35 Burst results for "Anthony Bourdain"

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:36 min | 11 months ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"As a child of immigrants herself has a deep connection to these stories and the people who are telling them and i think it's a really special food series if that is even remotely your bag and if you're interested in anthony bourdain presumably it is so it's on hulu The first season came out last summer. And i believe there is a second season on the way which i am very much looking forward to the i. Love food shows and Banos a a significantly better house than than katie. Joel i think was the first. Was it the first season the first and second. Gosh yeah yeah. I could see a bit of an upgrade there and she. She's terrific and the in has that same spirit and i. It's good to see that that kind of perspective on world cuisine did not end with boarding there. Many people on television who take kind of same have that curiosity and passion in may not be out of it. Yes very much so No about what's been good for you. I want a second takes the nation which i have seen in a favorite of mine. Tv show as well is coming to amazon. At the end of the month. July thirtieth. It's a three part series. It is written and directed by emily mortimer and adaptation of nancy mitford's novel pursuit of love Which is about the whole bright young things era in great britain between the worse when a lot of people were trying to young women were still going through the old courtship rituals of jane austen era. But we're also going to university and trying to engage with the world more and dealing with the patriarchy It's very cinematic. It reminds me a lot of west anderson in. It's the way it's composed and sofia coppola. There's kind of a new wave soundtrack that runs through it even though it set in the twenties and thirties star. Jane's and emily beecham and together. The reports are about the length of the prestige feature drama film. So i'm going to say at the movie. Three pursuit of love. I definitely toyed with recommending a series. That is six half hour episodes but the justification of it's the length of movie so i definitely support that logic. We're we're here to rage tv. Critics claiming claimed things for film so anyway. That's on amazon july thirty. That's when debuts scott yes so i was on hulu is looking for some Things to watch for this double feature thing. I do for the times and and I came across the film. Cheap thrills Which is made i think. Two thousand fourteen. The indie horror film. Indie horror comedy. That i really liked a lot at the time. And i watched i kind of started watching it again and got immediately hooked by it. This is a film directed by el cats stars. Pat healy as a guy. I mean this is established. Really quickly in the in the in the film which i which i love how it's very it's eighty five minutes long. This is not an ounce of fat on it. He works auto mechanic. He's about to get evicted. He has his wife and a child is about forty five hundred bucks short of where he needs to be and He's being he goes to ask his boss for a raise in in before he can do that. He's told that they don't need any longer. He's laid off and so rather than go home. He goes to a bar tries to drink troubles away and ends up encountering old high school buddy and the two of them..

nancy mitford hulu anthony bourdain Banos west anderson emily beecham emily mortimer amazon Joel katie sofia coppola jane austen great britain Pat healy Jane scott
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"And i don't necessarily mean this as a put down but like the first two thirds of this movie. Feel like like a cnn special. You know feels like something that would have aired in the months after his death on. Cnn is sort of a remembrance. You now But then once it gets into sort of grappling with his his final days it becomes something else and i don't think what it becomes a successful. I i have to say. I i have a much. More charitable assessment of both the man and the film. I'm a loved. Anthony bourdain don pretty much unreservedly. I did your kitchen. Confidential is a book. I i loved..

cnn Anthony bourdain
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Front Burner

"About how to actually address the consequences around to fix.

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Front Burner

"True. It's just not their actual face.

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Front Burner

"From cbc podcasts and the fifth estate brainwashed is a multi part investigation into the cia experiments in mind control from the cold war and m. k. Ultra to the so called war on terror. We learn about a psychiatrist who used his patients as human guinea pigs. And what happens when the military and medicine collide. Listen to brainwashed on the cbc. Listen up or wherever you get your podcast. This is a cbc podcast. Hi jamie when anthony bourdain fans heard the food rockstar would be back in our lives for a few moments with story being shared in this new documentary roadrunner. It was pretty exciting so many people were shocked when he died in two thousand eighteen and this was a chance to see him again. So how was this food related but that was quickly overshadowed with questions over whether the filmmaker morgan neville went to far here. Roadrunner was released last week and his faced a lot of criticism sense specifically for a moment in the film where anthony bourdain reads his own email. You were successful. And i'm successful. Am wondering are you happy. That's because he didn't read the email at least not out loud that moment and two others. The documentary were the product of an a technology known as deep fake which uses algorithms to make synthetic copy of somewhere. And if you just watch the movie you might not have even noticed. The audience discovered that only because he had an interview with helen. Rosner at the new yorker and helen asked him. How did you got this audio of this e mail. And then he revealed it in the. And that's karen house. She's a senior editor at the mit tech review. He specializes in a i in deep fakes in today's episode. She's joining me to talk about the ethics of this technology and the risks for how we perceive our own reality. Hey karen thanks for taking the time today. Hi jamie thank you so much for having me. What was your reaction when you first heard Like a essentially that that that his voice is being faked in this documentary. I guess the the documentary itself was very transparent about it. My first reaction was honestly you. Oh wow we now. Finally have example of this technology in the mainstream. Because i've been writing about it for a while but a lot of people don't know that it exists and it isn't widely used so i was like wow my like the thing that i've been writing about has finally made it into pop culture but then the immediately second thought was ono what what has never done like this. Technology is It's it's just inherently controversial and experts who've been studying it and people who have been writing about it for a long time have been talking about the ethics of it for quite a while and whether or not he knew that effectively it was ignored in the decisions that he made and so it sort of ended up introducing a really large chunk of the public to this technology and a pretty negative way. clearly ordained didn't get a chance to actually consent to this Later on never clarified that he had gotten consent from the ordain estate. So you could argue. Maybe that that that quiet things. But i think people in general fell really off put by that and then the second thing is that he didn't disclose it. He wasn't up front with it. We would have never learned about had helen. Roger not asks the question so it makes people start to doubt what are other things that i've heard that i thought were real but we're actually fake and they just no-one taught to tell me we're did deep fake technology Actually originate do we know the first instance of it. So we know that defects came from a set of algorithms that are known as generative adversarial networks and thought category of our was actually invented by this guy named good fellow and at the time he was actually trying to figure out how to make images how to make computers better generating images and the like folk tale around him. Coming up with this idea was he was a bar and was sketching out some ideas about how to create this algorithm on a napkin and then it ended up being like this really successful technology at least for his particular use case but then what happened was artificial intelligence community open sources most of their research and so someone took that open source code And then started using it in pornography and started posting that pornography on read it And that's actually why we call it. T fakes today is because that reddit. Users username was fakes. Oh interesting so for a while. Technology had like a pretty bad reputation but over time. It's gotten a little bit more professionalized so at least with Video which is a bit more advanced then fake audio. One of the more exciting uses has been documentary. That came out last year called welcome to chechnya to ask you about alleged abduction and torture of gay and the republicans where deep faces were used to conceal the identity of the whistle blowers that were portrayed in the film because they were trying to tell their story but at great risk of telling their story and the director made the decision to use technology to allow their authenticity and their expressions to maintain to To be retained but to have them portrayed with a different face. When i learned from them that i did not yet understand was that they knew that they were being hunted around the globe. And if it were known that they were alive that even by members of their family that that would put their lives in risk no matter where they landed even if they landed in toronto in paris or berlin and so i promised them that i would find some way to cover them up and doing not case the documentary filmmaker chose to disclose it to the audience and explain why he had made that choice and then with every character that had the d. thick face he actually Left a little bit of a halo shimmering effect around their face as a visual cue to people that. Hey this person.

anthony bourdain morgan neville cbc helen karen house jamie Rosner guinea cia ono karen Roger reddit chechnya berlin toronto paris
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Reset

Reset

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Reset

"So. Let's start with the people behind the documentary. Who are they. The director of roadrunner is morgan novel and most people might have run into his work previously from. Won't you be my neighbor. The documentary about mister rogers. That a lot of people saw a few years ago he also made twenty feet from stardom. One thing i really have always appreciated about morgan's work is that he's really good at finding the cultural significance of particular figures or particular events and turning them into a film that is really enjoyable to watch does never achieve that effect in his latest project. I think he does. I think that for the most part. This film is very successful. You are watching anthony. Board danes life. he kind of appears onscreen at first as a chef as an adult. So we don't spend a lot of time slogging through background story. And then we learn a lot about him through just watching video of him of course his thousands and thousands of hours video because he made these tv shows and he was widely beloved for his. His travel shows differential lovely italians on one side but the terrifying swiss on the other there close to close for me. A man with a neurotic childhood fear of alpine vistas yodeling. Even cheese with holes. we also get b. Roll and archival and backgrounds video. That helps build out a bigger impression of who anthony bourdain really was it also leads to one of the more questionable about this documentary. So what is the thing. That's raising eyebrows. So there's really two things. One of them has nothing to do with ai. It's more the treatment of our gento who was Ordains girlfriends And they broke up not long before he died by suicide in two thousand eighteen. But the other piece of this and it kind of only emergent interviews right as the film was being released is that there's actually small bits of the film where you think you're listening to ordain speaking but it turns out what you're actually listening to is an ai. Recreation of his voice reading things that he had written down so they're not making him say things he never thought or words he never put in that order but they were able to use hours and hours of recordings from his tv show. Podcasts audiobooks ends in artificial intelligence engine and turn it into board danes voice so they're not faking the text but they are faking his voice and that could seem sort of creepy because he never recorded that right exactly and in reality it might be kind of been all in this case. It's certainly something that he wrote something. He thought Although you could argue that maybe intonations wouldn't necessarily match up But also it's a bigger problem overall because as soon as you kind of open the pandora's box which arguably has been open for a long time but once you do it in a sanctions space like documentary. People feel like they've been lied to and with good reason right. Seems a bit like fake technology where you create a video out of archival footage and make someone do something that they never did. Is this the first time studios have used technology in these sort of ethical grey areas. So obviously not right like the movies are always showing us things that don't actually exist or creating things. That never really happens. The difference with documentaries is that there is this. I guess i would think of it as a contract between the documentarian and the audience And the contract. Says i'm going to show you stuff and to the best of my ability. I am not going to manipulate you by tweaking. It so that it's inauthentic or lying or you know sort of portraying things. That aren't true of course. Every documentary includes things like editing. You decide what goes in and goes out. You can compress time. You can recreate things. Everyone does this. We're quite used to it. But there's still this presumption on the part of the audience that everything in documentary is one hundred percent true. That's not actually true. But it is the presumption we have right. And this is a little further along on the spectrum of that exactly and so what we do with. This is that we present something that literally didn't exist and say this did exist and then when people hero it didn't exist then suddenly they're going to call into question not just that choice but every single other thing that they've seen in the film you know other ways that it's been used in film for instance i think of the star wars films. So carrie fisher. And peter cushing have both passed away but they both portray pivotal characters in those films and so disney chose to recreate them You know in some cases to like basically reanimate their image and have them speak lines and essentially play part that they weren't there to play your host transmission. We received what does it. They've sent us. Hope we the audience know that these actors are gone. But i do think about maybe a hundred years from now. Someone watching star wars film might not realize that. That wasn't the real person playing that part and this has also been used outside of studios and more nefarious ways. The sort of technology right absolutely. Yeah and you know one really scary thing about the fake is that it keeps getting better and better really quickly. So it's been used to create sexual images of celebrities or revenge porn Certainly people are worried about. Its use in the future in politics right now. You watch a video of someone saying something you're pretty sure they said it But that trust has been slipping away and at some point we may totally lose the ability to distinguish between reality and not reality in that can destabilise economies that could star wars. That could elect horrible people to office impossible. This technology is still pretty new. And it's not quite perfect but obviously it's causing a lot of debate and backlash how have critics and viewers reacted to nevels decision to use ai. To bring bourdain back to life in a sense so the fact that this had happened had come up in an interview With morgan novel the helen rosner did in the new yorker and he sort of tossed it off as like. You didn't even realize it had happened. It was a seamless transition and a lot of people of course as soon as this quote hit twitter. Got very angry about it Some people are just uncomfortable with that technology being used. Some people wondered like would ordain have wanted this what they would. This have been acceptable to him Neville push back and said you know. I checked with the stay. I checked with his widow ends. They said that it was something that he would be fine with. She pushed back on that as well. So there's been some kind of back and forth about this story. What would anthony bourdain have wanted. What is acceptable for him. em for some critics including myself honestly. The frustrating part isn't even so much the use of this. Hey i understand that this is an email that what i'm hearing is a voice narrating an email. I understand the subject is gone. That's the whole point of the documentary. But i want something to tell me that. That's what i'm listening to and there's different ways to do this. We could put a no on screen. Could even be a notice before after the film that in some cases we have recreated anthony ordains voice so that he can read texts. He wrote down if i had known that going in. I would have a different impression of when i'm watching it. And i think for me and for a lot of people it's not even so much about this particular instance it's just about Very successful documentarian. Setting a precedent. That could be used in ways. That could be much more troubling in the future right. So do you think we'll continue to see the sort of technology this sort of. Ai re-creations in movies going forward. It's hard to imagine that we won't right and again. That's that's deeply troubling. One would hope that documentarian who often are very concerned with ethics And with truth would put notices up would inform people when they're going to use this. You know it makes sense that you might want to for storytelling filmmaking purposes. But we want to know that. That's what's happening in a documentary But it's equally possible and even likely that for instance. A polemical documentary made about a political issue might fake a politician or a scholar or pundits saying something and then the people who watch that who are already kind of inclined to believe that this person might say this thing would then believe it as if it is true indus could cause all kinds of problems. And that's really what we're up against. Thanks for joining us. Elissa thank you and thank you for listening to rico daily. My name is ronny mullah. This episode was produced by ellen. Rodriguez espinosa and engineered by paul muncie. Let us know what you wanna learn more about email us at recode daily at recode dot net if e commerce business this ad might change everything for you and i'm not just saying that but if you ever scrolled wistfully do incredible marketing. Emails and texts from major brands and wonder quietly allowed. What sort of magic does these guys sprinkling over their communications. I'm gonna let you in on a major secret. They're probably using flavio. Clave you'll take the mystery out of email and sms marketing offering all you marketers entrepreneurs and creators out their data driven automated platform. You need to create authentic relationships with your customers like a top tier brand. Say goodbye to blessing. Vague newsletters to an entire massive faceless. People combine your customer data with a smart marketing platform like flavio. And you'll engage every customer one on one like they're. You're only customer engagement like this bills valuable relationships that make you money. If you're the creator of e brand you need a platform. That houses as hard as you do clovio unlocks the power your e commerce data so you can personalize automate messages. That keep customers coming back to get started with a free trial of clovio. Visit clovio dot com slash fox. That's k. l. e. v. i. y. o. dot com slash fox..

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Reset

Reset

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Reset

"To bring bourdain back to life in a sense so the fact that this had happened had come up in an interview With morgan novel the helen rosner did in the new yorker and he sort of tossed it off as like. You didn't even realize it had happened. It was a seamless transition and a lot of people of course as soon as this quote hit twitter. Got very angry about it Some people are just uncomfortable with that technology being used. Some people wondered like would ordain have wanted this what they would. This have been acceptable to him Neville push back and said you know. I checked with the stay. I checked with his widow ends. They said that it was something that he would be fine with. She pushed back on that as well. So there's been some kind of back and forth about this story. What would anthony bourdain have wanted. What is acceptable for him. em for some critics including myself honestly. The frustrating part isn't even so much the use of this. Hey i understand that this is an email that what i'm hearing is a voice narrating an email. I understand the subject is gone. That's the whole point of the documentary. But i want something to tell me that. That's what i'm listening to and there's different ways to do this. We could put a no on screen. Could even be a notice before after the film that in some cases we have recreated anthony ordains voice so that he can read texts. He wrote down if i had known that going in. I would have a different impression of when i'm watching it. And i think for me and for a lot of people it's not even so much about this particular instance it's just about Very successful documentarian. Setting a precedent. That could be used in ways. That could be much more troubling in the future right. So do you think we'll continue to see the sort of technology this sort of. Ai re-creations in movies going forward. It's hard to imagine that we won't right and again. That's that's deeply troubling. One would hope that documentarian who often are very concerned with ethics And with truth would put notices up would inform people when they're going to use this. You know it makes sense that you might want to for storytelling filmmaking purposes. But we want to know that. That's what's happening in a documentary But it's equally possible and even likely that for instance. A polemical documentary made about a political issue might fake a politician or a scholar or pundits saying something and then the people who watch that who are already kind of inclined to believe that this person might say this thing would then believe it as if it is true indus could cause all kinds of problems. And that's really what we're up against..

helen rosner bourdain anthony ordains anthony bourdain Neville morgan twitter
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Reset

Reset

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Reset

"This week we got a new documentary looking back at the life of late. Chef and writer anthony boarding. These are still coming in. But there's one part of film that's raising eyebrows. there's a moment of the fillmore. David show an artist and friend and board anes starts to read aloud. An email from the chef then fades into anthony's voice. But here's the thing. Anthony bourdain never read that email. His voice in scene was recreated with ai. By the film's producers. The technique is ethically questionable and has started a conversation around how media continues to portray those who've passed away joining me as elissa wilkinson boxes film critic. She recently reviewed the documentary. Eliza thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me so. Let's start with the people behind the documentary. Who are they. The director of roadrunner is morgan novel and most people might have run into his work previously from. Won't you be my neighbor. The documentary about mister rogers. That a lot of people saw a few years ago he also made twenty feet from stardom. One thing i really have always appreciated about morgan's work is that he's really good at finding the cultural significance of particular figures or particular events and turning them into a film that is really enjoyable to watch does never achieve that effect in his latest project. I think he does. I think that for the most part. This film is very successful. You are watching anthony. Board danes life. he kind of appears onscreen at first as a chef as an adult. So we don't spend a lot of time slogging through background story. And then we learn a lot about him through just watching video of him of course his thousands and thousands of hours video because he made these tv shows and he was widely beloved for his. His travel shows differential lovely italians on one side but the terrifying swiss on the other there close to close for me. A man with a neurotic childhood fear of alpine vistas yodeling. Even cheese with holes. we also get b. Roll and archival and backgrounds video. That helps build out a bigger impression of who anthony bourdain really was it also leads to one of the more questionable about this documentary. So what is the thing. That's raising eyebrows. So there's really two things. One of them has nothing to do with ai. It's more the treatment of our gento who was Ordains girlfriends And they broke up not long before he died by suicide in two thousand eighteen. But the other piece of this and it kind of only emergent interviews right as the film was being released is that there's actually small bits of the film where you think you're listening to ordain speaking but it turns out what you're actually listening to is an ai. Recreation of his voice reading things that he had written down so they're not making him say things he never thought or words he never put in that order but they were able to use hours and hours of recordings from his tv show. Podcasts audiobooks ends in artificial intelligence engine and turn it into board danes voice so they're not faking the text but they are faking his voice and that could seem sort of creepy because he never recorded that right exactly and in reality it might be kind of been all in this case. It's certainly something that he wrote something. He thought Although you could argue that maybe intonations wouldn't necessarily match up But also it's a bigger problem overall because as soon as you kind of open the pandora's box which arguably has been open for a long time but once you do it in a sanctions space like documentary. People feel like they've been lied to and with good reason right. Seems a bit like fake technology where you create a video out of archival footage and make someone do something that they never did. Is this the first time studios have used technology in these sort of ethical grey areas. So obviously not right like the movies are always showing us things that don't actually exist or creating things. That never really happens. The difference with documentaries is that there is this. I guess i would think of it as a contract between the documentarian and the audience And the contract. Says i'm going to show you stuff and to the best of my ability. I am not going to manipulate you by tweaking. It so that it's inauthentic or lying or you know sort of portraying things. That aren't true of course. Every documentary includes things like editing. You decide what goes in and goes out. You can compress time. You can recreate things. Everyone does this. We're quite used to it. But there's still this presumption on the part of the audience that everything in documentary is one hundred percent true. That's not actually true. But it is the presumption we have right. And this is a little further along on the spectrum of that exactly and so what we do with. This is that we present something that literally didn't exist and say this did exist and then when people hero it didn't exist then suddenly they're going to call into question not just that choice but every single other thing that they've seen in the film you know other ways that it's been used in film for instance i think of the star wars films. So carrie fisher. And peter cushing have both passed away but they both portray pivotal characters in those films and so disney chose to recreate them You know in some cases to like basically reanimate their image and have them speak lines and essentially play part that they weren't there to play your host transmission. We received what does it. They've sent us. Hope we the audience know that these actors are gone. But i do think about maybe a hundred years from now. Someone watching star wars film might not realize that. That wasn't the real person playing that part and this has also been used outside of studios and more nefarious ways. The sort of technology right absolutely. Yeah and you know one really scary thing about the fake is that it keeps getting better and better really quickly. So it's been used to create sexual images of celebrities or revenge porn Certainly people are worried about. Its use in the future in politics right now. You watch a video of someone saying something you're pretty sure they said it But that trust has been slipping away and at some point we may totally lose the ability to distinguish between reality and not reality in that can destabilise economies that could star wars. That could elect horrible people to office impossible. This technology is still pretty new. And it's not quite perfect but obviously it's causing a lot of debate and backlash how have critics and viewers reacted to nevels decision to use ai..

anthony boarding Anthony bourdain elissa wilkinson anthony morgan gento ai mister rogers roadrunner Eliza David peter cushing carrie fisher disney nevels
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Was that leprechaun. Yes he he said something. What did he say. I don't know i was more focused. And how he was shattering my whole constructive. What's real and not real in the world. Because he was a freaking leprechaun this new six part apple. Tv plus series also features very strong turns by among others. Fred san and dove cameron the performances. The script by dario in paul the songs by paul the choreography by christopher guitar direction by sonnenfeld each element feeds off the others. Shmegegge dune is produced by lorne michaels of saturday night live and current cast members sesame. Strong and recent guest host keegan michael key. Really pull this off. Mega dune is being described as a parody. But it's a lot more sincere and complicated than that. Like such tongue in cheek broadway musical comedies. As the book of mormon and the producers. it's a lovely production. That's not only very very funny in making fun of the musical genre but also is a wonderful addition to it. They've been coolly as a professor of television studies at rohan university in new jersey on monday. Show writer akash. Kapur talks about utopias the impulse to build a better world and what happens when dreams crash against reality he was raised in an experimental community in india left for school in the us at age sixteen and later returned to raise his own family. His new book is better to have gone love. Death and the quest for utopia in ouro ville. I hope you can join us. Fresh air's executive producer is danny miller our technical director as audrey bentham with additional engineering. Support by joyce lieberman. Jim herzfeld and al banks are. Interviews and reviews are produced and edited by amy salad. Phyllis myers sam rigor lauren crendall heidi soman theresa madden and marie bolden auto. They've challenor seth kelly and kayla lattimore our associate producer of digital media. Is molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show for terry gross. I'm dave davies..

Fred san dove cameron christopher guitar sonnenfeld keegan michael key lorne michaels paul rohan university dario saturday night live ouro ville akash apple Kapur audrey bentham joyce lieberman Jim herzfeld al banks new jersey danny miller
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Ask a question. People tighten up was if you sit down with people who just say. Hey what makes you happy. What's your life like. What do you like to eat more often than not they will tell you extraordinary things many which have nothing to do with food. So yeah we've shot in Some pretty contentious pfeiffer shot in beirut during the war and and since congo gaza a post benghazi libya I'm not a journalist But i think it is useful as a as it addition to journalism to have seen what people are like in libya for instance i mean who are these people. We are talking about when we talk about benghazi or libya. Is it not useful to to see them with their kids to see how their lives their everyday lives are doing seemingly ordinary. Things are trying to do ordinary things to show what people actually live like in iran who may not support their government at all. What what ordinary people like it around we. We seem all too eager and willing to ignore those things. And i think in southern or a sub saharan africa in particular. We are seem to be so used to seeing people of color in these disastrous situations that we become inured and and and a callous So it's always useful to especially in africa. Say look you know th. They're our allies happening here. This is what's involved in getting water for the table. You know this is how nice people can be or how gentle or complicated or it just seems to me. The more you are able to show people's everyday lives often as they revolve around food and daily tasks when something happens in the news. You have a better idea who who were talking about here. Anthony bourdain. Thanks so much. It's been fun. thank you. Anthony bourdain recorded in two thousand sixteen road runner. The new documentary about board aimed opens in theaters. Today boarding took his own life three years ago in france when he was there to film an episode of his cnn. Travel show parts unknown coming up. David ben cooley reviews. Sh- meghan a new six part series on apple. Tv plus inspired by the broadway musical brigadier on this is fresh air. This message comes from npr sponsor sought via the comfort company. Sada was the first company to sell luxury mattresses online without the hassle or expensive traditional mattress stores so safa customers have always paid about fifty percent less than retail visit as double a. t. v. a. dot com slash. Npr today where npr listeners. Save an additional. Two hundred dollars sought via the comfort company support for this podcast and the following message. Come from marcus by goldman sachs. Who believes that you can money. Marcus by goldman sachs offers personal loans with no fees. Ever find out more about marcus by goldman sachs no fee personal loans as well as other products today at marcus dot com you can money lending and deposits products provided by goldman sachs bank. Usa member fdic today the streaming service apple tv plus premieres a new six part series. That's pretty unusual. It's a tv. Musical called sh- mega dune using the broadway musical briggstone as a launching point our tv critic david b. and.

libya Anthony bourdain pfeiffer benghazi beirut africa congo David ben cooley gaza iran npr goldman sachs Sada meghan safa cnn france marcus
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

"A short break. This is fresh air. Hi it's terry gross inviting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews and reviews. You can hear my interviews with people like david bowie. Aretha franklin johnny cash. John updike. Tony morrison searched for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at fresh air. Archive dot org. That's fresh air. Archive dot org. This is fresh air and today we're listening to our interview with food and travel journalist. Anthony bourdain who the subject of a new documentary which opens in theaters. Today bore dane died by suicide. Three years ago. I spoke to him in two thousand sixteen when he'd published a new cookbook called appetites. This is an interesting cookbook to look at and to read You right in it. There's nothing remotely innovative in the recipes. You you're lifting them from imperfect memories of childhood favorites. Why this kind of. Oh well i wanted to be useful. Approachable reflective of the life. I've lived over the past Eight or nine years as a father as opposed to a professional dazzle with the pretty pictures and food. That's different than everybody else's no. I wanted to make beautiful cookbook. Creative looking one spoken in honest straightforward casual terms that gives the reader reasonable expectations that encourages them to organize themselves. In the way that i've found to be useful as a professional. It's also reflective of i think age and all those years in the restaurant business most chefs. I know after work. Do not wanna go out to dinner. And be forced to think about what they're eating in a critical analytical way. They want to experience food as they did as children in an emotional way The pure pleasure of that bowl of spicy noodles or even a you know a bowl of soup that their mom gave him on a rainy day when they'd been bullied in school. I mean that's a happy time. When you can escape this world you know in. Lose yourself in food so these are recipes. That hopefully where i try to evoke those kinds of feelings and emotions. You reluctantly addressed the subject of breakfast as a professional. The smell of breakfast was the smell of defeat. Well you know. I do not have a particularly Prestigious are notable career and for much of the time as a chef unemployable by respectable businesses. And the only people who would hire me would hire me for brunch shifts because most cooks hated doing brunch. For for very good reasons. I was good at it but it was only work. I could get. And i came to hate the you know when you're cooking three hundred omelettes day you know scraping waffles out of the waffle iron and Making french toast pancakes. Cooking hundreds of pounds of home fries. Those smells Those associations those were very painful times. You know addiction post addiction. You know as a desperate man often working under a under a pseudonym. When i was cooking branch so i really hated it and i also hated the whole concept of branch later as a chef. I hated it because it was a huge profit center that caused problems for me as an employer. 'cause cooks hated to do it but it was such a money maker because people so far so foolishly. Happy to pay twenty two dollars for the same two eggs and bacon that they have during the week for seven dollars or even three dollars. You give him a free but most A little strawberry fan and suddenly they're happy to just utter contempt for the for the entire enterprise. All right so back to the cookbook. You tell about breakfast one of the things. I was shocked to read is you. Don't fry bacon you you put you cook it in the oven. Yeah i think it's a first of all it's nicer. I mean you know you. Stick up. The i live in an apartment in new york So frying bacon First of all. I was going to stick up the whole apartment second of all. It's really particularly if you're naked. Debra never fry baking naked. It's very dangerous business And it's just not the best way to evenly cook bacon we all like most of us like crispy bacon or at least evenly cooked the best way to do it in my experience. And the way we always did in restaurants was to lay it out on Baking parchment and put in the oven and cook patiently but evenly turning occasionally because there are hot spots in ovens. You get a much better product. Do you often cook naked. Well not now that have a nine year old around nope but prior to that experience. I did have some bacon related Nudity related injuries. That were were memorable pushing for discomfort. Yeah as you've traveled around the world so much and you love street food. But you've so you've seen kind of cheap authentically made food and you've seen a lot of poverty and what how people get by the. Has that made you less interested in high end dining. Yeah i think. I'm because a one hand i'm happiest inexperienced food in the most purely emotional way And it's true of most of my friends as well When it's like street food or a one chef one dish operation where it's just somebody who's really really good at one or two or three things that they've been doing for a very long time that's may reflective of their their their ethnicity their culture nationality. Those are the things that just make me happy And i'm i'm spoiled like a lot of fella chace we get a lot of fine wines and dinners thrown our way and you do reach this enviable point where you just don't wanna sit there for four hours with course after course after course it's too much first of all it. It doesn't feel good at the end of all that time. And it's not interesting and you don't want to you know if it's the waiters taking ten minutes to describe each dish you know. You only took three to eat it. Something's really wrong. I think people lose sight of the fact that that chefs should be ultimately in the pleasure. Business not in the look at me. Business You sometimes visit places where there are really contentious political issues You say you're not a journalist storyteller but you must think carefully about how you deal with that stuff. Well there's nothing actually more political food. I mean who's eating who's who's not eating Also it's i found it just very very useful to not a journalist. I mean journalists. Drop into a situation..

Aretha franklin johnny Tony morrison terry gross John updike Anthony bourdain david bowie dane Debra new york chace
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And that's from your series parts unknown. You know these are part travelogue part personal essay now a lot about food. This seemed really personal. What did you. Why did you want to go back to this. Little village in borneo for two after i kind of I think i wanted to see how things had changed. I think someone said some travel writer said that you what you really looking at when you travel is inward all the time I think a lot of ways the first time i went up that river the scratching river From kuching up to a e- bond longhouse in the jungle. I was heartbreaking. I was coming off of love affair. That did not pan out the way i had hoped I think in a lotta ways the motivation for show. The second one was the to see if it still hurt. You know to See how i felt So it was very personal. I thought i've to go right back to the same log house. Yes let's see. How did that community has changed Let's do a better job with better cinematography a A bringing to bear all of the things that i've learned and my crew has learned in in in the intervening years but really it was revisiting. An old wound to see if Was okay now. There's a moment in this Powerful scene in there. I mean in this episode where you're standing in the pouring rain with a spear in your hand you've been granted an honor by the village. Explain this well I think both times When i went to the both times that i went to the village as the guest of honor they kill a pig For the feasts. The whole village eats There's an equitable division of pig parts. it's a big deal But that i. I don't i don't think i'd ever killed an animal before. Been ordering them up as a chef over the phone so i was culpable in the death of many animals. But here i was being asked to physically plunge spear in the heart of a pig It seemed to me the height of hypocrisy however uncomfortable i might have been with that To to put it off on somebody else You know. I've been responsible for the death of any animals here. I'm being asked. I didn't want to let the team down. I didn't want to dishonor the The the the village Or embarrass anyone. I the first time Was very very very very difficult. My camera guys almost passed out. It was certainly very difficult for me. The second time as much as i'd like to say that it was still really hard At i think i said in the in the voice over I don't know what it says about me. Probably something very bad That i become have changed over time. I like to think in good ways for the most part. But i've also become more callous. I i've become able to plunge spear in the heart of a screening pig an live with that much more comfortably than i did. The first time and I could lie and say Ah tormented me forever of. And since. But i felt that ugly emotion or lack of it and i thought i should mention it. Yeah you said you did it this time without hesitation or remorse bill but it was a relief when the screaming stopped will yes dalwin. No good person likes to hear or see an animal and pay. That is monstrous. I mean i tried very hard to do a good job quickly Yeah exactly right Yet a memorable episode recently where he went to vietnam and you add. Can't remember whether you said this on an episode. Or whether i read it somewhere else. You said the world tilted for you in vietnamese rice farmers home. Yeah i think. The first time. I went to vietnam. I i just remember coming away from thinking i just. I have to have more of this. This is this is what i want to do with the rest of my life. Vietnam you want to be able to come back to vietnam again and again and again and if this place is so wonderful the world must be filled with many more wonderful and interesting and challenging heartbreaking and inspiring and beautiful places as it turned out to. But i really got that that the first time i went there i think i found myself sitting in a yeah. It was a rice farmers home in in the mai cong delta At the time they were a little suspicious of westerners with cameras so The people who i was allowed to eat dinner with were all former viet cong with impeccable revolutionary credentials. This sort of people who you would think would be hostile to america's particularly in that area where they caught a lot of ugly action Ah just hammered drunk and had this sort of wonderful bonding experience. I remember this the eighty five year Former viet cong. I asked him. Aren't you angry about anything. And he looked in with amiable contempt said look body base. Got it don't take yourself so seriously before you there were you know the french japanese chinese cambodian since you. There's been you know. I i've been fighting. This country's been fighting for six hundred years. Don't take it personally now. Drink and I just had this wonderful time in vietnam as a country that i go back to at every opportunity meaning as soon as i can make another show getting away with making another show there I do anthony. Bourdain recorded in two thousand sixteen board. Who took his own life in two thousand. Eighteen is the subject of a new documentary by filmmaker. Morgan neville it's called roadrunner at it opens in theaters. Today we'll hear more of our interview after a break and david in cooley. We'll review the new apple. Tv plus series schmidt geduhn starring keegan. Michael key incessantly strong. I'm dave davies. Man this is fresh air investigations into police use of force and misconduct. Where secret in california. Until now we've sifted through hours of interrogation tape to find out who the system of police accountability really served. and who does it protect. Listen now to every episode of the new podcast on our watch from npr and kick qe. Today we're listening to my interview with chef writer and tv host anthony bourdain who is the subject of a new documentary which opens in theaters. Today borden killed himself three years ago in france where he was filling an episode of his cnn series parts unknown i spoke with more dane in two thousand sixteen about his life travels and a new cookbook he published. I want to listen to another clip As we said the show is part personal essay. It's part about travel in the countries and about food and this is a moment in your trip to borneo before you go up the river. Were you sit down noodle.

vietnam dalwin borneo Morgan neville viet cong dave davies america cooley keegan anthony apple anthony bourdain david Michael npr california borden dane cnn france
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Dave davies in for terry gross. Three years ago the celebrated chef writer tv host. Anthony bourdain took his own life in france while there to film an episode of his tv series. Parts unknown on cnn now. His life is the subject of a new documentary. Titled road runner. It's directed by oscar winning filmmaker. Morgan neville who also made. Won't you be my neighbor and twenty feet from stardom. Before becoming one of the world's best known food and travel journalists bourdain spent decades in the restaurant. Business becoming the chef in what he described as a working class brasserie in new york then he discovered he had a gift for writing and storytelling. He wrote a best selling book kitchen confidential then several others eventually. He found television hosting two series on the travel channel before launching. Parts unknown on cnn. The show took viewers to places all over the world exploring local cultures and cuisine and offering bore danes. Unique commentary on the experience a memorable episode found him eating six dollar bowl of noodles with president. Barack obama and vietnam borden was also a guy who tell you what he thinks which led to some public battles with others in the food world. I spoke to anthony bourdain in two thousand sixteen when he'd published a cookbook called appetites if focused more on family meals than professional cooking because at the time he was the father of a nine year old. Well anthony bourdain welcome to fresh air. I'd like to begin with the reading from the book. Share this with us. What is it that normal people do. What makes a normal happy family. How do they behave. What do they eat at home. How do they live their lives. I had little clue how to answer these questions for most of my working life is i've been living on the margins. I didn't know any normal people from age. Seventeen on normal people had been my customers. They were abstractions literally shadowy silhouettes in the dining room of wherever it was. I was working at the time. I looked at them through the perspective of the lifelong professional cook and chef which is to say as someone who did not have a family life who knew and associated only with fellow restaurant professionals who worked while normal people played and who played while normal people slept to the extent that i knew or understood normal people's behaviors. It was to anticipate their immediate desires. Would they be ordering the chicken or the salmon are usually saw them only at their worst. Hungry drunk horny ill-tempered celebrating. Good fortune or taking out the bad on their servers. What they did at home what it might be like to wake up late on a sunday morning. Make pancakes for child. Watch cartoons. Throw a ball around a backyard. These were things. I only knew from movies. The human heart was and remains a mystery to me. But i'm learning i have to. I became a father at fifty years of age. That's late. I know but for me it was just right at no point previously. Had i been old enough settled enough or mature enough for this. The biggest and most important of jobs the love and care of another human being. Thanks and that's one of the reasons. You wrote a cookbook about notable food and normal everyday stuff indeed. Yeah you seem like at a normal life. You grew up in fort lee new jersey. Your parents sounded like normal people but didn't get along with normal people angry kid. I think i grew up You know as a child of The kennedy years the summer of love. I missed. I wasn't old enough for the for everything that was happening with with sub culture. So when i became an adolescent. I was disappointed very disappointed. Bitterly disappointed with the way the country was going with the kind of Entertainment center adventures. That seem to be on offer. I seem to have missed the good times. A for whatever reason I was definitely a very angry bidder. Neolithic destructive and self destructive Kid you did acid when you were. Thirteen is to the extent that i identified with anyone. It was I pretty much defined myself. And my i was. I was like a thirteen year olds. I think a thirteen year old boys in particular awkward. I lacked confidence. I was looking for some kind of a template for personality and I guess like a lot of people at the time i i. I found that in drugs defined myself by the drugs always taking identified with people who did similar drugs and and the people who do lsd about our wanna and other drugs that those the people i wanted to hang out with you found a home in among restaurant. People dropped out of college went to culinary school. Yeah well. I've started working as a dishwasher one summer and it was really a big event for me because up to that point i was lazy I was. I was the kid that if you hired me to shovel you walk in winter i would really do a terrible job of it and probably find a way to weasel out. I just there was no group. There was no club to which i wanted to be a member This was the first discipline the first organization because it is a very militaristic organization the kitchen brigade the first people whose respect i wanted in the first time in my life that That i went home feeling respect for myself. i'd work. It was very hard work how to be there on time. There were certain absolute rules. And for whatever reason. I responded to that. It was a mix of chaos but also considerable order that i needed at the time. You know. there's a joke or the found a home in the army. Or i found a home of the circus met circus folk who who i felt. It was a subculture. I wanted to be part of and i. I was willing to work very hard to be part of it. It's interesting that you describe the discipline because a lot of what people think of when they think of restaurant. People is a really wild hedonistic lifestyle. The hour after hour stuff that goes on forever at its root. It is factory work in the sense that The the the the the religion of any successful more busy restaurant is consistency. You have to do the same dish the same way. And on time I was a happy dishwasher. I jokingly say that. I learned every report lesson All the most important lesson my life a dishwasher and in some ways that's true Thomas keller. The great chef talks about how happy. He was as a dishwasher when he talks about the magic of discovering that you put those align the dirty dishes up you push pushing in the machine and they come out clean every time. There's something very comforting about that And.

anthony bourdain Morgan neville cnn Dave davies terry gross bourdain borden oscar Barack obama france vietnam fort lee new york kennedy new jersey army Thomas keller
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Of the dave chappelle show's brought to you by square. You know square you seen their cool white registers when you eat or shop. But did you know they can help. Turn any business. Even your business into an online business it starts with a website. Actually scratch that with square. You get more than a website. You get a suite of connected tools designed for doing business online. And whether you're bespoke boutique or big time chain a burger joint or bistro a barber shop beauty shop or bookshop square can get you selling more products looking more appointments in taking more orders online in no time. See what square can do for your business at square dot com slash. Go slash dave. That's square dot com slash. Go slash dave this episode of the day chang show is brought to you by hot wire imagine. A nice vacation is their view of the parking lot. No so don't book. A cheap motel took an expensive hotel for cheap on hot wire with hot deals..

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Film about anthony bourdain. I think more than anything. When i watched the film it made me just miss him more. And i'll just leave it at your young good fred morgan novel oscar winning director documentary filmmaker producer. Our good friend a partner in other delicious and are soon to be hulu. Show that come out sometime this year. And he has been on the press. Junket doing a lot of media. I know because when we're filming. He was starting to media for the anthony. Bourdain dock road runner out july sixteenth. Is that the date and morgan. That's the day amp in theaters. So go out there. Check it out. Is that what we're supposed to talk about. I feel like we talk all the time talking about all the time we can talk about. Whatever you wanna talk about. But ostensibly were supposed to talk about the film and not only is coming out. But you're in the film to dave. Yes yes. I am in the film Yeah there's a lot to talk about this this a lot of a lot of different emotions about this movie How it got made why god made but before we get into that. How many interviews have you done so far to promote this film. Yeah probably twenty five. What what is the answer. Let's just get the regular question. You're like okay. I've been asked this every for twenty to twenty five times. So what how did you end up. Making about anthony bourdain. How did you end up making the snowman. We're not asking you questions. We're just trying to get some questions. Actually you know what. I what i was looking forward to about. This is that we don't have to talk about those same things. Because i remember. I mean my connection to bourdain other than just being a fan and having read his books and watched his shows and was really for you. Dave and i remember when we started the idea of ugly delicious which originally was going to be lucky peach. tv.

fred morgan anthony bourdain hulu oscar morgan dave Dave
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Director for twenty feet from stardom. If you haven't seen that you should. He has made documentaries on. Keith richards pop mr rogers. She has done a lot of epic work in one of the great filmmakers out there. And i'm honored in lucky to consider them my partner in tv. We've made ugly delicious together. We are making a show on hulu that should be. I don't know coming out soon Next few months. And i think he is just an extraordinarily good person and one of the few people i think they could do. The documentary on anthony bourdain life justice and we get into a conversation with that. It's not an easy conversation. I still have a hard time. Talking about. Tony's death it's still hard to move on and after three years or so. It's still remarkable to see the imprint. His life has add on so many others and man. I don't know what else to say about that other than go. Watch the movie Roadrunner it's coming out. July sixteenth in theaters. Please check it out. I think it will go onto streaming a month after but it should give you some insight into his life. It is not doesn't go into everything. I think that would be impossible. You'd need like twenty five hours but Morgan did the amazing job of giving some clarity. And hopefully some resolution to everyone that mrs tony i mean i remember doing a podcast way back when a couple years ago whenever tony died and was That was emotional. And and i think anybody that listens to this. Podcast knows about my feelings about that. A mental health But know that you're not alone and don't forget to ask for help. And that's oftentimes the hardest thing to do But the people that seem to be doing the best don't assume that they are in a good place You never know and that's why we are all needed to help each other out but it's a it's a very good movie very entertaining and christine and i get into a conversation with morgan novel. The director of roadrunner. Please please please go check it out on a different note and there's no way to make a transition outside of that Because anytime you think about bourdain at it For at least for me. It's pretty pretty heavy shit. But i will do my best and go directly into frozen foods and dairy queen and milkshakes I haven't been to a dairy queen in a long time in a very very very long time and the place. I wanted to get ice. Cream for my son was There was a roadblock. There was a construction. I couldn't do it. But i said let's go to..

mr rogers Keith richards mrs tony anthony bourdain hulu Tony Morgan tony christine morgan
Is Suicide Contagious?

Last Day

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Is Suicide Contagious?

"A beloved celebrity dies unexpectedly before their time. And the headline start to quickly pile up and take over social media. But there's no real story yet. No details no explanation just click -able headline with a bunch of photos. Celebrity. Dead at forty, eight, thirty to twenty, four whatever and in the absence of any real information, a question inevitably arises. Was it an overdose or suicide? Unfortunately, I am acutely aware of what it's like when the answer is overdose. Please refer to season one for that story. But when the answer is suicide, how the story is told matters. For so long there has been cautioned around public discussion of suicide. Asking the news media think a little harder by reporting it, they could be perpetuating the story. We touched on this episode one but if media gets the message wrong and that wrong message reaches a struggling person at the wrong time, the consequences can be devastating even fatal. For example. In Two thousand fourteen after beloved comedian actor Robin Williams died by apparent suicide. And that shocking news flooded the headlines. Suicide rates went up by ten percent. This detail got repeated after another prominent suicide death we'll designer kate spade was found dead in her apartment today her death and apparent suicide. We saw after Robin Williams suicide rates went up ten percent. We Know Kate spade reportedly was infatuated with his suicide. which became part of another subsequent suicide. Relearn today we lost a friend and colleague Anthony Bourdain. Anthony is the second public figure to die this way this week. Was the first some experts point to a phenomenon? They call suicide contagion, which often happens moments such as this. And it turns out there is a long historical precedent for this. There's this phenomenon called the weather effect. Stick with me. This won't take long. It is a fancy literary version of the outdated term copycat suicide. And it comes from this seventeen seventy four to novel called the sorrows of Young werther the book spoiler alert and with the sympathetic hero or they're dressed in a blue code and yellow trousers shooting himself after being rejected by someone he loved. In the years that followed so many young men were found dead having shot themselves while dressed as werther that people freaked out and banned the book in several countries. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two, when Marilyn Monroe died. The following months were filled with extensive coverage about her apparent suicide. which led to widespread sorrow and an apparent twelve percent uptick in suicides. These are obviously massive national reactions to the loss of our beloved heroes and icons. But you see the same thing happening in communities or someone dies by suicide. All of sudden, you have to worry about the other people in town. Or the kids in the schools. And it brings us to this very complicated question is suicide contagious. This question of course has been plaguing us this whole project not just because we're talking about suicide. But also if I didn't know, we are doing it in the midst of a global pandemic where community spread is all we're talking about. So is it as simple as that? Is suicide something you can catch and if so. How do we protect ourselves. Like. What's the equivalent of a mask for suicide? I'm Stephanie Woodall's Wax and this is last day. We knew early on that, we wanted to talk about contagion but truth be told we didn't totally get what it meant for suicidal thoughts to transfer. Is it like. Flipping a switch not suicidal one moment suicidal the next. And that's how we were thinking about it. Until we heard this. Every morning I wake up and I make agenda for the day. I love plans I love knowing my options. In sixth grade when the first suicide cluster happened in my community when we lost more than three people in one year. It was the first time that suicide became on my list of options when I was going through a problem. I feeling, Sad, one day I think through what the options were. NAPPING, think about hanging my friends I thought about taking my own life I thought about going out. On my list of what I could potentially do to help. Figure it out in solve it. This is Lisa. How speaking at a jet event a few years ago. And when we watch this video something clicked. We knew we had to talk to her. Can you tell me a little bit about yourself like who are you? WHO IS LISA? Yeah. So that's such a hard question sometimes answer. It makes sense that this is a tricky question for Lisa because a lot has changed in a short period of time. Today Lisa is twenty two and she just graduated from college. She's about to start a theory impressive job as an engineer at a little known company called Apple. But. In sixth grade, she was in a very different place at the center of what is probably the most commonly referenced example of suicide. Contagion. Lisa was a student at gun, high school. In Palo Alto California a school that comes up again and again when you start to dig into the concept of suicide. Contagion

Lisa Anthony Bourdain Kate Spade Stephanie Woodall Robin Williams Marilyn Monroe Werther Palo Alto California Engineer Apple Anthony
What's Streaming ON HBO Max

Radio From Hell

01:19 min | 2 years ago

What's Streaming ON HBO Max

"I have here a complete list of all the shows and movies that H. B. O. Max will be making available on launch day it was a today say complete list of and here we go the alienist Anthony Bourdain parts unknown the bachelor the bachelor where you're really gonna bachelor Australia the bachelor Canada you're you're not rational or New Zealand the bachelor U. K. he's going to the bachelorette the bachelorette Australia I'll be back in a little bit of bachelorette Canada at your pad after we're in paradise bachelor in paradise Australia that woman the big banks and I could I could go on the author can we just skip does a thorough wait a minute let me place is in the seas yet no no we go down to the bottom of the list now you mentioned see what the west skips here we go here we go V. for vendetta when Harry met Sally Wonder Woman the wizard of oz and X. men dark Phoenix that's the bottom of the list

H. B. O. Max Bachelor Canada New Zealand U. K. Australia Harry Anthony Bourdain Bachelorette Canada Sally Wonder
Cristina Tzintzn Ramirez, Candidate for Senate in Texas

The Electorette Podcast

08:29 min | 2 years ago

Cristina Tzintzn Ramirez, Candidate for Senate in Texas

"Cincinnati Eras. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me glad to be here you are one of my very first guests with the electorate. I think in two thousand seventeen the very first year and I talked to you because you had an organization called Jolt in Texas which was to register voters. Latino voters in Texas. Is that still going on? Jolt Yeah Jolt is up and running across the state and quickly become one of the most important political forces in Texas lifted up the voice vote of thousands of Latinos across the state of. It's amazing so what made you decide to run for the Senate so I wasn't looking to run for the Senate. Texas has changed a lot in the last few years and some of the state's most important progressive leaders and folks that helped run better. O'rourke Senate race. I guess we're in a meeting back in April and recognized that the state is very close to flipping but for us to get over that last hump to flip the state that we have to drive up voter turnout amongst young people in that he knows and I'm one of the folks on the best job of that in our state and so they asked me to run for. Us Senate also because of my policy background working on raising wages Making job see for my first organization. Workers Defense Project also tackling issues like student debt climate change and based on that resume. They thought that I would be a good fit to run for. Us Senate and at first. I told them no and they kept calling me and I thought no because I felt like the really wrong time for me. Personally I have a two year old little boy named Santi at home that I raised primarily by myself and I went on a long walk after the kept calling me because I lived for changing the politics of Texas and they were really convincing me that this was the best way to influence the political outcome on the progressive issues that I care about and so I went on this long walk and I thought yes. It's totally the wrong time for me personally but it was also the wrong time for me personally when I was twenty four years old and I launched my first nonprofit called Workers Defense Project and it was the wrong time for me personally when I was six months pregnant the week after the two thousand sixteen election and I launched jolt so I thought yes. It's the wrong time me personally. But maybe it's the right time in Texas history for Progressive Latina to become our next senator so I threw my hat into the ring and here we are well. That's really great. That's a really great story. I mean I'm just thinking about I mean because I have a baby at home I understand. Thank you and I'm always thinking about that. Like I talked to women like you. And they're all at different stages of their political careers and they all have really good advice. I remember talking to someone last year. Who was running in the November elections and she said something to the effect of you. You're more ready than you think. You are. Always think that we're not ready. So I love hearing stories like yours so congratulations. Thanks Emma's who really know is it. Does it feel heavy to have so many people relying on you saying you're the one you're the one we think you can do this like what does that feel like. You know. I think after being a jolt and working across the state to have young people especially young Latinos see they were this tremendous political force. I realized that so much of the reason why it was hard for people to believe that was because they didn't see anybody in power that reflected their stories their experiences. It looked like them that came from their backgrounds and so every day I wake up I think about what a gift. And what a responsibility this is to be running that. I WANNA be everyone senator in Texas and I also want to uplift the stories and communities often haven't been reflected in what story gets told about Texas so there is always some piece of you that wonders is this actually what I should be doing. And then there's another part of you that realizes that this is the right moment. This is the right time. And if we're not the ones to cease it than who will and so. That really keeps me going and focused on. Why I'm doing this and who I'm doing it for and what it means to many many people across my state so what story is told about Texas that you think is incorrect or needs some correction the narrative about Texas. Well you know. I think when people think of Texas they think of state. That's pretty monolithic. Actually they think of cowboys and Barbecue. And there's great barbecue and Greek cowboys and Texas to be sure but our state is actually incredibly diverse. From I want people to think of Texas I want people to think of the Anthony Bourdain episode where he goes to Houston Texas which is one of the most diverse cities in America and he goes to a Kenyatta and is there with a Latino family. He goes into a Vietnamese community into African refugee communities to meet with African American communities and it just and then goes and eats barbecue. And it's just this beautiful reflection of WHO Texas is. That's the Texas that I see and that is really who we are as a state in that one in three Texans are like me we are immigrants or children of immigrants. I think so much of WHO Texas is today is who the rest of the country will be common. I think it's a beautiful diverse place that I want to uplift and for other people to see while it's really beautiful. I have to go back and watch that episode. It's one of the bats. Yeah I'll have to watch it. You know it's funny because you're talking about better O'Rourke right and what people are thinking about the state of Texas and the possibility of it flipping so I was just looking at those numbers and first of all just want to point out that your primary field is huge right there. Lots of people running in this primary for the seat right. That's one thing. So maybe they the same idea that this is a great time to try to you. Know get involved in flipping Texas but the second thing you know. A lot of the analysis says that there is a better effect here and I think in twenty one thousand nine hundred Ted Cruz one by a little over two slightly a hair over fifty percent and better work product forty-eight percent but that was a five percentage point improvement over Clinton because I think trump won Texas by fifty two percent in Clinton loss with forty three percent. I mean is that what people are looking at? Yes so you know just in the last few years. We've seen a huge uptick in voter participation. What you have to remember about Texas people have said were. This has been a long time red state and while it's true that we've Gone Republican. We've more than anything. Been a nonvoting state. We've had one of the lowest voter turnouts and that's how Republicans have held power in Texas. They have been happy to win without a mandate but with a minority voters participating. And now because that's changing we're starting to see that Texas who are future leaders will be will likely change in likely happen in twenty twenty. We are one of the youngest states in the country where majority people of Color and those young people and people of Color and progressive white folks are voting like never before in Texas and I think with trump on the ballot. You're going to see a massive wave of Latino voter turnout in Texas. Because half of all those turning eighteen in the state are Latino and they are voting decidedly for progressive candidates. So what do you think that is I mean? Why do you think that you have low voter turnout in Texas? Because I know that states had to have low voter turnout. The story is different for each one. There's always some voter suppression. You know especially in the states that have high populations of people of Color right you know. I always dismissed the idea that apathy is a big part of it. Like what do you think it is with Texas? Will you look at the states that have lower voter turnout? A lot of them are going to be states where people are working many hours In Texas we actually work more hours than most people in other states We have people in power that have made it increasingly difficult to register to vote and to vote and that ends up getting reflected in who actually goes to the polls and now though that is changing and it's changing because also Democrats are taking control over the big metro areas in our state which were the majority of the State's population lives and they're making it easier and more accessible to vote so place like in Houston which is Harris County. They're now extending hours to where you can vote and making sure you can anywhere in the county that you don't have to vote your precinct where your local polling station. And that's changing the outcome of

Texas Us Senate Workers Defense Project Senator Houston Cincinnati Eras Donald Trump Santi Emma Harris County Ted Cruz O'rourke Anthony Bourdain America Clinton
Nancy Rommelmann Digs Into the #Meneither Controversy

The Four Top

09:08 min | 2 years ago

Nancy Rommelmann Digs Into the #Meneither Controversy

"Nancy. Hey I'm so glad to be here with you. Thanks for joining us well yet. Maybe we should start with your ear passes food writer. Tell me about that Schumer. So when I first started working as a journalist it was in nineteen ninety four And I had a knife column in in Los Angeles where I lived at the time and But you know and I was also reading with really super long on features I interviewed cereal. Kalaniiki see and just like really chunky sort of more difficult stuff but you have to bring money right and I thought well what do I like and I was like. Well let food in writing so maybe it dabble in that and get a call one day from this woman that says hey this is Barbara Fairchild from petit and I've been reading your work and I'd like to if you'd like to go skiing for us. In in Sun Valley it was literally those like who is moments call but she had read my narrative. Work look into start. I had a good voice and I wound up writing for not on and off. Mostly travel pieces. They send me to these places for about ten years I did some food writing in La when Jonathan Gold Gourmet for awhile took his column over at the L. A.. Week later it was just something I always kind of did but the reason I n WanNa keep moved up to Portland. I wrote for I wrote restaurant reviews for a week and I had a column in the monthly. But the problem for me is that I never primarily considered myself a food writer. I was doing like really long features and articles and profiles including stops that really I really was invested in but I kept getting known as a food writer. I actually just at some point said I'm not doing it anymore because my my first love was writing different kinds of journalism so I kinda ditched. Yeah well I mean your work as hard hitting and you tackle really really difficult subjects things that tend to fascinate me. I have to just keep following the thread so so so What what have you worked on recently listeners? To check out well I Have I've been waiting for reason magazine And and sort of having to do with with sometimes with free speech or wait now where people are not interested interested in other people having free speech. I've written several articles Roy them having to do with Berlin stuff that happened for instance the city council Banning hate groups but not naming who they were and then the big sort of big got a thing down by the waterfront between the problems and Tika everybody screaming free meet each other. You know we live in a very a very polarized environment right now. We're nobody wants anybody else to be allowed to say anything and that's been sort of fascinating waiting for me. And what a journalist to cover and you've really experienced this personally. In a way that intersects with the food industry Yeah and exercising sizing your free speech Maybe we can talk a little bit about. It was just about a year ago that you launched your video blog right. It actually trait about last December and other journalists nine nine New York. We kept having these really long email threads about stuff. We saw going on in the culture that we thought needed to be aired out One incident was Gento Zinat talion actress. She was Anthony Dance girlfriend. She'd been sexually assaulted by Harvey Weinstein. Then onto have like a ten year relationship with him on and off she really had become sort of the face of the metoo movement one of the phases of metoo movement. I written about her already. I'd foot night interviewed reviewed her years ago and then After her boyfriend Anthony Bourdain killed himself. it turned out that she'd had sex. The seventeen year olds and Dana had been paying off the seventeen year old and then she denied it and she sort of got caught in a a bad situation that maybe should fessed up to But she didn't initially and my friend. I were questioning whether she was really the best face of the me too. It's like you Wanna be able to have this incredible momentum be able to fly straight and we just didn't think she she was and so we talked about it on air. We talked about some other stuff. My friend had written about some of the heads of the women's March who were deeply anti Semitic and that it was problematic so we talked about things that I didn't think that they were particularly controversial. I thought that they were pretty sensible. And pretty data-based but we live in an environment right. Now we're if you are not sorta according to some people if you're not on that party line like you can only believe this way and if you're not forest against us and Some people in Portland decided that my views were very dangerous. And in order to make their beliefs known went to the press about it and decided the way to to state their displeasure was to a boycott and and really slide. My husband's business restarted roster and It was pretty effective in terms of Really getting the entire city who for fifteen years really loved her husband's business like never problem. family owns. I never. That was something mistake they thought and I thought that was really just wish people would come to talk to me. Because that's what I do. I host shows I interview people all and if People WanNa have a conversation with me I opened that door and we have a lot of writing bad people go online and they can website and see wherever about it but happily we all move on and we go onto the next interesting phases of life and work with more information than we had because when these kinds of things happen can you really try to sit and think all right. So what was this really about. What is really what is really animating people And how do we you better conversations. That's what I'm super committed to always work and and now probably never. Yeah and I just. It's kind of stunning. Yeah I mean your husband. Didn't Johnson is an artisanal coffee roaster and he really just cares about high quality coffee and he had to close one of his locations He lost asked loses biggest customer. Will we have a location at Nikolai. That was the lease was up in a month and the temperature was just so hot and so not that we just want like. Let's just close this early early. Yeah wholesale definitely definitely did flee but one of the reasons was because I mean I know this only because Blah Blah but you know the people that were angry. They called all his customers. And said you know you will drop or Streto or else and that was the problem. People believe me I can understand not wanting to be in the middle of the stuff. It's not fun. It takes a lot of time very stressful but it was. You know super unpleasant situation nation having said that did is doing well. And I'm to lots and lots of projects and you. You know these things happen in your life changes but in many ways it's changed for the better so there you go. Yeah but you know what strikes me as interesting is as if it were another if you had this video blog and your husband had a different sort of business like an accounting firm or an insurance agency. I don't know that this would have happened. I I feel like right now. Food and beverage are so much in the in the public eye that played a role. Well it's visible okay. Like if if my husband had been an accountant it's like frankly. His appliance would have been like whatever they would. They're not the demographic that's going to get super woke up about this kind of stuff right right. So you've got who goes to coffee shops you know young people and then we'd have reading series and we'd always had it had been a very sort of friendly and social environment. So you know they're going to try to hit you. Were you hurt. I mean if they come around like wow. Nancy is a terrible frisbee player. Like I don't mm cure but they make sure that you know it's going to affect you and it's going to be public because that's we're sort of I guess The satisfaction what really does make me SAM on. I've talked about this a lot before the idea that people will take pleasure in uh other people's suffering I mean seriously catherine I just cry. It's like that's this. This way is really lies madness. You know if you just think the way to forward in the world is to make sure were that people. You don't like suffer publicly. This is a this. Is Everybody's what he's doing this on the left and the right right now. I watched the impeachment hearings today. It's not a good way to live and I don't think it's a good way to live for the people who are proponents of it either. It's just it's unhappy

Writer Los Angeles Portland Barbara Fairchild Sun Valley Schumer Anthony Bourdain Nancy. Gento Zinat Talion Harvey Weinstein Jonathan Gold Gourmet ROY Petit Dana New York Berlin Johnson Nancy Accountant
An Anthony Bourdain documentary is in the works

Donna and Steve

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

An Anthony Bourdain documentary is in the works

"Documentary about late television star and chef Anthony Bourdain is in the works from focus features CNN films in HBO Max and to be directed by Oscar winning filmmaker Morgan at nettle the director to an academy award for twenty feet from stardom and was also behind last year's documentary won't you be my neighbor will also produced the feature seen in films on HBO Max will executive produce focus will first release the film exclusively in theaters worldwide forty years on television on CNN and streams HBO

Oscar Morgan Director MAX CNN HBO Anthony Bourdain Executive Forty Years Twenty Feet
Gordon Ramsay, Ramsey And New Zealand Ramsey discussed on Memphis Morning News

Memphis Morning News

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

Gordon Ramsay, Ramsey And New Zealand Ramsey discussed on Memphis Morning News

"Gordon Ramsay has hopefully cooked up another hit series only this one Ramsey takes viewers out of the kitchen stars the views of my school was a delicacy spiny plant the cactus on the edge of the cliff I was latest uncharted Ramsay visits global destinations to explore the culinary cuisine from all over the world improve the climbs mountains for specific cactus while New Zealand Ramsey will dive deep with his bare hands for a slippery and delicious easy all the National Geographic series of which is available to stream right now as far from the competitive kitchens court is known for but more like a cross between Anthony Bourdain and bear Grylls Michelle Pelino

Gordon Ramsay Ramsey New Zealand Ramsey Anthony Bourdain Michelle Pelino
Emmy nominations are out and HBO is back on top for now.

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:56 min | 3 years ago

Emmy nominations are out and HBO is back on top for now.

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter and Bat obviously the Emmy nominations came out this past week and my first reaction was really to admire the wealth of material that is so oh good and you know the academy. The television academy has been paddled in the past for the sort of reflexive conservative re-nominating modern family teen times not that there's anything a great series it but got to the point where it seemed crazy just keep nominating and over and over again this time there is some really fresh interesting shows and actually some formidable matchups yeah I mean I think a lot of the headlines that came out of the Emmy nominations were based on game of thrones getting a record thirty two nominations but if you look deeper there are a lot of nuance shows like fleabag getting into the comedy race killing Eve in the drama race bowl shows from phoebe waller bridge if you look. Ed Shits Creek which is a word. I don't know if we can say on the radio <hes> but it is spell with a C. H.. In two TS <hes> that's a show that has been on for a number of years and not gotten much attention but the ground swell of love for the stars Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara got popped T._v.. Its first emmy nominations and there's a lot of Nice little narratives like that yeah I I was late to the Shits Creek Party. Yes it is going to say that word and <hes> benched it on Netflix like so many people I was like Oh look what I found on Netflix when really pop would probably like to assassinate me for even saying that except be really can binged on Netflix and it's pretty great. I'm also really impressed by the very high impact series that ran. They're not in the same category we have the R Kelly series from lifetime in the in one category up against <hes> Leah Remedies Scientology series and weirdly comedians in cars. I mean very very very different kind of material. Anthony Bourdain also is going to be I think for a lot of people an emotional choice but that r Kelly dock as we know he's imprisoned or Kelly right now and I think a lot of credit goes not only to Jim de regardless the journalists who pursued. Him For so long but Dream Hampton and lifetime for doing that series and if you look at the authorities who arrested r Kelly they specifically cited that Docu series as being the thing that opened there is to what was going on and if I'm lifetime I'm looking at that and saying wow that should be our emmy materials because this is the best advertisement you could get for winning. An award is that there's real world impact. You might think that the H._B._O.. Series leaving nevertheless would be in the same category with the R Kelly but it's not <hes> and it is up against you know things that are so diverse in and you know again. This is golden age in many ways some of the stuff I mean minding the gap and this points to the confusion. What's a T._v.? Show what's a movie mining. The gap was an Oscar contender this now also an emmy contender. That's happened before in the last few years and it's it's confusing and in the same category you have you know Jane Fonda Series and <hes> thing about Gilda radner and the it's it's a very <hes> odd set of. Things to be competing with each other but talking about cultural impact. I think you know I don't even know if we can measure what the impact of that series was but I think it was huge yeah. The breath of the nominees is one of the reasons that H._B._O.. Oh really clobbered Netflix this year. If you remember from last year the big narrative was at after seventeen years netflix finally overtook H._B._O.. As the top nominee at the emmys this year no such luck now obviously game of thrones was a big reason and for that but even if you take out the number one nominee on both of them game of Thrones H._B._O.. And when they see us the central park five miniseries on Netflix H._B._O.. Would still be the winner this year and that might be the Swan Song. I think in the future is going to be really difficult for H._B._O.. To compete with what Netflix is doing now. We're seeing the output of H._B._O.. Increase via this new streaming service called H._B._O.. Max that was announced last week but in the short term Netflix Netflix is really focused on winning awards and they are green-lighting things with an eye on whether they can win Oscars Emmy's so for the foreseeable future. I predict the emmy champion is going to be Netflix but it's going to be a nice party this year.

Emmy Netflix H._B._O R Kelly Ed Shits Creek Phoebe Waller Bridge Shits Creek Party Anthony Bourdain Oscar Hollywood Kim Masters Matt Bellamy Eugene Levy Gilda Radner Reporter Jane Fonda EVE Leah
In Vietnam, There's Hope North Korea Will Follow Its Model For Economic Success

NPR's World Story of the Day

05:05 min | 3 years ago

In Vietnam, There's Hope North Korea Will Follow Its Model For Economic Success

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from Cleveland Clinic ranked the nation's number one heart care, according to US news and World Report for information on complex cases treated at Cleveland Clinic, or to get a second opinion. Visit Cleveland Clinic dot org slash heart care, the choice of Vietnam to host this week summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong own is full of symbolism like North Korea. Vietnam is a one party communist state that fought bitterly against the US since that war. Vietnam has made peace with the US and prospered now Kim is seeing the results first hand from Vietnam. Michael Sullivan has more. In nineteen sixty seven during what the Vietnamese call the American war North Korean pilot secretly fought alongside there. Communist comrades flying combat missions against American bombers in the skies over North Vietnam. Some of the North Koreans who died were buried here about an hour from the capitol where caretaker fund Dow opens the gate to a modest memorial fourteen headstones the names of the dead etched in Korean on one side in Vietnamese on the other he lights some incense and says a quick prayer. The memorial doesn't get many visitors these days, he says the bodies were actually repatriated more than a decade ago. But the headstones remain Donner the dead. I didn't lie. He's hitting the middling. They were foreigners. They came to fight for our country, and they died for country. So this memorial is to remember their sacrifice. But all that the caretaker says is in the past more than fifty eight thousand American lives were lost with over three million. Vietnamese debtor missing. But the US and Vietnam are now frenzy says having normalized relations twenty years after the war's end that decision says, economists laid along Sean still baffles visitors. From young young the North Korean delegation. All the time us me. Why did you memorize relation to the US you live in fighting for so long? How did you do it? The simple answer the advisor to several Vietnamese Prime Minister says was necessity like North Korea. Now postwar Vietnam was crippled by economic sanctions and trade embargo by the US something had to give I have told him. We never forget the pass. But now we look to the future and Vietnam must develop the economy much industrialized. And it's the best way to have an animal and friendly relation to the US and that policy has helped make Vietnam economy. One of the fastest growing in Asia over the past two decades and best of all perhaps from dictator Kim Jong UN's perspective. He would see development of the economy under the one by the ruling congress party rule. One knock Zhao is. Director of the institute for policy law and development studies in Hanoi. He says the Vietnamese model should appeal to the North Korean strongman. He can you know, he'd some more freedoms fall the market economy freedom for the people in private sector and as a same time he can keep the political power. He learns his from Vietnamese communist party. Dinnertime downtown Hanoi. I'm standing outside the hole in the wall restaurant where former President Obama Anthony bourdain famously sat down for meal Boonchai and a beer few years back but tragedy the places closed renovations. They say kitchen fire said the neighbors. Let's try to talk to some people. Anyway. Inside the coffee shop next door tour guide one. We Ling is also unhappy one of his favorite restaurants is closed. I this come here for the food actually before a here. This also by famous restaurant in Hanoi. But not for tourists only for local Vietnamese. But went over my here like a bomb, boom. He reckons the Trump Kim summit might raise Vietnam profile on the world stage and help bring more tourists the coffee shops owner when mine isn't sure he doesn't think President Trump will show up at the restaurant this week. But he does think North Korea's Kim. Should learn from Vietnam's example and make peace with the US. They say. Hey, they will have to do that to survive because North Korean people have been suffering abject poverty for so long just as we did. So I think they need to change the follow Vietnam path if not he says, ordinary North Koreans lives are just going to get worse for NPR news. Michael Sullivan and annoy. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

North Vietnam United States North Korea Hanoi President Trump Vietnam NPR Michael Sullivan Kim Jong Kim Jong Un Cleveland Clinic Comcast KIM Sean Communist Party DOW President Obama Anthony Bourda
How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 3 years ago

How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

"Just wanted to let you know this episode deals with the topics of depression and suicide so if you're not up for that today. Go ahead and skip it and hey, take care of yourself. Okay. During the publicity that attended the recent suicides of Anthony bourdain end Kate Spade. People were urged to reach out to loved ones. They suspect are coping with depression. There's good reason for this nudge, a more than sixteen million American adults experience major depression with only thirty five percent of those affected turning to a mental health professional for treatment effective treatment can lead to partial or complete remission and thus a vastly improved quality of life. But one of the tricky things about depression is that it can prevent people from getting help still despite these numbers a lot of people are confused are anxious about how to handle a potentially depressed loved one. How can you tell if someone is really depressed and how exactly should you approach the person? What if they get mad at you for asking? Although a lot of variables are at play. And it's impossible to predict a reaction experts insist that it's always better to make a true and carrying effort. We spoke with Matt Onarato director of social work and an adjunct clinical assistant, professor at the Ohio State University. Wet. Sner medical centers Harding hospital. He said a people who contemplate suicide are embitterment up to the end. They want the pain to end. And if there was some other way to end the pain than kill themselves. They would take that. There's always hope you make a small gesture of. Hey, I'm here if you need me, and that could stop someone a week later from trying to kill themselves, the small things we do make a huge impact. So how do you know, if someone is dealing with depression almost all of us get the blues at some point feeling down about our lives or selves, the difference with depression is that this feeling does not lift and has not improved by spending time with friends or taking part in fun activities some fairly well known symptoms of depression include sadness and loss of interest in hobbies enjoyed in the past weight gain or weight loss. Trouble sleeping or excessive sleep difficulty. Concentrating and suicidal thoughts or comments a general ability is a lesser known and often overlooked symptom. Verbal statements of feeling emptier. Worthless are also important to note as well as physical symptoms like pain fatigue, headaches or stomach aches, if any of these symptoms last more than two weeks and interfere with the person's life functioning in some way. It's probably not just the blues like any serious illness depression needs to be treated to get better. A lot of people are scared to approach left. What about depression or suicide a whether it's because they don't want to offend the person are afraid to make the situation to real or are worried that they'll get yelled at we also spoke with Dr Catherine brunette assistant, professor at the school of social work at Tulane university via Email, she said anytime sensitive issue was brought up the potential for defensiveness or anger is there. She also noted that you're not necessarily in for a fight though. Quote, everyone responds differently and many people may be relieved to talk about their struggles. Especially if a non judgmental insensitive approach is taken. In the event that the person does react unhappily. It can be helpful to be open and direct about your emotional response, therapists, suggest saying something like I understand you're going through a lot. But when you snap at me. It makes me feel sad. There's no guarantee that one talk will result in action. And that's okay, Burnett said sometimes they friend seems to blow you off you can affirm that you just care about them. And are there if they ever want to talk your friend may not respond immediately. But your care may have left an opening for future conversations. When you do initiate the conversation calmly expressed concern, then let them do a lot of the talking. Listen, I hold off on any problem solving or suggestions, it might sound silly. But just listening to a person's experience of depression can help them validate that experience for themselves. Once they've had their say, therapists recommend asking probing questions. Like how bad does the scat? A does it ever get worse than what you're telling me? Are you aware of having a lot of guilt or shame? Just void saying things. Like look on the bright side, or it's not that bad or even something like when I was depressed. Once I started walking every day. And I got better. Remember, the depression is a systemic illness. It can affect a person's whole body and being so it needs treatment tailored for every individual person. It may take time, but hopefully, they'll come to the conclusion that their depression can be treated there are lots of options, depending on how severe the situation is if the person is suicidal. There are services that offer twenty four hour access to trained professionals and other resources in the US. Try looking up the National Alliance on mental illness or mental health America. Or these suicide prevention lifeline or the substance abuse and mental health Services Administration some services are free. And there are federally funded outpatient and inpatient programs available to folks without insurance with payment based on sliding scale, according to income if the situation is less urge. Don't talk to your friend about what option they might be most comfortable with this could start with a trip to the family. Doctor a, particularly if your friends doesn't want to see a therapist after all primary care. Doctors are also able to rule out any other medical 'cause like Siread problems or Nimia they can screen for depression prescribed medications and refer patients to mental health professionals, many employee assistance programs offer free or reduced cost counseling sessions to staff and family members. So be sure to check your specific plan for counseling and other resources. Onarato said, I think culturally were becoming in America more comfortable talking about mental health, depression, and suicide people are being more open, and knowing that there is help out there that you won't be judged and are not

Depression Matt Onarato Anthony Bourdain Professor Kate Spade Sner Medical Centers Harding H Headaches National Alliance United States America Ohio State University Tulane University Burnett Director Email Dr Catherine Thirty Five Percent Twenty Four Hour Two Weeks
"anthony bourdain" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"anthony bourdain" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"The American team of natural history. Featuring my interview with chef author world traveler, Anthony bourdain, we're talking about the science of food. Check it out. There's a branch of the culinary universe. That seems to focus on molecular molecular gastronomy, am I correct in characterizing that as how can I bring as much science as I possibly can to the protein molecules and the and the freezing and cooking times does this attract the the experience from you or add to it. It depends. I know a few shifts who are really really great at this. And they're like scientists I was just talking to why lead to frame a one of one of the real masters of this area of cooking. And he says look at my restaurant. We ask questions were were were were asking. Questions about food and the dining experience, they're not necessarily looking to dazzle or to challenge their their diners. They're asking questions like can I deep fry mayonnaise answer? Yes. Also, I'm sorry. I would've never in my whole life. That is not that. I'm sorry. I would never thought that. But once he figured out how to deep fry mayonnaise. He figured out how he could fry other sauces how to cause them to stay essentially, solid solid and not explode when you throw into hot fat of Ferron Andrea, widely Defraigne and very few other chefs make this experience intensely pleasurable and exciting and fun. Many other imitators it is it is a long painful slog through one of their meals where it's just science class for its own sake. You know, look, I can look what I can do. Joining us now for a conversation or the intersection of booed and science is chemical scientists event gone through Mont, and you're you're known simply as siber-. Indeed. And so you got ripped online for doing what debunking bad science for the combination of good science and dick jokes as it relates to food. Yes. Yes. A lot of a lot of especially bad science. Yes. So chefs to think they would make better food if they had a firm understanding of the chemistry of food. I think it can help. But I've seen somebody's trying to make mashed potatoes using Emily's to break down, the they're like I can make the creamier mashed potatoes you've ever made you've ever seen. Instead, they made sugary goof because when you break down starch, you get sugar sometimes you have to add some buttering creep to your potatoes. So you have some science food demo you can share with us. I just happened to have some liquid nitrogen, right? Never leave home without it. Yes. And..

Anthony bourdain Ferron Andrea Emily
These were 2018's top 5 searched terms on Google

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

These were 2018's top 5 searched terms on Google

"So what are you searching for on Google turns out a sporting event at some tragedies. The year's top Google searches. USA radio's Chris Barnes reports. Now from Washington DC. The number one most Google terms. This year was the World Cup, which is not unexpected as it's the world's most watched sporting event. The second most googled event was hurricane Florence which brought destruction to the Carolinas number three two suspected drug overdose. A twenty six year old rapper MAC Miller, the suicides of designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony bourdain rounding out the year's top five biggest Google searches

Google Drug Overdose Kate Spade Chris Barnes Mac Miller Florence Anthony Bourdain Usa Radio Washington Twenty Six Year
Pfizer to raise U.S. drug prices in January after previously backing down

Trending Today USA

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

Pfizer to raise U.S. drug prices in January after previously backing down

"Will be around five percent and won't affect about ninety percent of the drug companies portfolio, including newly approved medicines and sterile injectables. This summer Pfizer had raised the lowest prices on more than forty drugs which prompted the president to tweet that the company should be ashamed of its increases. Hillary barsky, Fox News. We'll be Goldberg and Hathaway comedian, Chris rock Seinfeld star. Jason Alexander supreme court Justice Samuel Alito in the late CNN host Anthony bourdain among the latest nominees to the New Jersey hall of fame. You're going to

Justice Samuel Alito Hillary Barsky New Jersey Hall Of Fame Jason Alexander Anthony Bourdain Chris Rock President Trump CNN Goldberg Fox News Ninety Percent Five Percent
Actress Kim Porter dies suddenly after suffering from pneumonia

Colleen and Bradley

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Actress Kim Porter dies suddenly after suffering from pneumonia

"Were an incredible mother, and you were rare case. I mean, that's the thing. The tributes here are. Are unique in that. There is so much depth to them in terms of the type of person that she was when it came to her relationships. And I think when I was reading more about her when I was really struck by was the relationship that she and Sean combs had in terms of co-parenting their children. They never had a custody agreement. They always just worked it out with their schedules, which that's amazing spend holidays together, they had a deep affection and a deep love for each other. Even though they weren't in a romantic relationship, and they always just made it work. And, you know, her youngest kids are eleven year old twin girls, that's I mean, you know, immediately, obviously because they she had a public relationship with Diddy in and we all know who he is your mind immediately goes to him, and then and then you think about those those young children. And what a loss that is for all of them. But, but just you know, we don't know them. They're not they're not the celebrities, but you just your heart just sort of breaks. Oh, gosh. Anytime a child loses their gosh. Just a devastating thing. So thinking of them today in other sad news, chef Daniel balloon is talking about Anthony bourdain and Daniel balloon is a big deal in the food world. I mean, he is like big big big big deal. And he and Anthony Anthony bourdain were very good chefs and are very good friends. And of course, fellow chefs and Daniel balloon said event, his heart was broken. I think was that the one that was with him. Eric repair. Okay. Eric repairs another one that new who's, but they're both French chef. Yeah. But Daniel blue then kind of backtracked a little bit and said, I don't know. Exactly. But I know I know that what he did was something that was a shock to everyone. Absolutely. There's been a lot of speculation about his relationship with. Yeah. And what was happening there and photos that were published of her with another man and that the deep intensity of that relationship. Maybe contributed to the instability and Anthony bourdain. Yeah. I wanna be careful in my words. Yeah. But I think that was you don't that's just still such a sad loss. Oh, big time big time. And especially, you

Daniel Balloon Anthony Bourdain Eric Repair Daniel Blue Sean Combs Diddy Eleven Year
Asia Argento Admits She and Anthony Bourdain 'Cheated' on Each Other: 'It Wasn't a Problem'

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

00:36 sec | 4 years ago

Asia Argento Admits She and Anthony Bourdain 'Cheated' on Each Other: 'It Wasn't a Problem'

"Some people accused Asia are Gento Anthony bourdain girlfriend at the time of helping to drive him to suicide because she cheated on him. But she's now come out she gave an interview and she said they both cheated on each other. They essentially head what you would call an open relationship. Yeah. Yeah. He was a man she says who traveled two hundred sixty five days a year when we saw each other. We took really great pleasure in each other's presence. But we are not children. We are grownups. So she says that her cheating on him had nothing to do with him killing himself that he was well aware that their relationship wasn't open

Asia Two Hundred Sixty Five Days
Anthony Bourdain Remembered at Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Screening

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

01:10 min | 4 years ago

Anthony Bourdain Remembered at Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Screening

"I think the feeling is disco. Get your judge your would have road for? No. Yeah. The your judge, whatever's going to happen in mid terms to happen. I think they're. Worst. I'm with you put some women on that panel for God's sakes. Why are they look at the female senators? Do it just because they are waiting. Optics this. Now we learned from these optics. We need some female Senate Democrats went through this in Ninety-one. Biden said that he only campaign in exchange for campaigning for Senator Carol Moseley Braun before he was a Senator he promised. He made a promise that she would sit on the judiciary. I mean they, they were like, we need women on the dish committee. They're six Republican women senators. The second lesson is Barrett. Next time, Amy comb Conybeare absolutely. This me too stuff camp you pulling against her. I think get two hundred twenty people arrested in that hearing as well, but we can get your pets. We're never going to get more than fifty. One votes again ever. This is going to be a knife fight for every single one of the president there is she is unequivocally anti-choice annually conscious wasn't. I'll tell you what exactly. Tuned.

Carol Moseley Braun Senator Amy Comb Conybeare Barrett President Trump
Anthony Bourdain Remembered at Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Screening

Purity Products

00:38 sec | 4 years ago

Anthony Bourdain Remembered at Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Screening

"Anthony, bourdain parts unknown the final season begins airing with board aims trip to Kenya. Alongside comedian Kamal bell everybody who had dreams of traveling with Tony. It's exactly as cool as you think is Val gets to step in as narrator and describe what it was like travelling alongside boarding and laughs for some of the memories getting emotional over others in particular, the statement made by bourdain sues cameras and the crew will be sitting around. We have a cocktail. Show airs at nine on CNN bourdain committed suicide

Kamal Bell Bourdain Kenya CNN Anthony VAL Tony
A body in Motion is a Powerful Leader

Up Or Out with Connie

20:25 min | 4 years ago

A body in Motion is a Powerful Leader

"The. Former executive turned lifestyle entrepreneur, Connie is ridiculously dedicated to inspiring individuals to activate their power and live their dream as a lifestyle entrepreneur. It's time to sit down, lie down or squat down and turn up the volume up or out with Connie starts right now. Why? Hello and welcome to activating power women podcast. I'm Connie five-year transformational sneaker, mentoring coach, and if you're looking for inspiration motivation and just want those tools to excel in business eggs really come to the right fights. So on tier sage because we have a phenomenal guest today, she is the author of the workplace while miss that works. And she's also the CEO and founder of motion infusion, which is a leading well being and learning provider. Her work has been covered on MSNBC the New York Times. US news wurley pour onto nor business insider NPR. She's also a former urban public high school teacher, Ellen de professional public policy advocate as something I've always been interested and international community organizer dancer gymnast. And now of movement builder and the World Health and wellbeing with emission, get people and organizations in motion to is a frequent keynote speaker and work with a range of organizations from fortune five hundred two government agencies to academic institutes, nonprofits, she's a recipient of the American heart association's twenty twenty impact award as well as a national wellness institute circle of leadership award. She's a graduate from Brown University and Saint for university, and she comes to us from San Francisco where lizard, her fiance, please walk Laura, but room faith, Connie, it's really nice to be back. So you'd have so so many incredible things so many incredible things. And now you've come to the place where it's all about getting people in motion, getting people moving from people and people inside of organizations. So a union talk about half. Ving that energy, but do you have the energy to be effective leader? Yeah, I think that this is the reason why I asked this question a lot is because I think it's hard for a lot of people to make the connection between wellness annotated a life, and sometimes it better way to reframe that is asking leaders managers and for other women leaders out there asking the question, do you have the energy that you need to be an effective leader and energy starts with wellbeing? Keep them points at my aunt had this great sticker that was on her refrigerator that read the bridge between despair and hope is a good night sleep. So it's already. Hell you can't get any basic than that, right. And we, you know, the bridge between being an ineffective leader versus an effective one is often something as simple as getting enough sleep man, though when we think about energy, it derives from a lot of different places, but we cannot ignore the role that wellbeing pleased in having energy and wellbeing purchase physical, although that extremely important but also wellbeing on an emotional level. I mean, certainly we're seeing a lot of evidence of that today was with the loss of Kate Spade in Anthony bourdain that nece who can't ignore emotional wellbeing here, these people who are, you know, at the peak of their careers in can't ignore things like emotional wellbeing, zillion awhile, being or community wellbeing, social wellbeing. All of these really factor into our capacity. To have the energy that we need to be ineffective weaker. And that really unin find finding that life balance because I mean, I'll admit it. I mean, I've leads several organizations and it could be really exhausted. It really can to the boy where even that emotional energy, because as they say, you know, when you're at the top, it's lonely. I don't wanna say it was lonely, but sometimes you just don't know who to go to write talk and Hutu confided without feeling less of a person out filling

Connie CEO Executive School Teacher Msnbc American Heart Association New York Times Kate Spade San Francisco Ving Brown University NPR Anthony Bourdain Laura Founder Saint For University Five-Year
Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain wins posthumous Emmys for 'Parts Unknown'

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:31 sec | 4 years ago

Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain wins posthumous Emmys for 'Parts Unknown'

"Jones whose brother Pete took his own life. At the age of twenty three says suicide is more pervasive than homicide in Louisville. Louisville ranks number eleven in terms of the highest rate of suicide number eleven among fifty peer cities for information on times and locations of the courses. Visit QPR Lou dot com. Suzanne Duval, NewsRadio eight forty W H A S the United soccer leagues says that the game between Louisville city f c and FC Cincinnati that had to be abandoned due to lightning

Louisville Dallas Amber Geiger Cincinnati John Anthony Bourdain Clark Newsradio Officer Slugger Field Lou Dot ABC Suzanne Duval Dane Jones Soccer Rene Hall CNN Pete
Geena Davis hits back at estranged husband's divorce filing, claims 16-year marriage wasn't official

Jason and Alexis

01:23 min | 4 years ago

Geena Davis hits back at estranged husband's divorce filing, claims 16-year marriage wasn't official

"Okay. Tissue campbell. Martin who we probably all know best from the show, Mark. Yes. Gina. She's a great actress. Well, she had some legal trouble with an estranged husband Duane Martin who she was married to a since nineteen Ninety-six. She filed new documents. Putting him on blast for his wardrobe? He is asking for spousal support from her. But she pointed out an in the documents that TMZ got it says that he has more than five hundred shirts that cost fifteen hundred dollars a piece totaling a whopping seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars. She knows this because he just made a video bragging about it. Oh, yes. She says tissue says that she has a one point five million in assets. But right now doesn't have a steady source of income. And that's why she's asking for spousal support. She says her monthly expenses, total at least thirty three thousand a month and estimates estimates that twain makes around sixty two thousand per month. Also, they're fighting over money. They they got divorced back in February after twenty years of marriage now she's looking into his

Peter Lawford New York Campbell Martin Christopher Lawford Gina Davis Anthony Bourdain Duane Martin Dawn Mcclain Elizabeth Harvey Weinstein Heart Disease Mark Twain Jimmy Bennett La County Genadi Frazier JFK Official