13 Burst results for "Anthony Cox"

"anthony cox" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:47 min | Last month

"anthony cox" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Now. In a rare admission, China's top disease control official has said the efficacy off the country's covert vaccines is low. In a press conference, Zhao Fu added that China was considering mixing vaccines as a way of boosting efficacy. China has developed four different vaccines approved for public use of though some trials abroad had suggested. Efficacy as low as 50% and in Chile as low as 3%. Beijing has insisted the jobs are effective and said in March that obtaining visas would be easier for foreigners who have received a Chinese vaccine. To discuss this. We can speak now to Dr Anthony Cooks. A vaccine expert at the University of Birmingham Year in the UK doctor. Welcome to the program, sir. Your reaction, Firstly to what this Chinese official has said. Yeah, I think, he said, actually walked back his use somewhat, so I think he suggested that he was misunderstood. So his argument now is that he was really talking about how they might optimize the use of the vaccines. Violin in China on docking about different immunizations. Drugs is However, it's quite clear that the efficacy of the Chinese vaccines seems to be coming out is quite variable dependent. We study look out some somewhere between 50 and Sort of 90%. Depending on where you look at the most recent study, it was the Brazilian one that should about 50% effectiveness, which is high enough for it to it. A TV approval by the World Health Organization. You may be looking at it later this month would such a variety than in these results? How do you did determine how effective they actually are? Well, you do good studies. But in terms of looking at the existing data, we've God's, um, I think it's Looks worth looking at real world examples as well. So in Chile, we've seen a resurgence of cases despite high vaccination rates. I think there's an important thing to look up into. When we talk about vaccine effectiveness. How effective the other percentage figures you'll hear. I'm talking about actual infection with Cole ridden and it may be that these vaccines have a place because they actually prevent the more serious cases of covert and perhaps hospitalization. With all the data is low on that. I'm so even if even if you do get cases, you're gonna have a less serious case of coverage. And so they have do may may have a role a zoo, we go forward. But effectively if you have if they're not so effective, that case reduction they may have less in effect on stopping transmission of covered disease. So is mixing them a good idea. Well, we don't know a present for certain in the UK work currently conducting a study looking at mixing vaccines in the UK that would be the fires of job on the AstraZeneca vaccine. Um, it does make sense scientifically in terms of income boost effectiveness, but we we need to see the study data, but it's certainly something that should be locked up. Okay and very, very briefly with they have passed a regulatory tests, for example, before they're actually being used in in countries where they have been sent. So they passed the emergency approval process above the Chinese government where they've been used there. Um, I believe that any country that would be easy and then would have would have put them through their their existing regulatory functions and another mentioned Who should be looking at the use for emergency use, but the end of April and they've received enough data to make that decision now. So, yes, I would expect anyone who receives the vaccines that it would have been approved by their local government or a zoo. We have rollouts and by who? It's important that this vaccine is easy to mistreat us. Well, it's not one of the marinade vaccines where you have to store it in the freezer, so How's the real benefit for worldwide distribution? Okay. Thank you very much. That's Dr Anthony Cox joining us there from the University of Birmingham. Right. Let's stay on that subject. We're talking about Brazil and its response to covert 19 death toll of over 330002nd only to the U. S hospitals overcrowded People dying as they wait for treatment in the health system described constantly is on the brink of collapse. But the president continues to oppose any lockdown measures. Our correspondent Mark Lohan, sent this report from Sao Paolo is.

Mark Lohan World Health Organization March Anthony Cox Zhao Fu Anthony Cooks Chile UK 50% 90% University of Birmingham end of April Sao Paolo 50 Beijing Chinese later this month Brazil 3% about 50%
"anthony cox" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This is the marketplace morning report from the bbc. World service on victoria craig. Good morning vacation pay minimum wage and retirement fund contributions. Those are all benefits. The us ride hailing giant has agreed to offer its drivers here in the uk just two weeks after a landmark supreme court decision more than four year legal battle. The court rejected uber's argument. That drivers were self employed and said they should be categorized instead as workers entitled to employment rights. The bbc's deal like it has more on that story. This is a significant change for uber. And one which had fought hard to avoid making for years. The ride hailing giant claimed. It was a simple intermediary. Technology platform which connected self-employed drivers with potential passengers. Luebbe says more than seventy thousand drivers in the uk will now be paid at least the national living wage. Ovo only when they're actually driving for the company and not waiting for work. Jamie hayward is abyss. General manager northern and eastern europe drivers consistently told us that they wanted both the flexibility that we provided but also they wanted the benefits. And we've been struggling to find a way of bringing those two things together in a way that worked for us and worked for drivers the gm be union. Welcome dubious decision which marked the end of the road for what it called bogus self-employment but the two drivers whose legal challenge led to the supreme court case that uber's offer had come a day late and a dollar short james farrar and yes in aslam said because he was not planning to pay its drivers for time spent waiting for work. They would still be shortchanged by forty to fifty percent. That's the bbc's the legat reporting there checking the numbers now. Global stocks are little changed as the federal reserve wraps up. Its latest policy meeting today. Investors are expecting clarity on whether the central bank plans to raise interest rates sooner than expected a senior world health organization official has urged african governments not to lose faith in astrazeneca and oxford. Universities corona virus vaccine. That's after several european countries including germany france. Italy and spain temporarily suspended use of the vaccine over concerns about blood clots. The european medicines agency has insisted the product has so far proved to be safe. Dr anthony cox. At the university of birmingham's in state of clinical sciences says the decision to pause vaccinations unnecessarily could harm public confidence in wider. Inoculation programs i think the decision to be concerned about reports coming in and investigate them is an excellent session. I think the decision to pose vaccination is poor decision. And i think the reason for that is such decisions once you've made them reduce public confidence and if the signal that you are concerned about turns out not to be real. I think he's quite hard to reverse that decision and convince people though the wasn't a problem. I think there's a sort of smoke without fire problem. There is a lot of debate about whether politics is part of this problem. I don't think politics is really the issue. I think these committees are genuinely looking at issues that they have had come in. They're making decisions based on the evidence. And i think it's more a scientific framing of the issue around the precautionary principle. That i think is the issue and this was a vaccine that earlier this year the eu complained. It wasn't getting enough of now. These individual countries are temporarily suspending. The use of it do you think overall country should have rather than completely pausing the vaccination program said there may be an issue and we'll look into it but we'll continue vaccinating in the meantime Green with. I don't think there's enough evidence to pose vaccine..

james farrar forty Jamie hayward Luebbe anthony cox uk oxford two drivers fifty percent uber bbc today more than seventy thousand dri two things astrazeneca germany more than four year earlier this year both northern
"anthony cox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"It never fully thought through of hash out. They arrived in malacca a spanish mediterranean island where anthony his new wife and keo living and they hit in a hotel for three days while anthony and his wife were busy. Meditating ironically with the maharishi mahesh yogi the same guy. This fucking motherf this motherfucker right here here. John and yoko took yoko from her kindergarten and attempted to flee the country with her. They were stopped by police however the charges were eventually dismissed yoko when see her daughter again until nineteen ninety eight holy shit thirty year. Yeah 'cause anthony cox was like bitch no. This is my daughter. Uk fbi custody. And you just try to kidnap her the same way. That elf tried to do with john when he was young kid and then forced him to choose between him and julia. Like the amounts of history. Repeating itself in this story is blowing my mind. Podcast medium is not appropriate right now for my action because i have no words yet have no words. I do not heavy single fucking word. You look like chuck berry. Is that very much. It's it's steve. Harvey faces coming back. Holy shit that's like the only way it can react to that. I'll come back to me now. A series of steve harvey faces. Yeah during this time. John was also writing and recording his second solo album. Imagine i'm gonna say it like that every time. imagine imagine imagine Another phil spector production. Album spawned the song of the same name that john lennon is arguably best known for right. Just before the album's released. John and yoko moved to new york city. They were disillusioned with britain and the relentless press attacks on yoko which i get totally tabloids were fucking means to her and so racist. It's the british tabloids are though what they're fucking garbage yeah. I don't blame them for that. That is yeah get together. John did not inform cynthia or his own child that he was up rooting and moving to a different country. Imagine all the rat abandoning their kids. Who guys this is your. This is your idol for love and peace. Yeah he wouldn't see julian for another three or four years. You know what. Better than yoko. And kyoko though i cast but still not great. I'm just. I'm reaching at this point. Yeah we're grasping at straws. All over the place. John battled with authorities to stay in new york because of his previous drug conviction. He wasn't allowed to get a green card. The nixon administration was also starting in f. b. i. File on john for his radical left politics and war sentiments young cause that warranted and f. b. i. file on learning rural town. John if you're gonna do an exit precious shake your face. Lots of your giles. Just flapper. futurama's started that now. I can't get it out of my head. And i think it's the most accurate certainly is god fucking nixon. I hate everyone right now like everybody. The story can eat it to everybody. Except for cynthia and julian they're fine and then like kyoko and her father he'll goes fine. We'll me a couple of other people that are fine but but everybody can just me fuck off to set fire anyway. The american government spent four years trying to deport..

john lennon new york John Harvey yoko malacca julia anthony three days three julian four years steve cynthia john new york city thirty year keo single second solo album
"anthony cox" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on Pantheon

"The backing bands really into it. And then all of a sudden you hear yoko grab the microphone and go pull the toddler absolutely. Didn't you see chuck berry like in his head. go what go look it up. It is absolutely hilarious. I've seen her interviewed before she has actually a very soft Feminine voice and she does still have like a tinge of a japanese accent. Yeah yeah. Larry softspoken she is but but her screeching music chevra dolphin. Well she is like you go damn girl. She found it. I don't know what it is. But she found it. She did find it. Meanwhile despite being divorced from anthony cox yoga was still locked in a custody battle over their daughter kyoko rate. Yoko had basically done the same thing to kyoko that john did to. Julian effectively her to focus on john and their arts but she randomly changed her mind on april. Twenty third nineteen seventy-one. John and yoko attempted to abduct yoko and do something with her. I don't know what the end game was here. We own her. I'd look a tougher as a child custody. You are two of the biggest names in the world. You're constantly followed in watch. What did you think you were going to do with her. I don't understand what the end game was say. We're probably really high with came up with the i 'cause it sounds the way this all worked out. Sounds like the plan of two people that were just high out of their minds and had no idea what they are doing. Hell shit so yeah. Even my notes. I said i have a feeling. This plan was hashed out during a drug binge. it never fully thought through of hash out. They arrived in malacca a spanish mediterranean island where anthony his new wife and keo living and they hit in a hotel for three days while anthony and his wife were busy. Meditating ironically with the maharishi mahesh yogi the same guy. This fucking motherf this motherfucker right here here. John and yoko took yoko from her kindergarten and attempted to flee the country with her. They were stopped by police however the charges were eventually dismissed yoko when see her daughter again until nineteen ninety eight holy shit thirty year. Yeah 'cause anthony cox was like bitch no. This is my daughter. You gave me custody and you just try to kidnap her the same way. That elf tried to do with john when he was young kid and then forced him to choose between. Him and julia like the amounts of history. Repeating itself in this story is blowing my mind. Podcast medium is not appropriate right now for my action because i have no words yet have no words. I do not heavy single fucking word. You look like chuck berry that very much. It's it's steve. Harvey faces coming back. Holy shit that's like the only way it can react to that. I'm coming back to me now. A series of steve harvey faces. Yeah during this time. John was also writing and recording his second solo album. Imagine i'm gonna say it like that every time. imagine imagine imagine Another phil spector production. Album spawned the song of the same name that john lennon is arguably best known for right. Just before the album's released. John and yoko moved to new york city..

john lennon John Harvey Julian Larry malacca steve anthony john julia two three days two people Yoko yoko kyoko april keo single thirty year
"anthony cox" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on Pantheon

"New york state you are allowed to possess up to one and ounces maybe two maybe two ounces of marijuana either way eight must be a lot. Yeah i'm going to say it's a bit math kind of really. Never seen any of these drugs in my no. I've seen pied don't know. Both were charged with possession and john was also charged with obstruction of justice. He had panicked when an officer. Banged on the back window during the raid. And for a minute refuse to open the window. That charge was dropped when he pleaded guilty to truck drug possession which also let yoko off the hook. Shortly after the incident. She miscarried a sock. It does that is not an easy thing to go through all in february nineteen. Sixty-nine yoko own divorce from anthony cox went through yes. She was married when she met john up and had a daughter named kyoko cox and john was actually her third husband. Yup within a month. John and yoko flew to gibraltar and got married then went to amsterdam in stage. They're famous bed in for peace. Sure you remember that. Now i do. I just i always roll my eyes with mike. Yeah that's right yeah. Celebrities can lay in bed for a weekend for peace. And who get like this. This was a protest against the vietnam war. Chur made a lot of hearts in the government. Move through this yeah. These rich pieces are like. What can i do to protest the vietnam war. What can i do to change hearts and minds and policies and get the troops back home. I know i'm gonna lay in bed. It's the most like completely the most privilege thing you can possibly fucking do and just ignorant yeah but at in.

John gibraltar february nineteen New york anthony cox two mike vietnam war Both Chur eight amsterdam john kyoko cox third husband yoko two ounces of marijuana Sixty-nine ounces up to one
"anthony cox" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

23:01 min | 7 months ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Wind howls. Storm outside shoes of broken still in Moscow so far, just also ability off. On drawn militant college is like a shadow just from stalls. God. Swift on two stroke Screw death fine. No down. Fates already. Still stops colleges back into shadow. I have to. Screen flag. Stuff. It's not from a back on Grazia See Santa Cruz on DH. Last piece from 1995 called Lunch with Pancho Villa. Composed by David Friedman, who's on vibes with, you know, Saluzzi on bandoneon. And Anthony Cox own base Intuition label. Rio's name. The date preceded by Johnny Lee Naci, his brand New Wilde gay state, recorded in November of 2017 in Italy. For Dodie Saloon records. Trio date with Pasqual ee. Szaroleta on base. Johnny. Look Naci on piano. And Bob Moses on drums and percussion. You heard their cover of Karla plays host to Gatto. Generally gnocchi. Recently died and started tonight's outfront back program with Mark Rebo from his goodbye beautiful songs of resistance 1942 to 2018 on anti records. Hand the militant Ecologist Much tune into transformation. The highway It's an.

"anthony cox" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"SC Santa Cruz, If you have any questions, comments, feel free to text 8314594036 We just heard cherry pop. Go to Amsterdam. 2003 and group headed up Why? Well, it's ah, actually. Michael Brams label and, AH, a double CD. The other city is all Michael Bram compositions. But for this CD, it's Ah Franz Ver Medicines compositions. He's a tenor player. Along with her Robertson trumpet, Frank Krakowski, alto sax and clarinet. Mikhail Brum on piano, Duda Base and Michael Venture own drums. Your cherry pop from well, they call themselves collectively, all ears and the date they called line. B B B. The name and label and Little I music named label preceding that with group headed up by Jeff Letter. And Ah, it's called swinging Dicks Spell D I X and We heard a cover of Fats Waller Composition Honeysuckle Rose, Jeff letter doing the read. Work. Kirk enough. Cheon Cornet Cornett. Bob Stuart on tuba Matt Wilson on drums. Then from Jack Walrath Great Trump Player who Ah was with Charles Mingus and Meg's later years. We heard from his master of suspense, state and the peace of studying porcine. Again. Jack on trumpet with Kenny Garrett on Delta Sex. Carter Jefferson Tenor Sax, Steve Troy trombone. James Williams Piano. Anthony Cox Basin, Ronnie Barrage on the drums. You know, to label Ported in 1986. From a brand new release from drummer Matt Wilson on the pole metal label. We heard a cover of Dewey Rodman's Schwab, Viv. Met played with Dewey. So ah, he likes to Keep his material alive, though. Ah, Do we no longer with us. By the name of data's hug. Egan brand new with Ah, Matt Wilson on drums. Jeff Letter. We heard him there as well Doing the raid work, Kirk, Enough Key on Cornett Christlike cap on the base. And started with out of nowhere as covered by frank Low with on tenor sax. With Philip Wilson on drums, and it's a double, actually, one sided 12 inch epi on forced exposures Ecstatic piece label. Once again, your Let's send out for not back and sometimes you pick out things because of name, huh? Well, maybe Wobblies were Workers of the world. That's what the Wobblies were back in the Forties in particular. Ah, And I kind of picked up this one because it's for D. J Wobblies trapped in Are you tired of the government and global corporations ruining the earth and your life? Do you.

Matt Wilson Jeff Letter D. J Wobblies Dewey Rodman Jack Walrath Kirk Michael Brams Cheon Cornet Cornett Santa Cruz Michael Bram Philip Wilson Anthony Cox Basin frank Low Schwab Carter Jefferson Frank Krakowski Charles Mingus Mikhail Brum Ronnie Barrage
"anthony cox" Discussed on Genre Junkies | Book Reviews

Genre Junkies | Book Reviews

14:44 min | 1 year ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on Genre Junkies | Book Reviews

"Weirdo Book Worms Unite. We want to share our love of genre fiction with you some MHM readers out there may look down on you for your love of horror sci fi and fantasy but not us so stop by as we discuss. What we've been reading? Johner junkies at Sandra. This Scott got stitches year to alone says thank you to everybody who gave for some well wishes as a few weeks ago when she was sick and she's all better now. He seems to be doing much much better. Yeah she had to have her medicine. She's all all good just here overseeing the podcast odd cast per usual. Hey you know. Wells was sick. That would be Scott. Hanson this episode is a weekly. It was it was real bad. y'All it was really. I had no voice I had no energy was really on a massive insane ear infection Kenneth Out of nowhere but yeah and then like yeah no voice voice and it was just. It was a whole thing sell you know. Sometimes the start of the year can be a little rough. This is one of those times. One of those times was a long ear. And Gal. We've been a little remiss in lake our social media posting and like telling everybody what's coming up up so we were going to get better at that again but I can tell you right now after this book. Were doing a some women in horror staff off for February which is very very exciting. We're doing a compilation called strange women. And that was kind of mostly composed by I assure a knox and that's going to be a fun little horror short story collection by. I think they're all women authors or at least Mostly Yeah I don't know. I think they're all women authors though are believe they are yes yes yes yes that'd be fantastic and then after that. We have the babysitters coven. And that's going to be a crossover event. With one of my other shows those bookie slumber party there's GonNa be so many of yes and then and we also The cold show another one of my shows where doing some limited hor month stuff too. So there's just there's so much so much awesomeness for women in horror and you know the Jonah Junkies. We like to participate so because I am a woman in horror and I am married to a woman in horror. He lives a pretty horrifying in life. So tonight we're talking about it's fiction science fiction pretty hard core science fiction. A novel cold old sleeping giants. This is the first of a trilogy from the famous files and it's written by Sylvan. Neuville who is a will this whole trilogy. I should say is really popular. It's been read by many many many people. It is a pretty well regarded. Did pretty well loved science fiction trilogy not older anything but recent Sifi stuff and it is told through a series of interviews. It's one of those. That's non traditional format. It's similar in some respects to World War Z.. Yeah he kind of from one perspective in a way well. It's not from one perspective. No but it's it's it's more because all the characters get interviewing even in this is like their interviews yes it's definitely about multiple characters but it's compiled from one perspective whereas World War Z.. Reads more like a a Like a smattering of different stories. Right and this is actually lake in the blurb. It's like if you're a fan of Michael CRICHTON World War Z.. And the Martian Shen. Then you'll like this. So that's that's pretty exciting stuff in one of the reasons this company this series has been on my radar for long long time. And I've always thought Scott would enjoy this but especially once. I saw that blurb in those are like a few of his favorite things right there I was like okay. I think we gotta try this so I'm going to read you guys the description again. This is sleeping giants but one of the themes files. A girl named rose. Rose is writing her new bike near her home. In deadwood South Dakota when she falls through the earth she wakes up at the bottom of a square hole. It's walls glowing with intricate carvings things but the firemen who come to save her peer down upon something even stranger a little girl in the palm of a giant metal hand. Seventeen years later the mystery history of the bizarre artifact remains unsolved its origins architects and purpose. Unknown it's carbon. Dating defies belief military reports are redacted theories or floated then rejected but some can never stop searching for answers. Rose Franklin is now a highly trained physicist leading a top secret team to crack the hands code and along with her her colleagues. She is being interviewed by nameless interrogator. He's power and purview or is enigmatic as the providence of the relic. What is clear is that rose? In her compatriots are on the edge of unraveling history's most perplexing discovery and figuring out what it portends for humanity but once the piece of the puzzle in place will the result proved to be an instrument instrument of lasting peace or weapon of mass destruction. So it's interesting the it doesn't really go into details on the hand is so I guess we should be careful with our non spoiler section discussing what what the hand leads to. Yeah okay so we'll kind of dance around that I think from the description like you kinda get in the something a giant metal hand but we'll we'll keep it vague so first of all One of our friends one of my really good friends. Molly is from South Dakota. So Hey South Dakota deadwood yes she says like awesome awesome I wonder if all of all y'all in South Dakota big fans of this book specially around that area so yes so let's just kind of right off the bat talk about our our scores on this so I felt I found this book to be a good read. I really enjoyed did it. I found myself coming back to it fairly easily. It wasn't it wasn't a page Turner. It wasn't something I just absolutely couldn't put it down but I really enjoyed the writing in the the the decision that was made in in the styling of the book I really enjoyed it. So here's the thing I'm I'm I'm in good re too but I would say there was parts of it that were page Turner. I wouldn't say it was just a solidly good read I would say it's kind of in between those two. Yeah of course you're going to like certain people's perspectives more than other people's that does happen in any sort of like multi perspective book but there is some just really cool things about how this book was written. So that's GONNA be Kinda my my my launching doing my launching into that if you don't mind launch your way launch away off so as we mentioned this book is told through a series of interviews views. And it's really interesting because we've had lengthy discussions on this show about how Scott and I are really care to driven readers and and I was very nervous like how is this going to be character-driven when it's kind of Almost exposition and lake. How how is this all going to work? And like with the plot and for this being a not traditionally character driven narrative. You still get a lot of character stuff and really distinctive voices an ear characters and kind of an interesting intimacy with them an insight into them but also just a lot of cool plot staff and I think that in the hands of a less skilled writer this entire structure would have been horrible. So this is I really Commend Nouvelle for his style and his execution education. Well what the author does to bring you the characters and actually bring you that that feeling of them into the story is it's actually two different types. Yeah well it's there there's three. There's three different types of X. Positional story types in the book. There's the classic interview between the Project Project leader and these different characters. There's confessionals that are basically transcriptions of things that the characters are putting into their own personal diaries stories and then there's also X. Positional reports that are written by Organizations about what has happened. And that's and and that's the part that's a little bit drier to give you some setting but the combination of both the confessional and interviewed as a really good job of of bringing you into the the struggles in the personal thoughts of the characters I think that's a really really good way of putting it cell. I was overall overall very pleased with the characters and the development of this. Of course the story. And the mystery of what their unraveling and you know these this absolutely insane. Gene scientific discovery that is rewriting humankind and has these far reaching. Oh just huge concept things that are being put on humanity and making us change as a culture and making religions have to adapt to this artifact and so so much It's interesting that some of the characters voices were still just really Gosh I can't think of a great word for it but just you did feel a connection connection and it felt humble even with all the really big stuff going on. I wasn't crazy about one male characters perspective. which is it's actually not a huge one in the book And I didn't really care for him and that was me. I mean the characters not super likable but he was the only one that at times felt that it was a little male Gezi. I know what you're talking about. And he is not a great character. Yeah but at the same time from a male perspective he is somewhat relatable and so I I totally don't I don't disagree at all that he's not like a like a like a fabulous character but at the same time supposed to. Yeah but but at the same time. He's not he's not gross. He's not he's not all that assuras and he is. He is somewhat relatable from a male perspective. Okay I appreciate that. Yeah he was the only one that like that kind of took coming out of the story at times and made me roll my eyes and be like you know like just let sound and again the rolling of the eyes you You can probably hear my is willing from space during some things. This character said but there's other meals perspective. That did not do that. And I. I really enjoyed the female characters in this book. I really enjoyed how rose and Kara are like super different. And you can tell when you're reading it those are humane female perspectives. We get and that was really cool. Because they have their own way of talking and thinking and reacting and it didn't it didn't feel copy paster Easter. Anything like that. You agree I do agree. I I like the female perspective in this book. Probably more than any male except for possibly the project director. Although I'm not sure do they is it. Explicitly stated the project director is male. Yes okay he is my favorite character. The the interrogator easily I love him. He is so funny and so ambiguous so true to his motives and and you love him and you hate him and he's funny. He's my favorite for sure. He's he's kind of a actually. Here's a fun game. Who would you cast as as the project director? Who did you visualize as the project director? I don't know if I really have like a person person but it would be light. Light White cisgender like early sixties male soaring Cox. Sure are we saw. Anthony Cox non descript White Dude who works for the government that has a lot going on under the surface. I would. I'd say this is as far as appeal..

Scott South Dakota director Rose Franklin Turner Hanson Wells Michael CRICHTON Kenneth Out Cox Neuville Project Project leader Anthony Cox Nouvelle Molly writer physicist Kara
"anthony cox" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Air air act requires a periodic review of the weight of evidence of adverse health effects of regulated air pollutants by an external body of scientists called called the clean air scientific advisory committee anthony cox. The current chair has characterized the abundant observational epidemiologic evidence from from time series and cohort series of the pm two point five mortality association as not proving causality rather than relying on the weight of the evidence approach that the e._p._a. Has traditionally used to infer causation cox wants to rely on studies that use a theoretical approach called manipulative causality this theory restricts epidemiologic evidence that may be considered acceptable to assess causality to results from intervention studies or studies that have been analyzed with the use of causal inference statistical methods the effort to exclude all observational observational epidemiologic data that have not been analyzed in a manipulative causality framework not only makes no sense it would set a dangerous dangerous precedent for environmental policy effects of sarah lax in in patients with acute heart failure by marco metre from the university of brescia italy. Several axon is a recombinant form of human relax into vase. Oh dilate or hormone that contributes to cardiovascular jio vascular and renal adaptations during pregnancy previous studies have suggested that treatment with sarah lacks may result in relief of symptoms and in better <music> outcomes in patients with acute heart failure in the relax a._h. F- to trial six thousand five hundred forty five patients who were hospitalized for acute you'd heart failure were.

acute heart failure sarah lax anthony cox university of brescia italy
"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

14:41 min | 2 years ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"You were talking about certain fans rejecting or or or being critical of a piece is in the timeline as same applies to star wars where folks have not liked this kind of the the back and forth that has happened in feel that it has a has kind of messed with the continuity 'em the there are purist tourist fans of star trek are there are there are times in b star trek 'em storytelling that fans really don't like or that the the the die hards just wish had never happened a yes you know when you're which is fine because when you're when you're as passionate about something and you invest as much energy in love and there's something you feel ownership right an and that's that's a good thing it could also be a bad thing and when it becomes a bad thing is when you start to take away other fans enjoyment of something and if you if you're so critical of the changes or or or the well what's happening in that universe of storytelling that you're taking away from somebody else's love that that's that's when the kind of crosses the line and in fact you can go all the way back back to star trek the next generation in nineteen eighty seven when they announced that it was happening there were fans that were up in arms and said well this isn't my star trek i'm not watching it they were they boycotted me and so it's not a new thing i think what's changed is obviously social media right so we have these outlets where we can deliver our opinions freely without consequence and and broadcast everything a an of course in in the world of of of you know click four dollars you wanna try to create as many clicks and be as controversial as possible to get as many people as you tend to to click on your thing so it it it creates this environment where negativity is sometimes rewarded and so we have to be careful of a of a of delivering opinions and delivering you know criticisms 'em in talking about this i'm not saying you shouldn't be critical of it but but there's a way to have discussion as opposed to just like a laundry list you know so there's always been people there's there's people now who don't like star trek deep space nine there's people who don't like star trek voyager there's people who don't like star trek enterprise enterprises kind of like you know the step child that nobody ever really remembers talks about it was a prequel set you know a hundred years before kirk so the great thing about star trek is that there is so much of it you don't have to have all of it and i think that's what's people sometimes forget and we find that time a time away from stuff in time to reflect on it almost makes you appreciate it more so we're now seeing fans who are appreciating star trek enterprise more were now ten years out from b star trek two thousand nine film the reboot and people are appreciating that more so i i think i i think anytime fans will all come around and and and that's okay that's another reason why it it'll sustain it for as long as it does didn't expert job they're not actually telling us what one of the congress parts of the timeline up and then i'm gonna let you off the hook by karen in hardwick may not let you off the hip let you out cook karen good morning guarantee you there yeah i'm here come here and i can hear you good morning how are you i think this is a really important program pretzel local people i think it's a shame to waste so much of drivel well i i understand a but there's lots of different kinds of things that are important folks in it would you find it odd that no no station covered the president's military demonstration yesterday that's never happened before i can remember fifty years ago we had military parades in which always he's covered and i think maybe he's proving his point but but they're spending our on this nonsense it's just really infuriating kyle wells karen thank you for the call um you know obviously we are never gonna please everybody end 'em and i would i would argue that there are fair number of people out there who are listening who 'em feel like they kind of a escape in these ideas that are brought forth through entertainment which is a very powerful message is oftentimes just as important in creating a how we think about things and how we perceive things 'em even more so in some cases in politics so tony you have any thoughts on that yeah well i think you know star trek does a wonderful job of not only entertaining us but informing us an end in a having having a conversation about what's happening in today's world i mean that's one of the reasons why star trek was created gene wanna talk about social issues happening in the world in the sixties a perfect example is you know a during the civil rights movement the show was was right there they had an episode where they had a they had an alien that was a black on one side is white on these other being chased by another alien that looked the same an app for some crime he committed and nobody knew what it was and then unity episode you find out that the reason why this alien is a criminal is because he's black on the wrong side of his body and that's the only reason why he's he's being sought after by the la and so that was a way to talk about 'em and you know the civil rights movement racial inequality things that were happening segregation in a way that was framed in a science fiction a set it so you could watch that episode and not even realize what they were talking about until the very end and then hopefully that need you sort of question things that were happening in the real world so i think that star trek in particular is very important a an end there's something that 'em that that does help to inform us of of what's happening in the world around well and i think the people often relate to it there there's there's something you can take a certain amount of comfort in in enjoying the show 'em in in in in have those lessons you know kind of seep into you rather than feeling like it's being thrust upon you in there are a lot of different messages that are coming at us and in different ways that 'em feel threatening in feel harmful in a you know oftentimes the storylines 'em in the morals and in the things that are with in the writing of those shows 'em is very poignant in i think it's worth 'em you know worth noting that the writers these these these episodes are very mindful of what the social norms are in what the political landscape is in the or are taking that into account we have another call dan from northfield dan good morning hey i just wanted to piggyback on karen's call by saying that karen call is exactly why i'm glad you guys are doing the show about star trek ideals of justice and truth and everybody working together to solve problems are needed now more than ever as evidence by parents phone call so thank you for spending time on a life imitating art or art imitating life he's ever you star trek yeah well thank you for the call 'em i want to apologize to the folks from northstar fireworks did call us back but are we were already midway through are congress's second part of our conversation with anthony cox so we're gonna try and get them back on the year at some point next week where david graham so i apologize that we were unable to get them on the year a this morning but 'em anthony i want to just give you an opportunity the dan from northfield called in and it was kind of piggybacking on the previous caller in saying that you know this is why we need to be doing this whether it's having these discussions and in offering these perspectives and we've covered a lot of that in the last few minutes i just wondered if you had any additional thoughts 'em yeah i think you know gene roddenberry created this 'em this part of the vulcan culture culture in star trek called it an end it stands for infinite diversity in infinite combinations and that is a very powerful thing and i think that it's something that you know even in the stories of star trek they sometimes forget a little bit but it's something that sticks wins star trek fan some end and we take that with us throughout are day improper wives and that's part of you know the philosophy that we believe in something that we are are trying to apply every single day and especially you know today andy and i i think that you know if if you're if anybody out there is a star trek fan or isn't i you know i can't recommend watching star trek enough because there are these messages there are these conversations that they have in the shows that that make you think about things in in in different ways and the really great episodes are ones aren't preachy there ones that presented situation they a they resolve the situation within the show but then they leave you with questions or was a you know a way of thinking that you can apply to something that's happening in their own life and sometimes those personal issues and sometimes those are greater a social issues but there's usually something in there that you can you can use to think about something in the real world in a different way great 'em we have a caller from out of state steve from dairy new hampshire steve how're you steiber you there all right steve must have bailed on us 'em i think you got this is jimmy buried hey you all of a sudden you got louder no that's even better people love it when i get louder hey jim in berry how're you today hey you're looking at a mile hey the all over the place reacting to the different caller is my my nose interests were cheering from hardware call was i had just been thinking along the same line text them and then i said to myself you know but you're always.

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"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Back to the dave ramsey show i'm steve pappas i'm filling in for dave grand today my second guest is 'em on available at the moment so were actually gonna continue our conversation with anthony cox who is 'em has a podcast that is about star trek tony thanks for coming back thanks for having me back yeah no problem that it was just i was just remarketing marking to u v attacks that went by too fast and we we didn't even get a cover a lot of the things we were hoping the talk about but i'm going to put you back on on the hot seat engaged talk a little bit about 'em we talked about fandom in we were talking a bit about the podcasting i'm interested to know 'em in this whole kind of expansion of things where he idea that tearing tino may be wanting to be involved in others you know big name folks have want it to be involved in by the way lots of stars have appeared in star trek over the years because they're crazy fans of it as well they they they clamor for it but i i'm interested to know when you were rattling off all the different podcasts that are out there kind of supporting this discussion 'em it is it i mean it's almost like it's creating this and um you were talking about the time line that the the time line for this whole thing that it's become almost an education almost a religion almost i mean i don't know i don't quite know how you characterize it but 'em kind of what is the depths of this thing in how you know how connect keeps sustaining itself at this level it sounds like if studios are trained by each other up so the bacon keep the franchise going it's strong yeah absolutely i i tend to think of star trek an end the marvel universe star wars as modern day mythology you know that's kind of how i approach it is that they're these they're these cautionary tales of of some of these characters that are that are larger than life these these grandiose are types that are there to help teach as a guide us you know through life that's that's how i kind of see this this modern day pop culture phenomenon 'em as far as you know star trek itself there's you're right there's a timeline there's there's you know there's these interconnected stories that literally span hundreds of years within its own universe first and then it had movies that created a whole separate timeline you know of of a of a fence and things and an end looking at different a character is differently from a different weapons so one way to sustain it is to go beyond you know his star trek discovery actually takes place the first two seasons take place after the original pilot episode the cage in star trek the original series in the first three and the and the three seasons of star trek the original series so it kind of alleged itself in there which was difficult for some fans to accept because style is so different 'em be a instead extra so different the way they tell stories special effects all that stuff is typical production quality the production a design so one way to do that is you can pull it to the end of that time line so for and star trek card is taking place after everything else we've seen in star trek as far as the timeline goes so now they're they're not locked into any 'em pre existing event that happened after their story right a b other thing is that 'em in in smartly they've created a twenty five year gap right from from the time that next generation ended to this new series right so they could actually win something else in there too if they needed to exactly exactly and and the one of the reasons they did that is simply because it has been twenty years since a patrick stewart has played john card right and so where were able to see an end that shows gonna be very different that's not gonna be the typical star trek flying around in the ship the type of thing it's gonna be more contemplate of it's gonna be a more retrospective introspective to the character of cards and in fact one of the reasons why patrick stewart agreed the comeback this was that he he knows that star trek represents a positive future ands he's heard from fans in the past that no matter how hard of a day they have no matter what they see during the day they can come home and put on an episode of star trek and they know that the world is gonna be a better place and so he won't an end in you know in for today that's an important message is that no matter how hard it is today as long as we keep going forward forward towards you know what we hope to be weakened make it you know we could.

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"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

16:08 min | 2 years ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Monday with a brand new episode and so just being able to come home and sort of you know relax from the from the school day and watch star trek before dinner timer whatever it just you know it created so many young fans because of that time slot and that's actually what the original series dead in the in the early seventies that's how you know we got so many star trek fans and i'll i'll take i'll take truckee i'll take tracker whatever you wanna call me all right well we have a caller on the line michelle from plainfield a thanksgiving in scope mcquaid mcquaid to figure today i so i i was too old church star trek i when i watched kept a new video and it's just it's on tv and i'm wondering just listening to you but i look i have loved a science fiction stuff i i'm wondering where would you get the star trek now like if i want to the steroid at the beginning and watch star trek where would i find that and a say so if off there okay thank you for the call michelle tony where do you where do you start from the beginning end you know maybe the broader question of you know is is is there something that's comparable comparable 'em so the easiest place i find is netflix netflix has all of be television shows a except for the newest one a star trek discovery they have of the original series the animated series b next generation deep space nine of wager on there also i believe the only source to get your original pilot episode the cage from a from t o s m i believe who also so has it in a cbs all access which is a paid service which another paid service from cbs owns the star trek television rights has all the episodes as well so as far as a non payment digital service this 'em usually you know cable channels like bbc america or you know i believe inside fi or 'em a some of those sort of like second tier cable networks a usually run them in you know in reruns quite often 'em an end even do by marathons on holidays you were talking earlier about how it this early exposure to this particular show when in your kitchen his next generation really kind of 'em formulated your value system in an end it allowed you to sit with your family and enjoy the show it is that i mean that in a lot of people say that that is is kind of the connection that they want to be able to make with the show still in yet it seems it almost seems foreign 'em that a shokhin keep or a franchise king keep reinventing itself in a way that they continue to build an audience that is multi generational at an end over end over end do you find that the there that's unique or that there were other shows out there that are kind of a drawing people in in that same group because i mean i don't even wanna guess at this point i'm not enough of a of a sociologist to just play one on tv and know how many generations of star trek there are now but this is a big big number of people who really believe that this show makes a difference yeah absolutely v i think v sort of television watching culture has has changed dramatically over the last five years we now have binge worthy shows right that's the big work in binge this binge that an also it's more 'em serialized storytelling right we don't really have episodic you know the character is beginning episode episode in the same place you know and that was a big thing back in the day especially star track was they wanted to be as episodic as possible because cousin syndication well we don't really have syndication too much anymore now everybody gets most of their entertainment from a paid streaming service so they do a lot of the bingewatching and in fact the newest integration of star trek star trek discovery is eight binge double one story per season serialize art of a shell androids that has definitely brought in people who are more used to be stranger things m b m b a game of thrones that kind of you know where the show is either released all at once or it's released weekly but digitally 'em an end allows you to experience the story sort of this long form story so start checking definitely now a you know what sort of morphing itself into that and i think that's one of the reasons why it it has a sustained for so long is that the producers usually look around what everyone else is doing and say okay how come we apply that to are star trek stories now stranger things has a certain fan base hand anything game of thrones has a deep fan base 'em they don't have conventions they don't have fans like star trek has what what is it that that makes people who watch star trek who are really into it feel like they they have the have that connection to it i mean it's it's been going on again fifty two years and you know wildly original series is popular 'em it has really taken off into something else and it's it's not just the universe but it's it's kind of a lifestyle people absolutely 'em you know it's interesting because star trek really created sort of the blueprint for a geek fandom an you even even in even the terms of years slash fiction a is is called slash fiction because of kirk slash bach that would be original slash friction 'em you look at turns like mary sue the term mary sue comes from eight star trek fans sick about this about this enter named mary sue enterprise 'em conventions like pop culture conventions started in the seventies with star trek a an i think i think why why star trek fans an end in that sense to i'm gonna news many other star franchise here 'em star wars is because there's at its core at at each of their course there is a belief system you know in star trek it's b b ideals deals of the federation 'em it's be you know ideals that a way to solve problems together 'em and it's something that you couldn't really lip by you know in star wars you know you know the jetta i you know their their philosophies and whatnot and i think that 'em you know fans get so crazy in so into this stuff because it's literally something that we can apply in our wives on a daily basis and i'm not you know stranger things or game of thrones you could really apply you know that core message from those shows into your daily life i think it's really it's really a philosophy and and and in a way of life that makes it so 'em integral to our wives this is my guest this half hour is anthony cox who is the co host of priority one which is a a star trek podcast that now has spanning in its in its eighth year with more than four hundred episodes recordings is that correct i yes yeah we a we started 'em a win a there's a a an online game a and m m l about star trek a cop start drinking wine that started over nine years ago and the podcast initially started as sort of a companion to that a further news and emperor like you know tips and tricks but it's volved into sort of a weekly news roundup in both star trek universe a end of a game star trek gaming in general so end were on roddenberry podcast network which is actually run by gene roddenberry son rod rod married and we're amongst some great podcasts including women at work which is eight feminist take on the star trek universe on the track files with a doctor track larry number check who dives into gene roddenberry is personal volta files an outrage memos and discusses a you know the the behind the scenes aspects of a decrease in star trek 'em you have a daily news a program now offers daily star trek news that's how big star trek is coming back right now on and we also aj a podcast called mission laud where where you guys watch every episode of star trek and discuss the messages the morals of the meanings 'em starting from the very beginning and going all the way through to all movies an dumb in a and everything wow now that is a universe right there 'em well we have a caller dug in plainfield doug how're you today are very well i actually know so some people that are a huge fan base is certain organize it absolutely love star trek that's the united states navy they charge it just future navy well that would kind of makes sense because of the structure of of i mean i'm i'm gonna be honest i'm not in star trek but you have to go point some why why all my made were walking star trek yeah well thanks for the call doug 'em tony the structure of the the hierarchy on star trek is very much in akin to usa navy end end while it's not a show necessarily about the military it's more about exploration of both ideas in in in planets and things 'em it there is a structure there that's familiar yeah absolutely yeah in june june is a big fan of of you know of of supporting the military and i mean he was a he was a a vet himself and you know that's why the ships called the enterprise you know if it's it's it's based after the namesake of aircraft carrier and also he you know she'd like to like to think of starfleet as morell like the coastguard but there's definitely that you know the the naval type ranks and the end the military structure of it that a hierarchy the command structure an down you could definitely see the influence of his support for armed services in in the show you were talking before about how it's gaining in popularity to the point where you're actually able to produce daily news out of this what kinds of things you're talking about i mean they're they're they're i i've heard in and others say the you know there's talk of more films maybe an are rated star trek film coming out like what what kind of things are we talking about here a so so right now where a star trek discovery a was used a kind of launch cbs is streaming service cbs all access and it was a huge success rhythm huge success a and because of that they're they're now developing more shows are not just for that streaming service but also for other things we have confirmed we have the next show coming out which is actually filming right now is star trek the card which is the return of capital charlotte card from star trek the next generation also in development is any star trek show based be a clint that stein secret organization within the federation called section thirty one which is sort of thing is you know a lot of star trek fans like the debate whether or not that type of organization station has a place in star trek but i think it creates a conversation a win within the star trek ideals that you could have in the show there's also an animated series coming called star trek lower deck's that is a firm of dv runners of.

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"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"anthony cox" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Is friday july fifth two thousand in nineteen sixty pappas sitting in for dave ram today hope everyone had happy independence day a we have a really great show for you today if not a bit eclectic maybe 'em later this hour we're gonna be talking with tom swenson of northstar fireworks and he's montpellier about just how busy this time of year really is for them and 'em seems only apropos giving the week in our second hour we're going to be joined by berry native chris bowen who has gone on to be creative director writer in a performer with blue man group 'em that's the highly acclaimed claimed in very popular show that has been touring around the nation but cut its roots in new york city and chris has been a big part of that for about twenty years now but we're gonna kick off the show 'em kind of kicking out a my guest is anthony cox who is co host of priority one are roddenberry star trek podcast he is probably without question 'em an expert on the star trek universe 'em in a he's also a friend of mine so from his home in the catskills welcome anthony cox hello good morning and a and a thank you for having me yeah well it's a pleasure 'em it's funny i know you is tony the podcast world knows you as anthony so if i regressed i apologize as long as you don't call me by one of the names that you know me by so we were just gonna keep going hey let's talk first about what it's been fifty two almost fifty three years since star tracked went on the air a b original star trek obviously in that universe has grown into so many different incarnations in it's not just shows it's it's it's kind of a multitude of things in you know people relate now to the marvel universe in a certain way but that star trek universe has been there for a very long time what is it about star trek that that kind of transcendence time in in in makes people connect yeah it's interesting that you mentioned the marvel universe because a lot of people learn all about the the connected university they've created when in fact you know star trek did that in the eighties when when they created the next generation and then there was the spinoff shows and i think one of the one of the main reasons and probably v main reason that star trek has continue to exist and be at the forefront of our culture alive is the message the gene roddenberry the creator of star trek was saying when he created the original series and that was that there is hope for the future that humanity e is not necessarily just just what we see in the world today where you know war on poverty and and all of the the negative negative things that the humanity is credit but it's also a you know gene gene was a real humanist and he believed that human beings could ascend to more than than what we see every day you know people think that aliens built the pyramids and in gene deleting now with humans humans have ingenuity and an ambition and and so i think it's a real hope that message of hope the future and doing it together who wears infinite diversity in combinations is really what's what's kept it going office i well and i'm glad you mentioned diversity because a huge part of the message throughout star trek has always been diversity intolerance tolerance and you know it always feels like at a certain point in history wherever we happen to be whether it's you know politically or just in crisis because of war or whatever happens to be you can always fall back on that end in understand those messages are are there in the there are solutions and might be in science fiction but there they have created worlds that offer solutions that we probably ought to be trying a little harder to achieve she get to right absolutely it's it's interesting because when when gene created the first pilot episode of star trek it was called the cage and it did not have william shatner the in fact it didn't have any of the cast members that we now think of from the original series except for leonard nimoy spock andy he had a woman as the first officer m m a r a and then when they showed be a pilot to be nbc executives at the time one of their complaints was mileage to surrey bros ukrainians to thinking and also a woman would never ascend to that level of a wreck on in mill organization so then gene went back to the drawing board and he said okay well if that's it's how you feel but i'm gonna put an african american officer as the officer who's in charge of all communications on the ship i'm gonna put in asian in charge of driving the shipping and taking it where he needs to go i'm gonna have a scottish engineer 'em in season two they added 'em into checkup as weapons officer a russian during you know this wasn't this is in nineteen sixty seven you know at at you know one of the one of the pinnacle moments of the cold war an end conflict conflict with russia so he he you almost it was almost because of their their arrogance and their bigotry that that we got the diversity of show a that we know.

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