35 Burst results for "Antarctica"

Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

"Hi. I'm scientific. American Assistant News. Editor Sarah Lou in Frazier and here's a short piece from July twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits In it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From, Turks and Caicos Islands analysis of Ano- lizards collected before and after hurricanes, Irma and Maria in twenty seventeen and eighteen months later revealed that the surviving lizards and their descendants had larger and therefore grippier Topaz. The team examined Lizard photographs from natural history collections and seventy years of hurricane data to confirm the trend. From Italy sediment samples drawn from the tree and see revealed hotspots with up to one point nine million micro plastic particles per square meter, the highest concentration ever recorded on the sea floor. Most of pollution comes from wastewater and sewage systems. Researchers say. From Antarctica, paleontologists found a fossilized forty million year old frog on Seymour. Near the tip of the peninsula, The FROG is related to modern ones living in temperate humid conditions in the Chilean Andes. From Iraq researchers probing the Turkish State Archives found the earliest known record of a meteorite causing a death. The object struck a hilltop in neighboring Iraq in eighteen, eighty, eight, killing one man and paralyzing another. From Japan results gathered from the KAMIOKA. Observatory which includes an underground detector tank filled with fifty five thousand tons of water, suggested intriguing discrepancy in how neutrinos, an anti neutrinos oscillate potentially violating symmetry between matter and antimatter. From Kenya scientists identified a malaria blocking microbe in mosquitoes on the shores of Lake Victoria. Every mosquito catalog with this apparently benign fungus was free of the disease, carrying parasite and experiments showed the fungus prevented its transmission. That was quick hits. I'm Sarah Lou Frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Iraq Sarah Lou Chilean Andes Caicos Islands Editor Antarctica Turkish State Archives Kamioka Malaria Kenya Japan Turks Italy Lake Victoria Irma Maria
Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:38 min | Last month

Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

"We're talking about dragonflies and ladybugs. And we're going to be joined by someone. We've talked to before on an episode. We did about moths. I'm kept McFarland with a Remote Center Frigo Studies Research Biologist and I like to study insects and all kinds of other flying things. Why in the world do you like to study insects of all the creatures you could study? Well you know. I've studied birds and I've studied mammals, but insects to in my world. Everything you can think of. That's in the movies insects do it. They do strange things that we'd never imagined possible, and and it just excites me to go out there and find out what they're doing. Strange things like what lift something that would be like US lifting a car or leap tall buildings that kind of thing. Yeah. They're like the Superman the animal world, they can do all of things that we couldn't dream of Fahd of the sky for hundreds of feet. Fly Long distances. Long distances like three thousand mile sometimes longer than we never imagined swim underwater for long periods of time. I mean you name it. They do it so. The water and walk on the ceilings. Yeah, so it's just crazy things they do. There are so many kinds of insects estimates range between two million and thirty million different types of insects. If you count up the total number of these animals themselves, scientists think there are ten Quintillo individual insects on our planet. But we can't do an episode about all of them. Just think how long that would be. We're going to focus on to cool types of insects. You have sent us questions about dragonflies and ladybugs, but even those are categories of insects with lots of different species within them, as we'll find out more about later, but first. Let's dive into some of your questions. My Name's illegal. I live in Seattle Washington in my question is. Why do ladybugs have spots? Claire. I am six years old. I live in rent. Would Missouri and My question is how do ladybugs get their spots I Aria that result I live grateful or Kaleida it by question is how to ladybugs have spots well. Here's the interesting thing about ladybugs. There's a lot of different kinds of ladybugs and the ones that we usually think of are the ones that are red with black spots or sometimes a little white spots on them. And that represents maybe you. A quarter of the species of ladybugs, there's a whole bunch of other ladybugs that are black, Brown, red white, even some kind of other colors mixed in like yellows, and so the traditional thing we think of the ladybugs of the ones that are black and red, but there's all kinds of others that have all kinds of other patterns and colors associated with them how they get their spots. I'm not really sure how they exactly get their spouse, but one of the things is spots. Spots are the patterns are probably on them, so that is a warning to other insects or even birds that they might not want to eat them, because they might taste poorly, and so it's a way to defend themselves against being eaten by birds or other insects to some types of ladybugs have a certain number of spots and others have a different number, or could you know the same kind of lady bug lined up ten different individual bugs. You'd get ten different spot patterns. The answer is yes. It happens, both so there are lady bugs that have certain number of spots in evac through even named after that, so there's a native lady bug in North America called. The nine spotted lady bug, and it has nine actually, and there's the seven spotted lady bug, and it usually has seven spots. There's a twenty spotted lady bug, and you get the picture. There's different kinds of ladybugs that have different amount of spots, but sometimes within those groups they can have a variety of spots, so there's one. One kind of Lady Bug comes from Asia called the Asian ladybugs that's been introduced. It's been brought here in an outlives. North America and sometimes it can have almost no spots, and sometimes it can have maybe a dozen or more spots on it, so it's really variable. Compared to say, the nine spotted lady bug, which almost always has nine spots, and we have listeners and I think every continent. EXCEPT ANTARCTICA, we haven't gotten a question from Antarctica and do ladybugs also live on every continent except Antarctica. I'm pretty sure they are on every continent, except Antarctica. Yes, and that brings us to this question. Hello, my name is Hallelujah I live in. Rwanda CA golly. My question is. How many different types of ladybugs are there? There are over five thousand different species or types of ladybugs in the world. And as Kent said, it's not just the spots that vary, their colors can vary, too, but those colors are basically always there to warn predators that the lady bug will taste terrible now. Some of you are probably wondering why they're called ladybugs. Anyway or maybe you aren't even sure what insect were actually talking about. Not everyone calls them ladybugs for example. If you live in the United Kingdom you might call them, lady, birds or Ladybird Beetles and Kent says he actually doesn't like the name Lady Bug because they're Beatles, not

Antarctica North America Remote Center Frigo Studies Re Mcfarland Kent United States Seattle Fahd Beatles Rwanda United Kingdom Asia Claire Missouri Washington
Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:46 min | Last month

Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

"This week, we're getting out our bug nets to look at something considerably smaller than us. We're talking about dragonflies and ladybugs. And we're going to be joined by someone. We've talked to before on an episode. We did about moths. I'm kept McFarland with a Remote Center Frigo Studies Research Biologist and I like to study insects and all kinds of other flying things. Why in the world do you like to study insects of all the creatures you could study? Well you know. I've studied birds and I've studied mammals, but insects to in my world. Everything you can think of. That's in the movies insects do it. They do strange things that we'd never imagined possible, and and it just excites me to go out there and find out what they're doing. Strange things like what lift something that would be like US lifting a car or leap tall buildings that kind of thing. Yeah. They're like the Superman the animal world, they can do all of things that we couldn't dream of Fahd of the sky for hundreds of feet. Fly Long distances. Long distances like three thousand mile sometimes longer than we never imagined swim underwater for long periods of time. I mean you name it. They do it so. The water and walk on the ceilings. Yeah, so it's just crazy things they do. There are so many kinds of insects estimates range between two million and thirty million different types of insects. If you count up the total number of these animals themselves, scientists think there are ten Quintillo individual insects on our planet. But we can't do an episode about all of them. Just think how long that would be. We're going to focus on to cool types of insects. You have sent us questions about dragonflies and ladybugs, but even those are categories of insects with lots of different species within them, as we'll find out more about later, but first. Let's dive into some of your questions. My Name's illegal. I live in Seattle Washington in my question is. Why do ladybugs have spots? Claire. I am six years old. I live in rent. Would Missouri and My question is how do ladybugs get their spots I Aria that result I live grateful or Kaleida it by question is how to ladybugs have spots well. Here's the interesting thing about ladybugs. There's a lot of different kinds of ladybugs and the ones that we usually think of are the ones that are red with black spots or sometimes a little white spots on them. And that represents maybe you. A quarter of the species of ladybugs, there's a whole bunch of other ladybugs that are black, Brown, red white, even some kind of other colors mixed in like yellows, and so the traditional thing we think of the ladybugs of the ones that are black and red, but there's all kinds of others that have all kinds of other patterns and colors associated with them how they get their spots. I'm not really sure how they exactly get their spouse, but one of the things is spots. Spots are the patterns are probably on them, so that is a warning to other insects or even birds that they might not want to eat them, because they might taste poorly, and so it's a way to defend themselves against being eaten by birds or other insects to some types of ladybugs have a certain number of spots and others have a different number, or could you know the same kind of lady bug lined up ten different individual bugs. You'd get ten different spot patterns. The answer is yes. It happens, both so there are lady bugs that have certain number of spots in evac through even named after that, so there's a native lady bug in North America called. The nine spotted lady bug, and it has nine actually, and there's the seven spotted lady bug, and it usually has seven spots. There's a twenty spotted lady bug, and you get the picture. There's different kinds of ladybugs that have different amount of spots, but sometimes within those groups they can have a variety of spots, so there's one. One kind of Lady Bug comes from Asia called the Asian ladybugs that's been introduced. It's been brought here in an outlives. North America and sometimes it can have almost no spots, and sometimes it can have maybe a dozen or more spots on it, so it's really variable. Compared to say, the nine spotted lady bug, which almost always has nine spots, and we have listeners and I think every continent. EXCEPT ANTARCTICA, we haven't gotten a question from Antarctica and do ladybugs also live on every continent except Antarctica. I'm pretty sure they are on every continent, except Antarctica. Yes, and that brings us to this question. Hello, my name is Hallelujah I live in. Rwanda CA golly. My question is. How many different types of ladybugs are there? There are over five thousand different species or types of ladybugs in the world. And as Kent said, it's not just the spots that vary, their colors can vary, too, but those colors are basically always there to warn predators that the lady bug will taste terrible now. Some of you are probably wondering why they're called ladybugs. Anyway or maybe you aren't even sure what insect were actually talking about. Not everyone calls them ladybugs for example. If you live in the United Kingdom you might call them, lady, birds or Ladybird Beetles and Kent says he actually doesn't like the name Lady Bug because they're Beatles, not bugs, so that's right now and they're not all ladies.

Antarctica North America Remote Center Frigo Studies Re Mcfarland United States Kent Seattle Fahd Beatles Rwanda United Kingdom Asia Claire Missouri Washington
How Many Continents Are There?

BrainStuff

04:20 min | Last month

How Many Continents Are There?

"Two plus two equals four the world's Brown. There are seven continents on earth. But that last one isn't quite so cut and dried here. In the United States students learned that there are seven continents North, America. South America Europe Asia. Africa, Australia and Arctic. But that's hardly the last word on the matter and much of Europe students learn that there are six continents Africa. America Antarctica Asia Australia slash. And Europe. There's a five continent model which lists Africa. Europe Asia America and Oceana Slash Australia, and that's by the way why there are five rings on the Olympic, flag. And, some experts think that four is the way to go using as their criteria landmasses. Separated by water rather than manmade So Afro Eurasia America and Arca and. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, some people said there were just too. It's the old including Europe Africa and Asia and the new encompassing north and South America. So what really makes a continent continent? We spoke by email with Dan Montello. A geography professor at the University of California Santa Barbara he said nothing really determines a continent except historical convention, a bit of an overstatement, but mostly valid a certain factors make a landmass more or less likely to be called a continent at various times in history by various people, but nothing can be said to determine continent tally, a completely principled, non arbitrary way. Take for example, the vast country of Russia six point, six million square miles or seventeen million square kilometers a why has often been counted as part of Europe, rather than Asia Montello explained. The Euro Mountains are taken to separate Asia and Europe. But only because Russians wanted their great city of Moscow to be European, so the euros were a convenient marker for that arbitrary decision. Continents are mostly spatially contiguous collections of landmasses larger than countries, but smaller than hemispheres of course cotton's do not necessarily fit entirely within single earth hemispheres, and thus cannot be defined by ranges of latitude or longitude. Okay, so how about plate tectonics if certain landmasses are constrained to one of those massive shifting hulks? Can we safely call it? A continent Montello Says No. Quote Plate tectonics has nothing to do with it historically, and it certainly could not provide a principal basis for continents now. Nearly every continent includes parts of multiple plates. The. Same goes for climate after all continents contain multiple climates as evidenced by Alaska's Arctic. Chill compared with Florida's humid heat. They're both part of North, America. Mountain ranges and coastlines are useless to as our culture and politics. Montella said neither ethnicity race culture nor politics has ever defined continents except by conventional theories that were largely mythical such as old and fallacious ideas about correspondences between races and continents. Politically Hawaii is part of the US but is in Oceania rather than north. America Greenland is controlled by Denmark for now, but is considered part of the North American continent. So really it boils down to whom and when you ask Montello, said no one can say as a matter of principle fact, how many cotton's there are because the decisions are largely based on convention and convention that goes in and out of fashion over time, and is still debated today. He concedes these days. Many geographers would opt for a list of

Europe Dan Montello Asia Hawaii United States America Russia Asia Montello Africa South America Oceana Slash Australia Plate Tectonics Arca Moscow Euro Mountains Australia Alaska
The Ice Shelf Garden

National Trust Podcast

04:52 min | 2 months ago

The Ice Shelf Garden

"Job seats working in life support systems that may eventually support astronauts on missions to the Moon and Mars. These are places where poor is unlikely to see who were in action, but in Twenty Fifteen Paul was given the opportunity to join a crew on a mission where be in charge of testing a life support system that would help subsist. Subsist an isolated crew in one of the furthest flung frontiers, not humans pull was going to Antarctica the continent often tactic half is next best place you can garbage very similar to living and working on the mood to wasn't quite the Moon Amas. It wasn't even the job pool was expecting. The official title was systems engineer about the most commonly used as laws on Octagon A- die, I was doing gardening and growing vegetables and OCTA. Pool was going to be part of a team that would be tasked with building and Transport Espace. Greenhouse called even I s to Attica Bay on the eskimo Ice Shelf in eastern Antarctica. The I S S would be stationed at a research base where poor and the crew would spend twelve months, but for nine of these months that'd be is elated from the outside world and poor would be solely responsible for the cruise supply of fresh fruit. There's just one problem garden in wasn't pose particular forte. I've done some some gardening. A child in the garden I would say I had not much experience with that. So in just a few weeks had to master the scientific gardening art of Arrow, politics. So. Soil normally already has all the nutrients the plans need, and when you water, the soil, water dilutes the nutrients and make them available for the roots of the plants can use the nutrients to grow, but with their opponents things were differently. The roots are basically hanging free in the air and are sprayed with water and nutrients every two minutes, so it turns out Paul. Skills as an engineer were perfectly suited to the task of Space Garden. We have a very technical greenhouse, the control the climate, the temperature immediately you the CO two level all systems that keep the plants alive so that they can produce food for the crew. So after months of preparation, it was finally time for poor to make his way to Antarctica. Even the first leg of this adventure could be an epic seven day journey. Surfer cool. It was faster flight from his home town of Bremen to meeting. From unique to Cape Town. Then, a native of three days for his Antarctic bound flight. From south. Africa is still nieve about six hours flights. And Star this just felt like another routine flight. Bomblet flight number to go to a normal check in desk. Instead of auditing, the normal flights, your flight, one doctor. Then you sit in this APP plane of people from different to countries. They'll really excited. Enter the aircraft with some cloves. The crudes cooling down the path. That everybody is changing. All, clothing governor nerves. I'm boss for plunk him. I'm a professional social psychology to University of boss ambassadors, main area of research is into the psychology of habit or people don't realize how many have is we have? And that comes to the to the fore when you are the want to change behavior or have to change behavior I often have an overestimation of how easy or how good we are in changing. What's what we usually do, so we? We overestimate our willpower, says one of the most effective times to get the better of your habits is at a time of drastic change so when you're devoid of all the routine and triggers that allow your old habits to prevail. Happy sign not triggered by your patient or your willpower, your intentions, but trick triggered by cues in the environment. The Eight o'clock cure for instance is trigger to to go to work or certain moments in the day you to to take snack. They have not think that you decide. It's not willpower. It's it's environment. That's that's cues. The TRICO sits so pause lockdown Antarctica an hour lockdowns in our. Our homes would create these almost blank canvases for creating new

Antarctica Pool Paul Attica Bay Trico Systems Engineer Africa Engineer Space Garden Cape Town Transport Espace Official University Of Boss Bremen
"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:35 min | 2 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

"So the daily penguins. Alex put said she has seen many more humpbacks over the last few years in line with reports of their recovery from wailing up to the nineteen sixties. I've found some fascinating organisms. Floating singly and in chains in the ocean and stranded on the Antarctic beaches. The selfs these rather delicate and beautiful creatures look like jellyfish but because they have a central nervous chord a more closely related to humans. Each one had a clear to like body encasing. An orange beach shaped got soaps farther plankton and they facie struck quickly to the ocean floor with the benefit of locking carbon down there. We do not know what it's helps but penguins don't they have exotic reproductive behavior and can transition through two generations in a day where there is abundant krill. The self seem to be rare and vice versa. The experts on my ship. I saw them just ten years ago. So yes some things are changing in the Antarctic or visited and I came. Home is concerned about this out of the world as I am about others but I was amazed that the Antarctic Treaty. Coalition of fifty four countries manages it using just trust and collaboration because no one actually owns this fall place. The International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators I auto under a similar impressive arrangement overseas safe and environmentally responsible traveled to Antarctica. What concerned Al Guides was the increasing? Number of tourists ships. We saw a monster ship carrying thousands of passengers. The guides came to measure the impact of tourism on Antarctica because the number of ships is growing rapidly with fifty five thousand tourists visiting last season. I'm told that seven years ships are being built for Antarctic voyages. This could impact the continents plant and animal life but ocean. It say their studies had so far found no evidence of damage to penguin colonies from visitors however with increases in tourism and the use of flights in and out it seems the threat to habitat will only rise with pressure to open up new travel destinations numbers so many numbers in the sideshow and so important that was medical research of Sally Smith who now farms walnuts and I see the news. This week that Krill yes combined weight equal to all people on Earth those griller expected to move north according to PhD student. Divvy Bichir from the University of Tasmania..

Antarctica Al Guides Antarctic International Association of A Alex Krill Sally Smith University of Tasmania
Climate change turning Antarctica's snow green

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:18 sec | 3 months ago

Climate change turning Antarctica's snow green

"Dhoni during snow over climate change turning parts of Antarctica green the slimy kind of green scientists have backed a microscopic algae bloom across the surface of the melting snow there and some regions a single cell life form is so dense it turns the snow bright green can be seen from

Dhoni
Noisy by Nature: Elephant Seals

Imagine This

05:37 min | 4 months ago

Noisy by Nature: Elephant Seals

"Welcome to noisy by nature my name. He's an my favorite thing to do is to use my ears and listen to the different. Sounds that night makes. I love the sound of frogs and when the wind how but my favorite sounds of the weed ones and I have a very funny one for you. Today I am in the middle of the ocean. Well I'm not in the ocean. Exactly I'm on a teeny tiny island halfway between Australia and then Tactica no matter which direction I look. I can't see any other land out there and we that any other land to protect me from the wind. I'm nearly getting blood up my fate. A newly lost my hat. I think I need to get out of the swings. Walk down to the beach. I think it'll be more protected from the winds who that's been season a normal beach though. The whole beach is covered in smooth round pebbles and rocks. Can you hear the waves sh? I'm going to try and walk to the other end of the beach. Lets us out is to listen to all the things along the way speeches. He's really busy. Actually it's really noisy back. That's squawking is coming from some blackened. What Birds Rolling around the beach? Do you know what birds they might be obtained wins. They can't fly but they can swim. What else can you hear? This is strange noise. Coming from those huge Brown lumps lying on the beach. Very weird noise. It's sounds a little bit rude. Those creatures they have long Brown bodies we the short flipper like tail. Tiny little dog is and two flavors that are kind of like hands and some of the bigger ones. They have a really big long knows all my slacking elephants trunk. They must be elephants seals. Think they doing a big fluffy. I don't think they're fluffing. I think the sounds are coming from their mouths or maybe their noses funny. I think the little baby elephants seals are talking to them. Mums making sure. They don't go too far away and the Huge Dad Elephant. Seals are on patrol. So no other. Dads get too close to this but on the beach. Oh the data elephant seals enormous. They are the only ones with those speak noses to did you know that Dad elephant seals are so big that they can be heavier than I car. That is very heavy. No wonder they just lie on the beach like these. It must be hard for them to move on. I'M NOT GONNA get too close. I don't want to fry it to them and they frighten me a little bit too because then so be excuse me that are look very graceful on land but when they're in the ocean they glide through the water we'd this smooth bodies and special flippers. They can dive down deep towards the bottom of the ocean to find food. They can even hold their breath for up to two hours. That's really long time. Elephants seals can be found all around Antarctica and its nearby islands. What are we nature sound?

Brown Tactica Australia
Scientific Hiccup

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:03 min | 4 months ago

Scientific Hiccup

"All Welcome to kiss Miss Misery. Sime your host kit chrome hoping you're healthy and staying sheltered in place today. I'm going to talk about scientific hiccups and I'll begin with the woolly mammoths arose about five point. One million years ago in Africa according to the curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated throughout Europe Asia North America. Their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing the woolly. Mammoth we know today. They began roughly two hundred fifty thousand years ago. Mammoths went extinct about ten thousand years ago. Hoops that's the first scientific hiccup more like three thousand five hundred years ago. Scientists now believe in isolated population of mammals persisted on Wrangel Island off northeastern eastern Costa Siberia and deep in Canada's Northwest Territory and World Heritage Site than Hani Valley. They were there until about three thousand seven hundred years ago. The ten thousand year more of extinction is in most textbooks though. But let's take a closer look at that date. The prominent theory that made it into most textbooks and the cyclopes. Pedia is ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through Eurasian orth America driven by the last ice age. What scientists called police to seen ice age following the food supply? If that's the case that it makes sense that some ended up in the valley because it was never touched by the last ice age and yes sponsor the mammoth have actually been found in that region. But this isn't the first theory published in a textbook as fact that is founded. It's been believed yes. Baited into text books that the continent of at Artika has been covered by ice for millions of years again. Oops scientific hiccup. The Perry reese map drawn in. Fifteen thirteen shows a northern coast of Antarctica. Ice-free the most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be so accurate three hundred years before and articles discovered but that the map shows the real coastline under the ice geological. Evidence has confirmed. How could that have happened or been charted in an ice free age four thousand years ago which is what science states? That was the last time that Arctic was ice free officials. Science has been saying all along that the ice cap which covers the Antarctic is millions of years old. The Perry reese at Arctic amount shows it the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it that could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time. Furthermore accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice-free condition in that Arctic area the northern tip ended about six thousand years ago the question is who mapped Queen Maud Land of Antarctica. Six thousand years ago which unknown civilization had the technology or the need to do that. I want to state at this point. That the Perry map has been validated as being real and brought back to that data. Fifteen thirteen it is not a about that which made twenty years. I pushed office something true. I want to touch on just one. More scientific kick up nestled in the ancient city of Papun Kabul. Libya are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of pyramids each block. Wade from two hundred to four hundred tonnes. Nothing unusual there. The city dates back to five three six ad yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found giant staple liked clamps. That it in place and we're used to hold the blocks together. Wait a minute. How could the indigenous people with no knowledge of metallurgy have created these clamps and worded the metal used for them? Come from? But this isn't the only case of clamps be used to hold giants Jones together and Cambodia's Angor Watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the side of the temple from a nearby mountain bias. Here's waterways close inspection. The stones that are scattered around the side has revealed carved indentations receptacles for metal clamps. Says kind of interesting. How about an eerie coincidence? Just outside the magnificent ruins of anger. What Stanton Asian Pyramid temple known as boxy CAM gone now from? Cambodia travel eight thousand miles to Guatemala and the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at to call is the temple of the Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid Guatemala. The similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that don't exist in other pyramids or temples however most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up to the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on top once there you could see. There's a small door goes inside the pyramid and there's another internal structure that looks the same basically. What you have here is an ancient civilization in Cambodia and another in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles away featuring credible similarities that no one has been able to explain. Thus my idea of being a scientific hiccup because when you read in the textbooks is different than what facts

Perry Reese Cambodia Africa Stanton Asian Pyramid Temple Pyramid Guatemala American Museum Of Natural His Europe New York Pedia Artika Arctic Guatemala Wrangel Island Papun Kabul Hani Valley Antarctic Tacoma Canada Queen Maud Land
If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

Science Friction

08:06 min | 4 months ago

If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

"You've said at one point that you think. Weist is beautiful. This zero philosophy is in a sense in practice for you. Isn't it one thing really like my life is just one big experiment you know. We had all sorts of experience. Guy On knock Ou- out offcuts of Broccoli with given to a Guy. Campbell had crickets growing. And he's and he's building and and there was a transaction. We paid him for the crickets. And what did the cricket stay ate the Broccoli yes. I'm quite obsessed with a nutrient density as well so fat soluble vitamins. How do you get all your vitamins? And crickets are a great source of that. And then you know. There's a lot of food that can be composted what about intercepting it. Before it gets composted and getting the most out of out of them and yeah we had them on the menu and we roast them and look like really a little bit like prawns in a sense. It's whatever you garnish them with. So we had salt Bush dehydrated and then mixed with salt and pepper and then some kelp dehydrated. People loved it. Okay so almost no waste zero. Yeah I can honestly say that we had zero waste and even the table was made from reconstituted plastic that came from Adelaide which company that makes bump recycled bumper bars. And we Lebron's I love the fact that out rubbish bins because there wasn't a rubbish bin in the place that's right. Yeah was any of these economically viable. I mean when I think about the restaurant and food industry. It's all about cost cutting isn't it? Food costs a very low but me because very hard. Because you're making butter from scratch making your grinding your own flour to make bread. You were making money yet. We were and then headed the council respond to you. How did regulate is and the Health Department released on? Ta The interesting thing we saw was counseled loved it and support it but it was relying on an invisible imposter. A Korean investment compost machine which took one hundred kilos plus of waste a day and would through bacteria and hate. Turn that into ten percent of volume pretty much overnight so this is like a loop yes. I would take it back and put it on my phone and grow more food. That was that was the idea. Originally four really beans and my goal was to get all the surrounding cafes to supply as well. I wanted to get that whole line way. Basically organic waste free and at just over one hundred twenty miles. It went on for years and Indian I just had a full and then it just got to a point where the threaten the V. Cat and my lease was up and decided enough's enough is enough. I it needs to be on wheels because it's crown land so wheels on it but then you've got it on wheels but it's plugged into the wall so it's technically building just went on and on and on and people at the city will argue that. It's not the case but I went to so many meetings own it went on for so long the Iraqis at the best year yet so it was just a wonder two. We've got a very different men now. I wonder if I would open it today. I think sally would be very different. And make sure that the people down and it wasn't their fault. Either this is like a law. That's one hundred years old. You go at bureaucrats but food safety is a wonderful thing. I'm mighty glad that I don't risk my life. Well I probably do. But you know the bugs extensively. Don't get me and don't kill me thank penicillin for that or thank medicine for that. All thank food safety laws and regulations that so these things are set up to Cape as well and healthy as well. The for the right reasons. I mean the reason why faces in European killed people in the during the gold rush. The contaminated water was killed people. There's a reason why these laws exist. Yes if you want to go carbon and look out of your lovely hotel room that you're staying in at at the river flowing underneath and the kids playing in it and then guide hospital. You'll find out that about half the hospital. Bids are filled with children. Who have drunk the water and the system doesn't work what we call the great centralized system of taking water from well outside the city using it and getting the pathogens as far away from the people as possible has worked for a very long time. So it's a good system but it. It's not a sustainable system anymore. It was a great system when it was invented. It's no longer a great system. The laws about keeping the pathogens and the chemicals away from the people still great laws. Yeah we just have to reinvent here we do it so you want a radical rethink of how we think about waste about how we think about water. How we think about sewerage. What would you like to see done differently? And why I believe we could have enough water in the city for twenty five million people currently when we get to eight million. We're going to have to build a new diesel nation plant. We have taking salt water and making it. Fresh is very expensive way to do it and it. It perpetuates the model that we will go and find new water rather than fix up the water that we pollute every day and throw away. The problem is that we would need to exploit that. We would need to move to a distributed model. Not Unlike a an energy model an engine model would say we'll generate half my electricity in my house and it might not be the most efficient thing to do might do it at a precinct scale and dealing with wastewater is not something I would recommend the public does however at a precinct scale. We could create a new suburb was sustainable. In terms of its water us so we have a wastewater treatment plant and WOULDA treatment plant. That are the same thing so it would just be a water treatment plant. It would take at polluted. Water would take watering from sources. That may or may not be polluted and in Australia. We spent a lot of time protecting those sources but around the world on average we still use that model in the sources on predicted working Sarabhai or any new Asia with river that supplies the water for the city is twenty times more concentrated in wastewater than what we dispose of this wastewater. Wow here and yet die. Beehive as though it's a clean water source in terms of the purification process if they just accepted that distributed model it said it is polluted wastewater with clean it up as though it was wastewater. Let's do it properly. Let's produce gripe water in in actual fact. That city could change very radically if they try it as the centralized piece. It's very difficult. You've got to build huge sewage. You've got to build reservoirs you've got to build a whole range of things if you do it. As a distributed system you could actually stop tomorrow and so this model in a Harvard sense for a Melbourne. Where new suburbs could be like that but for other CDs with his saying. We're GONNA put in sewage system. I say why would we do that? I mean th th thinking about that Indonesian example. You climb that we can process. We produce water that is cleaner more pure in a sense than tap water if I look at the waters of the world and we do that for a living and I look at what we can produce out of recycled plant currently in Antarctica by any test chemical biological any taste. You WanNa do. We are far cleaner than any tap water in the world

Weist Campbell OU Broccoli Melbourne Lebron Penicillin Health Department Adelaide Australia Sally Cape
Swarm finally gets full regulatory approval to launch its satellites

Geek News Central

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Swarm finally gets full regulatory approval to launch its satellites

"Sworn remember about swarm swarm is finally got full regulatory approval to launch satellites even though it had launch some already without necessary approvals so sworn violated. Fcc Rules of course to pay nine hundred thousand dollar penalty. The company appears ready. Move on and received regulatory approval. Operate commercially in. Us In in and in several other countries over international waters where step closer providing affordable satellite activity the world so in two thousand seventeen the AFC denied application launches satellite saying they could pose a safety hazard swore went ahead and launched sport. Cubesats without tearing necessary approvals. They weren't happy about that. So ultimately storm hopes to play in satellite data. Work that can be used for Iot. Applications swarm now has gone station. Us UK Antarctica New Zealand and the stores and exp expect to have brown thirty more ground stations. So we'll see what happens with them.

FCC United States IOT AFC New Zealand UK
Science News Briefs from around the Planet

60-Second Science

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Science News Briefs from around the Planet

"From the Dominican Republic. A Sunken Museum Adlakha. Later Underwater National Park will preserve in place a ship that sank in seventeen twenty five complete with real and replica. Artifacts kept under water for people to explore submerged artifacts often degrade faster when removed from the sea from Greenland new simulations indicate that Iraqi valley detected under the islands icesheet may contain sixteen hundred kilometer long subterranean river flowing from central greenland to its Northern Coast from Greece. Archaeologists uncovered gold jewels and beads in a large building on the now uninhabited. Minoan island of Chrissy a location. That about thirty five hundred years ago was devoted to making purple dye from sea snails called Miramax from England. Researchers found seventeen hundred year old chicken eggs along with other ancient objects in a waterlogged pit in southeastern England. A few eggs broke during extraction releasing a sulphurous smell but one remained intact making it. The only complete egg found from Roman Britain. We can't do archaeology without breaking some eggs from Australia to help boost Sydney Harbour's endangered seahorse population. Scientists bread baby seahorses in an aquarium and built crab trap like hotels to protect them as they adapt to the wild and from Antarctica. Scientists test drove a meter long wheeled rover that streamed live of the depths as it rolled along the underside of Antarctic ice. The Buoyant Rover for under ice exploration could someday explore frozen overseas on worlds such as Jupiter's Moon Europa

Greenland Sunken Museum Adlakha Dominican Republic Southeastern England Underwater National Park Minoan Island Miramax Chrissy Sydney Harbour Iraqi Valley England Roman Britain Australia Greece
Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

Science Talk

09:37 min | 4 months ago

Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

"This is scientific. American science talk posted on March. Twenty seven twenty twenty. I'm Steve Mirsky. I'm going to let my guest introduce himself in a moment because he does a better job than I could. Midway through the following discussion. We'll take a break for a short segment sponsored by the Calveley prize with Caltech Planetary Astronomer. Michael Brown who has done groundbreaking work though solar system breaking work on the Kuyper belt and its largest members. His segment is not unrelated to what will be talking about now. It's not about corona virus. You'll find some parallels to how some people are reacting to corona virus. Buckle up so I'm Michael Marshall and I'm the project director of the good thinking society which is a charity based in the UK the whole purpose charities to promote science to challenge pseudoscience. So we'll do work Ford Science Education and then another PA the work that we do. The bulk of my work is to find ideas. That aren't backed by evidence and find people who are promoting those ideas find people who are buying into those ideas and to explore them and figure out if anything can be done to prevent people being confused by them Hound by the misled by them and those kinds of things. So I spent a lot of time looking at things like alternative cancer kills and the people who promote those and alternative medicine spent a lot my time going to see people who say they can talk dead. Oku can do faith healing and then another part of my time is spent token people who believe in unusual ideas and kind of proponents. And that's how I came across the flat. Earth world is through my slightly odd a hobby at the time before I was working. Fulltime as as a skeptic is a hobby of mine to be in rooms filled if he who disagree with me to just understand what brings people to ideas that. I would look at and say well. This can't be true. These kind of fringe and extreme and unusual beliefs. What brings people to believe them? And what what? What kind of path leave people there will? Evidence supports supports that position in their minds. And how do they engage with the world with that worldview and try and have conversations? Podcast where I talked to people who have kind of fringe beliefs and instead of having a conversation that a lot of people have if they are a skeptic about something and they're talking to believe where you shout at them and tell them never home and point out all the evidence and tell you gets into a volatile discussion sometimes instead of that. I've tried to have a civil and polite chat to try and explore the gap between us. So I don't believe in this idea of yours but I'm reading to figure out why I don't believe it. Why do so? Let's have a conversation? So have these kind of civil discussions and that's kind of how I came across That the flatter theory and the idea that there are people walking around today. Who think well this flat. This is really interesting and serendipitous that were sitting here because I knew that there were some flatter. Thor's out there and I just thought it was kind of strange and funny and about a week ago I discovered a friend of mine who is very well educated. She got a doctorate in biochemistry and She has a sister who's also very intelligent and very well educated and my friend told me that her sister is a flatter and that her sister is very indignant about the idea that We don't take them seriously and she said something to the effectiveness is hearsay. That we're getting for me right now. That will you know if you looked at the evidence. Then you'd know that what you've been told isn't true. So all of a sudden became fascinated with the flat earth people and then Just on twitter and I had I had been a follower verve yours until I saw this tweet that somebody I follow must've re tweeted that you had just given a talk in Edinburgh where I have been and So I reached out to you and it turns out you live in Liverpool and here I am in Liverpool today. So that's why we're here talking so tell me what do the flat Earth People Think and why do they think it so to your packet question that will bit because it's very easy for us to see the flat? Earth Movement is one singular cohesive movement and. That's how I I thought about it when I first came across in two thousand thirteen when I came across the flutter society in the UK. And so I had a conversation with the vice president of the Flat Earth Society and I assumed you probably have in your mind that people who believe the world is flat thing that the world's disk and in the center you've got the Arctic Circle then you've got all the continents of the world are splayed out to fill the circle. Antarctica is like the edge of disk. But I found out when I first spoke to flatter societies that not everyone in the world has that version of the world and the heads. Some do believe it's a disc but others believe that. Yes the Arctic Circle in the middle the landmasses around it and then on top Around the edge but instead of it being discreet disc some people believe in fact Antactica just on forever and all directions and so they believe that the earth is actually an infinite plane in all directions that bisects reality which is a really lovely idea. What does that mean by? Second three dollars so it will go on. North South East West go on forever and there is the above and the below. But there's no way of getting from the top to the bottom because it's just infinity of all ice in all directions forever so there's no way of getting below the earth and so this was when. I first came across the floor of moving in two thousand thirteen. This quite vociferous debate that was going on and the website of the three in the flat. Earthers yeah it was. It was quite a schism really and so they'd the society. The the time was largely a forum where they would bring forth that proofs of one version this theory or another and I also think there's another schism going on in the movement at the time Which is between one side which people who genuinely really believed the world was flat and the other side which after he did not believe it but enjoyed intellectual pursuit of arguing a position than you false and so they would find quite esoteric off the wall proofs that most people wouldn't think of and so when I first came across it in two thousand thirteen there are people waiting into these arguments who believe the world is round but had never thought about it the fall but just assumed innocent of arrogant way that they must know better than anybody who's thought about it and come to a different conclusion and so they were stumping into these arguments saying well what about photos of the earth from space and what about this and what about ships going with the rise in thinking. Well this is the Gotcha but not realizing that those are the first things they thought about that. They thought the world approved walls around. And therefore it's probably likely that people who think the world is flat had the same idea and yet they're still flat earth So at least in their mind they must have a good answer to that. The people believe the world was round in these arguments. Didn't have 'cause they'd never scrutinize the idea. They rejecting enough and so what was happening. Was I think to a degree? The part of the schism that were just having fun and move very well. The world wasn't flat but just enjoyed the pursuit of doing that. They will winning those arguments of people who are coming in and arrogantly assuming that they could answer everything and in winning those arguments they were really converting even more people who really believed it. And so you had this kind of effect where we saw spiral out of control a little bit. But I think it it wasn't viral in the way that in two thousand thirteen and a as a in the way that it was in two thousand sixteen in two thousand seventeen. I'm think PA that is because that ISA teric off wall version of proofs could be quite complicated to get your head around so for example if you have the disc version the world and the infinite plane version both muddles suffer from an inability to explain gravity. You don't have the spherical mass united central mass of a central point pulling it all two to one point So it's very difficult to explain. Gravity neither one models but these people who are doing kind of East Tarik arguments are saying well what gravity gravity and accelerate falls towards the ground. Think nine point. Eight meters per second. Squared accelerates downwards. They said that is identical to a world in which the ground accelerates upwards to meet you and so when you let go of something it isn't that it's accelerating downwards that it's the grounds accelerating up to meet it Sephora relativity and that's this is exactly where they come to you so people then say when if ground is if the earth is an infinite in all directions that by sex reality and is accelerating open at nine seconds and always has been since the dawn of time. You'd hit a problem which would be the speed of light. You can't go fast so people don't have a Gotcha for this. And so the people who were putting forth esoteric the wall trobisch arguments would say well look at Einstein's theory of relativity as you approach light speed time itself slows down and the mats in their head works back out again so yes beginning. Quick time getting slower and we can account for gravity in that way. And that's quite a complicated auditing Enron. And so I think the fact that these people were winning arguments was getting converting some people movement but the way in which they were winning them were keeping people away from the movement because they were quite complex ideas to you. Couldn't stick them on a mean as you can these days. Here's a picture of the earth. You couldn't explain all that stuff about the relatively proving gravitate infinite plane version of the world. So I think it was a limiting factor going on and that's why when I first came across the free movement it was probably still pretty small. Pretty unknown I've been given talks about pseudoscience for the last five six plus years and I've mentioned that I came across the Flat Earth. Moving and people would always say to me this. Nobody who actually believes that nobody actually doesn't really exist. That people having fun with stay quite small and then in. Twenty fifteen in two thousand sixteen a couple of things happened that really ignited a movement and it was the publishing of two videos on Youtube video series on Youtube. One I believe was Eric. Debate tuned approves the Spinning Globe. And the other was mark sergeants. Fourteen videos in his letter clue series.

Flat Earth Society UK PA Arctic Circle Earth Movement Liverpool Steve Mirsky Michael Brown Caltech Planetary Astronomer Calveley Youtube Cancer OKU Ford Science Education Twitter Michael Marshall Thor Antarctica
Coronavirus cases top 200,000 worldwide

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Coronavirus cases top 200,000 worldwide

"The number of coronavirus cases top two hundred thousand worldwide it's on every continent save Antarctica details on a spread in Russia have been limited but we learned something officials in Russia's presidential administration are being tested for corona virus the country's also expanding testing to everyone returned from Europe in the last fourteen days those who travel abroad in the past month and had flu like symptoms

Russia Europe Antarctica
Ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland increased sixfold in the last 30 years

CBS News Weekend Roundup

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

Ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland increased sixfold in the last 30 years

"A new analysis finds the polar ice caps are melting six times faster than they were in the nineteen nineties an international team on climate change says the ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland is contributing to rising sea levels around the globe the prediction is one final information comes in last year twenty nineteen will be a record year for ice loss because of what was considered to be an arctic heat

Greenland
Greenland and Antarctica ice loss accelerating

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 5 months ago

Greenland and Antarctica ice loss accelerating

"A new report finds something new at the ends of the earth a new analysis finds the polar ice caps are melting six times faster than they were in the nineteen nineties an international team on climate change says the ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland is contributing to rising sea levels are the globe the prediction is one final information comes in last year twenty nineteen will be a record year for ice loss because of what was considered to be an arctic

Greenland
Q&A: Coronavirus expert speaks about the spread of COVID-19 Pandemic

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

12:05 min | 5 months ago

Q&A: Coronavirus expert speaks about the spread of COVID-19 Pandemic

"So I'm really confused as to what the difference between a pandemic an epidemic is regardless of. Whatever you call it. People are starting to panic us. Everyone just going to be working remotely and avoiding travel for the foreseeable future. So just how serious is the corona virus situation really for you personally? There's no question. There is not really a sector of our society that has not been impacted by what has happened over. The last several weeks having covered a lot of these outbreaks over the last twenty years. I knew that the economy would be affected. But I don't think anyone could have predicted. Just how badly corona virus fears coupled with an oil price war with tank the markets. What is clear? Is that investors parents. Just about everyone is getting spooked. Look some of it is warranted in. Some of it is not and today. We're GONNA explain why I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Let's start at the beginning or at least as close to the beginning as possible. In December of last year a novel or New Virus started circulating in China and over the last three months virus spread to nearly one hundred countries in regions around the world. More than one hundred thousand people have been infected and around. Four thousand have died when you hear. The global fatality rate is around four percent. Now you have a rough idea of where they get those numbers. Let's also define some terms that are increasingly being used by public? Health officials and I will preface by saying sometimes they sound scarier than they are for example. You may have noticed that. Cnn shifted its terminology yesterday and started calling the ongoing corona virus situation. A pandemic truth is many public. Officials have been telling us that it meets the criteria for a pandemic for some time and I will share those criteria with you in a moment but still we thought long and hard about using this word. This is not a decision. We take lightly. We don't WANNA cause panic. We simply want everyone to be prepared. Individuals hospital systems cities and the country. So let me get some of your questions question. One first things first. What is a pandemic honestly? There isn't a universally agreed upon definition which was surprising to me. Many will describe it. Generally speaking as an outbreak that has spread to several countries incontinence. It typically affects a large number of people. Harvard epidemiologist Mark Lipstick. Says it helps to call a a horse a horse. I think it helps clarify that. It's not a series of locally contained outbreaks and when we see more cases it's not because necessarily those cases just appeared. It's finally testing them. I think the reporting to some extent has been that there are a few hundred cases at most the United States and that you know every day the number goes up a little bit when in fact there may be quite a number of more cases. Testing is critical here and with increased testing. We will certainly have increased numbers of those diagnosed with the infection but that is good news and bad news. The bad news is that the numbers will go up. The good news. Is that many of the people who test positive may not be that ill. And that will bring down that fatality ratio. Remember those numbers. We discussed earlier say that instead of four thousand people dying out of one hundred thousand which is a four percent fatality rate. Say instead it was four thousand people dying out of two hundred thousand. That would be two percent fatality rate. You get it. So it's more people test positive. It may bring that fatality ratio down. Also another important thing about a pandemic is that it does not necessarily mean. The symptoms of an illness are more serious or that the disease is more deadly. The three general criteria for a pandemic are a virus that can cause illness or death sustained person to person transmission of that virus and evidence of spread throughout the world. And that's what we're seeing with the novel Corona Virus. Right now question too. So why is CNN calling this pandemic now? Well words matter on Monday morning we made the decision that many epidemiologists and public health experts had already made to call the novel. Chronic virus pandemic essentially. We checked the final box. We already knew the virus was out there and we recently learned there was community spread after carefully evaluating the global picture. It is now clear. There is spread around the world in one day last week. The number of new cases outside of China was nearly nine times higher than the number of new cases in China. This virus has found a foothold on every continent except for Antarctica and in several countries the number of cases continues to climb again just to reiterate calling it. A pandemic doesn't necessarily mean it's more deadly. It's just more widespread so here. Cnn We knew using the word pandemic was a big decision. But we think it was the right one. Dr Anthony FAUCI Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Thinks the focus should be on what we do going. Forward people call that a pandemic is. Cnn would call a pandemic whol quo pin them. It's not GonNa make any difference with what we do. That's the point instead of people getting all bent out of shape about what you call it. It's a serious situation for sure. Question three so how does calling this a pandemic change things in terms of our response when something is considered a pandemic? It means that we've moved beyond this idea that we can simply contain the virus and now all the focus is on slowing the spread as much as possible. So that would be switching gears from containment to mitigation. Us Surgeon General. Dr Jerome Atoms explained this in an appearance on CNN state of the Union. This past Sunday. Initially we had a posture of containment. So that we could give people time to prepare for where we are right now. Now we're shifting into a mitigation faith which means that we're helping communities understand you're going to see more cases unfortunately you're going to see more deaths but that doesn't mean that we should panic but again it does mean that it is time to start preparing some countries around the world are taking drastic measures some of the largest quarantines ever recorded in history have taken place over the last few months. I in China and now in Italy where the entire country is in a state of lockdown could be recommended in the United States schools might be closed and mass gatherings cancelled in your town. It might mean changes at work or how you work as in working from home it might mean putting off a family vacation or catching up over the phone instead of getting together question for do we have the infrastructure to support this pandemic doctor. I think of the medical infrastructure first nurses doctors hospital beds. Icu beds and I am a little worried about that. For example if lots of medical staff get exposed to the virus and need to be quarantined. We could start to quickly have a shortfall at. Cnn's corona virus townhall last week. I asked Ron Clean about this clean. Was the Ebola response coordinator. Under PRESIDENT OBAMA GETTING OUR HEALTHCARE SYSTEM. Ready for this influx of cases is something we should be doing now. We saw China they. They built temporary hospitals. They really flexed up their capacity. And I think this is the point. We all need to think about the possible impact on our healthcare system is something we should be using this time. We'll cases ramp up to really get ready for the US Department of Health and Human Services is estimating that if this becomes even a moderate pandemic at least two hundred thousand people in the United States could need intensive care. Problem is at the moment. Are Hospitals have fewer than one hundred thousand beds in intensive care units and many of them are being used because we are in the middle of flu season and will need more equipment on hand as well like breathing machines again estimates are that we would need around sixty five thousand breathing machines and we have just barely enough with again? Many being currently used this is all a fundamental part of pandemic preparedness. And we need to be working to address these deficiencies and plan ahead question. Five should the elderly be afraid so many listeners have reached out to ask about their parents and their grandparents. And you know what? I've been speaking to my own parents every day down in Florida. Older people are worried understandably. We've been talking about the elderly in general terms as an at risk population. But I WANNA be clear about who that means when the CDC talks about older adults. They're really referring to anyone sixty years or older. Starting at age sixty there is increasing risk of disease and the risk increases with age the highest risk of serious illness and death people older than eighty years. That's Dr Nancy Mess and the Director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and respiratory disease. She was speaking in a teleconference on Monday. People who are at greatest risk are those who are older and you also have serious long term. Health conditions like diabetes heart disease or lung disease. You might not feel old if you're in your sixties but you do need to take precautions. Dr Anthony FAUCI warned. Even younger people need to think about the safety of older adults they interact with eighty percent of people will do well if they don't have any underlying conditions but you may get infected and then come home and infect your grandmother or grandfather who does have an underlying condition so each family unit each individual has the look about not only the risk for themselves but what risks will they putting the people around them in but just because you're older or have an underlying condition that doesn't mean it's fatal or that you'll even get seriously sick. It means you need to be prepared and take precautions. Use Good Judgment. Stay home as much as possible. Avoid crowded areas especially now and for the next several weeks. Stay away from sick people even if it is a granddaughter or grandson who you haven't seen in a while and if you do get sick you need to get tested and you need to seek treatment. The World Health Organization's Director General Pedro Adam gave races offered some optimistic words yesterday. Now that the virus has a foothold in so many countries that threat of abundance has become very real but it would be the first fund music in history that could be controlled. The bottom line is we are not at the mercy of the virus. The bottom line is humanity has overcome pandemics before in this globally connected world. We may be asked to add more social distance between one another but that doesn't mean we still can't collectively come together as a nation and as a world we'll be back tomorrow. Thanks for listening.

CNN China United States Dr Anthony Fauci Director Dr Sanjay Gupta Us Department Of Health And Hu National Institute Of Allergy World Health Organization Harvard CDC First Things First FLU Dr Jerome Atoms Antarctica
Africa has been spared so far from coronavirus

Morning Edition

04:05 min | 5 months ago

Africa has been spared so far from coronavirus

"The Australian farmers may have receded but coronavirus has surged yet again just like we feared it might when we talked about the rise in global cases last week it's on all continents except Antarctica which hardly counts but still Africa is being only touched slightly but that he's with the world health experts fear the impacts could be the greatest if the virus does take hold because of the many health challenges already facing the continent Saudi organ solo helped establish a pan African infection prevention network after the ibotta outbreaks of twenty fourteen and fifteen and she's a professor of clinical microbiology at the university of lake house since a bola all the twenty nine Lavery trees across the country have the capability this last case we tested the two this was done at my university the it's been a lot of training in terms of collecting samples we've done that with a single patient we have a word presently monitoring the suspect and the contact over the station you mentioned V. po la not forgotten until I read your article the a bona had reached Nigeria nexus because you were able to handle it quite quickly which must be encouraging to you the fear of the boiler allowed us to do a lot of things in a way it also helped us to evaluate the structures we had in place which had not been tested but these structures are not evenly spread out across the country one of the reasons we were successful was because he came to legal state our legal state hi good public health infrastructure and so it was not difficult to scale all and at that time the other thing that happened was that we were able to come together so you had public sector private sector everybody works together all from different political parties with their parties aside the people in the U. epidemiologist posing with incumbent in the university is works together so there were a lot of feet on the ground and I was part of this response and it was I mean it was quite heavy for us to wake up in the morning you go to the emergency operations center which we have around the country's now and have all been activated because of this virus present we've had the NCDC that's the Nigeria centre for disease control has been empowered how does this work has been in the tracking of Lassa fever right now I agree to warranty is Lassa fever we having an epidemic of last a few which is more deadly than the coronavirus for us the death rates are worse and so when running actually at this present time working on Twitter that makes at the same time when I listen to the World Health Organization press conferences that comes across to me as one of that worries that it's the additional strain that may be put on Africans health services as opposed to the just the coronavirus the fact that there are other issues and the sort of the strength in depth of some services may be tested we will be tested definitely some countries for short like South Africa will be quite ready and have a lot more systems in place I'm some countries of war and I suspect some of the west African country is a work ID hit by a bullet this is how we can healthcare systems so they're less prepared we trained people from Ethiopia Namibia Malawi I think the G. five countries and we're going to go up on next week to train another twenty three countries so how ready every countries I can't tell you show a lot of countries are still young in the area of preparedness and notes are not as strong and as

More testing sheds light on how virus is spreading in US

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

More testing sheds light on how virus is spreading in US

"At king least county six Washington people have public died health officer in a corona Dr virus Jeff Duchin outbreak says in the the virus Seattle suburb it elderly and already ill patients king county we Washington have an outbreak public health officer at Dr the long Jeff term care Duchin facility says the life virus Karen currently it elderly Kirkland and already Duchin ill says patients all of those made we have ill an by outbreak the virus have at similar the long health term problems care facility before life Karen the currently outbreak Kirkland he has Duchin the number says of all fatalities of those made and serious ill by illnesses the virus have is similar far health less problems than the before actual number the outbreak of likely infections he has the number in of fatalities the area and serious it's important illnesses to understand is that the vast far majority less of these cases than the actual that number are milder of likely going undetected infections in the the worldwide area death it's important toll tops to understand three that the vast thousand majority of these the number cases of known that infections are mild are going rose undetected to about eighty nine the worldwide thousand death in seventy toll tops countries three thousand on every continent the number of but known infections Antarctica rose to about I'm Tim eighty McGuire nine thousand and seventy countries on every continent but Antarctica I'm timid wire

Officer Washington Karen Kirkland Antarctica Mcguire Jeff Duchin Seattle Duchin TIM
"antarctica" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on AP News

"Ones a record high temperature in Antarctica may have been recorded by an Argentine research base clear knowledge as a media officer with the U. N.'s world meteorological organization it's among the fastest warming regions of the planet we have a lot about the arctic but you know this particular part of the talked in an insular is warming very quickly the Esperanza based on the continent's northwest tip near South America recorded a reading shot at a women's sporting event set in nineteen ninety nine at the FIFA World Cup final in Pasadena California Perry said in a statement that she is all about celebrating a quality and the achievements of women Britain is set for another royal wedding Buckingham Palace announced Friday that Queen Elizabeth the second grand daughter princess Beatrice will marry in London the palace says Beatrice's thirty one and real estate entrepreneur and water my belly multi who's thirty seven we went in the chapel royal of some changes palace the queen will host a reception afterwards at Buckingham Palace Beatrice the elder daughter of prince Andrew and his ex wife Sarah Ferguson announcer engagements to multi last year he's a Briton descended from a noble Italian family the wedding date is set for may the twenty ninth seven five wire on Alexander and his twin brother army lieutenant colonel Yevgeny than men were both removed from their jobs at the White House president trump's response to Alexander's testimony to Congress in the impeachment investigation defense secretary mark Casper tells reporters have been mens are still in the service we welcome back all of our service members were they serve to any assignment they're they're given I'd I would refer you to to the army for any more detail on that a short time later ambassador Gordon son on who also testified announce he was recalled immediately from his post as ambassador to the European Union trump also take shots as on the Democrats running to take his place especially critical the problems with the Iowa caucuses embarrassing hello I'm not overly embarrassed by it I see the shows is going to this day it is a disaster trump is going to kill us on this one they're right seven of the Democrats running for president debate ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary former vice president Joe Biden says he expects to take a hit since voters in the state normally back candidates from New Hampshire or neighboring states tech entrepreneur answer to Yang says while he and the others all want to defeat president trump in November his fellow Democrats are wrong in thinking trump is the problem he feels the problems this country faces have been growing for years if not decades more cases more deaths from the corona virus in China more people have been flown out of China to the U. S. where they will be quarantine for two weeks doctor Robert Redfield heads the CDC this is a serious global public health situation and it continues to fall rapidly it's understandable that Americans are concerned but again the immediate risk to the American public is low the CDC says it's unlikely people arriving from China will have symptoms this is a P. news a federal judge hands down the toughest sentence yet in the college admissions bribery scandal involving rich parents in top universities a B. Jackie Quinn with more Douglas Hodge has received the harshest penalty yet nine months in prison a three quarter of a million dollar fine and community service prosecutors say the sixty two year old former investment company C. E. O. paid out eight hundred fifty thousand dollars in bribes to get four of his children into the university of southern California and Georgetown University as fake athletic recruits he also allegedly tried to get another son into Loyola Marymount Hodges apologized in a statement read in court for tipping the scales in favor of his children over others more than fifty people were charged in the admissions team including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin I'm Jackie Quinn a total of twenty parents have pleaded guilty I'm to McGuire AP news more news right after this thank you for we.

Antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:46 min | 6 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Rejoining US Antarctica as we've just been hearing is an unusual place and it has a fittingly unusual history here to talk us through. It is Camila nickel chief chief executive of the Antarctic Heritage Trust Camilla is a straightforward answer to the question of who governs. Antarctica is nobody. It's governed under an international treaty under which fifty four nations have signed it and fifty one nations signed up to the the ideals and the cruises within the treaty. And it's through the treaty did it and taught to his governed so nobody ends it. There are territorial claims being talk about that a little bit more but these are set. Aside on the Antarctic Treaty there is that smaller cohort of countries smaller than the fifty four much smaller. Who Do actually claim a chunk of it? I can't remember being nerd ish enough that I I did have a small more collection of Australian Antarctic territory postage stamps as a kid. That's right So the pair between one thousand nine hundred and the second war number of nations put forward sovereign claims claims to portions of Antarctica UK. Was I possibly not surprisingly the U. K.. The first cave in one thousand nine eight then shortly thereafter. They encouraged strongly main coverage Australia New Zealand to do the same so they are still under president to that time. Of course. That's three unions. Eat and you have no way another with a big Antarctic nation and France as well and then you have the USA and Russia and the Soviet Union they were then they claim the right to claim the whole thing at any point in the future. Why was there that extraordinary gap between the discovery of Antarctica? Two hundred years ago this week and those first claims being asserted in the early years of the twentieth century. Was it just that everybody looked at time tactic and just thought. What are you supposed to do that and decided to leave it there? Well the vest discovery it came about as she because the sealy industry so the nations were looking for new stocks of seals. In who gets you'll pelts and sell them back up north and in the eighteen twenties there are a number number of ships operational Dan so she's getting more more further south and it was only the few pining brave souls that measure penetrate the first I drake passage which isn't a torty difficult passage of water but also into the ice so fifty years previously in seventeen seventy s captain cook course famous circumnavigates Antarctica. Okay Cross Antarctic Circle. Three times failed to spot the continent. If you look at the map of where he went to you could see the you've just crossed a little bit higher. He probably would have seen something but it was ice conditions and the small ships and they weren't ice strengthened ships. These these vessels. They're using so they couldn't be terribly brave in terms of pushing into the ice because they would difficult stuck in one thousand nine hundred. William Smith was on the brink Williams and he found the South Shetland islands and he's spotted those went back Valparaiso and got instructions. Underneath Captain Edward Brownfield to head South again. The following season in January to go and find Antarctica must be there beyond the South Shetland Islands so Brownfield Field Irishman from Cork leading this royal naval expedition. Or but on a merchant ship did just that and on the thirty January eighteen twenty spotted the Antarctic peninsula and named aimed at Chelsea land. You mentioned those. I claims stopped being made around the beginning of the twentieth century. And that is of course just in time to queue up the two world wars which which both had consequences far beyond the primary battlefields in Europe. was there ever any echo of the registered in Antarctica which Oh you had all these potentially rival nations huddled or again did everybody just look at the prospect of the potential battlefield before the been this. This does those look like kind of hard work well. The festival certainly didn't we registered Antarctica so that period was still this lot wailing going on. So they're they're winning fleet still down on their wedding Stations doping operated famous the men from Shackleton's Expedition Endurance Expedition. All came off. That expedition went straight into war. So that was the kind of the notable bull so first of all story the second is interesting so the Second World War is where those sorts of tensions were really starting to rise temperatures. Were starting to rise. Certainly and it was was in response to these kind of geopolitical maneuverings by several nations particularly the UK that Argentina Chile joined the race and they asserted their claims ninety four. Three eight hundred forty four and this really just Rosa temperature and in forty three the UK the colonial office and the Admiralty said. Having none of this we need to assert sovereignty not a little more explicitly so they salvage operation tavern which was a secret mission to go down to documents and established wintering basis. So this is so we could they could have wintering purser people on on Antarctica on the ground year round creating facts on the ground as diplomats. Like to put her thing yes. It's sort of absolutely said that there's a physical British present Serta Times prior to that you'd had vessels going down during the summer season but outside of that not much but Argentina and Chile were were starting wanting to do the same. There was a bit of a race of flag-planting flag removal clotting but little little huts being built plaques being installed and removed and it was. It's getting a little silly. It never came to blows. There's plenty of blows on Northern Hemisphere Dunes. But certainly this this operation fresh tavern from the case for interview establishes wintering being stations and established for formerly the total claim. So that was the limit of open conflict a certain amount of I guess cosmetic Rg Bulgy indeed aide continued through the forties and fifties and of course after the Second World War. The Cold War ensued the tension sort of moved to between the US and the USSR and stations are being built and the survival of sessions have claimed the whole continent but it wasn't until the nineteen fifty seven and the intellectual fiscal year. which was this extraordinary year of Science Science International Collaborative effort for science mostly in Antarctica? Excuse me but pretty much. It was and that was a global effort across nations between nations crossing boundaries to study Antarctica. So there's all sorts going on. It worked tremendously well as eighteen months extraordinary science and collaboration and it paved the way for the treaty. Not we can collaborate here if we remove territorial claims remove any military activity ending that if we're focusing on things like science. There's a collaboration that can happen here. And this this paved the way for the Treaty of fifty nine. How did the fifty nine treaty? Actually do that. What was the framework that enabled all these current and past and potential future rivals to either agree or agree to disagree on certain things? He's that so the initial centuries to the treaty when they're twelve of them and these actually where the the nation's with US often claims significant activity in Antarctica so these nations got together in in Washington for some weeks to negotiate this treaty. Now I think the final final treaty is short is any forty clauses. It's pretty elegant. It's it's pretty straightforward pragmatic that simplicity I think reveals what what has been kept out so so all those things number of things that just are not included in the treaty that obviously to contentious and therefore they focused in on setting aside the consonant for peaceful the scientific purposes. They outlawed all nuclear activity later. And any mineral exploitation anything like that and then later protocols environmental portal came into force all switch really rigorously manage environment. So in terms of Wildlife Managing Tourism Heritage Management Waste Management that sort of thing shipping so the final treaty is possibly the ultimate compromise that she it is incredibly workable. It's enforced through domestic government so every nation secrecy nation passes totic law onto which it upholds the the laws of the treaty and all activity by any nation is permitted by domestic government. So any activity we do is permitted by the Foreign Office here and anything. Any transgressions are then punished or considered under domestic law. You have yourself travel to Antarctica several times. Has it been your experience. That is a genuine cooperative community or or obvious. Still rivalries are their transgressions alday disputes. Does anybody have pushed their luck. With the terms of the fifty eighteen Andreotti on the ground in Antarctica. There are very many people. Really you know any given time I think The maximum people in highest peak is six thousand. They're very spread apart around the content. But it's an incredibly collaborative place so whilst there may be robust discussions around the treaty table said there's an Antarctic Treaty meeting every year between the rival nations. You'd expect those are not played at quite the same way down in Antarctica so for example we look after she cites there today. In an Argentinean stations. Nearby I am very closely the team we have done there. Have Klay spacious with the Argentine. They bring station. There's search and rescue. Reciprocal such rescue arrangements. The Navy Eh. If ever there is anybody in the navy will appear and and a rescue when our teams are on remote feel camps considering the remote sites often the the today in basis like San Mateo will radio in and say we're here for need us. We've got a doctor here and we'll come over and visit you in a few weeks. So it's an interesting positive playing out of Intellectual Inc.. The two hundred. Th Anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica is obviously a failure. Spacious anniversary in the annals of exploration are the great celebrations versions of this moment planned semi the Antarctic heritage. Trust to whom I see. We have a new program called Antarctica insight which is a cultural program which is engaging with artists artists. Scientists historians young people to look at Antarctica to consider the last two hundred years. And I think that that two hundred isn't terribly long to have been involved in a content content on a to reflect on those two hundred years of human activity there the good in the bat but also to think about the present and the future. What kind of Antarctica? What kind of constantly we handy onto the next generation and how they can take responsibility for it and how equipping them to do that so I'm going to be some autism conventions is going to be exhibitions? Talks workshops learning programs in an schools activities. Help people engage that every meaningful way just one final question on behalf of listeners. Who Like My Sofa? incandescently jealous because they've never been to Antarctica. Do you have a favorite part of it. Of course a potluck Roy. Of course it is an extraordinary place because what you've got is the coming together of extraordinaire landscape even agenda Penguin Colony. which brings you this extraordinary life and humor and and raw wildlife off as well as a historic site which has all the significance of it being the birthplace of Shanti Science and that is tangible you can smell it and taste it in the air? When you're there sits a special special place Camilla Nickel?.

Antarctica US Antarctic Heritage Trust Camil Australian Antarctic Antarctic Cross Antarctic Circle UK Antarctic peninsula Argentina Camila nickel Chile Expedition Endurance Expeditio South Shetland islands chief executive Captain Edward Brownfield France William Smith Camilla Nickel Soviet Union
"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

16:51 min | 7 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

"What happens to the surrounding oceans. And that's what's motivating our work at the moment going on the field. Yes exactly what's happening to Arctic. Ice Sheet is something that for a long time. It's been the largest uncertainty in terms of future sea level rise but satellite data shows us. That not only is Antarctica. Losing mass overall therefore raising sea level but the rate which is losing masses accelerating. And so we see that in west Antarctica and just recently. We've done some work. In fact on the voyage H we took the Aurora Australis to place ship. It never been before the front of the totten glacier. The glacier is important because this single glacier holds enough ice nice to increase equivalent to three and a half meters of global sea level rise about half a greenland in this one Antarctic glacier satellite data hits told us that it was thinning. But it didn't didn't fit the pattern. Warm water wasn't supposed to get there and so on that voyage The ship was reaching the front of the totten glacier and we found that actually there is warm water reaching that part of East Tactica. That's important because most of the ice more than ninety percent of the Antarctic ice sheet is in the eastern part of Antarctica. So if that's also exposed to warm ocean moderns debts are concerned. It means that we need to take that contribution to sea level rise into account as well have you told skomer my doors open and we're doing everything we can. Maybe use doors closed to communicate the scientists effectively as we can but sometimes it is a challenge whose moods so Merz. Let's was part of the famous Australian Arctic Explorer Douglas Mawson's expedition down to Commonwealth Bay and one of his colleagues who was a particularly skilled skier And so he took Murzyn on his trip west to explore west of Commonwealth Bay famous story. I'm sure all of you know it but it didn't didn't go so well so new. NFL Crevasse with most of their food Murzyn and Mawson continued on. They didn't realize at the time that eating dog liver was not a good idea. You and Mertz died and so eventually got back to the base just in time to see the ship. Sailing away and spent another winter is famous. That's Australian Antarctic Story. So much somewhere down. The glossier and Mitch is on the move again. I understand stand. That's right so in two thousand ten long extension of the Mertz Glacier broke off in a forum to a massive iceberg about eighty kilometers long and Benoi. Ny Legacy one of my colleagues. It's IRO works on. Glaciers did a calculation of where merged body would have been at the time of the glacier calving and it looks likely that he's he's on the move and floating along with this massive icebergs. See Twenty eight which is making its way westward and so much is on the move again on the move again now I mentioned William Hewlett before Cambridge invented the word scientist in a question from Coleridge. The poet actually heating thirty three and the other word that he mentioned. You mentioned a number of words in signs many many of them and the the one I'm very fond of is conciliates because that's to do with a number of different elements of evidence. You have to make a case that something is so and when you come to climate change here you have in Antarctica and the southern ocean and all of what you're measuring yourself and your colleagues so many elements and you add those all the other ones they've got for example in San Diego the keeling curve killing he went up the mountain. The measured calm dockside. First Time no one knew why and he told this graph going up and up and up and up and up and anyway these numbers of evidence you got fifty one hundred. Two eight hundred. The evidence is staggering. Isn't it that we have a problem. The evidence now is completely clear that climate it is changing. It's changing more rapidly with time and that human actions are responsible so that the scientific evidence for that is clear the the scientific evidence is also clear that we were humanity was blessed in a way by getting delivered a fat wallet full of Carbon To get it through the lifetime of humanity but the temperature of the earth depends on how much of that carbon we spend. It's a very clear almost linear relationship and so forth nightly pay packet and you blow it all in the first. Tonight's IT'S GONNA be tough to eat later on and that's basically what we're doing with our carbon budget. If we WANNA keep carbon below level at which the consequences will be manageable. We need to rein in the rate at which we're using up the carbon that we were blessed with in the analogy is not so distant not so far fetched in the sense that we will literally find it more difficult to feed ourselves and to find shelter as levels rise and the other consequences of climate. Change come through unless we change our behavior one of the things. I WANNA come back to the notion about what you see if I go into a conference. Mm Front in North America in February gigantic snow into these huge cold winters and people come and say well. Where's with global warming gone? Tom and here is a case. Of in fact it's suggested took the wind up. North a wobbling and bringing down these Turkey Nicole streams of air and similarly. Do you get wobbles with the current in the Southern Ocean or do you get some changes to the currents that way we get wobbles in the current but also wobbles in wins over the Southern Ocean currents respond to those some of those are natural wobbles but some are are caused by human activities and there's not just carbon dioxide but of course the ozone hole is a big issue in the south and so as the ozone hole develops the winds shifted did south and that was a direct response of the system to a human forcing but a different one than the greenhouse gas. And the other thing that really puzzled me is is that with what you described these huge ocean moving so fast down the south unimpeded by quick continents nonetheless. You can take water coming all the way from the Arctic all the way from the north. How do you do that so it is connected? So the the global ocean circulation is fully connected and so the properties ladies that are set when water sinks from the surface in the North Atlantic. Give a parcel of water. At a certain fingerprint that allows us to identify the origin of that water. The reason is so important for climate really is that it plays a big role in driving that global network of ocean currents and it's that global conveyor belt of ocean currents the transports heat and carbon into the oceans when we talk about global warming. It's not so well known that it's really ocean warming that we're talking about more than ninety three percent. Ah of the extra heat energy that's been stored by the planet over. The last fifty years is found in the oceans. The implication of that is if you want to track how climate is changing. We really really need to be using that Planetary Monitor. It is the ocean we need to be measuring the oceans but the oceans also influenced by taking up so far about a third or thirty eighty percent of the carbon dioxide we've emitted into the atmosphere. It's a service. The Ocean is provided in the Southern Ocean is the primary way that heat and carbon dioxide get into the oceans. So that's why it's so crucial that we understand how the southern ocean works now and also how it may change in the future because if it becomes less efficient it picking up carbon dioxide decide that will act as a positive feedback and that will further accelerate the rate of climate change. You think the heat will come out of the ocean instead of being absorbed by it so it does eventually come back out again and how long it takes depends on how deep it goes in. What part of the ocean circulation gets wrapped up in so the changes in those ocean currents are part of how climate change will unfold now? Obviously we've talked about a number of different elements here and you're getting two point. Perhaps perhaps although it seems to me a consistent story that you might find duct members of the public stop giving so many elements. How'd you put them together? What do you you say when they seem to be asking that question you know? What's what's the big story? What's the clear line? And why do you keep having to have more and more evidence adding up. You know I said that. The evidence is clear that climate is changing and what that evidence is is looking for changes in all parts of the system in the atmosphere. The ocean the ice the land and vegetation. We know what to expect in terms of the pattern of change and so when we look across all those different parts of the system. It's all pointing in a consistent direction. It's all changing aging in a way that's consistent with climate change signal. Put another way why you keep having to do more research to find out more things and what are you doing infected among among. We don't need to do more research to show. The climate is changing. We need to know. Exactly how rapidly climate is going to change because that will affect the actions we take and we need to communicate clearly the evidence that we have already obviously because it's important to remember that it's not too late but time is running running out that wallet of carbon that we have it's getting pretty thin and that has to last us for the rest of humanity. The grounds for optimism are that were making and changes to decouple our economy from carbon at a rate faster than we ever have. It's already cheaper to build a renewable energy with storage jdpower plant than it is to build a coal-fired power plant. It's already impossible to get an Australian insurance company to ensure your coal mine. The future is is coming. The problem is it's been a little slow and if we were where we are now thirty years ago we'd be a much better position what it means is we're we're in a race and we've given the other guy very big headstart and so we have to use every tool that we have to try to catch up one thing. The brilliant puzzles me. Everyone it comes back to the dollars and the GRANTHAM institute which is connected to the London School of Economics led by Lord Stern Nicholas. Stern must be by the Lord. They did the crunching the numbers to find out whether it would cost so much to tackle climate change or whether you save money and it turned out that you'd say between one point five. Trillion and two trillion pounds pounds are going down to still Laura Laura money and when you talk to politicians about saving lower our money they say well that's in ten years fifteen years. I'm concerned about next week because people want to have smaller electricity bills. How do you argue with people like that? When they're saying we we won't it now? It's a challenge but I think part of the story that perhaps we haven't told so. Well this is actually the one you've put your finger on which is that. It's actually much more costly to us. to not act and it's more costly not just economically but it is more costly economically. But it's more costly socially in terms of health off and the environment and so it doesn't really depending on your values and what you're concerned about is a compelling argument that it makes a lot more sense sense for us to take action to slow the pace of climate change than it does to do nothing to trillion pounds huge amounts of money. We could say there are so many efficient things. I have been broadcast in any number of different schemes for improving things getting cheaper energy more Stable energy and on it goes to the question is turning it around the willingness to do it soon. Have you had arguments with decision makers on that yourself. Well alive count except for when directed which does happen. I've had a series of interesting conversations with a a number of Australian parliamentarians including Senator Malcolm Roberts for example. You may know and it's a it's an interesting experience France. What's clear is that people do use values and making decisions and their beliefs and there are those who are disinclined to act on climate change? Come from a number the different positions but many of them are ideological and they would prefer. It wasn't so and so they find arguments to support the idea that it isn't so it's tough to reconcile that point of view with science because none of the science points in that way and so the challenge is optimism is is important and we need to paint a future that is possible and achievable. It gets more difficult the longer we wait but the truth is that it's it's not too late. And if we act soon we can avoid committing ourselves to consequences that we can't undo and I think that's an important part of the story which is sometimes missed. It is the idea of commitment and Arctic. Ice Sheet for large parts of it to melt may take a century a couple of centuries but we may commit ourselves was to that happening within a couple of decades or decade because for some of the glaciers in Antarctica. Once they start to go. There's no way to turn it off. It's a self fulfilling self-reinforcing process and that's just one example. And so I think when I speak to people and they realized yeah well some people say well. It's hundred years from now. I don't care but if you say that the decisions you make in the next ten years to determine whether that happens in one hundred years we're not that changes how people think about it a little bit now some questions. I'm going to come down here and while I'm walking down. The steps are mentioned. Two things that encourage rage optimism. One of them is a book was published just over a year ago called drawdown by Paul Hawkins with two hundred different ways that you can do something constructive either an industry in work or whatever and they're all costed and you have an indication on each two pages of each the example of the state of whatever it is scheme so there are two hundred different suggestions. There's another film actually called twenty forty with a book matched and they're also examples there plenty of them of what we can do what we can do now. Who would like to ask? Question of Steve the Amana Carbon. That goes up into the atmosphere. There's a level of it when it leaves the water or lays the ground goes up. What dissipated to go up into the atmosphere like what level of breath carbon is omitted from the ground to what it gets up at the top and is there any way to actually dilute? What's coming up before it gets to the atmosphere? The the atmosphere is pretty well stirred mixed up the lower part of the atmosphere so as we omitted the surface it tends to get mixed up through the atmosphere and there are natural processes that remove not that we add but the lifetime of co two molecule. Once it's in the atmosphere is I think a one hundred years or more and so so. This is a gas that sticks around for a while once we put it in the atmosphere unless it's ends up in a plant or in the ocean for example in terms of trying to stop it before it gets in the atmosphere there are techniques of scrubbing. Co Two gas out of smokestacks for example before it reaches the atmosphere. None of that has been proven and yet at the scale that we needed to do. And the the intergovernmental panel on climate change recent did a report on the global warming by one and a half degrees which is the target that the countries of the world set for themselves to try to keep warming blow one and a half to two degrees above the pre industrial level. Most of the scenarios that make that possible require something that doesn't exist yet. which is something called negative emissions technologies? These are things that will actually remove co two from from the air. They depend though scenarios. Most of them depend on having that technology sometime. But we're not there yet so it's just one example of where sciences needed what and we might do is actually change policy on knocking down forests. Did you see the front cover of the Economist magazine. If you didn't look it up it shows all the stumps and and talks about the Brazilian death. Wish for the Amazon knocking. The trees down at such a rate to Manhattan's a week. And what we need is is one point two trillion trees which will make a huge difference to that equation question here in key mines to potter. I think we're a little bit blindsided. The federal election to see how few voters.

Southern Ocean Antarctica totten glacier Mertz Glacier Antarctic glacier greenland Ny Aurora Australis Douglas Mawson North America Commonwealth Bay Australian Antarctic Story East Tactica Economist magazine Mertz Merz North Atlantic
"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:20 min | 7 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

"Were going otherwise they see them on the beach and then they're gone. They don't know what they do. So they invented tags that would allow them to know where the seals were how deep they dove and also to measure things like temperature and salinity so they actually knew what sort of water they were forging so it really started with biologists and then the oceanographers realized that hold it. This is amazing because not only do they dive that deep but they go there and winter when we're usually back at home and so the seals have really South of sixty degrees south. We now have more Oceana graphic data collected by seals than in the history of chip-based oceanography. What should of Allah Gist are you? Are you a physicist. Assist physical oceanographer and a climate scientist covers the field. Isn't it now. What I want to know is how is the southern thousand part the ice getting on because what we saw of the northern part it really is crumbling? And we were vaguely aware aware of the West Part pent-up what about the other part so when we talk about ice down South we have to be clear to pay attention to whether we're talking about the is the frozen seawater or the ice. That's on the Arctic ice sheet. So we'll talk about the Antarctic ice sheet and Arctic Ice Sheet. It's an immense amount of ice. If all of that ice melted into the sea it would raise global sea level double by about fifty eight meters. That's not going to happen anytime soon. But as that ice runs off the continent and reaches the ocean it starts to float and that means it's exposed to the ocean and if the ocean warms or if currents carry warm water beneath those floating ice shelves the shells melts or thin and so particularly in west Antarctica. The ice shelves are thinning. And they're retreating. What happens then? Is the ice shelves like a buttress holding the ice on Antarctica and without that force that back for us that's provided by the shells more ice floes off the continent in into the ocean and that raises sea level and so in that sense the future of Antarctica A- and the Antarctic ice sheet is really tied to what happens to the surrounding oceans. And that's what's motivating our work at the moment going on the field. Yes exactly what's happening to Arctic. Ice Sheet is something that for a long time. It's been the largest uncertainty in terms of future sea level rise but satellite data shows us. That not only is Antarctica. Losing mass overall therefore raising sea level but the rate.

Antarctica physicist scientist
"antarctica" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

10:55 min | 8 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Past Gas

"Hello Today on pass gas. We are starting our two-part series on the machines of Antarctica. Dang doing I'm so excited for this one get used to enunciating Antarctica because it's hard is that the north part of the south part is the south that is the South Pole is located at at the Antar at the Antarctic. The penguins are there. They actually just drilled down like thousands of feet into this lake. That hasn't even been been touched in like millions of years. That's the only so you get like the thing. The thing right. Yeah why are we messing around with that kind of stuff. Didn't we learn anything from the thing ever seen John Carpenter film Anyway so yeah to give you guys some context here listener We're going to start with the very beginning of ant Arctic exploration and see why they needed machines in the first place. Because you know what kind of it's hard to get around Tell you that much. There's no buses. Let's say that. Yeah let's get that out of the way no uber no scooters here's There will be car talk near the end of this episode. We just have to get there so get yourself some hot cocoa ready because it's about the cold in here. Hey guys welcome to the pass gas podcast. If you like passed gas please help us grow by giving us a good rating and a nicer view on the podcasts platform of your choice to really help us out and I really appreciate that. So thank you all right now for the show on board his ship. The resolution captain James Cook. I discovered the continent of Antarctica on January. Anuary thirty-first seventeen seventy five after discovering quote discovering New Zealand and circling the globe. A few years prior cook hated that much of the Pacific still remained unexplored so he had returned to find what he believed to be a hidden seventh continent many offered to do this exploration for him but he refused to let others hinder his imperialistic. Swag Cook. Listen you've done a lot. aww exploring let us do some exploring. Come on no no way Jose. I'm going into that frigid seventh continent so he set Out to find it for himself he had thought he discovered the continent but he refused to row ashore in claiming land for the British Empire because the land he saw appeared inhospitable and believe it would never serve as an asset of the British Empire as it turned out though James Cook had not discovered the true continent of Antarctica Instead he'd only discovered the Sandwich islands but that didn't matter to him nor his explorations investors back in England and to him any further southern expiration would be pointless as the southern sea was just too dangerous and was as cold outside the icebound continent was now globally understood to be a worthless asset but time would soon challenge that idea cook. Never got the chance to be proven urban wrong. No as he was dismembered and killed on a Hawaiian beach seven. Seventeen not yet he. That's a whole other story Shortly after he quote again discovered covered Hawaii's existence. At least he was in a Hawaiian place. Mahalo babies because of Cook Britain did not yet James Cook. It's not a good guy I can just want to say that Britain did not have any intention to explore the frozen wasteland but there is a different sentiment over in Russia in eighteen eighteen nineteen czar Alexander the first dispatched to Pacific expeditions with the sole intention of discovering the Antarctic continent. He knew there'd be some scientific havoc benefits to such an exploration but what he really wanted to demonstrate was his control to Alexander. The control of both the North and South Poles would be global demonstration. Shen of CZAR's power to the entire world kind of Mir's like Russian history has been like that forever whether just like we want power. Russia has a very very complicated in super interesting history. Yeah yeah it is kind of funny to think the guy was like I want top of world I want but them of world middle report little sweaty down there. Also it's hilarious because most of Russia's it's like frozen wasteland and they're like I want more. I want more shout who are Russian listeners. Retrieve again on January twenty seventh eighteen. Twenty honey the Russian expeditions crossed the inked Arctic Circle. It was the second expedition to have ever done. So and just one day later the crew of the Russian ship the Vostok stock reported sighting of the continent the once again. The discovery was only Some more islands close to enter Sandwich Islands. It's pretty hard to discover land. It's made out of Ice Mountains and snow. The first actual actual sighting of Antarctica was by a small American crew of Seal L. Hunters and February eighteen. Twenty one But the siding was swept under the rug as only quote real explorers could make such a discovery. Would you ever eat seal meat. I couldn't do that now. Acute Dank you I would imagine it to be very like fatty almost for sure goose of ood Uh Cows or whatever yeah actually kind of sounds good in one elsewhere uh-huh q.. Magic being a seal hunter in eighteen twenty. One there's nothing more shittier. Think of on a boat in the water. Freezing your balls. Yeah Yeah and then you have to like you can't shoot him. You have to club beat the John. James Kirk had described the land as inexpressible Sibley horrid in every aspect At this point in time the existence of Antarctica had yet to actually be proven but race to be the first to truly discover the continent had begun gun. I it was the Russians that wanted a piece like we said then the French came along then the British and the Americans and even chilly at a point a joint German Norwegian exploration team was formed to try to claim some of the land. What made this team unique? Though was the people it was composed of the majority of the group. whaler's tough men who a thing or two about being cold like being cold. They're the closest to experts on the terrain that existed at the time. Now finally the first actual landing aunt and Artika was by another group of seal hunters in eighteen fifty three report. Nobody cared and the Norwegian expedition declared themselves the first people to ever stepped foot on the land on January twenty fourth eighteen. Seventy five life. The feeling of being the first people to have ever stepped foot on on the new land was quote strange yet pleasurable Until at least the locals attacked. It took nick two hours to fight off a colony of Adelie penguins with sticks but once they hunted a few seals They they left after that so I guess they got attacked by paying win. Some seals bounced I think that's so crazy that these people from like take the top of the world. Just go all the way down here. Pangolins Edith and like okay. We did it. The Norwegian whalers arrived to prove that landing was possible there returned to the land would be accompanied by a wave of scientists and explorers. They had unknowingly kicked off. What would become the quote heroic age of Antarctic exploration that would dominate the early twentieth century? If you don't know much about the terrain of Antarctica it sucks WCHS allot original. Explores did not see much commercial gain from the continent. They saw tremendous scientific value for their home countries. Though specifically Britain Britain has a nasty habit of wanting to dominate. Every piece of land in sight So most things were done in the view of how could this benefit Britain. Well there there is always we need for our T.. Don't don't people in your typically not like ice in their beverage yeah uh-huh that's true so weird So that might have been something other than have a warm Dr Pepper night. Yeah like after after a hundred years of this place people like they go down there they see it there. There's nothing here and then it's like they forget fifty years later another group the report stuff they get down there. There's nothing there might be or get their Joe. We'll get back to more pass gas right now over at my sponsors a private expeditions skyrocketed in hopes to claim the land for Britain Britain took the lead When it came to the expedition's but the Germans also wanted a little piece? Kaiser Wilhelm the second wanted wanted to dominate the southern seas solely leave for Prestige and glory and began sending expeditions down to claim territory for Germany. Everyone's is freaking going down there in nineteen ninety one. The British ship discovery departed from London's east India. Docks onboard were two men who had become the most infamous explorers of all time. Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott. Really good names. Yeah yeah those are sick ball and asked me on this expedition. They explored nearly five hundred sixty kilometers inland. And we're officially claimed all of Antarctica for Britain much like when the US astronauts. Linda Moon so we basically claim the Moon Right we on the moon we on the mound. Yeah you against ah other. Countries claim that the land was obviously too vast to be conquered by single run like that so they continued sending more and more expeditions in nineteen. You know seven Shackleton's set off aboard the Nimrod in an attempt to claim the earth to conquer the poll and undisputably conquered the land for Britain. Okay wait it. Quick aside for Nimrod a lot of people think it means dumb no but that's only because of the bugs bunny cartoon Nimrod was actually like in accomplished hunter in Old Greek Lore. WHOA so it was? He was saying ironically to Elmer fudd.

Antarctica Britain James Cook Sandwich islands penguins Russia Hawaii Antarctic John Carpenter Pacific Cook Britain ant Arctic Nimrod South Pole Ernest Shackleton Arctic Circle New Zealand Linda Moon Anuary
"antarctica" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"This week on the weather. Geeks podcast, we go to the bottom of the earth Antarctica, a white desert covered in snow and ice. But did, you know plant an algae make up an underwater forest at its edges, and that these plants can be used to develop drugs to help with cancer and the flu Dr James McLintock from the university of Alabama Birmingham joins us to discuss. Why studying this part of the world is important. And why so many people are making the trip down to Antarctica to learn more about the region and experienced climate change inaction. Thank you for joining us. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. It's a pleasure. Well, let's just dive right in first of all welcome over to Atlanta. We're talking about some really interesting topics today. You you go to an Arctic. So as we are actually talking about this. We're in may. So it's the other side of the seasonal calendar there. So what is it? There in are there people there in an article right now. Well, the equivalent to may and Antarctica would be sort of mid fall right now, my colleagues Chuck and Maggie Adams there in three of our our students are down there right now. Winter is coming on. I can tell you because I've been down there this time year that getting light about ten in the morning. It's getting dark about three in the afternoon and from emails and keeping in touch with my group. I know that they've had days where they just, you know, can't get outside there, the winds blowing, but the weather does pick up every now and then and perk up for going out and getting into the field and scuba diving and doing all the kinds of things that are marine ecology research is involved in. And let me just kind of set the stage for who you are for for our listeners, you're at the UAB polar and marine biology endowed. Professor the author of lost and Artika and a new book a naturalist ghost fishing. That's right. We'll talk about both of those today, and you're going to be honored in June. Then in Davos with the scar.

Antarctica UAB Dr James McLintock Dr Marshall shepherd Davos cancer Artika Professor university of Georgia Atlanta Maggie Adams Chuck
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Yeah, but other, you know, just kind of like Moines did. We did an episode on Grimwasde and we talked a little bit about the Necker NAMA con- yeah, another HP lovecraft creation. He's very adamant that's work of fiction, but people like this story so much that they want it to be real. Yeah. In some cases they kinda slender mandate isn't it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy, much like slender man has at least once yet. And then the last thing which we don't have time for, but we'd love to refer you to one of the first videos we've ever done the fool society. Yes. The idea that there is a civilization or ruins of civilization that survived some great cataclysm by going underground. Round similar to the Ben folds five song with ancient technology and that the Nazi party and the US military were both aware of this possibility. And as they were exploring the region through various various cover stories through the use of various cover stories like operation, high jump out, they were instead actually exploring these the possibility of these subterranean civilizations or waging war upon one another in secret at the south pole. Those are fascinating tales and all in an attempts to gain the favor of whatever civilization is down there. Yes, yes. And spoiler alert there, of course, the Nazis in this tale in this tale, the Nazi party thought that the subterranean civilization would of course be aerienne. Yeah. Yeah, and super into geopolitical happenings on the surface world the because it's. You know. I have nothing to say there. It's just it's, it's messed up. It's it's an interesting story and you'll a lot of Antarctica has not been fully explored, certainly not to the extent that other continents have. Yeah. And we have to remember there's still parts of there's still very remote parts of the world where no human being has ever set foot that have nothing to do with Antarctica. This is this is one of the concepts that early on when we started making this show been really got me into even further into these subjects, some of these, especially ancient civilizations. This one in particular Klaudia. Yeah, no, really be because I could imagine a world in where it was real only because we've found so many real things in in this world where opposing powers have been in a race to achieve something I or get somewhere. I because the other team is going to get there. For sure. At some point, we just have to get there before them and with everything from nuclear powers our lands to ensure this. Yeah. And so this was just another version of it for me where maybe there was something there or at least to establish bases on versus if some. Yeah, I'm so sorry. Mashes said operation Stargate. Oh, yeah. Started not wrecked in kale Tra. Yeah, that's a great point. This is if it's not a thing, a government did it certainly in line with the MO of most world powers. Yeah. So this leads us to conclusions, right? We don't at this point, have any solid proof that there was some sort of permanent settlements. In in Antarctica, at least not antiquity, and we don't have proof that there was even a a notable temporary settlement, much less a civilization or remnants of an ancient civilization, and this problem where this lack of knowledge is compounded by the fact that it's just devilish -ly difficult to do a lot of exploration in Antarctica, at least it becomes devilishly expensive. Yes, and astray of difficult just to get any kind of transportation there. Right. And now we're in a situation where our entire species and whatever Eldridge species may await us under the ice. Doesn't have to wait much longer because as the as the earth leaves as temperatures shift around the planet, we know that glaciers are receding. They're losing mass Ryan's. It's just getting a little warmer in most places, and we do know that we will see some pretty strange things when the ice actually melts depending on where it melts we, for instance, we don't know very much about the dinosaurs range of animals that roamed Antarctica when part of Gondwana. So. All we found so far about the from fossil life. There are going to be things that we could dig up on the margins of coastal islands or exposed mountains that have gone above the glaciers, and they're the few places that don't have a thick layer of ice. We might also find sources of geothermal energy. We are almost certain to find forms of life that.

Antarctica Nazi party Moines Necker NAMA Grimwasde HP kale Tra US Mashes Ryan Stargate
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Far reaches a Russian stuff that we can say for sure that it's, it's it's almost certain that different small groups of people interacted largely through trade and exploration in ways that we have yet to understand. Absolutely. I feel that's. It is safe to say that it's actually very safe to say that and your word of the day is an acronym. Said a word of the day. I think everybody should be. Yeah, but it's fun to say. I think that's all it takes the day. It is. It is if you want to be a real pedantic, nerd insult person. Yeah, can always decide to call someone anachronistic when you think they're not being cool. Using completely inappropriately to. But but yes, all that aside this this map itself is an agglomeration of twenty twenty something other earlier maps that already existed before it was made in fifteen thirteen and. Moose cartographers, mainstream historians today, believe the map does not actually depict Antarctica. That's a bummer. It's a bummer because it looks cool. You can see how it would you. You can see how someone could look at that and say, holy smokes Antarctica. There's a group called bad archaeology and they have a great right up on this. We recommend visiting their website for more details. Just Google bad archaeology period race. But we do have a quote, describing their conclusions about this map. It shows no unknown lands least of all Antarctica and contained errors such as Columbus's belief that Cuba wasn't Asian peninsula who swing in a miss. Yes, errors that not to have been present if it derived from extremely accurate ancient originals. And it also conforms to the prevalent, geographical theories of the early sixteenth century, including things like balancing landmasses in the north, with others in the south too. Keep the earth from tipping over. Yeah, don't wanna do that because it's balanced on the on a turtle's back. That's right. True Sawyer. The the idea that the earth itself is sort of like a. Has its own geographical equilibrium too many continents of one air quotes side or another will inevitably tip the scales because it's. Right? Although it was relatively common knowledge at the time that the world was globe take that for which will the the maps is based on our older, but they're not. They're not ancient. It's not as if they found some six thousand year old. Sumerian map depicting lands that had never been heard of in the modern day and said, let's just copy this, right? Yeah, at least according to the different experts who have examined the actual map. So unfortunately periods while being an incredibly tantalizing possible indicator of ancient exploration of an article if not ancient civilizations in that continent, and just a cool map and just a cool met. Unfortunately, it really is a tantalizing thing because it doesn't deliver. It doesn't. It doesn't hold up, but we would be remiss if we did. Shout out something completely different. I think thing that we're all fans of, which is. Are. And. HP lovecraft as the author of the mountains of madness famous author, terrible person, inspired millions of people with his story. I was so taken. I was hypnotized by your depiction of these of these ancient pre human races got a little mad there for a moment, but I'm feeling better. Now you're back off the mountain. Yeah. So it's it's. And I want to say it's a really well written story, but it's a, it's, it's very, it makes a great impression. It's cool in people. Yeah, that's one of the best ways is so cool. And and the idea there is that there is an there ruins of an ancient pre human civilization hidden in the hinterlands of Antarctica. That has not been proven on this bite. What some people have tried to depict in earlier arguments on the fringes. There HP lovecraft was writing fiction. He knew he was writing fiction and he liked it..

Antarctica Cuba Google Sawyer HP Columbus six thousand year
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"So why would we see monuments but not see the homes of the people who lived in nearby, right? Maybe they're just so far covered by the ice, maybe only the monuments are large enough to be visible. Well, maybe grandma handcocks thirteen less than thirteen thousand years ago. Williams six thousand years ago. Maybe their way off on how long ago structures were there because we do know that that over time nature takes over. And we'll erase almost anything like weathering and just like totally wearing down mountains over time, and it's crazy. But yeah, I'd love to see a time lapse of them pretty cool. Yeah, exactly. But then you have to start thinking, well, then how old have humans or at least intelligent life actually been on this planet. Right, right. Which that date keeps it seems to get pushed back further and further every decade. You know, Minu discoveries who new discoveries going back as far as what sixty thousand years, I think is one of the newer ones at least close to where we're at right now. So. There's also argument that we've brought nature into this. There's also an argument that maybe the ice on Antarctica is not even if it formed millions of years ago. Maybe it wasn't as constant a presence as we have initially assumed. Interesting. Maybe the ice ebbed and flowed. You know what I mean? Waxed and waned. Maybe there were times when the glaciers retreated away from coastal areas, right? Then possible and maybe they did that for long amounts of time. Yeah, there. There's so many possibilities. I, I bet there are scientists out there going. No, absolutely. Not. Studying this entire life and no, you can't say that. Well, we don't know. That's true. We don't know, and we're not saying that the entire thing is covered with a glacier. At this point. It's just it's still inhospitable. Yeah. So we can tell you, however, about a very particular map, which for people who believe in our to maybe more familiar with to our species than we have always assumed this is sometimes seen as a smoking gun. Stay tuned after the break will introduce you to period Rhys. It's Barrington day Thurston host of spit, iheartradio's newest podcast, twenty three.

Minu Williams Antarctica Rhys iheartradio Thurston thirteen thousand years sixty thousand years six thousand years
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Hello, welcome back to the show. My name is Matt nine names. No, they called me Ben. We are joined with our super producer Paul decade. Most importantly, you are you. You are here and that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know quick as I say Pete behind the curtain, the the four of us rashly relatively well traveled people, although I have never been to Antarctica rights. Right? And that's the subject of today's episode. Very, very few people have been. I got very close to go into an article once number of years ago, Matt, you may remember it was with. With a good friend of ours. Fringe of the show who does a lot of write ups on the house of works website about our podcast. Diana Brown checkout her work. If you get a chance she was going, her family was going to go on a group expedition and Antarctica is one of those places that is very, very expensive to go go to by your lonesome, you know, for you gotta roll deep and get the price cuts. Unfortunately, that didn't happen, but I'm hoping one day to get to this continent. I think it'd be a cool thing for all of us to do because of all of earth's continents. Antarctica remains the most mysterious today. It's it's nice box. It's a gigantic ice desert. It's one of the last places in the world that is largely or somewhat the same as it was before, what we call the anthropoid or the age of humans. And you know, it's no wonder. There's not much reason for human being. Is to be there, not not that it stopped us before, and for a lot of people, this may be weird to think about Antarctica wasn't always a frozen wasteland. In fact, it was kind of balmy for a while. That's true in just before we get into that you, you can take a flight crews to Arctic. That's probably the easiest way gotta fly somewhere that's closer. And again, on a ship rights, she can't fly into Antarctica, really? Not not really. No, not easily. Yeah, it's not a delta flight, right? Yeah, even thing called icing. It gets worse when you're an anthrax. Yeah, even spirit won't take you there for about virgin. They go, I don't know. Yeah, they do. They are trying to go into space. Richard Branson, trying to go to space. So in aren't has kind of like space on earth similar to the Mariana trench. There's a lot of stuff we don't know about either environment. That's a very good point. What we do know about how Antarctica arrived at this strange position that works on multiple levels. I comes from a series of theories and a lot of research into timelines, so we can. We can explore that just briefly be here are the facts. Yeah. The first thing you have to subscribe to is continental drifts. Yes, that's the first thing you have to buy the idea that once upon a time or several different times throughout the history of earth in times had nothing to do with human beings. We weren't even a twinkle in the ecosystem. Is I the continents as we know. Today, we're actually part of a larger things called supercontinent super continents. Perfect, super continents because they not because they add extrordinary powers. They were just really big. And from what we understand, they shifted into each other, a number of different super continents about one billion to maybe five hundred and forty two million years ago, and they formed this huge thing. We call Panja and the southern part of Panja was a place that we call Gondwana. Of course, we made these names up after the fact because again, no people were there that we know of right or at least no life form capable of naming things. And guns wanna was made up of what we call South America, Australia, India, Africa, and Antar ticket today at this point in Antarctic is life span. It teamed with plant and animal life. It was lousy with it. It was actually pretty hot. But around one hundred and fifty to one hundred eighty million years ago, Gondwana began to separate or drift and eventually Australia, which was still attached to Antarctica. Eventually, Australia moved pretty quickly for continent speed toward southeast Asia. While Antarctica finally became isolated about thirty four to thirty five million years ago..

Antarctica Matt Australia Mariana trench producer Pete Paul decade South America Richard Branson southeast Asia Diana Brown Arctic Panja India Africa one hundred eighty million yea thirty five million years forty two million years one day
"antarctica" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Back out again in Antarctica. And the particles that are being detected physicists, they know. They're out there. But they don't make up the standard model model of what we know as particle physics. And they shouldn't be able to do that. It's almost like this this energy beam of whatever it may be high energy neutrinos other particles. They have large cross sections that means that they'll they'll they are meant to crash into something after the zip into earth. And and and that's the thing they're meant to crash. And we don't know why it's almost like this is some. Frequency or some sort of a light beam being broadcast. And NASA Antarctic impulsive transit antennas picking up on. Now. What's interesting about this is that if this is some sort of signal coming from the earth going out into the cosmos, or is it coming from out there going through the earth to we sent out in like the earth is one big prison, sending out the message all of the cosmos. It just reminds me of the time where we received the computer interpretation. Of Saturn communicating with Enceladus. Here's that recording. Remember the recording. It's it's rather amazing. Listen to this. Her. The search..

Antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"Things that we we can see over the last couple of decades is the ocean is warming their current surround antarctica and if these flow up towards the ice sheet they can start to melt the underside of the ice and that's what we think is happening and that's what's triggered this acceler ovation nice loss the ice sheet is what we call a marine grounded ice sheet if you took away west antarctica then you would not be left with land he'd be left with an ocean because it's actually sitting on the floor it's several kilometers fake sitting on the sea floor and actually as you go towards the center of the ice she just gets deeper and deeper and what happens as you melt the ice sheet and the ice she starts to retreat back towards this deep area that actually causes the flow even more quickly into the ocean and that's what's causing this acceleration we think andrew so you've calculated the rate at which antarctic melting is raising sea levels and it's three times grade since two thousand and twelve that was in the period before that so how much of that changes ascribable to human induced climate change and how much juice award antarctica would just do normally in west antarctica the pattern is very very clear it's not related to a fluctuating mutual signal related to some long term increase in the rate of ice loss and we can see that in the speed of the glossiest they're ramping year on year and poorer more ice into the oceans and this is this is not a normal pattern of behavior this is something related to changes in the conditions around the ice sheets and we know that it's in the oceans how much uncertainty is there around these figures given that you're looking at a non uniform continent.

antarctica andrew
"antarctica" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Become ambassadors to antarctica it literally changes them and they go home and they're convicted to do something to help protect down artika it to talk to their senators and congressmen about climate change in the things that they've witnessed the other thing is that we visit the station where i work it's a federally funded us station funded by the national science yes that's right and this is an opportunity there's usually over one hundred americans onboard the two hundred among the two hundred guests and you get to see your taxes at work you you get to see a wonderful science operation going on talk to the different scientists some that are doing meteorology some that are doing marine ecology working on wales and it's it's just a fantastic opportunity for people to learn about what science is going on in antarctica so for those reasons is there a negative side to antarctic tourism well the potential for disrupting station activities but actually the station has embraced tourism we have a group of people at the station that really enjoy giving the tours we bring people through the station but not through the active research lab disrupting what's going on but they get to the you know they get great feel of what's going on and they get to have you know one of those famous brownies that served in the galley palmer station that now is it's it's known worldwide and has been famous for probably twenty five years i don't know the story of the round he's why well apparently some one of the chefs or maybe one of the early national science foundation reps that was down visiting had this famous you know recipe from a grandma or aunt or something for brownies and it just sort of became part of the lore of the station and so the same recipe is now in fact i believe that when you visit the galley as you're on a tour ship you can actually take a copy of the recipe with you.

wales palmer station twenty five years
"antarctica" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Antarctica are in the same department as me yet it's there is a profound weirdness of walking around agu especially when you give presentations here the allotted the presentations will begin with definitions know if like hey i study this which is an ill advised and it's it's amazing because you would expect it a lot of conference you've got while we all know and they'll just launch right into the details of it but because everything here is so crazy diverse and i love that but it also does mean that i do have to sort of play one on one and play this you want to one student all the time wait what is that again what are you talking about what's what is a cloud channel that sounds coal i don't know what that is that just like how do you but it was like banded with the air he's if these particular like cloud formations that are almost like linear and they'll run next to each other so they look clear on earth on earth and on on some of the big gas giants you can see him and it's like young atmospheric scientists as far as i can tell from what i've heard it kind of throat their shoulders shrug emoji style millikn we don't know what to do in this we noticed something new with the convection cells right it's definitely think i reviewed median some miss ability there yet but they're pretty distinct yeah that's weird and then you know and they persist one of the i think what happens is the kind of know how they might initiate but the fact that they persist in space for you know a hundred miles or something like that that's the part the people await want want the dissipates sort of self organizing climate system that seems kind of odd and people have been trying to figure that went out for a while but apparently hanggliders when they see that in the in the atmosphere they'll go go because it means that there are these big convection so they can online for a long time so it's kind of an instant visual learn you know visual cute.

Antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Blind in the frozen tundra of in ourika uh and you know maybe murdering somebody with a claw hammer in the snow or something that affect i'm not saying i just you know they ended hat nickel here um you know or at a campsite is what he says it's his example if we that it in my uh then it won't necessarily be clear who has jurisdiction mmhmm right in this becomes the crux of the complication ig save hundreds of dollars by switching to gaiko i'm so happy i feel like i can fly disclaimer you will not be able to fly by switching to gaiko this is against the laws of physics and nature if you find yourself line pc professionell and or medical help immediately in the unlikely event you find yourself lying you might be a superhero or a pigeon or a superhero named page woman was bitten by a radioactive pigeon if you are indeed bid woman takeover tang's all licensing publishing rights in the event pits woman the movie becomes a top pros in hollywood blockbuster geico fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more four is dr hemmings news there's never been a criminal prosecution for a murder committed in antarctica ends i'm gonna go on record here on our show in say that i think there were probably murders that occurred in antarctica over the span of human history we know that there is violence and vice in this continent ends we just brought up a real life example that claw hammers thing happen yet another claw hammer thing actually happened not not in the way that i speculated earlier but in 1990 six there was an incident at an australian facility where a cook in the galle attacked one of his fellow workers with the back end of o'clock hammer and no one was killed illegitimately resulted in both both guys getting stitches and actually in.

tang geico murder antarctica galle hollywood dr hemmings illegitimately fifteen minutes fifteen percent
"antarctica" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"More ice is falling into the sea and raising sea level in the article it it talks about how scientists measure what's happening and of underwater what's happening underneath these ice sheets house they're warmer water and what's the interaction of saltwater do this all well the the big thing that's been happening in recent years is that warmer ocean water and and when i say warm warmer i don't mean really warm we're talking about four five degrees above freezing that water is penetrating further up towards the coast of antarctica under under the ice shelves and it is undermining the ice shelves it's melting them in thinning them from below in weakening them you know you have a large map that you have in the national geographic article accomplish this ins in perspective and there's there's areas of kind of purple that are the areas that are floating off and there's a couple of patches of red which really happening at an incredible rate tell us about how fast it's happening and say the pine glacier basically it's been an acceleration by several times all over antarctica the loss of ice from floating ice shelves has increased by a factor of twelve in the past two decades so where in the midnineties they were losing six billion tons of ice now they're losing seventy four what it is is it's an it's natural for these glaciers the flow floated this the sea but what's happening is the is the speed his increased.

pine glacier antarctica four five degrees six billion tons two decades