the emails isn't it so funny how that works. I believe that the evidence is now overwhelming that the chinese corona virus was manufacturing in a laboratory. I believe dr anthony. Fauci was more involved than people realize. I believe that he was intimately into the wuhan institute of technology because of that and because of now the sudden interest and finding out where the virus came from. And how the evidence is showing this the not come from a bat. This did not come from the himalayan mountains. This did not come from a wet market. This came from a biolab that dr fauci very well might have visited himself but we do know that. The national institute of health funded the wuhan institute of technology through gain of function research.

Washington Post Dr Anthony Dr Anthony Fauci Ron Clain Wuhan Institute Of Technology Fauci Dr Fauci Himalayan Mountains National Institute Of Health Wuhan Institute Of Technology
New Vibe at White House: Hugs Are In; Masks Are (Mostly) Out

AP News Radio

01:07 min | Last month

New Vibe at White House: Hugs Are In; Masks Are (Mostly) Out

"The White House is springing back to life now that people are vaccinated and with the recent relaxation and federal guidance about wearing masks and social distancing right to family come on there's a new fine but the White House of late press secretary Jen Psaki near a warm and fuzzy crew and we like to hug around here but we were waiting for that to be allowed to buy a CDC guidelines which we certainly abide by yes hugs are now in masks mostly out the complex is taking on the look and feel of pre pandemic days with more west wing staffers on the premises soon more reporters and certainly a continuing to open the white house up the people's house up to the American public the White House is eager to send a message that a return to normal as possible with vaccinations the president Biden's chief medical advisor Dr Anthony Fauci says it's not a rational to be apprehensive you can understand that when people the following a certain trend for a considerable period of time that it may take time for them to look just so I would not say that that's irrational I'd say that's understandable Ben Thomas Washington

White House Of Late Press Jen Psaki White House CDC President Biden Dr Anthony Fauci Ben Thomas Washington
Anthony Fauci Offers a Timeline for Ending COVID-19 Pandemic

WBZ Afternoon News

00:31 sec | Last month

Anthony Fauci Offers a Timeline for Ending COVID-19 Pandemic

Dr. Fauci: Booster Shots May Depend on Variants

Here & Now

00:15 sec | Last month

Dr. Fauci: Booster Shots May Depend on Variants

"Anthony Fauci says it remains unclear whether Americans will need a coronavirus booster vaccine later this year. He tells CBS this morning. Scientists are still tracking data on new variants of the virus and that another shot maybe needed this fall.

Anthony Fauci CBS
The Latest: Pfizer-BioNTech pledge 2B doses to poor nations

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

The Latest: Pfizer-BioNTech pledge 2B doses to poor nations

"Have we turned the corner on the corona virus coronavirus infections are down to their lowest levels since last June and deaths are down to to a level not seen since July the percentage of Americans were fully vaccinated thirty eight percent about forty eight percent of gotten at least one Kovic shot according to Bloomberg's cove it tracker now the question many are asking if you've been vaccinated will you need a booster shot in the fall the nation's top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says maybe they don't know yet he tells CBS this morning that scientists are still tracking data on the virus possible variants he's also reminding those who haven't been fully vaccinated to keep the mask on I read a folate

Kovic Dr Anthony Fauci Bloomberg CBS
Apple brings CEO Tim Cook to court in defense of app store

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Apple brings CEO Tim Cook to court in defense of app store

"Have we turned the corner on the corona virus coronavirus infections are down to their lowest levels since last June and deaths are down to to a level not seen since July the percentage of Americans were fully vaccinated thirty eight percent about forty eight percent of gotten at least one Kovic shot according to Bloomberg's cove it tracker now the question many are asking if you've been vaccinated will you need a booster shot in the fall the nation's top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says maybe they don't know yet he tells CBS this morning that scientists are still tracking data on the virus possible variants he's also reminding those who haven't been fully vaccinated to keep the mask on I read a folate

Kovic Dr Anthony Fauci Bloomberg CBS
Dr. Fauci: Booster Shots May Depend on Variants

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Dr. Fauci: Booster Shots May Depend on Variants

"Will Americans need to get coded nineteen vaccine booster shots this fall Dr Anthony Fauci says it's possible as scientists tracked data on both the virus a and a possible variants but he tells CBS this morning Americans would not necessarily need booster shots for more protection in the meantime he's urging everyone to follow CDC guidelines stressing the unvaccinated need to wear masks even if they're largely around people who have been vaccinated Sager mag ani Washington

Dr Anthony Fauci CBS CDC Sager Mag Ani Washington
Nervous Workers Struggle to Adjust to New Mask Policies

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

Nervous Workers Struggle to Adjust to New Mask Policies

"People across the country especially store workers are still trying to figure out the new government guidance on wearing a face mask the supermarket chain Kroger becomes the latest to announce that it's no longer requiring customers or workers to wear face masks in states where mandates have been lifted some workers are celebrating but others have been posting concerns they still could catch the corona virus from unvaccinated customers or co workers infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci visiting a vaccine clinic at children's national hospital in Washington admits the new guidance was confusing unfortunately some people interpret it is that that everybody can get rid of their masks which is not the case it was only speaking about people who are vaccinated he and First Lady Jill Biden kept their masks on for the clinic tour I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr Anthony Fauci Kroger Children's National Hospital Infectious Disease Washington Jill Biden Jackie Quinn
"anthony fauci" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:57 min | 4 months ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Fine someone else. Give us your accents and your origin. Stories your cross cultural misfits yearning to just be and listen to rough translation on npr. Let's get back to the interview. I recorded last night with dr anthony fauci at a whyy zoom event. Dr fauci is now president. Biden's chief medical advisor and served on president. Trump's corona virus task force. Dr fauci has been the director of naiad the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases since one thousand nine hundred eighty four. When we left off we were talking about dr rao cheese work during the early days of the aids epidemic. What are some things that you learned from the aids epidemic that you feel you're applying now to cove it to the pandemic that we're living in now Including how experimental drugs are handled. Well i mean. There are several things that that we could discuss. I mean one of them is the importance of getting the community involved and dealing with the community and their special needs You mentioned that in our discussion over the last several minutes about the activist group. We have a different type of situation here in the united states with kobe. We have a disparity here that is striking and needs to be addressed. That if you look at the incidence of infection and the incidents of serious disease including hospitalization deaths brown and black people suffer disproportionately more than whites and the general population. So i think that shines a bright light on what we probably should have done all along and certainly must do in. The future is to address those social determinants of health that actually lead to with the great disparity of suffering in cova nineteen among brown and black people. You know we had the same sort of thing With the disparities of infection in certain demographic groups with hiv so from an epidemiological standpoint..

Trump fauci last night Dr united states Biden naiad one one thousand dr anthony fauci dr rao national institute of allergy cova nineteen nine hundred eighty four them whyy zoom
"anthony fauci" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:59 min | 4 months ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Anthony fauci america's top infectious disease expert has become a hero to many americans for his scientifically based straight talk about the corona virus. He became a medical celebrity during the press briefings from president. Trump's corona virus task force which dr fauci served on. He's been the head of naiad the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases since one thousand nine hundred four working with seven presidents from reagan to biden none of that stop trump from calling fao she an idiot retweeting time to fire foudy and eventually preventing fao g from being interviewed on certain. Tv shows and publications. But as you've probably noticed. Dr fauci has been an muzzled. By the biden administration. Dr fauci and his family have faced death threats from extremists. And he's been the subject of bizarre conspiracy theories about the virus. Much of dr faustus. Career has been devoted to researching viruses and the immune system. He's made major contributions to the understanding of how hiv affects the immune system was instrumental in developing drugs. That could prolong the lives of people with hiv and is continuing to conduct research into the body's immune response to hiv. Our interview was recorded last night. As part of a whyy zuma event. At which dr fauci received. Whyy's annual lifelong learning award. Whyy is where fresh air is produced. Dr fauci thank you so much for talking with us. And i just want to thank you for everything you've done. I wanna start with your new role as president. Biden's chief medical advisor. What did he tell you he wanted you to do. And how does that compare to what you did in the trump administration. Well it was very clear what president biden wanted not only of me but of the entire medical team and it was really very encouraging because he said it publicly he said it privately to us and that is that science was going to rule that we were going to base whatever we do our recommendations or guidelines. Or what have you based on sound scientific evidence and sound scientific data but he also said something. That was also very encouraging. He said. We're gonna make some mistakes along the way we're going to stumble a bit and when that happens we're not going to blame. Anybody would just gonna fix it and boy was that that refreshing to know that we were gonna let the good scientific method truth guide. Whatever we say whatever we do and when we don't know something we're going to admit that we don't know it and try and figure out how we could find out what the good dater is. And what the evidence is so like everybody. I'm alarmed to find out now that there's a new mutations of the virus and there's apparently like hybrid that has the worst of both worlds it's more transmissible and also more resistant to vaccines. So how does that change your calibration of the future. I know you want us to keep wearing masks. And to keep social distancing and washing our hands and all of that and to if anything amp that up but how does that change your calibration of where we go from here. What the next strategy as well. I think people need to understand something. That's very important that aren a viruses of which sauce kobe to in our vars will mutate and the more. The virus replicates the more opportunity you give it to mutate so when you have so much infection in the community as we have had in the united states over the last few months where you literally have hundreds of thousands of new infections per.

Anthony fauci Trump trump Biden last night seven presidents fauci america naiad faustus both worlds hundreds of thousands of new i one thousand nine hundred united states whyy zuma president Whyy dr fauci reagan last few months
"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Ten News

The Ten News

08:00 min | 6 months ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Ten News

"Hi dr fauci. My name is miles. I'm eleven years old in. I live in san jose california. I see on tv talking about covid ally in. I was wondering. What exactly is your job. Well my job mostly. I have actually two jobs one a really big job and another one. Not as consuming. The big job is that. I'm the director of the institute here at the nih which is right outside of washington dc which is called the national institute of allergy and infectious disease. And we're responsible for funding or doing most of the research associated with infectious diseases of all types hiv aids ebola zeka and now covid nineteen. And when i say research i mean we are involved in the development of the vaccines that we're going to talk about in a little bit. Our group here was very heavily involved in that into development of drugs. The team that's worked on the vaccine that have made contributions to all the vaccine is a team at the nih vaccine research center. It's made up of a number of people very diverse from all parts of the country. We actually have one of the lead. Investigator is is a woman doctor. Because mickie corbett caller her kizzie. She's a a young african-american doctor who has played a significant role in the development of a vaccine. So she's a good role model for young women who want to get into science. In addition i'm a member of the white house virus taskforce and that's the reason why you see me on tv a lot. Because i get out there and talk about the public health measures that we need to do to stay safe and avoid infection. So i'm doing to simultaneously running the institute and being a part of the white house task force a madeleine ten years old man from new orleans louisiana. I'd like to know if everyone stayed home for two weeks. Would kill it. go away well. If everyone stayed home for two weeks it likely would decrease kovin. But i don't think two weeks is enough to have covid just disappear because right now. It's very very prevalent in the united states. The numbers are really disturbed. If you look at the numbers there have been between two hundred and three hundred thousand new cases each day. So it's gonna take more than just two weeks of shutting down. I don't think we need to completely shut down. But i do think we need to make sure that we uniformly abide by the public health measures of uniformly wearing masks of avoiding close contact of avoiding crowds and congregate settings particularly indoors. Except when you with family that's okay but you don't wanna have big parties and social gatherings right. Now you wanna keep things as minimal as possible for that until the level of infection gets much lower heidecker g. My name is summer. i'm fourteen in. I'm from alfa reta georgia. Today's my first day of quarantine since in my class was exposed to corona. Even though our my master today do you. Southern is a possibility getting corona. Well if you or your masks faithfully every day the chances of your getting corona because you're exposed to someone is low so i wouldn't worry about it. It is low but it is not zero. And that's the reason why you have to quarantine but if you were in the classroom and were faithfully wearing your mask and washing your hands. Frequently the way you're supposed to be doing. I think the risk view is low. That you shouldn't be worried but you do need to continue to quarantine my name. Is she in eight years ago from west out to ask dr fauci. Can pats kin corona virus. You know there is individual rare instances of cats and other domestic animals being able to carry corona virus. But there's no indication that that is a significant or even a real danger of spreading infection. So one of the things we don't want to do is to have children be worried that their pets are going to be dangerous to them. So i know that when you read about one or two cases of a dog or a cat having the infection. That's something that we've not seen being Actually i wouldn't say an important not even a source of infection. So don't worry about it you can give you a big hug dr fauci. My name is nola. i'm eleven you sold. I was wondering. Are you a dog or cat. Person dog all the way. Hello my name's arianna. And i'm nine years old and my question is when the covert vaccines out. When our kids get the vaccine will one of the things that were very careful with when we do. Vaccines is to make sure that we're absolutely certain about the safety of a vaccine in what we call vulnerable populations and two of the most important vulnerable populations namely we wanna take extra special care of you. That's what vulnerable means our children and pregnant women so when you do vaccine trial and you show that safe and effective usually wait a couple of months until it's very clear that the vaccine is going to be efficacious and is very clear that in adults in normal adults. It's very safe then. You could start doing a phase one or face to a trial which means the trial doesn't have to be very lodged like tens and tens of thousands of people. It could be a couple of thousand people and you do that in children and you can also do that in pregnant women and when you do that you can then use that data to ultimately get the vaccine because of the safety and the fact that it induces a response very similar to the protective response in adult that after a few months you can approve it for use in children so even though the vaccine will be approved for adults i think a few months from now children would likely be able to get vaccinated but it will be a several month delay before we get them. The vaccine hi. I'm harper and eight years old from california. If i have an allergy will. I still be able to get the covid vaccine right now in the rolling out of the vaccines both in the uk. And in the united states they have been incidences of people who have a tendency for an allergic reaction to get an allergic reaction to the vaccine. That doesn't mean that if you have a history of an allergic reaction you can't get vaccinated. It means that your extra special care so that when you go to get vaccinated it is in a place. Where if you do get an allergic reaction you have somebody that knows how to treat it. Hi this is john Nine morton jersey. If i already. Kobe interviewing butter from it than.

dr fauci national institute of allergy nih mickie corbett white house ebola washington dc san jose aids california louisiana new orleans alfa united states georgia nola arianna harper allergy uk
"anthony fauci" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

06:29 min | 8 months ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Donald Trump's absolute disregard for scientific reality whether it's the corona virus or climate change has been a signature of his presidency. His open contempt for putting on a mask was a threat from the first to the countless Americans who choose to emulate him. It endangered in the end, the president's own life and the lives of everyone around him. Last week just as trump was leaving Walter Reed hospital after a stay of three days. Dr Anthony Fauci sat down for a conversation with the New Yorkers Michael Specter. Foul she is the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is a branch of the NIH and he's really the most public voice in this country for medical reason. Michael is a longtime staff right at the New, Yorker covering medicine and the sciences they spoke on Monday. As we are speaking the president of the United States is scheduled to leave hospital any minute. And he's going to go back to the White House and I'm not GonNa ask you to comment on his strange regimen of drugs or how he's feeling I know you're not his personal physician and that's not your thing but I do want to talk about public health because this afternoon he tweeted. No big thing. Don't be afraid of it. and. You know two, hundred, ten, thousand Americans have died in seven million have been infected is it fair to say no big thing don't be afraid of it. Yeah. Well, you know Michael, that's been one of the things that have been. Sort of a bone of contention in communication. Of the seriousness of this. I mean, obviously it's a very unusual athen that can have virtually no effect in the sense of forty percent forty, five percent of people can be without symptoms, and then for those who have symptoms the overwhelming majority of them. A MILD But there are a group of individuals who fall into a certain subset or category namely, the elderly and those with underlying conditions at any age. Who can have a severe outcome? So, when you look at the now, two, hundred, ten, thousand people in in the United States of America. died. And you talk about the seven million have been infected and the one million died globally I think anybody who's looking at this realistically has to say that this is a very serious disease that we need to recognize. White House will now not do any contact tracing from the September twenty six Rose Garden event to celebrate the nomination of judge a Makoni Barrett. Are. You comfortable commenting on that? You. Know the answer to that. No. Not I I don't want to get into what the White House is or is not doing that becomes non. than. Doesn't really help the messages that I'm trying to get across. Sorry my well, let me just I was it was a try. Baloney. Slightly, more general. General way how can we stand this thing out if we don't contact trace, how can we know who's infected and who isn't infected if we don't follow the people who are infected and see who they were in contact worth zero way other than countries. We do need contact contact tracing is important I. Mean it's one of the many tools that we have to try and contain outbreak in his likely. We haven't proven it yet but likely that in a symptomatic person during that gathering at the white. House again, the chain of transmission obviously occurred within that group I must tell you Michael that in this situation that we're in. We're of infection comes to a great extent. People without symptoms. It becomes very difficult. And problematic to do adequate contact tracing even if you wanted to do adequate on tech tracing. The community spread among people without symptoms make that. Very. Difficult. We have a real problem in this country with people believing in vaccines they are hesitant. I'm not even talking about the hardcore anti vaccine activists just people who are afraid. And what has gone on with the discussion of the vaccine until now has not made people more confident. They say to the tune of about forty percent that they won't take the vaccine. How do we get people back to the point where they think that things that will save their lives will actually save their lives. No Michael is not going to be an easy answer to that. First of all, we need to be completely transparent and consistent in what we do. This is true for everyone out there it becomes even more imperative to do that. With minority communities because traditionally and historically minority communities have not been served well. By the governments and by society in general and they don't trust authority for a number of reasons, many of which are really justified. So you've got overcome at varian that's what we try to do. We try to get community people who they trust. To, go into the community and tried to get them to understand. Importance for their own health. But. Also for the health of the community in would be tragic if we do get a safe effective scene, but they don't benefit from it. Because A, they refused to get involved in the clinical trials or be once the clinical trials are over they don't believe that the vaccine is safe and effective for them. They don't take it. When in fact they they stand to benefit the most? Safe and effective axiom. When you describe this makes me wonder how short of very effective in which even if we're lucky, it's not going to happen soon, it's not going to be distributed immediately we are going to get out of this. It looks like we have a long way to go in this pandemic before we go to the movie, are we ever going to go to the movies? Yes we are Michael and I'll even. Buy A ticket go together to alleviate your anxiety. You know we.

Michael Specter National Institute of Allergy White House president Donald Trump United States Dr Anthony Fauci Walter Reed hospital NIH MILD Makoni Barrett America.
"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

05:45 min | 9 months ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"First of all more and more young people you see when you look at it or getting into some significant trouble, not a lot not a high percentage. That's true. The other thing is that when people get infected, we're seeing more and more of lingering signs and symptoms so that when you clear the virus, you may have weeks or months or so in which. You just not quite right and the final thing is that they've recently done a study that was published in the Journal of the American. Medical Association cardiology with people recovered even from disease that wasn't that severe. When you do MRI's or imaging sensitive imaging, you can see things like inflammation of the heart. Now, they may not be symptomatic, but we WANNA make sure that six months or years from now they don't wind up with unexplained me is premature heart attacks or cardiomyopathy. So the situation is not wrapped up about what is the full impact of this which means we have to take it very seriously even among people. Who are obviously in trouble and die? There's other people that we need to be concerned about. All right. We'll take a quick break but don't go away because when we come back Dr Fauci will tell you when and where you need to wear a mosque. So stick around. Welcome back to the daily social distancing show. So earlier, today I spoke with Dr Anthony Fauci. Here's the second half of our interview. Many people say. That they will only take a vaccine once Dr Foul she says. The vaccine is safe. My question to you is if everyone's asking Dr, Ouchi who does doctor felt she asked Wendy you think vaccine is safe. I. Look at the Data Trebek in fact, the data and Safety Monitoring Board, which is an independent group that monitors the the trials they look at data they analyze it with independent statisticians and they will say this is effective and then you look at the number of people that have been on trial for a period of an additional. Thirty to sixty days, and if you don't see any obvious serious adverse events than I would consider that effective and safe and I would take it myself. You know that we should wear masks when we are indoors and macos environment but feels like this confusion when it comes to a few other things. So I'm just GONNA shoot a few rapid-fire ones that you have written them down and you just tell me yes or no whether or not we should be wearing a mosque. Should be wearing a mosque if I'm riding my bike out on the streets, not necessarily know but you should have with you. In case you come into close contact with people on the outside. But if you're alone, there's nobody near you and you're riding your bike, you don't need to wear the mask. Okay. What about if I'm eating in a restaurant where they are open should I put my mosque between courses because I can take to into after put it on between. The causes? Yeah I think because there's enough movement and people that are usually within six feet that you probably should. What I do is I, put it around my neck and then I could you know eat drink and then put it back up when you're waiting for the way to something's occur. But now people have said that the coronavirus on your neck. So should I put it on my neck or can I get cornerstone my neck when the LAS comeback to my mouth Good question. If you just flip it up and down, you won't. You don't WanNa put your hand on the outside of it. Got It in an empty elevator. Can I do I put my Moscow? Well, you know the answer is when the door opens somebody's might walk in and you have no idea who you know who's GonNa walk in so you might want to just keep it on by the way. Let me show. You see this. This is what will you have it on you go like this Bingo and you're okay then you go like this Bingo is up what if you're talking to somebody and they don't understand what you're saying do you put it down to? Say something or do you just like like practice saying it louder. Again repeated. That's a really good point because when you then put down, you tend to speak louder with more force and that's when all of the particles. If they're there if you're infected will come out, I would leave the mask on all right and then my final one. If you in a movie theater, some people are going to movies around the country and you're watching Christopher Nolan's and you movie tenants right and then there's only two people in the cinema. Do you put your Moscone or do you keep it off if they're so physically distanced away from you? You probably could keep it off but remember you gotta be careful because in the theater if there's not good ventilation, there could be aristotle than that myself. What I would do I would probably keep it on just to be safe. Because I'm indoors. That's the reason because I'm indoors. Okay. We'll Dr Fauci I. Hope we see you again soon I opened it's not six months and I hope that we don't have a worst case of coronavirus. Must thank you for taking the time. Don't forget to do your vocal warm-ups. It helps me a lot before I I talk for a long time and lost the last thing I will say to you is. Would, you consider getting one of those celebrity phone numbers? So then you could just text everybody personally then we could just like celebrities tex people go like, Hey, my concert is coming out you could do that in just tell us hey, guys here's the update for corona just a thought you should consider doctor I will do that. Thank you. Thank. You look after yourself and thanks for joining us and you to stay safe take care. Thank you so much for your time Dr Chee. Show for tonight's. But before we go last week, we introduced the pandemic. The award show for the most notable achievements of the coronavirus pandemic, and since then you you home cost more than one million votes. Now, obviously, president trump is trying to throw out half of those votes, but before he can. Hear some of the big winners and the pandemic.

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Foul Medical Association Dr Chee Dr Fauci cardiomyopathy Moscow aristotle Safety Monitoring Board Ouchi Christopher Nolan Journal of the American corona Wendy president trump
"anthony fauci" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on 1A

"States have been blaming the recent violence. Don Arrest in their cities on quote. Outside agitators on this coast with from NPR, a history of blaming civil disobedience on bad actors from out of town. This is one A.. We're talking with Dr Anthony Fauci about the latest corona virus news and I wanted to ask you Dr Fauci. What do we know about the possibility of vaccine any significant movement on that? Oh Yeah Oh, yeah, there's an awful lot of good movement with regard to vaccine first of all. There are number of companies that are very actively involved. The NIH is has developed one of those with the company, but also is collaborating with at least four other companies to try and put together. Obviously what we would hope would be a safe and effective vaccine. We're moving very quickly and I might emphasize not at the expense of safety, nor compromising any of the scientific integrity of the study, but a couple of candidates are already an early phase one trial, and we fully expect that we will have an advanced trial. That would ask the question. Does the vaccine work by the first week or two, in July, which is only just a few weeks from now, that would likely take several months. To determine vaccines work and other vaccines will be coming in. After that by staggering a month or two or three later so. Yeah, July. It's going to start. Careful, dumping fuse starting to trial with having a vaccine. Okay wanted to be there. That's important. Our listeners are gonNA hear. July and everyone's just going to get so excited. Yeah, no, no, no, no July is when the trial starts Gotcha. It takes several months from that to determine if it works so there's no guarantee that a vaccine is going to be effective. Certainly, we would not. Not Have a vaccine given to anyone if it's not safe, and if it's not effective, but you can get to the point where you can make a determination if it's effective likely by the end of this county year and the beginning of twenty twenty one, so if the vaccine does show itself to be safe and effective, we may get doses that are available for people by the. The very end of this year, and the beginning of the first few months of twenty twenty one, and if China gets there first, I is that an issue or not I? Hope China is highly successful with the vaccine. This is not a race of who gets there first. This is a number of groups trying to get a vaccine. I don't think know what I be satisfied with. With just one, I would love there to be more than one two or three next scenes, including China getting a vaccine, and we get a vaccine, and some of the European countries get a vaccine, because if a vaccine is going to be successful, you want it to be available throughout the world, not only two countries that can afford to make a vaccine so the more companies. That have successful vaccines the better off we are I. don't see this as a race in which there is one winner. We have just about twenty seconds to Dr Fauci. As cases around the country are surging, tell us real quick. How do we prevent the second wave of coronavirus? Well. You do the kinds of things that we've been saying all along first of all, you can't proceed safely to trying to get some degree of normality, but you've got to do it within the context of careful, prudent reopening namely having at your. Capability The ability to be able to identify isolating contact trace so that when you see the inevitable blips, in cases that those blips come surges and those surges. Don't become a second wave. It is not inevitable that we're going to have a second wave.

Dr Anthony Fauci China Don Arrest NPR NIH
"anthony fauci" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Where the infection rate at one point was very high, and is now coming down. Unfortunately there are also some areas. Where the infections continue to go up, I think when you look at all of the country as a whole mainly putting everything together and getting the averages of it, certainly, the deaths clearly coming down. Hospitalizations are coming down the cases. Coming down, but less steeply it. It's a slow decline of going in the right direction, but it is I'd like to see. It'd be a little bit more sharply declined, but in general in general job going in the right direction. Dr what question so many lives but Louis. Everybody was saying by more ventilators by more ventilators. The death rate in some places was high as eighty percent. Of people put on ventilators. What say you about this? Well when you're sick, enough John. This. Division. He's taking care of a lot of very sick patients in my career. When you when you have a very serious disease. That requires integration. And Ventilation. That, is already a very very serious. Certainly eighty percent mortality. In people that go on ventilators is severe and higher. I believe than the average of pull in general for all diseases to go onto ventilators but this. Infection is so severe that by the time. You get to go on a ventilator that you are already very seriously ill, and that's the reason why I believe you're seeing very high. Death rates have been some reevaluation of that. Apparently, that is in some hospitals, but in others. The death rate is considerably lower. Than that eighty percent, but it's still. Unacceptably high, but that's because of the seriousness of the disease. In addition I have heard from some of my Kochta's my friends at does a lot of doctors that did not know how to use to ventilators properly at that probably record seventy problems. Yeah we! We have a minute left anything else who want to tell people well. You know I do I. WanNa just continue to encourage that we'd been through a lot. This will end if not something that's going to go on forever. He will end by how we response to it. We need to be responsible. Obviously, we all want to open up the country again and bring back some some semblance of normality. Get the economy going. We've got to do that. Delicate balance between moving forward in a careful way. You know heating the guidelines. So that we don't do something precipitously. Continue to push your head to trying to get back to normal at the same time that put all our efforts into trying to contain it alternately. Bring this outbreak down to a negligible level. Hopefully we're in the right direction. I believe we are. We just need to keep pushing. Dr Anthony FAUCI director of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Health. Thank you so much for calling into Sunday boarding? You're bringing the American people today. It could be with John Thank you for having me. This is the catch roundtable. We'll be right back..

John Dr Anthony FAUCI Allergy and Infectious Disease Louis National Institute of Health director
"anthony fauci" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on What It Takes

"You just can't. Let's go home and have dinner type. It doesn't work. You don't go home. And then when you're in the middle of anthrax crisis do you ever ever think about retirement? No No I. I'm just going to keep working until until I I feel and I think I have a pretty good radar screen for that that I'm not at the top of my game and right now I think I'm even more than on the top of my game because if you if you keep your energy up and you build on experience that's really the ticket you know and I'm in a field where accumulation of knowledge and experience in difficult situations make you well suited to play a very special room. If you don't learn from experiences than you know you can just burn out. Run OUT OF RUN OUT OF TIME BUT I. I don't really think about retirement. Anthony Faouzi thank you so much for your time good to be with you my pleasure. Dr Anthony Fauci medical and public service. Pioneer there really is no better word dr FAO. She is the director of the Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and NIH. Just outside of Washington D. C. He's the winner of the National Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of freedom both bestowed by President George W Bush doctor fouled she spoke with. Npr's Nina Totenberg for the Academy of Achievement. In two thousand seventeen and I have to end on the last question Nina. Ask the good doctor. His answer earns him the final word. I'm Alice Winkler. And this is what it takes if heaven exists What would you like to hear? God say when you arrive at the pearly gates. That's assuming you're arriving at the pearly gates. Yes I'm assuming you did a good job. I'M GONNA make you go back as Mickey Mantle.

Anthony Faouzi Nina Totenberg Dr Anthony Fauci Institute of Allergy and Infec director National Medal of Science Academy of Achievement Mickey Mantle dr FAO anthrax Alice Winkler Npr President George W Bush NIH Washington
"anthony fauci" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on What It Takes

"That immediately followed very dark ones. At first there wasn't even a test for the infection and half of the HIV infected patients who walked into his clinic died within six to eight months. There are still forty million people living with HIV around the world today and there are almost two million new infections each year but anthony vouchers. Research has been absolutely critical to understanding the disease and to developing the therapies that manage and contained thirty seven years later he is still at the forefront of the research into HIV AIDS and other daunting infectious diseases including malaria and tuberculosis. Dr Falcon has been the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Part of the National Institutes of Health for over thirty years infectious diseases caused somewhere between a quarter and a third of all deaths in the world there the leading cause of death for people under fifty. So that gives you an idea of the scale of his portfolio. His sleepless nights let us all sleep a little better. F- Fatty is on this episode of what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance from the Academy of Achievement. I'm Alice Winkler at a made. This child is gifted and I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it. You may never have another child. It always so clear it was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new wing which ally could prevail over the truth darkness over light there who were life. Every day I wake up and today I'm going to love my life decide if they're going break your leg or it's when you go on please stay out of there and then along companies differential experiences that you look for. You don't plan for the boy you better not. Miss Him came from the Benson her section of Brooklyn about four hours north of here. And for those of you know anything about New York and the Benson our section of Brooklyn the very fact that I'm here is my first major accomplishment. Benson Hurst was largely Italian neighborhood. When Anthony Fauci she was growing up his grandfather was an immigrant to this country. Who spoke only Italian and worked as a Stevedore with cargo ships that came into New York harbor. His father was a pharmacist. And that's where Dr Faucher began his story in Brooklyn when he sat down to talk with. Npr's Nina Totenberg in two thousand seventeen for the Academy of Achievement. He owned the drugstore and my sister and I and my mother and father lives in the apartments above the drugstore so he owned the building and we lived on top of that. And that's where I lived until I went away to college and the drugstore I did. It was a pharmacy that was right across the street from Saint Bernadette Church and what we used to do is that when the masses would finish on a Sunday crowds and crowds of people that would come in to the pharmacy and not only just the prescriptions but for cosmetics and things like that so from a very very early age I would help out behind the counter with the cash register and wrapping things but in the summers and sometimes in the evenings I would use my Schwinn bike with. It's a little basket and deliver prescriptions to the neighborhood people so back then it was very common for calling up. The pharmacy are getting a prescription done. And you would deliver it to the house. And that's what I remember doing from the time I could ride my bicycle. Your education was entirely up until medical school in Catholic schools. You started out at Our Lady of Guadalupe Grammar School. And then you were picked for a very special private jesuit run high school. It was not in Brooklyn so tell me about regis. Highschool so reaches high. School is an all scholarship? High School right in the middle of Manhattan. Meaning it's free. It's free so you had have been put forth as the representatives of your elementary school so it academically it was extraordinary because you had kids from there from all over Manhattan Bronx. Staten Island Queens Brooklyn some from Connecticut. Some as far away as new so it was a very very good mixture of people from different backgrounds. And how long did it take you to? I presume you commuted on the subway. Well I a real subway.

Brooklyn National Institute of Allergy Anthony Fauci HIV Guadalupe Grammar School Academy of Achievement Dr Faucher New York Benson Hurst Dr Falcon Manhattan National Institutes of Health High School jesuit run high school malaria Alice Winkler Nina Totenberg Saint Bernadette Church Staten Island AIDS
"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

"Um

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

09:31 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

"Lockdown would be. I think we can get there without necessarily having literally a forcible lockdown but where there isn't a functional lockdown is there not a greater risk of transmission of. I don't know I really don't. I think that you can accomplish this if you do it. I mean obviously if you do a sloppy job of trying to do the mitigation and the physical separation. You're not going to be as effective as if you do it. In a more rigid way I mean I was very concerned about seeing videos in Florida of people frolicking on the beach going to bars and things like that I mean. We were very very articulate in vocal about how. That's the wrong thing to do. So what do you do in that case? Do you call the governor of Florida and say hey. I don't like what I'm seeing and I'm telling you giving my expertise that has to stop. I don't have to call him. I get on national TV. And say I make it pretty vocal about it. I mean that's a big message you mentioned dodgy your daily interactions with the president. It has seemed that he's been on a bit of a long and zigzagging journey starting with skepticism of this threat and downplaying of it and projecting a lot of optimism to sounding the alarm conveying the serious of it in the last twenty four hours or so in telling Americans to take it very seriously does that characterization feel fair I he was. The president has his own style. That's obvious to the American public. When I speak to him about issues that a substantive he listens I think he always understood the seriousness of it. Right now is the numbers are becoming crystal clear. He himself is articulating an awareness of that seriousness but from the beginning he always took it seriously. Do you see it as your job to influence. How he not only understands it but how he talks about it to the country. That is very difficult. I mean I actually my I see my job as the person who is the scientists. The public health official the physician who understands disease and to get the information correct information correct evidence to him so that he could make decisions that are based on evidence and based on data. I I don't think it would be possible for me to influence another person style. I mean that that just doesn't happen. I think the question at this point on everyone's mind is how long we're going to be in this situation. We're in with social distancing school shutdowns working from home or not working at all and you have said repeatedly that the federal government reevaluates where we are week to week. Maybe even day to day right. Is there a version of this? Where we need to remain in this position social distancing state-by-state patchwork but a functional kind of version of a lockdown. Not just to April maybe even to the entire summer and maybe even into the fall is a possibility. I when you say into the fall I I would be really surprised if that's the case. I think when you talk about. Is it going to be thirty days or sixty days or longer? You know as I've said the virus determines the time line not us we manage and formulate a time line. Depending upon how successful we have been in containing the virus and what the patterns and the dynamics of the virus. Aw so I always say without any regret at all or hesitation is a better word that you evaluated really as the time goes on and I had a very interesting conversation just this morning with colleagues from literally all over the world down the weekly telephone conference that the WHO sponsors and it was interesting to me that some of the most cogent concerns of people from different countries. I mean all over. European African Australian Canadian was that we need to make sure we keep awry on the balance of if you're too stringent in things like lockdowns and keeping people under wraps for a long period of time. You may have the unintended consequence of triggering from an economic and societal standpoint. Such disruption that you get things like poverty and health issues unrelated. The Corona virus was really a serious concern. Like what I mean. What are the worst case scenarios for unintended costs right? So many people need medications. Many people are dependent on supply chains for nutrition for food that they might starve that people who have illnesses. If you dramatically interrupt to the point where it no longer exists. The disruption of society can be really quite catastrophic. I mean that's the one of the things you want to avoid. And that's one of the pushbacks you have when you have people who say we really need to lock down everything and lock it down indefinitely. Well you might get an extra mile to out of suppressing the virus there but you gotTa make sure that you look at what the ultimate issue is. I've always been one. That leans much more heavily that it's the public health. That's the most important thing but I have very good people and many of them were on that international phone call. I was on who was saying yes. We agree with you but let's be careful that we don't do such a disruption of society that we really heard it is much more than what we're trying to prevent. I want to turn to how we will understand when this is over and I wonder if you think we have enough measures in place to understand when we've reached that point when this peaked and when this is actually bottomed out and will that mean for example doing millions of tests today to understand where the virus is. I mean what evidence. Will you need to see to feel confident that we can kind of call this over? Yeah so obviously. You'd want to see a very dramatic and complete turnaround. In the number of infections. There's illness this hospitalizations there's intensive care and there's death and the one that's the furthest out is the deaths that lags behind the others so you will continue to see deaths at a time when you have actually very good control of the new infections. The outbreak itself. So when I start to see the number of new infections essentially approaching almost zero and the number of deaths being close to that then I think we are through with this phase of it but that gets to the long term because we have a large planet here and we may be in a situation where we've got it really under control here but in other parts of the world it's still smolders which always gives the possibility of the reinsertion of the outbreak back into your own country now. Several things will mitigate against that being something that is a really serious problem one. We will obviously have been much better prepared right. We will likely have enough test to flood the entire country which we don't have right now. We very likely would have some therapeutic interventions and importantly hopefully as we get on a year year and a half from now or more will have a vaccine that works but Dr Vouch. I guess I need to ask the question. I think a lot of listeners are going to be thinking as here. You say this. Are you saying we may not be done with this functionally until we have a vaccine? Which could be eighteen months from now. Yeah well make sure that the listeners understand. It isn't a year of the intensity of what we're going through now. I believe that in a few months. Hopefully that will get it under control enough that it won't be as frightening as it is now but it will not be an absent threat. It will be a threat that is there and the threat of resurgence will be something that we need to make sure that we're prepared for the ultimate weapon against a resurgence is a vaccine. But before we get a vaccine we WANNA make sure that we have the wherewithal that when we turn the corner and that curve goes down to practically nothing that we realize and are not naive in thinking that the threat is no longer there because they will there will be as long as there's virus circulating in the world. There will be a threat of resurgence. If we're not properly prepared.

Florida president Aw disease Dr Vouch official
"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

"With you.

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

"Let's explore how we got to where we are you. You came out a few days ago and you told Americans that up to a quarter of a million of US could ultimately die from this pandemic in the best case scenario which was a very terrifying kind of best-case scenario. So I want to explore how it is that we got from that moment of recognition back in December January to this moment where the situation is so dire. I want to focus for a moment on the steps that could be taken to limit that back in the beginning. I know people like you are loath justifiably to second guess decisions in the middle of a crisis but at one zero in on a couple of items in particular for example by the time you all decided to ban travel from China. I think that was the end of January January thirty first the WHO had detected infections in multiple countries not just China. But I think it was South Korea and Japan meaning that any travelers from those countries could bring the virus to the. Us was this a moment to begin essentially sealing off the US from international travel or was the die already cast by that point. Well I mean. I think that we sealed off from China very quickly with regard to the realization of what might happen. Fact you might recall. We received a lot of criticism for doing that and even more criticism for sealing off and restricting travel from Europe. So I think that given the circumstances we were ahead of the curve and we acted quickly relatively speaking. I mean obviously if you knew everything that was going on as it was happening you might have acted sooner. But when you're dealing with viruses they stay silent and what you see. Now is the reflection of what likely happened a few weeks ago. And that's the reason why you probably remember. I have always said that if I get accused of overreacting. I feel good because it's probably that. I'm acting appropriately. Enough as opposed to overreacting. But when gentlemen when it comes to overreacting if you suspect the virus like this is invisible why not restrict travel earlier right? I mean I think the gap between when we restrict travel from China and Europe was over a month or so. Yeah yeah no I mean I. I don't think we could have done it early. I think we did it quite early and eating. Why couldn't we have a lot of pushback because of because of the resistance because it wasn't practical because people wouldn't have understood it wasn't very clear I mean right when you're dealing with like that retrospect to scope so really very would make things very very clear but when you're living through the fog of war isn't that easy you will always say everything. I've ever been through in thirty six years that I've been doing this as director of the institute. There's always that what could have been or what should have been. I mean that's always the case but I think in this case really just looking at it the way it is. I think that we acted pretty quickly in trying to cut off travel so I I wouldn't dwell on that as being what might have happened. It has felt like the delay in testing meant. We didn't recognize the scale. The problem really on because as you said this is invisible but it's not invisible to test it may just be invisible symptomatically so assuming that the Horse left the barn and the virus had gotten into our system. I know you don't run the CDC. But I assume you realize pretty quickly what it meant that the US was testing so few Americans. Where does that rank for you? As a problem in our early response as this was starting to spread That's a reasonable question. I think it you know it obviously was a problem. I perceived it as a problem early on unfortunately the systems that were originally set up in the relationship between the CDC and the Public Health Community in the state and local level was really not geared for the massive type of testing. That would be needed. That would embrace an require the participation of the private sector particularly the companies. That do the kinds of lab tests that you and I get when we go to a regular doctor's appointment so it was not suited for that. It is right now today ramping. Up to essentially make the private sector the major driving force of the testing. But you're absolutely correct back then early on that was not in place in. That's unfortunate because that brings us to federal guidance to states and cities to begin social distancing to shutdown life as we normally operate and when we spoke to Governor Andrew Cuomo a few weeks ago he said governors like him and really kind of the American public assumed that the federal government the President Vice President the head of HHS and someone like you frankly would definitively signal when it was time to take decisive action whether that meant shutting down schools closing restaurants bars issuing stay at home mortars and in his feeling and we hear this from other state leaders as well as the Federal Direction didn't come in time and I wonder what you make of that here. I mean they will always be criticism about something was not done in time. The of there is in this country and has always been a degree of independence that is given to the local components the states the governor's etc so guidelines that her out now for Mitigation. They are very very clear. Guidelines the states are implementing and interpreting that differently from one st. U K with that because I think that's the essential question in our system. We have fifty states and multiple leaders within those states. And so the question becomes does that inevitably lead to a patchwork unless the federal government is very very farm and says right. This is what everyone must do and were telling you. You really shouldn't think of it as optional you. You have a valid point there. I mean I think people have different perspectives about how much central mandating should occur at something that is argued all the myself I mean I. I'm one that tends to be not overbearing but somewhat more directive than others. I like clarity of message. That has always been something that I've guided myself by throughout my career in medicine and science but not everybody feels that way but when we go back and look in that retrospective scope. Do you think we will look back and say we wished that we had favored federal decisiveness and communication over allowing states to act as their own decision makers. I'm not sure about that. I think that's certainly a possibility. I mean there's always these hypothetical scenarios that we put up. That are very difficult to come to a firm statement on it. I mean. Obviously that if something doesn't go as well as you'd like it to go you always examine saying well if we had done differently. Would it have made a difference? You know and I don't know to be honest.

China US federal government Europe CDC Governor Andrew Cuomo South Korea Japan director Federal Direction President Vice President HHS Public Health Community
"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily

"You wouldn't otherwise to shed light on stories that might be difficult and to bring us a little closer to understanding the most complicated parts of our world we take that responsibility seriously and when you subscribe to the New York Times. You're letting US know that you care about these stories and you want to hear them told by the people living that subscribed to the New York Times at NY TIMES DOT com slash. Subscribe thank you to be over. What do I need to just one piece but the one with the under dog? Oh I see I I D- I loved. Yes Hi how are you sir? I'm fine thanks how you doing. I'm doing great. Thank you very much for being with us. In for recording yourself above beyond. Thank you. Thank you so Dr. Voucher. You became head of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease in the nineteen eighty s when the AIDS crisis with becoming a national issue. And then you stayed in that role through the Ebola outbreaks SARS. Each one n one swine flu. And what point did you realize that? The Corona virus is going to be of an entirely different speed and scale than those when it came to the. Us was there a moment or that became clear to you. I think it relates to the issue of its efficiency of transmissibility. So the thing that rang the for me. That made me say Oh. We really have a problem. Here is when the corona virus was first identified in very early January. It was clear that this was something that had jumped from animal species in Wuhan China to humans so that was the first red flag for me then as soon as I found out which was literally days to a week so later that it was really circulating in China likely for several weeks it became clear to me that we could potentially be dealing with a global catastrophe and that was somewhere in the middle of January when it was clear that China was seeing not only extremely efficient transmissibility but also a disturbing degree of morbidity and mortality. Those two things together are the things that really are the makings of a public health nightmare. And that's exactly what I realized. We were in really bad trouble from the New York Times. I'm Michael Barr..

New York Times US National Institute of Allergy Wuhan China NY Ebola Dr. Voucher Michael Barr
"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Listening to comedy central higher everybody. Trevor Noah here with an episode of the daily social distancing show before we get into the show. I'm still getting a lot of questions from you guys online about the round things behind me and again. It's not a sex thing so please stop saying that. Okay I'll tell you what they offer real. They're actually simone exercise weights all right the same kind that the rock uses. And that's why both of us are so jacked. Sorry Dwayne I know. I said I'd never tell anyone but people wouldn't stop bothering me anyway. It's now day fourteen of being stuck in the house to try and stop the corona virus and goes. I'M NOT GONNA lie. I'm sort of getting used to us. You know there are a few things that stress me out for instance. I realized that for two weeks. I haven't been able to hang out with say now. Granted I wasn't hanging out with beyond say before either but thanks to corona virus. Now will never happen anyway tonight. We're going to catch up on the latest coronavirus news like the fact that states or telling tourists to stay away. How Brazilian gangs of stopping the virus? And how porn hub is helping hospitals plus. We'll be having a conversation with the renowned. Dr Anthony Fauci. So let's get into it. Welcome to the dating social distancing show from Trevor's couch in New York City to your account somewhere in the world. This is the daily social distance. Show with Trevor Noah. Here's.

Trevor Noah Dr Anthony Fauci Dwayne I New York City
"anthony fauci" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"anthony fauci" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Disease doctor Anthony Fauci says it will be important to keep a close eye on the southern hemisphere in the coming months as those countries south of the equator head into their autumn and winter months if the rate of coronavirus infections picks up during that time does he says that could mean the virus is seasonal with a second round coming at the end of the year in the southern hemisphere in southern Africa in in the southern hemisphere countries is that we're having cases that are appearing as they go into their winter season and if in fact they have a substantial outbreak it will be inevitable that we need to be prepared that will get a cycle around the second time Dr Fauci says it emphasizes the need to develop a vaccine testing it quickly in trying to get it ready so they'll have it available for that next cycle if it does come over nine hundred deaths have been reported in the U. S. to covered nineteen and there've been over sixty five thousand cases with New York the hardest hit area now the latest traffic and weather together accident right now reported Madison road east of eerie Avenue also an accident level Avenue a clip that Belgium is forecast from the advanced dentistry weather center during this challenging time advanced dentistry would like to say thank you to all the health care workers and folks on the front lines out there you are appreciated right daybreak a morning low of forty five now coming up for our Thursday partly cloudy some increasing clouds in the afternoon a high of seventy one at night a chance for showers and windy a low down to fifty nine from your severe weather station on nine first warning chief meteorologist Steve Raleigh news radio seven hundred WLW radar showing a clear sky our current temperature fifty seven degrees the state of Ohio now reporting a total of seven hundred four confirmed cases of the crown of virus along with two new test today with the death toll now at ten Dr Amy act and the director of the Ohio department of health had a correction on the age range it actually is less than a year to ninety four years of age the total number of hospitalizations is up to one hundred eighty two was seventy five admissions into the ICU sixteen percent of positive cases are health care workers Odiase says they know at least over fourteen thousand seven hundred residents have been tested so far for the virus but the exact number of negative cases is still unclear lawmakers passed emergency legislation to address several issues Ohio faces during the corona virus outbreak and now awaits governor Mike to one signature it addresses several issues including education the postponed Ohio primary and addresses delaying Ohio's tax deadline the primaries being moved to a mailing only until April twenty eighth under the bill and also the tax deadline to move to the federal deadline of July fifteenth one day after reporting a case of cover nineteen as a result of a coronavirus party Kentucky governor Eddie Bashir with another unique case today we do have our first case of someone that went on spring break to Florida and came back with the corona virus we can not do that there are now one hundred ninety eight confirmed cases of the corona virus in the Commonwealth that's up thirty five from Tuesday four new cases are out of Kentucky excuse me that is up yes thirty five from Tuesday and four out of ten counties would clarify that a seventy five year old man from Jefferson County is the fifth to die from the virus new restrictions will be going to affect the Kentucky tomorrow night at eight o'clock to combat the spread of the.

Anthony Fauci