35 Burst results for "Antarctica"

Steve Chien Talks About the Possibility of Intelligent Alien Life

STEM-Talk

01:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Steve Chien Talks About the Possibility of Intelligent Alien Life

"Are your thoughts on the likelihood in our lifetime or the lifetime of our listeners in discovery of life apart from that on earth. That's a great question can oddly enough. What did i get remarkably frequently. I kind of have to answer to that. One is a pragmatic answer. And then one is kind of like the answer that i'm hoping for and the pragmatic answer is that it just seems to me not likely that we would find life in the immediate future just because going to these places is so hard if we're looking at going to the sub ice ocean on europa we have to fly jupiter which is pretty hard. We have to land on europa which is hard for then we have to melt through this ice crest which is ten kilometers sick. That might even take a year or two and then we have to explore this under ice ocean. And we're actually practicing things like that on earth had to explore underneath ice shells underneath the ice shelf the ross ice shelf in antarctica. Because we want to study that to understand the effects of climate change on some of these pristine antarctic environments. But it's very hard on earth much less to go to another planet in do that. So the pragmatic answer is. I'm not holding my breath waiting for such a mission to happen in in my lifetime but if you look out thirty fifty years. It's just very hard to project. So i would. I would have a hard time predicting. But if you ask me as an optimist in what i hope for. It's quite possible that we could hear some signals. That might indicate to us that there could be somebody trying to contact us a little different from going there and literally visiting

Antarctica
How to Photograph the Upcoming Lunar Eclipse

The Digital Story

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Photograph the Upcoming Lunar Eclipse

"Lunar eclipse. what is it. well most of us learned about this. I think in grade school right. It's when the earth moves between the sun and the moon and so there's a shadow and then this happens in phases doesn't happen all at once Although if you don't see it coming on you can look up and go. Whoa what happened there but generally speaking. We know it's coming. You know so there are these seven phases of the eclipse. All of them are interesting. The photographs but of course we want to hang out for the total eclipse. you get the money shot and then keep playing after that happens. Let's talk a little bit about you. Know what are some of the things that we need to know how about. Where can you see it out with that. So according to the article here the may twenty six two thousand twenty one. Total lunar eclipse will be visible in the united states. Canada central america south america antarctica new zealand australia japan china indonesia philippines malaysia taiwan and south korea so depending on where you are will be how much of the eclipse you can see is total eclipse all that kind of stuff. Now in terms of timing. I look this up. So for instance san francisco. The eclipse begins at four twelve. A m maximum eclipse is at four nineteen and then the total eclipse ends at four. Twenty six so you have a good fourteen minutes earlier to play around. And that's that's nice. It's nice having the time to get some shots to be ready to do some testing now. Of course the exposure changes drain all the different phases. They clip so you know we. We do have to do things while we're there

Canada Central America Antarctica South America South Korea Indonesia Taiwan Philippines Malaysia New Zealand Japan United States Australia China San Francisco
Vast Antarctic Iceberg Could Drift Through Ocean for Years

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Vast Antarctic Iceberg Could Drift Through Ocean for Years

"A vast Antarctic iceberg could drift through the ocean for years the iceberg is called a seventy six mile forty one times the size of Paris or proximity seventy three times the size of Manhattan mark drink water with the European Space Agency says it will eventually drift into the south Atlantic before that happens we've seen icebergs that can last up to eighteen years that have been tracked around and talk together if they remain in relatively cold waters drink water since climate is responsible for these changes ultimately it's the loss of ice from Antarctica I went into the ocean which is what we concerned about any been larger iceberg from twenty seventeen disappeared earlier this year I'm a Donahue

European Space Agency South Atlantic Manhattan Paris Antarctica
Will Steger's 1989 Route Across Antarctica in Gone

Climate Cast

01:36 min | Last month

Will Steger's 1989 Route Across Antarctica in Gone

"Tell us why now for this film well. The two young filmmakers i worked with it was their idea actually when i met him about seven years ago. They wanted to do a film. I give them for all my archives and they join me two of my expeditions. We went to antarctica either. All i knew about the film was called after. Antarctica is for the first time last month. Will your team made this four thousand mile antarctic crossing nineteen eighty nine at the time. Did you have any idea that climate change would be evolving as the crisis of our time now back in nineteen ninety. I was very much aware of of climate change. I actually taught it my classes in the late sixties. But i never thought it would happen so quickly. It was twelve years after that in ninety nine nine hundred ninety when we finished it when the larsen ice shelf broke up in two thousand and two dow was my called action. And that's it was two thousand two that a realize this is very serious and nobody is really aware of. What's what's happening. And that's critical right because those larsen ice shelf. You actually cross those during your journey right. And then now they're gone. They're gone and it took us thirty days across Both larsen abmc and now they're mostly gone in a shelf that have crossed both in the polar areas in the arctic car. I have the cynic integrated and we've lost about sixty percent of the ice on the arctic ocean in the summer. So you know it's happening so quickly. Accelerating very fast right now.

Antarctica Arctic Arctic Ocean
"antarctica" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Short Wave

"Thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explorer aerial. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study and articles extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of the creatures that they studied there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. Couldn't could not have been easy going to antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to aunt hartika and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy and then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society which i am now the president of

Reo waldman antarctica earth one of my favorite critters Npr
What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

Short Wave

01:42 min | 2 months ago

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

"Thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explorer aerial. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study and articles extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of the creatures that they studied there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. Couldn't could not have been easy going to antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to aunt hartika and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy and then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society which i am now the president of

Antarctica Ariel Waldman Nasa Hartika San Francisco Microscopically
Space Junk Chronicals

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:27 min | 4 months ago

Space Junk Chronicals

"Since nineteen fifty seven. Humanity has been launching satellites into earth orbit. It's estimated in the last four years almost nine thousand satellites in total have put into orbit for the vast majority of space age. There was never a plan for what would be done with the satellites after their lifetime. They were launched without any thought as to how or if they could ever come down the nine thousand or so satellites. Five thousand are still in orbit. Two thousand our service in three thousand are dead. D satellites are usually quite large. They can vary in size from a bus to a box and they aren't the real problem when it comes to space junk the big problem is debris when you send up a rocket there's all sorts of miscellaneous parts on the upper stage of the rocket that holds the satellite. That will go into orbit with it. This can include metal panels bolts screws and even flakes of paint. You'd think that given how big spaces that space junk might not be a problem as douglas adams noted quote space is big really big. You won't believe how vastly hugely mind. Bogglingly big it is suppose you had a million pennies that would be enough to easily fit in a minivan. Now let's suppose you distributed those pennies all over the world including the ocean and antarctica. Each penny would have one hundred ninety. Seven square miles of space or a single penny would have a square which was fourteen by fourteen miles factor in that the lowest earth orbit is a sphere larger than the earth. And that there's a vertical dimension where we could put pennies at different elevations. Then it would seem that space junk was a big problem if the object just sat there. That's true it wouldn't be a problem however all that junk isn't just sitting there. It's orbiting earth at extremely high speeds. Any piece of space junk is probably travelling at at least seventeen thousand miles per hour when something is traveling that fast no matter how small it is it can cause a great deal of damage. Moreover everything is on a slightly different orbit that means over time these orbits can cross and the longer something remains in orbit the greater the odds that these past will eventually cross and that things will smash together some of the things which are floating around in space include two cameras that got away from astronauts players a screwdriver or wrench a full toolbag garbage bags a lens cap a spatula and microscopic flakes of rocket propellant and that is on top of all the rocket debris and dead satellites if a ship with astronauts were to be hit it could lead to the deaths of the crew if important satellite were to be hid it could lead to a loss of critical communications. Gps signals or observational capabilities. This isn't just a theoretical problem. There have been cases of collisions in space. The space shuttle headed many tiny impacts from debris in space on the seven space shuttle mission. In one thousand. Nine hundred three. The front windshield was hit by a fleck of paint which damaged the window. It looked very similar to what happens when a rocket. your windshield damage. To the shuttle's he tiles was so common that the eventually began flying the shuttle backwards in space so that the engines which weren't used during re entry took most of the damage. The shuttle endeavour was hit by an object so large that its radiator looked like it was hit with a bullet. The international space station has to move on average at least once a year to avoid space debris the soviet cosmos twelve. Seventy five satellite was hit by an object in one thousand nine hundred eighty one which was believed to be the first case of a satellite being destroyed by space junk. Perhaps the worst case occurred in two thousand nine when the kosmos twenty fifty one satellite which was dead smashed into the iridium thirty three satellite at a relative speed of twenty six thousand miles per hour. These collisions and there have been several more only make things worse. In the first case three hundred objects were created from the collision in the second there were suddenly thousands of new objects thrown off on different trajectories in orbit in two thousand seven. The chinese government didn't anti-satellite missile test. That blew up a satellite in space creating tens of thousands of pieces of debris this problem of junk causing collisions which then creates exponentially more junk risk. Something called the kessler syndrome. This hypothesized in nineteen seventy eight by nasa. Scientists david kessler. He proposed that collisions could start a cascade of debris which would cause more collisions and even more debris rinse and repeat.

Douglas Adams Antarctica International Space Station Chinese Government Kessler Syndrome David Kessler Nasa
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 4 months ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
A Lost Wallet Returns From Antarctica, 53 Years Later

Kim Komando

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

A Lost Wallet Returns From Antarctica, 53 Years Later

"Lost it in an Arctic appalled Grisham finally has his wallet back The daddy one year old brush with sad. Diego arrived in Antarctica, October 1967 as a Navy meteorologist. At some point during his 13 month assignment. He lost his wallet and eventually forgot about it until last week. Russians. Wallet was found in 2014 what a building at McMurdo Station on Antarctica's Ross Island was being demolished. Where should receive the wallet by mail Saturday after it took years to track him down. She said. I was just blown away. Patrick. False

Grisham Antarctica Arctic Diego Mcmurdo Station Ross Island Patrick
Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

60-Second Science

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

"Time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee you can learn about muscle mass loss during spaceflight track the migration of asian hornets and explore the supernova. That caused extinctions at the end of the devonian period subscribed to science sessions on itunes spotify. Google play stitcher. And wherever you get your podcasts. I'm scientific american assistant news editor. Sarah lou frazier. And here's a short piece from the january. Twenty twenty one issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe in costa rica researchers embedded gps devices in decoy sea turtle eggs to track poaching patterns in their first field test. Five of the hundred and one decoys which had similar size weight and texture to real eggs traveled significantly potentially reaching consumers in latvia dna harvested from a seven hundred year old public toilet in riga as well as a six hundred year old cesspit in jerusalem will help researchers examine. Human microbiomes have evolved over time. Microbial dna from both sites matches some species common in modern hunter gatherers and some in today's city-dwellers in antarctica. New analysis suggests a fifty million year old foot bone found on seymour. Island comes from a species of bird whose wingspan reaches six point. Four meters across the researchers also attributed part of a large jawbone with tooth like structures to the species in a madagascar garden researchers found several volts goes chameleons a rare species whose females can change from green to vivid black white and blue excited. The short lived species had not been documented for more than one hundred years and no females were previously recorded at all in indonesia. new research shows that fluffy but venus slow lawrence's frequently bite one another to settle territorial disputes a rarity in venomous animals in australia an enormous newfound coral reef off the continents northern coast is taller than the empire state building rising more than five hundred meters above the sea floor considered part of the great barrier reef. It is the first detached reef structure discovered there in one hundred and twenty years. That was quick hits. I'm sarah lewin frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Rica Riga Latvia Costa Google Antarctica Jerusalem Seymour Indonesia Lawrence Northern Coast Australia Sarah Lewin Frazier
Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

Environment: NPR

05:16 min | 6 months ago

Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

"It's chilly across the country today. Highs of just fifty eight in miami and sixteen in minneapolis which makes minnesota colder than an arctic as mcmurdo station but the cold weather doesn't last forever in the twin cities and in antarctica. It does ice their last hundreds of thousands even millions of years and as npr's nell greenfieldboyce reports that makes an arctic the perfect place to find some of the oldest ice in the world. Just how old is the oldest ice. On earth john higgins says. Nobody really knows you know. Would i be surprised at this point. We had five million-year-old is i mean. I'd be surprised. But not it's not unfathomable i think he and some colleagues recently collected ice samples in antarctica. That were later analyzed and shown to be as old as two point six million years. It's beautiful stuff when you pull out. The is it. Essentially as crystal clear accepted filled with tiny bubbles the bubbles contain air from when the ice formed and this trapped air is what scientists are really after higgins says if you want to understand how gases like carbon dioxide have affected the climate throughout history. You know you can't really do better other than getting a time machine and going back in time and taking an air sample then using these ice cores which physically just trap samples of ancient air to release that ancient air. All you have to do is melt the ice. That's the sound of a research camp manager in antarctica making drinking water by melting scraps of two hundred thousand year old ice in a metal pot to actually collect an analyze the release gases however ancient is has to melt in a lab. Sarah shackleton studies old princeton where she gets to watch the trapped air bubble out and that is something that i don't know if i'll ever get sick of watching. It's actually like pretty mesmerizing and one thing. That's released surprising every time to muse. Just how much gas is actually in the ice. She says it's a lot and samples from time. Periods undergoing past climate changes could be used to help make predictions about the future. One of the biggest questions in terms of kind of the modern warming and look anthropogenic. Climate changes helmich warming. Do should we expect with the amount of co two that we have in the atmosphere now. Antarctica has been covered by an ice sheet for at least thirty million years. But it's actually pretty hard to find really old ice. John gooch is a geologist. At the university of minnesota he says while snowfalls constantly add new layers of ice to the top of the ice sheet the oldest layers at the bottom can disappear. That's because of geothermal heat coming up from the ground so the rocks are giving off heat of slowly over time and so that has the potential to melt ice at the bomb. Still bits of super old ice like that two point six million year old sample can sometimes be preserved at the ice sheets edges the older snippets of ice. That we've been able to find come from places where the ice has flowed up against a mountain range and been exposed at the surface in those spots though. The ice can be all jumbled up and messy. It's not nice layers that have been laid down sequentially over a long continuous stretch of earth's history to get a neatly layered ice sample like that. Scientists need to drill straight down through the thick icesheet so far the oldest ice collected that way goes back eight hundred thousand years. Gooch says the goal now is to drill down a couple of miles to reach ice. That's older a million to two million years old whether or not we'll be able to find it at the bottom of the ice sheet where we can recover a relatively simple continuous record. Is i guess. That's the sixty four thousand dollar question at team from china has drilling underway a group from europe. We'll start in november. What everyone wants is i-i samples that cover a key time period about a million years ago. When there was a dramatic shift in the planet cycle of ice ages. Those had been coming every forty thousand years or so but for some reason that pattern ended and it changed to every one hundred thousand years instead unto us working on climate. That's a really big deal. Eric wolf is a climatologist with the university of cambridge in the united kingdom. It's a really big question as to why that change is fundamental tower climates. Work in a way you could say. We don't really understand today's climate. If we don't understand why we live in one hundred thousand year will draw the forty thousand year world. The coronavirus pandemic basically ruins the arctic research season. That would've been happening now but starting next fall researchers will be backed down there searching for really old ice nell greenfieldboyce npr news.

Antarctica Nell Greenfieldboyce Arctic Sarah Shackleton Mcmurdo Station John Higgins John Gooch NPR Minneapolis Higgins Minnesota Miami Princeton University Of Minnesota Gooch Eric Wolf China Europe
The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

Frank Beckmann

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

"Boxes, Tanya J. Powers explains Wired to this week, Antarctica was the only continent in the world that did not have any reported cases of the Corona virus. That's no longer the case. Hundreds of scientists and researchers live there. And now three dozen people at a Chilean bass have tested positive for covered 19. The U. S National Science Foundation told USA Today that it's Antarctic personnel stations don't have contact with Chile and stations. Those who live in Antarctica have tried hard to keep the virus out because it's a remote region where medical capabilities are limited and people shelter from the elements in close quarters. No other country that has people in Antarctica has reported any cases there. Tanya J. Powers. Fox News. The people The number of people following

Tanya J. Powers Antarctica U. S National Science Foundati Usa Today Chile Fox News
COVID-19 has now reached Antarctica, infecting 36 at research base

the NewsWorthy

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

COVID-19 has now reached Antarctica, infecting 36 at research base

"Nineteen has now swept across every continent in the world that became official this week after antarctica reported its first outbreak thirty. Six people tested positive on a chilean research. Base officials are now investigating how the virus reach the remote continent but the good news is so far. No one infected. There has severe symptoms. An american personnel. Doing scientific research and antarctica. Now are all virus.

Antarctica
Big Brass Banned

Your Brain on Facts

06:08 min | 6 months ago

Big Brass Banned

"Goes way way back and was created in distant disparate places egypt rome india italy hungary. You name it. There are ancient roman coins that depict niro playing the bagpipes so while we can debate whether or not nero fiddled while rome burned hinging mostly on what the definition of fiddle is. It seems clear. He played the bagpipes. It's not clear when bagpipes made it to scotland. But we do know that at the time they had only a single drone. The pipe put makes the characteristic constant background note until the fifteen hundreds won a second drone was added and the last drone was added in the seventeen hundreds all of the chiefs of the highland clans employed pipers for both peacetime and war spurring their troops on victory until seventeen forty five bagpipes were linked to jacobite ism the movement that sought to remove james the second from the british throne and restore the catholic. Stuart kings the jacobites saw the bagpipes. As an icon of scottish national belonging and military pride while there are loyalist opponents saw it at best as a risible accessory for unflattering caricatures and at worse as an instrument of war carrying pipes was viewed the same as carrying a weapon. And a your command was tried for treason. The court declared quote no highland regiment data piper and therefore. His bagpipes in the eyes of the law was an instrument of author and sentenced him to death but john gibson author of traditional gaelic bag piping seventeen forty five to nineteen forty-five said it didn't happen that way the bagpipe man. Not the execution. That part happened. In fact the execution of the piper james reid might have to the muddling of the historical waters. Some of the confusion seems to stem from the disarming act of seventeen forty six which would get an amendment quote restraining. The use of highland dress this outlawed tartan plaid but didn't say anything about bagpipes. James reid may well have been piper. But that wasn't why he got the short drop and sudden stop he'd taken part in jacobite rebellion's and conviction had nothing to do with the disarming act so a case could be made that the seventeen forty five ban. Didn't actually happen. That makes that one line from braveheart. Goodbye plan outlawed. Choose twice as wrong. Since that set over four centuries earlier the bagpipes were verifiably band. In the nineteen forties in poland. Germans forbade the polls to play their pipes for a similar reason. Because of its ability to stir up nationalist spirit. Just think about that the next time you say it sounds like a bag of cats and a garbage disposal in fairness though you're not completely alone in your entirely wrong hatred of bagpipes in eighteen ninety seven. Belgium sent an expedition to antarctica with the intention of being the first party to over winter there even in modern antarctica with modern transportation. A lot of planning goes into keeping a crew alive. If you're in charge of the food you might have to plan out a years worth of meals and order your supplies eighteen months in advance. And that's today so imagine what it was like more than one hundred twenty years ago. Part of the plan of the rv gca that being the ship that they took was to hunt and eat penguins which would not only provide them with fat and protein but also vitamin c to ward off scurvy catching animals perfectly adapted to the harshest climate on earth turned out to be much easier than they thought. The supplies of the ship included a few musical instruments to maintain morale and whatnot. Apparently all you had to do was play the trumpet and the penguins would come right up to you when one man took out his banjo and played. It's a long way to tipperary a whole raft of penguins which is the collective noun gathered to listen. The reception was somewhat more critical for the bagpiper. The penguins fled in terror and plunged back into the sea tremendous tinkerer. Benjamin franklin had been so captivated by performances on musical glasses. Were you rub your fingers around the rim of glasses with different amounts of water in them to produce different notes. It was big in the eighteenth century and franklin wanted to see if he could make it even better. He saw that before each concert. The performer would tune the instrument by filling each glass with just the right amount of water. That sounds like a half. And if you watched miss congeniality by choice or because it was on in the waiting room you know that musical glasses are one of the few instruments that can be ruined by being mistaken for craft services in a letter written in seventeen sixty two to the italian scientist. Giambattista macharia franklin described a musical instrument. He had designed that made use of thirty-seven cups to help you. Visualize it rather than cups think bolts each one a little bit smaller than the last picture them in a neat stack. Now imagine a rod going down through the lot turning it on its side and having them spin on that rod as an axle thanks to a foot pedal and

Stuart Kings Rome James Reid Niro Nero John Gibson Hungary Antarctica Egypt Penguins Italy Scotland India Piper James Confusion Poland Belgium
Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 6 months ago

Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

"In a sea of stress. Inducing headlines there is one seemingly perennial bright spot these days vaccine news the scientists researchers and doctors that have been working on a covid nineteen vaccine seemed to have made great strides toward finding effective inoculations to help protect us from the virus. Pfizer was the first to announce its vaccine in early november. The company said it showed more than ninety percent effectiveness but the vaccine also has an inconvenient distribution issue it has to be stored at minus seventy degrees celsius. That's colder than antarctica in winter. Maderna's vaccine announced later in the month had similar efficacy rate and similar storage needs. Both vaccines must be sold in special ultra cold freezers throughout their journey from manufacturing plant to where the vaccine will be administered. Those super cold freezers cheap. Their price tags may be as high as thirty thousand dollars but those frigid freezers are selling like hotcakes. Hospitals in government entities have been snapping them up to help distribute the vaccine to the masses even employers are getting on board. Automaker ford bought twelve ultra-cold freezers last month. In an effort to ensure its employees can get the vaccine tra- cold freezers. Aren't your garden variety ice cream and frozen pizzas storage units. They're typically the domain of university labs in hospitals that need to store cell extracts dna or other specialized materials at extremely low temperatures. Both a ba leading vaccine's use a relatively new technology called synthetic messenger are in a or emaar in a which attaches to the virus helping the immune system recognize attack it. The challenge is that ima- a needs to be kept super cold. Keep enzymes from breaking down according to smithsonian magazine when the team at so low environmental equipment manufacturer of these units got wind of the pfizer. Vaccines storage requirements. The company started ramping up production so low vice president dan hesler toll cnbc quote. It's been crazy. The company stockpiles been depleted in orders or taking six to eight weeks to fulfil one of solos biggest. Competitors thermo fisher. Scientific was ramping up production at the fastest rate in its history according to a company spokesperson talking wwl a local abc television affiliate in asheville north carolina. The company expects fourth-quarter earnings to grow about sixty percent over the same period last year driven by covid nineteen response but even with ultra low freezer manufacturers. Hard at work to meet demand. These vaccines have unveiled another weakness in the supply chain the cold chain. Most vaccines need to be kept at a specific temperature until they're administered. That's typically around thirty five to forty five degrees wired reports but the super low temperatures that the most promising covid nineteen vaccines require. Make it tough to distribute the vaccines widely in the highly developed north american economies. Let alone in places where equipment capacity isn't close to sufficient like parts of africa. Asia and south america wired estimates that upward of twenty five percent of all vaccines are lost because of a lack of reliable coal chains in some countries. Just one ten. Health centers have a proper vaccine refrigerator according to that report and that includes rural hospitals in the us. Allen morgan chief. Executive of the national rural health association told stat news that poorer hospitals can't afford the pricey ultra-cold freezers nearly half of us. Rural hospitals were operating at a loss as of april of this year and the pandemic has only made things worse that means that workers and residents in these areas may not have access to the vaccine. It's possible that the manufacturers may update their cold-storage guidelines or that new vaccines. That don't require such ultra-low temps may come along. But for now lack of a stable co chain to distribute the vaccine to some people who need it most is a situation with legitimate chilling concert

Maderna Pfizer Smithsonian Magazine Dan Hesler Thermo Fisher WWL Antarctica IMA Ford Cnbc Asheville ABC Allen Morgan
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 8 months ago

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
Why are humpback whales getting stuck in rivers?

The Naked Scientists

03:50 min | 9 months ago

Why are humpback whales getting stuck in rivers?

"Say the least as it's the first known instance of this happening. The first little these animals up to as much as twenty kilometers up a river up in the northern territory and USTRALIA dissipated pitchy here we're talking murky muddy waters and so when I first saw the picture of Humpback Whale, which is an oceanic spacey's in this murky water, it was something that was a phenomenal thing thought sydney-based marine scientist Vanessa at PIRATA. Now, two of the whales is thought have since swam back out to sea but at least one remains in the river and the worries if stranded in the shallow water, is it going to be able to get out? So the main reason that the probably in there is well, I should point out this has never happened before, but maybe one of the animals took. A wrong turn and ended up in this area thumbed back wiles generally in the Kimberley region, which is northwest of Australia H. and every year to breed and have their babies, and now say time to be hitting Beck South dant Antarctica where they're going to spend the summer fading. Let's hope that this one reminding while has the opportunity to do just that being a. Tidal River is rather different to being in the sea. So how might the whale be doing? Do you sound to to listen and to vocalise to talk about now this whale because in on Acre located may be reliant on visual cues. So simply having a little look around or trying to say where there's a space to soon that's that site side there's a whole. Number of things that would probably be going through this wiles mind and without ends Promo fighting it'll putting a human spin on it on show that this animal might be doing circles or at least on. Friday. There'll be a tame going up just to have another look at it just to say what it's doing and to see if it's made any progression in its movements. strumming is a real risk and up in the Northern Hemisphere Southampton University's Clive. Truman, told me why this is dangerous for a whale watch would want to be supporting with the weight of the organs and the way to the animal. So when it strands that can compress the lungs and undamaged into Logan's same time if a while is stuck and tide is coming in and out almost paradox. Can Drown because it can lift itself off of the the bite can then water can get into the blowhole and drown. So what tools to scientists have available to encourage twelve plus meet away? Oh, to do anything, there's a couple of examples that I could run through one being creating a physical barrier with farts. So the animal was simply move away with type in some cases that hasn't worked in the past where the animal is simply gone onto bites you could use acoustics such as banging on physically banging on vessels, which is really nice for a while some have suggested using kilowatt playback sounds, which is the Predator of the humpback whales but again, a Lotta, these are potentially guttering juice stress our. Expert, team will have to y out what options are potentially going to be put on the table to see if it's worth inducing these kinds of reactions to then have a favorable result, which would be the animal turning directions and heading out to say as the name of the river suggests the whale isn't the only thing in east alligator river. Clive again. It folktales of fantastic animals extremely intimidating, but probably not a risk to sixteen major adult humpback whale unless again the whale is stranded, and if the world is stranded and stuck than, you could imagine the talk dolls could pies an additional risk.

East Alligator River Tidal River Beck South Dant Antarctica Truman Vanessa Scientist Hemisphere Southampton Univers Clive Kimberley Australia Logan
Antarctica is the only continent free of COVID-19. How long can it stay that way?

News, Traffic and Weather

00:29 sec | 10 months ago

Antarctica is the only continent free of COVID-19. How long can it stay that way?

"Country free of the Corona virus, where people can mingle without mass and watch the pandemic unfold from thousands of miles away. That's life in Antarctica, the only continent without cove in 19. Antarctica is currently in the depths of winter, which lasts from Lee February to October, But there is concern Antarctica starts re opening at the end of August, with winter flights in and out of the country being bringing in fresh supplies and personnel. Opportunities for covert 19 to slip in.

Antarctica
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 10 months ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

"So the daily penguins. Alex put said she has seen many more humpbacks over the last few years in line with reports of their recovery from wailing up to the nineteen sixties. I've found some fascinating organisms. Floating singly and in chains in the ocean and stranded on the Antarctic beaches. The selfs these rather delicate and beautiful creatures look like jellyfish but because they have a central nervous chord a more closely related to humans. Each one had a clear to like body encasing. An orange beach shaped got soaps farther plankton and they facie struck quickly to the ocean floor with the benefit of locking carbon down there. We do not know what it's helps but penguins don't they have exotic reproductive behavior and can transition through two generations in a day where there is abundant krill. The self seem to be rare and vice versa. The experts on my ship. I saw them just ten years ago. So yes some things are changing in the Antarctic or visited and I came. Home is concerned about this out of the world as I am about others but I was amazed that the Antarctic Treaty. Coalition of fifty four countries manages it using just trust and collaboration because no one actually owns this fall place. The International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators I auto under a similar impressive arrangement overseas safe and environmentally responsible traveled to Antarctica. What concerned Al Guides was the increasing? Number of tourists ships. We saw a monster ship carrying thousands of passengers. The guides came to measure the impact of tourism on Antarctica because the number of ships is growing rapidly with fifty five thousand tourists visiting last season. I'm told that seven years ships are being built for Antarctic voyages. This could impact the continents plant and animal life but ocean. It say their studies had so far found no evidence of damage to penguin colonies from visitors however with increases in tourism and the use of flights in and out it seems the threat to habitat will only rise with pressure to open up new travel destinations numbers so many numbers in the sideshow and so important that was medical research of Sally Smith who now farms walnuts and I see the news. This week that Krill yes combined weight equal to all people on Earth those griller expected to move north according to PhD student. Divvy Bichir from the University of Tasmania..

Antarctica Al Guides Antarctic International Association of A Alex Krill Sally Smith University of Tasmania
"antarctica" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on AP News

"Ones a record high temperature in Antarctica may have been recorded by an Argentine research base clear knowledge as a media officer with the U. N.'s world meteorological organization it's among the fastest warming regions of the planet we have a lot about the arctic but you know this particular part of the talked in an insular is warming very quickly the Esperanza based on the continent's northwest tip near South America recorded a reading shot at a women's sporting event set in nineteen ninety nine at the FIFA World Cup final in Pasadena California Perry said in a statement that she is all about celebrating a quality and the achievements of women Britain is set for another royal wedding Buckingham Palace announced Friday that Queen Elizabeth the second grand daughter princess Beatrice will marry in London the palace says Beatrice's thirty one and real estate entrepreneur and water my belly multi who's thirty seven we went in the chapel royal of some changes palace the queen will host a reception afterwards at Buckingham Palace Beatrice the elder daughter of prince Andrew and his ex wife Sarah Ferguson announcer engagements to multi last year he's a Briton descended from a noble Italian family the wedding date is set for may the twenty ninth seven five wire on Alexander and his twin brother army lieutenant colonel Yevgeny than men were both removed from their jobs at the White House president trump's response to Alexander's testimony to Congress in the impeachment investigation defense secretary mark Casper tells reporters have been mens are still in the service we welcome back all of our service members were they serve to any assignment they're they're given I'd I would refer you to to the army for any more detail on that a short time later ambassador Gordon son on who also testified announce he was recalled immediately from his post as ambassador to the European Union trump also take shots as on the Democrats running to take his place especially critical the problems with the Iowa caucuses embarrassing hello I'm not overly embarrassed by it I see the shows is going to this day it is a disaster trump is going to kill us on this one they're right seven of the Democrats running for president debate ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary former vice president Joe Biden says he expects to take a hit since voters in the state normally back candidates from New Hampshire or neighboring states tech entrepreneur answer to Yang says while he and the others all want to defeat president trump in November his fellow Democrats are wrong in thinking trump is the problem he feels the problems this country faces have been growing for years if not decades more cases more deaths from the corona virus in China more people have been flown out of China to the U. S. where they will be quarantine for two weeks doctor Robert Redfield heads the CDC this is a serious global public health situation and it continues to fall rapidly it's understandable that Americans are concerned but again the immediate risk to the American public is low the CDC says it's unlikely people arriving from China will have symptoms this is a P. news a federal judge hands down the toughest sentence yet in the college admissions bribery scandal involving rich parents in top universities a B. Jackie Quinn with more Douglas Hodge has received the harshest penalty yet nine months in prison a three quarter of a million dollar fine and community service prosecutors say the sixty two year old former investment company C. E. O. paid out eight hundred fifty thousand dollars in bribes to get four of his children into the university of southern California and Georgetown University as fake athletic recruits he also allegedly tried to get another son into Loyola Marymount Hodges apologized in a statement read in court for tipping the scales in favor of his children over others more than fifty people were charged in the admissions team including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin I'm Jackie Quinn a total of twenty parents have pleaded guilty I'm to McGuire AP news more news right after this thank you for we.

Antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:46 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Rejoining US Antarctica as we've just been hearing is an unusual place and it has a fittingly unusual history here to talk us through. It is Camila nickel chief chief executive of the Antarctic Heritage Trust Camilla is a straightforward answer to the question of who governs. Antarctica is nobody. It's governed under an international treaty under which fifty four nations have signed it and fifty one nations signed up to the the ideals and the cruises within the treaty. And it's through the treaty did it and taught to his governed so nobody ends it. There are territorial claims being talk about that a little bit more but these are set. Aside on the Antarctic Treaty there is that smaller cohort of countries smaller than the fifty four much smaller. Who Do actually claim a chunk of it? I can't remember being nerd ish enough that I I did have a small more collection of Australian Antarctic territory postage stamps as a kid. That's right So the pair between one thousand nine hundred and the second war number of nations put forward sovereign claims claims to portions of Antarctica UK. Was I possibly not surprisingly the U. K.. The first cave in one thousand nine eight then shortly thereafter. They encouraged strongly main coverage Australia New Zealand to do the same so they are still under president to that time. Of course. That's three unions. Eat and you have no way another with a big Antarctic nation and France as well and then you have the USA and Russia and the Soviet Union they were then they claim the right to claim the whole thing at any point in the future. Why was there that extraordinary gap between the discovery of Antarctica? Two hundred years ago this week and those first claims being asserted in the early years of the twentieth century. Was it just that everybody looked at time tactic and just thought. What are you supposed to do that and decided to leave it there? Well the vest discovery it came about as she because the sealy industry so the nations were looking for new stocks of seals. In who gets you'll pelts and sell them back up north and in the eighteen twenties there are a number number of ships operational Dan so she's getting more more further south and it was only the few pining brave souls that measure penetrate the first I drake passage which isn't a torty difficult passage of water but also into the ice so fifty years previously in seventeen seventy s captain cook course famous circumnavigates Antarctica. Okay Cross Antarctic Circle. Three times failed to spot the continent. If you look at the map of where he went to you could see the you've just crossed a little bit higher. He probably would have seen something but it was ice conditions and the small ships and they weren't ice strengthened ships. These these vessels. They're using so they couldn't be terribly brave in terms of pushing into the ice because they would difficult stuck in one thousand nine hundred. William Smith was on the brink Williams and he found the South Shetland islands and he's spotted those went back Valparaiso and got instructions. Underneath Captain Edward Brownfield to head South again. The following season in January to go and find Antarctica must be there beyond the South Shetland Islands so Brownfield Field Irishman from Cork leading this royal naval expedition. Or but on a merchant ship did just that and on the thirty January eighteen twenty spotted the Antarctic peninsula and named aimed at Chelsea land. You mentioned those. I claims stopped being made around the beginning of the twentieth century. And that is of course just in time to queue up the two world wars which which both had consequences far beyond the primary battlefields in Europe. was there ever any echo of the registered in Antarctica which Oh you had all these potentially rival nations huddled or again did everybody just look at the prospect of the potential battlefield before the been this. This does those look like kind of hard work well. The festival certainly didn't we registered Antarctica so that period was still this lot wailing going on. So they're they're winning fleet still down on their wedding Stations doping operated famous the men from Shackleton's Expedition Endurance Expedition. All came off. That expedition went straight into war. So that was the kind of the notable bull so first of all story the second is interesting so the Second World War is where those sorts of tensions were really starting to rise temperatures. Were starting to rise. Certainly and it was was in response to these kind of geopolitical maneuverings by several nations particularly the UK that Argentina Chile joined the race and they asserted their claims ninety four. Three eight hundred forty four and this really just Rosa temperature and in forty three the UK the colonial office and the Admiralty said. Having none of this we need to assert sovereignty not a little more explicitly so they salvage operation tavern which was a secret mission to go down to documents and established wintering basis. So this is so we could they could have wintering purser people on on Antarctica on the ground year round creating facts on the ground as diplomats. Like to put her thing yes. It's sort of absolutely said that there's a physical British present Serta Times prior to that you'd had vessels going down during the summer season but outside of that not much but Argentina and Chile were were starting wanting to do the same. There was a bit of a race of flag-planting flag removal clotting but little little huts being built plaques being installed and removed and it was. It's getting a little silly. It never came to blows. There's plenty of blows on Northern Hemisphere Dunes. But certainly this this operation fresh tavern from the case for interview establishes wintering being stations and established for formerly the total claim. So that was the limit of open conflict a certain amount of I guess cosmetic Rg Bulgy indeed aide continued through the forties and fifties and of course after the Second World War. The Cold War ensued the tension sort of moved to between the US and the USSR and stations are being built and the survival of sessions have claimed the whole continent but it wasn't until the nineteen fifty seven and the intellectual fiscal year. which was this extraordinary year of Science Science International Collaborative effort for science mostly in Antarctica? Excuse me but pretty much. It was and that was a global effort across nations between nations crossing boundaries to study Antarctica. So there's all sorts going on. It worked tremendously well as eighteen months extraordinary science and collaboration and it paved the way for the treaty. Not we can collaborate here if we remove territorial claims remove any military activity ending that if we're focusing on things like science. There's a collaboration that can happen here. And this this paved the way for the Treaty of fifty nine. How did the fifty nine treaty? Actually do that. What was the framework that enabled all these current and past and potential future rivals to either agree or agree to disagree on certain things? He's that so the initial centuries to the treaty when they're twelve of them and these actually where the the nation's with US often claims significant activity in Antarctica so these nations got together in in Washington for some weeks to negotiate this treaty. Now I think the final final treaty is short is any forty clauses. It's pretty elegant. It's it's pretty straightforward pragmatic that simplicity I think reveals what what has been kept out so so all those things number of things that just are not included in the treaty that obviously to contentious and therefore they focused in on setting aside the consonant for peaceful the scientific purposes. They outlawed all nuclear activity later. And any mineral exploitation anything like that and then later protocols environmental portal came into force all switch really rigorously manage environment. So in terms of Wildlife Managing Tourism Heritage Management Waste Management that sort of thing shipping so the final treaty is possibly the ultimate compromise that she it is incredibly workable. It's enforced through domestic government so every nation secrecy nation passes totic law onto which it upholds the the laws of the treaty and all activity by any nation is permitted by domestic government. So any activity we do is permitted by the Foreign Office here and anything. Any transgressions are then punished or considered under domestic law. You have yourself travel to Antarctica several times. Has it been your experience. That is a genuine cooperative community or or obvious. Still rivalries are their transgressions alday disputes. Does anybody have pushed their luck. With the terms of the fifty eighteen Andreotti on the ground in Antarctica. There are very many people. Really you know any given time I think The maximum people in highest peak is six thousand. They're very spread apart around the content. But it's an incredibly collaborative place so whilst there may be robust discussions around the treaty table said there's an Antarctic Treaty meeting every year between the rival nations. You'd expect those are not played at quite the same way down in Antarctica so for example we look after she cites there today. In an Argentinean stations. Nearby I am very closely the team we have done there. Have Klay spacious with the Argentine. They bring station. There's search and rescue. Reciprocal such rescue arrangements. The Navy Eh. If ever there is anybody in the navy will appear and and a rescue when our teams are on remote feel camps considering the remote sites often the the today in basis like San Mateo will radio in and say we're here for need us. We've got a doctor here and we'll come over and visit you in a few weeks. So it's an interesting positive playing out of Intellectual Inc.. The two hundred. Th Anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica is obviously a failure. Spacious anniversary in the annals of exploration are the great celebrations versions of this moment planned semi the Antarctic heritage. Trust to whom I see. We have a new program called Antarctica insight which is a cultural program which is engaging with artists artists. Scientists historians young people to look at Antarctica to consider the last two hundred years. And I think that that two hundred isn't terribly long to have been involved in a content content on a to reflect on those two hundred years of human activity there the good in the bat but also to think about the present and the future. What kind of Antarctica? What kind of constantly we handy onto the next generation and how they can take responsibility for it and how equipping them to do that so I'm going to be some autism conventions is going to be exhibitions? Talks workshops learning programs in an schools activities. Help people engage that every meaningful way just one final question on behalf of listeners. Who Like My Sofa? incandescently jealous because they've never been to Antarctica. Do you have a favorite part of it. Of course a potluck Roy. Of course it is an extraordinary place because what you've got is the coming together of extraordinaire landscape even agenda Penguin Colony. which brings you this extraordinary life and humor and and raw wildlife off as well as a historic site which has all the significance of it being the birthplace of Shanti Science and that is tangible you can smell it and taste it in the air? When you're there sits a special special place Camilla Nickel?.

Antarctica US Antarctic Heritage Trust Camil Australian Antarctic Antarctic Cross Antarctic Circle UK Antarctic peninsula Argentina Camila nickel Chile Expedition Endurance Expeditio South Shetland islands chief executive Captain Edward Brownfield France William Smith Camilla Nickel Soviet Union
"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on The Science Show

"Were going otherwise they see them on the beach and then they're gone. They don't know what they do. So they invented tags that would allow them to know where the seals were how deep they dove and also to measure things like temperature and salinity so they actually knew what sort of water they were forging so it really started with biologists and then the oceanographers realized that hold it. This is amazing because not only do they dive that deep but they go there and winter when we're usually back at home and so the seals have really South of sixty degrees south. We now have more Oceana graphic data collected by seals than in the history of chip-based oceanography. What should of Allah Gist are you? Are you a physicist. Assist physical oceanographer and a climate scientist covers the field. Isn't it now. What I want to know is how is the southern thousand part the ice getting on because what we saw of the northern part it really is crumbling? And we were vaguely aware aware of the West Part pent-up what about the other part so when we talk about ice down South we have to be clear to pay attention to whether we're talking about the is the frozen seawater or the ice. That's on the Arctic ice sheet. So we'll talk about the Antarctic ice sheet and Arctic Ice Sheet. It's an immense amount of ice. If all of that ice melted into the sea it would raise global sea level double by about fifty eight meters. That's not going to happen anytime soon. But as that ice runs off the continent and reaches the ocean it starts to float and that means it's exposed to the ocean and if the ocean warms or if currents carry warm water beneath those floating ice shelves the shells melts or thin and so particularly in west Antarctica. The ice shelves are thinning. And they're retreating. What happens then? Is the ice shelves like a buttress holding the ice on Antarctica and without that force that back for us that's provided by the shells more ice floes off the continent in into the ocean and that raises sea level and so in that sense the future of Antarctica A- and the Antarctic ice sheet is really tied to what happens to the surrounding oceans. And that's what's motivating our work at the moment going on the field. Yes exactly what's happening to Arctic. Ice Sheet is something that for a long time. It's been the largest uncertainty in terms of future sea level rise but satellite data shows us. That not only is Antarctica. Losing mass overall therefore raising sea level but the rate.

Antarctica physicist scientist
"antarctica" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Past Gas

"Hello Today on pass gas. We are starting our two-part series on the machines of Antarctica. Dang doing I'm so excited for this one get used to enunciating Antarctica because it's hard is that the north part of the south part is the south that is the South Pole is located at at the Antar at the Antarctic. The penguins are there. They actually just drilled down like thousands of feet into this lake. That hasn't even been been touched in like millions of years. That's the only so you get like the thing. The thing right. Yeah why are we messing around with that kind of stuff. Didn't we learn anything from the thing ever seen John Carpenter film Anyway so yeah to give you guys some context here listener We're going to start with the very beginning of ant Arctic exploration and see why they needed machines in the first place. Because you know what kind of it's hard to get around Tell you that much. There's no buses. Let's say that. Yeah let's get that out of the way no uber no scooters here's There will be car talk near the end of this episode. We just have to get there so get yourself some hot cocoa ready because it's about the cold in here. Hey guys welcome to the pass gas podcast. If you like passed gas please help us grow by giving us a good rating and a nicer view on the podcasts platform of your choice to really help us out and I really appreciate that. So thank you all right now for the show on board his ship. The resolution captain James Cook. I discovered the continent of Antarctica on January. Anuary thirty-first seventeen seventy five after discovering quote discovering New Zealand and circling the globe. A few years prior cook hated that much of the Pacific still remained unexplored so he had returned to find what he believed to be a hidden seventh continent many offered to do this exploration for him but he refused to let others hinder his imperialistic. Swag Cook. Listen you've done a lot. aww exploring let us do some exploring. Come on no no way Jose. I'm going into that frigid seventh continent so he set Out to find it for himself he had thought he discovered the continent but he refused to row ashore in claiming land for the British Empire because the land he saw appeared inhospitable and believe it would never serve as an asset of the British Empire as it turned out though James Cook had not discovered the true continent of Antarctica Instead he'd only discovered the Sandwich islands but that didn't matter to him nor his explorations investors back in England and to him any further southern expiration would be pointless as the southern sea was just too dangerous and was as cold outside the icebound continent was now globally understood to be a worthless asset but time would soon challenge that idea cook. Never got the chance to be proven urban wrong. No as he was dismembered and killed on a Hawaiian beach seven. Seventeen not yet he. That's a whole other story Shortly after he quote again discovered covered Hawaii's existence. At least he was in a Hawaiian place. Mahalo babies because of Cook Britain did not yet James Cook. It's not a good guy I can just want to say that Britain did not have any intention to explore the frozen wasteland but there is a different sentiment over in Russia in eighteen eighteen nineteen czar Alexander the first dispatched to Pacific expeditions with the sole intention of discovering the Antarctic continent. He knew there'd be some scientific havoc benefits to such an exploration but what he really wanted to demonstrate was his control to Alexander. The control of both the North and South Poles would be global demonstration. Shen of CZAR's power to the entire world kind of Mir's like Russian history has been like that forever whether just like we want power. Russia has a very very complicated in super interesting history. Yeah yeah it is kind of funny to think the guy was like I want top of world I want but them of world middle report little sweaty down there. Also it's hilarious because most of Russia's it's like frozen wasteland and they're like I want more. I want more shout who are Russian listeners. Retrieve again on January twenty seventh eighteen. Twenty honey the Russian expeditions crossed the inked Arctic Circle. It was the second expedition to have ever done. So and just one day later the crew of the Russian ship the Vostok stock reported sighting of the continent the once again. The discovery was only Some more islands close to enter Sandwich Islands. It's pretty hard to discover land. It's made out of Ice Mountains and snow. The first actual actual sighting of Antarctica was by a small American crew of Seal L. Hunters and February eighteen. Twenty one But the siding was swept under the rug as only quote real explorers could make such a discovery. Would you ever eat seal meat. I couldn't do that now. Acute Dank you I would imagine it to be very like fatty almost for sure goose of ood Uh Cows or whatever yeah actually kind of sounds good in one elsewhere uh-huh q.. Magic being a seal hunter in eighteen twenty. One there's nothing more shittier. Think of on a boat in the water. Freezing your balls. Yeah Yeah and then you have to like you can't shoot him. You have to club beat the John. James Kirk had described the land as inexpressible Sibley horrid in every aspect At this point in time the existence of Antarctica had yet to actually be proven but race to be the first to truly discover the continent had begun gun. I it was the Russians that wanted a piece like we said then the French came along then the British and the Americans and even chilly at a point a joint German Norwegian exploration team was formed to try to claim some of the land. What made this team unique? Though was the people it was composed of the majority of the group. whaler's tough men who a thing or two about being cold like being cold. They're the closest to experts on the terrain that existed at the time. Now finally the first actual landing aunt and Artika was by another group of seal hunters in eighteen fifty three report. Nobody cared and the Norwegian expedition declared themselves the first people to ever stepped foot on the land on January twenty fourth eighteen. Seventy five life. The feeling of being the first people to have ever stepped foot on on the new land was quote strange yet pleasurable Until at least the locals attacked. It took nick two hours to fight off a colony of Adelie penguins with sticks but once they hunted a few seals They they left after that so I guess they got attacked by paying win. Some seals bounced I think that's so crazy that these people from like take the top of the world. Just go all the way down here. Pangolins Edith and like okay. We did it. The Norwegian whalers arrived to prove that landing was possible there returned to the land would be accompanied by a wave of scientists and explorers. They had unknowingly kicked off. What would become the quote heroic age of Antarctic exploration that would dominate the early twentieth century? If you don't know much about the terrain of Antarctica it sucks WCHS allot original. Explores did not see much commercial gain from the continent. They saw tremendous scientific value for their home countries. Though specifically Britain Britain has a nasty habit of wanting to dominate. Every piece of land in sight So most things were done in the view of how could this benefit Britain. Well there there is always we need for our T.. Don't don't people in your typically not like ice in their beverage yeah uh-huh that's true so weird So that might have been something other than have a warm Dr Pepper night. Yeah like after after a hundred years of this place people like they go down there they see it there. There's nothing here and then it's like they forget fifty years later another group the report stuff they get down there. There's nothing there might be or get their Joe. We'll get back to more pass gas right now over at my sponsors a private expeditions skyrocketed in hopes to claim the land for Britain Britain took the lead When it came to the expedition's but the Germans also wanted a little piece? Kaiser Wilhelm the second wanted wanted to dominate the southern seas solely leave for Prestige and glory and began sending expeditions down to claim territory for Germany. Everyone's is freaking going down there in nineteen ninety one. The British ship discovery departed from London's east India. Docks onboard were two men who had become the most infamous explorers of all time. Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott. Really good names. Yeah yeah those are sick ball and asked me on this expedition. They explored nearly five hundred sixty kilometers inland. And we're officially claimed all of Antarctica for Britain much like when the US astronauts. Linda Moon so we basically claim the Moon Right we on the moon we on the mound. Yeah you against ah other. Countries claim that the land was obviously too vast to be conquered by single run like that so they continued sending more and more expeditions in nineteen. You know seven Shackleton's set off aboard the Nimrod in an attempt to claim the earth to conquer the poll and undisputably conquered the land for Britain. Okay wait it. Quick aside for Nimrod a lot of people think it means dumb no but that's only because of the bugs bunny cartoon Nimrod was actually like in accomplished hunter in Old Greek Lore. WHOA so it was? He was saying ironically to Elmer fudd.

Antarctica Britain James Cook Sandwich islands penguins Russia Hawaii Antarctic John Carpenter Pacific Cook Britain ant Arctic Nimrod South Pole Ernest Shackleton Arctic Circle New Zealand Linda Moon Anuary
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Are almost alien to us because they have been isolated for so long, they'll they'll probably also this may be a little disappointing though. Probably also be really small, but then you know, they might be they might be really big like those several meter long worms seen though. Oh, Yeah. yeah. That would be the coolest if it was just giant giant creatures that we find. Yeah, yeah, man. And one of the new groundbreaking tools that the three of us really loved to talk about when talking about this kind of exploration is something called lied. Are light are allows us to detect otherwise invisible ruins the most people would fly over without a second glance, if there is some remnant of an ancient civilization or ancient settlements somewhere on anti Artika lied are is probably the best way to find it right now as we record this in twenty eighteen the other problem, but the lighters perfect. It's also expensive, crazy expensive. It's expensive in more accessible areas. Let it's it's crazy money. Once you try to take that out to an article in twenty seventeen a group did that they were well. They did it in two thousand fourteen twenty fifteen, but they released the data in twenty seventeen and it covered two thousand seven. Hundred seventy five point six, five square kilometers of an area of Antarctica, known as the McMurdo dry valleys. They did not find evidence of a pre existing civilization, but for those of us who still want to hold onto that belief that such a group community or society existed, we can always remember this. Maybe just maybe this first light are true was looking in the wrong place after all after all, what? What? Two thousand seven hundred seventy five, something square kilometers. That's not all of an Arctic. No, no, no, no. No. No Antarctica has a total land area of about fourteen million kilometers square. Good God. Yeah. Yeah. And we would love to hear your thoughts on where people should be looking first off. Is this bunk? Is there something to it? The stuff we looked through. You know, you can see some. Of the problems that people might have with these claims. But we, we want to know if you have something to add to the conversation, and we definitely wanna know if you've visited at Artika yourself. It's not. It's actually not that hard to get a job there on staff. Oh, yeah. The NRT staff like to be a cook. That'd be cool. There's, are they like, are they like lodges out there? They're like. That's it. Yeah, that's what she got. You can visit tour. Stuff is like as Matt said, like a cruise, something. Look Alevis crazy scientists spend their their days in their summers down here, walk. All right now get out of here. Seriously believe now. Hey, test is blood. I. But honestly, we, the best stories are going to be the ones that are real being in an article. And then I also want to hear the most far out ideas about what you think if there is anything beneath all the ice, I want to hear your really far out ideas specifically year. Yeah, go ahead. Just write it, write it out Senator away because I just want to eat popcorn and digging, but that how do they send it to us? Oh, they're a bunch of ways. First thing you can do is find us on social media and that way we are conspiracy stuff in most places. Conspiracy stuff show in others. You can send us a voicemail. If you want to describe something to us, like we described the period map terribly, I might add sorry about that. But you could leave a voicemail and you know, describe something to us about that or just tell us a cool story. We are one eight, three, three s TD w y que you can find us live. Yeah, you can actually come meet us in person. Yes, we're going to be on tour from October twenty third until October twenty eighth very, very soon. We're going all.

Artika Antarctica McMurdo Senator Matt fourteen million kilometers five square kilometers
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Yeah, but other, you know, just kind of like Moines did. We did an episode on Grimwasde and we talked a little bit about the Necker NAMA con- yeah, another HP lovecraft creation. He's very adamant that's work of fiction, but people like this story so much that they want it to be real. Yeah. In some cases they kinda slender mandate isn't it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy, much like slender man has at least once yet. And then the last thing which we don't have time for, but we'd love to refer you to one of the first videos we've ever done the fool society. Yes. The idea that there is a civilization or ruins of civilization that survived some great cataclysm by going underground. Round similar to the Ben folds five song with ancient technology and that the Nazi party and the US military were both aware of this possibility. And as they were exploring the region through various various cover stories through the use of various cover stories like operation, high jump out, they were instead actually exploring these the possibility of these subterranean civilizations or waging war upon one another in secret at the south pole. Those are fascinating tales and all in an attempts to gain the favor of whatever civilization is down there. Yes, yes. And spoiler alert there, of course, the Nazis in this tale in this tale, the Nazi party thought that the subterranean civilization would of course be aerienne. Yeah. Yeah, and super into geopolitical happenings on the surface world the because it's. You know. I have nothing to say there. It's just it's, it's messed up. It's it's an interesting story and you'll a lot of Antarctica has not been fully explored, certainly not to the extent that other continents have. Yeah. And we have to remember there's still parts of there's still very remote parts of the world where no human being has ever set foot that have nothing to do with Antarctica. This is this is one of the concepts that early on when we started making this show been really got me into even further into these subjects, some of these, especially ancient civilizations. This one in particular Klaudia. Yeah, no, really be because I could imagine a world in where it was real only because we've found so many real things in in this world where opposing powers have been in a race to achieve something I or get somewhere. I because the other team is going to get there. For sure. At some point, we just have to get there before them and with everything from nuclear powers our lands to ensure this. Yeah. And so this was just another version of it for me where maybe there was something there or at least to establish bases on versus if some. Yeah, I'm so sorry. Mashes said operation Stargate. Oh, yeah. Started not wrecked in kale Tra. Yeah, that's a great point. This is if it's not a thing, a government did it certainly in line with the MO of most world powers. Yeah. So this leads us to conclusions, right? We don't at this point, have any solid proof that there was some sort of permanent settlements. In in Antarctica, at least not antiquity, and we don't have proof that there was even a a notable temporary settlement, much less a civilization or remnants of an ancient civilization, and this problem where this lack of knowledge is compounded by the fact that it's just devilish -ly difficult to do a lot of exploration in Antarctica, at least it becomes devilishly expensive. Yes, and astray of difficult just to get any kind of transportation there. Right. And now we're in a situation where our entire species and whatever Eldridge species may await us under the ice. Doesn't have to wait much longer because as the as the earth leaves as temperatures shift around the planet, we know that glaciers are receding. They're losing mass Ryan's. It's just getting a little warmer in most places, and we do know that we will see some pretty strange things when the ice actually melts depending on where it melts we, for instance, we don't know very much about the dinosaurs range of animals that roamed Antarctica when part of Gondwana. So. All we found so far about the from fossil life. There are going to be things that we could dig up on the margins of coastal islands or exposed mountains that have gone above the glaciers, and they're the few places that don't have a thick layer of ice. We might also find sources of geothermal energy. We are almost certain to find forms of life that.

Antarctica Nazi party Moines Necker NAMA Grimwasde HP kale Tra US Mashes Ryan Stargate
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Far reaches a Russian stuff that we can say for sure that it's, it's it's almost certain that different small groups of people interacted largely through trade and exploration in ways that we have yet to understand. Absolutely. I feel that's. It is safe to say that it's actually very safe to say that and your word of the day is an acronym. Said a word of the day. I think everybody should be. Yeah, but it's fun to say. I think that's all it takes the day. It is. It is if you want to be a real pedantic, nerd insult person. Yeah, can always decide to call someone anachronistic when you think they're not being cool. Using completely inappropriately to. But but yes, all that aside this this map itself is an agglomeration of twenty twenty something other earlier maps that already existed before it was made in fifteen thirteen and. Moose cartographers, mainstream historians today, believe the map does not actually depict Antarctica. That's a bummer. It's a bummer because it looks cool. You can see how it would you. You can see how someone could look at that and say, holy smokes Antarctica. There's a group called bad archaeology and they have a great right up on this. We recommend visiting their website for more details. Just Google bad archaeology period race. But we do have a quote, describing their conclusions about this map. It shows no unknown lands least of all Antarctica and contained errors such as Columbus's belief that Cuba wasn't Asian peninsula who swing in a miss. Yes, errors that not to have been present if it derived from extremely accurate ancient originals. And it also conforms to the prevalent, geographical theories of the early sixteenth century, including things like balancing landmasses in the north, with others in the south too. Keep the earth from tipping over. Yeah, don't wanna do that because it's balanced on the on a turtle's back. That's right. True Sawyer. The the idea that the earth itself is sort of like a. Has its own geographical equilibrium too many continents of one air quotes side or another will inevitably tip the scales because it's. Right? Although it was relatively common knowledge at the time that the world was globe take that for which will the the maps is based on our older, but they're not. They're not ancient. It's not as if they found some six thousand year old. Sumerian map depicting lands that had never been heard of in the modern day and said, let's just copy this, right? Yeah, at least according to the different experts who have examined the actual map. So unfortunately periods while being an incredibly tantalizing possible indicator of ancient exploration of an article if not ancient civilizations in that continent, and just a cool map and just a cool met. Unfortunately, it really is a tantalizing thing because it doesn't deliver. It doesn't. It doesn't hold up, but we would be remiss if we did. Shout out something completely different. I think thing that we're all fans of, which is. Are. And. HP lovecraft as the author of the mountains of madness famous author, terrible person, inspired millions of people with his story. I was so taken. I was hypnotized by your depiction of these of these ancient pre human races got a little mad there for a moment, but I'm feeling better. Now you're back off the mountain. Yeah. So it's it's. And I want to say it's a really well written story, but it's a, it's, it's very, it makes a great impression. It's cool in people. Yeah, that's one of the best ways is so cool. And and the idea there is that there is an there ruins of an ancient pre human civilization hidden in the hinterlands of Antarctica. That has not been proven on this bite. What some people have tried to depict in earlier arguments on the fringes. There HP lovecraft was writing fiction. He knew he was writing fiction and he liked it..

Antarctica Cuba Google Sawyer HP Columbus six thousand year
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"So why would we see monuments but not see the homes of the people who lived in nearby, right? Maybe they're just so far covered by the ice, maybe only the monuments are large enough to be visible. Well, maybe grandma handcocks thirteen less than thirteen thousand years ago. Williams six thousand years ago. Maybe their way off on how long ago structures were there because we do know that that over time nature takes over. And we'll erase almost anything like weathering and just like totally wearing down mountains over time, and it's crazy. But yeah, I'd love to see a time lapse of them pretty cool. Yeah, exactly. But then you have to start thinking, well, then how old have humans or at least intelligent life actually been on this planet. Right, right. Which that date keeps it seems to get pushed back further and further every decade. You know, Minu discoveries who new discoveries going back as far as what sixty thousand years, I think is one of the newer ones at least close to where we're at right now. So. There's also argument that we've brought nature into this. There's also an argument that maybe the ice on Antarctica is not even if it formed millions of years ago. Maybe it wasn't as constant a presence as we have initially assumed. Interesting. Maybe the ice ebbed and flowed. You know what I mean? Waxed and waned. Maybe there were times when the glaciers retreated away from coastal areas, right? Then possible and maybe they did that for long amounts of time. Yeah, there. There's so many possibilities. I, I bet there are scientists out there going. No, absolutely. Not. Studying this entire life and no, you can't say that. Well, we don't know. That's true. We don't know, and we're not saying that the entire thing is covered with a glacier. At this point. It's just it's still inhospitable. Yeah. So we can tell you, however, about a very particular map, which for people who believe in our to maybe more familiar with to our species than we have always assumed this is sometimes seen as a smoking gun. Stay tuned after the break will introduce you to period Rhys. It's Barrington day Thurston host of spit, iheartradio's newest podcast, twenty three.

Minu Williams Antarctica Rhys iheartradio Thurston thirteen thousand years sixty thousand years six thousand years
"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Hello, welcome back to the show. My name is Matt nine names. No, they called me Ben. We are joined with our super producer Paul decade. Most importantly, you are you. You are here and that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know quick as I say Pete behind the curtain, the the four of us rashly relatively well traveled people, although I have never been to Antarctica rights. Right? And that's the subject of today's episode. Very, very few people have been. I got very close to go into an article once number of years ago, Matt, you may remember it was with. With a good friend of ours. Fringe of the show who does a lot of write ups on the house of works website about our podcast. Diana Brown checkout her work. If you get a chance she was going, her family was going to go on a group expedition and Antarctica is one of those places that is very, very expensive to go go to by your lonesome, you know, for you gotta roll deep and get the price cuts. Unfortunately, that didn't happen, but I'm hoping one day to get to this continent. I think it'd be a cool thing for all of us to do because of all of earth's continents. Antarctica remains the most mysterious today. It's it's nice box. It's a gigantic ice desert. It's one of the last places in the world that is largely or somewhat the same as it was before, what we call the anthropoid or the age of humans. And you know, it's no wonder. There's not much reason for human being. Is to be there, not not that it stopped us before, and for a lot of people, this may be weird to think about Antarctica wasn't always a frozen wasteland. In fact, it was kind of balmy for a while. That's true in just before we get into that you, you can take a flight crews to Arctic. That's probably the easiest way gotta fly somewhere that's closer. And again, on a ship rights, she can't fly into Antarctica, really? Not not really. No, not easily. Yeah, it's not a delta flight, right? Yeah, even thing called icing. It gets worse when you're an anthrax. Yeah, even spirit won't take you there for about virgin. They go, I don't know. Yeah, they do. They are trying to go into space. Richard Branson, trying to go to space. So in aren't has kind of like space on earth similar to the Mariana trench. There's a lot of stuff we don't know about either environment. That's a very good point. What we do know about how Antarctica arrived at this strange position that works on multiple levels. I comes from a series of theories and a lot of research into timelines, so we can. We can explore that just briefly be here are the facts. Yeah. The first thing you have to subscribe to is continental drifts. Yes, that's the first thing you have to buy the idea that once upon a time or several different times throughout the history of earth in times had nothing to do with human beings. We weren't even a twinkle in the ecosystem. Is I the continents as we know. Today, we're actually part of a larger things called supercontinent super continents. Perfect, super continents because they not because they add extrordinary powers. They were just really big. And from what we understand, they shifted into each other, a number of different super continents about one billion to maybe five hundred and forty two million years ago, and they formed this huge thing. We call Panja and the southern part of Panja was a place that we call Gondwana. Of course, we made these names up after the fact because again, no people were there that we know of right or at least no life form capable of naming things. And guns wanna was made up of what we call South America, Australia, India, Africa, and Antar ticket today at this point in Antarctic is life span. It teamed with plant and animal life. It was lousy with it. It was actually pretty hot. But around one hundred and fifty to one hundred eighty million years ago, Gondwana began to separate or drift and eventually Australia, which was still attached to Antarctica. Eventually, Australia moved pretty quickly for continent speed toward southeast Asia. While Antarctica finally became isolated about thirty four to thirty five million years ago..

Antarctica Matt Australia Mariana trench producer Pete Paul decade South America Richard Branson southeast Asia Diana Brown Arctic Panja India Africa one hundred eighty million yea thirty five million years forty two million years one day
"antarctica" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Back out again in Antarctica. And the particles that are being detected physicists, they know. They're out there. But they don't make up the standard model model of what we know as particle physics. And they shouldn't be able to do that. It's almost like this this energy beam of whatever it may be high energy neutrinos other particles. They have large cross sections that means that they'll they'll they are meant to crash into something after the zip into earth. And and and that's the thing they're meant to crash. And we don't know why it's almost like this is some. Frequency or some sort of a light beam being broadcast. And NASA Antarctic impulsive transit antennas picking up on. Now. What's interesting about this is that if this is some sort of signal coming from the earth going out into the cosmos, or is it coming from out there going through the earth to we sent out in like the earth is one big prison, sending out the message all of the cosmos. It just reminds me of the time where we received the computer interpretation. Of Saturn communicating with Enceladus. Here's that recording. Remember the recording. It's it's rather amazing. Listen to this. Her. The search..

Antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"Things that we we can see over the last couple of decades is the ocean is warming their current surround antarctica and if these flow up towards the ice sheet they can start to melt the underside of the ice and that's what we think is happening and that's what's triggered this acceler ovation nice loss the ice sheet is what we call a marine grounded ice sheet if you took away west antarctica then you would not be left with land he'd be left with an ocean because it's actually sitting on the floor it's several kilometers fake sitting on the sea floor and actually as you go towards the center of the ice she just gets deeper and deeper and what happens as you melt the ice sheet and the ice she starts to retreat back towards this deep area that actually causes the flow even more quickly into the ocean and that's what's causing this acceleration we think andrew so you've calculated the rate at which antarctic melting is raising sea levels and it's three times grade since two thousand and twelve that was in the period before that so how much of that changes ascribable to human induced climate change and how much juice award antarctica would just do normally in west antarctica the pattern is very very clear it's not related to a fluctuating mutual signal related to some long term increase in the rate of ice loss and we can see that in the speed of the glossiest they're ramping year on year and poorer more ice into the oceans and this is this is not a normal pattern of behavior this is something related to changes in the conditions around the ice sheets and we know that it's in the oceans how much uncertainty is there around these figures given that you're looking at a non uniform continent.

antarctica andrew
"antarctica" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Antarctica are in the same department as me yet it's there is a profound weirdness of walking around agu especially when you give presentations here the allotted the presentations will begin with definitions know if like hey i study this which is an ill advised and it's it's amazing because you would expect it a lot of conference you've got while we all know and they'll just launch right into the details of it but because everything here is so crazy diverse and i love that but it also does mean that i do have to sort of play one on one and play this you want to one student all the time wait what is that again what are you talking about what's what is a cloud channel that sounds coal i don't know what that is that just like how do you but it was like banded with the air he's if these particular like cloud formations that are almost like linear and they'll run next to each other so they look clear on earth on earth and on on some of the big gas giants you can see him and it's like young atmospheric scientists as far as i can tell from what i've heard it kind of throat their shoulders shrug emoji style millikn we don't know what to do in this we noticed something new with the convection cells right it's definitely think i reviewed median some miss ability there yet but they're pretty distinct yeah that's weird and then you know and they persist one of the i think what happens is the kind of know how they might initiate but the fact that they persist in space for you know a hundred miles or something like that that's the part the people await want want the dissipates sort of self organizing climate system that seems kind of odd and people have been trying to figure that went out for a while but apparently hanggliders when they see that in the in the atmosphere they'll go go because it means that there are these big convection so they can online for a long time so it's kind of an instant visual learn you know visual cute.

Antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Blind in the frozen tundra of in ourika uh and you know maybe murdering somebody with a claw hammer in the snow or something that affect i'm not saying i just you know they ended hat nickel here um you know or at a campsite is what he says it's his example if we that it in my uh then it won't necessarily be clear who has jurisdiction mmhmm right in this becomes the crux of the complication ig save hundreds of dollars by switching to gaiko i'm so happy i feel like i can fly disclaimer you will not be able to fly by switching to gaiko this is against the laws of physics and nature if you find yourself line pc professionell and or medical help immediately in the unlikely event you find yourself lying you might be a superhero or a pigeon or a superhero named page woman was bitten by a radioactive pigeon if you are indeed bid woman takeover tang's all licensing publishing rights in the event pits woman the movie becomes a top pros in hollywood blockbuster geico fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more four is dr hemmings news there's never been a criminal prosecution for a murder committed in antarctica ends i'm gonna go on record here on our show in say that i think there were probably murders that occurred in antarctica over the span of human history we know that there is violence and vice in this continent ends we just brought up a real life example that claw hammers thing happen yet another claw hammer thing actually happened not not in the way that i speculated earlier but in 1990 six there was an incident at an australian facility where a cook in the galle attacked one of his fellow workers with the back end of o'clock hammer and no one was killed illegitimately resulted in both both guys getting stitches and actually in.

tang geico murder antarctica galle hollywood dr hemmings illegitimately fifteen minutes fifteen percent
"antarctica" Discussed on TV Avalanche

TV Avalanche

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on TV Avalanche

"While the sitting to don't look back in anger by oasis yes very important oiler they also local naacp who does it and if you're going to die to anything yet but what is good way to go but that was a mobile when i was like oh this show is completely off the wall and i cannot wait for whatever is next the one thing i really liked about that particular thing that particular plot is that a lot of these plots involve the animals trying to kill a lot of people all at once right you know there was so specific veered they're like we're going to kill these two uh female married burned scientists who live in the end it live in antarctica and just them and batch than a fly from wherever they were all the way to antarctica to kill the by blocking their so they're solar panel spend a lot of time and energy on this so incredibly cruel in specific yes i was a yet so kamasi bats solid i'm going to go what am i had to go with next i'll probably go with the wolf jailbreak um solid it in which there was a guy who we were led to believe is some sort of important man can speak to wolves and was later again killed off it never spoken out again but the a pack of wolves broken out of jail and i feel like i should explain that were but i also feel like i shouldn't and the only thing you need to know is that.

antarctica
"antarctica" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"antarctica" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"More ice is falling into the sea and raising sea level in the article it it talks about how scientists measure what's happening and of underwater what's happening underneath these ice sheets house they're warmer water and what's the interaction of saltwater do this all well the the big thing that's been happening in recent years is that warmer ocean water and and when i say warm warmer i don't mean really warm we're talking about four five degrees above freezing that water is penetrating further up towards the coast of antarctica under under the ice shelves and it is undermining the ice shelves it's melting them in thinning them from below in weakening them you know you have a large map that you have in the national geographic article accomplish this ins in perspective and there's there's areas of kind of purple that are the areas that are floating off and there's a couple of patches of red which really happening at an incredible rate tell us about how fast it's happening and say the pine glacier basically it's been an acceleration by several times all over antarctica the loss of ice from floating ice shelves has increased by a factor of twelve in the past two decades so where in the midnineties they were losing six billion tons of ice now they're losing seventy four what it is is it's an it's natural for these glaciers the flow floated this the sea but what's happening is the is the speed his increased.

pine glacier antarctica four five degrees six billion tons two decades