35 Burst results for "Antarctic"

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

Short Wave

01:42 min | 3 weeks ago

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

"Thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explorer aerial. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study and articles extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of the creatures that they studied there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. Couldn't could not have been easy going to antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to aunt hartika and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy and then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society which i am now the president of

Antarctica Ariel Waldman Nasa Hartika San Francisco Microscopically
WIRED Senior Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks about The Mission to Find Ancient Life on Mars

Gadget Lab Podcast

02:57 min | Last month

WIRED Senior Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks about The Mission to Find Ancient Life on Mars

"The place that we landed this month is essentially what they believed to be a dead ocean right a lick a river leading into a lake. It is as researchers said to me not everybody agrees with that but but he said if there's a place that's likely to have the signs that something once lived there. This is that it is. It's a crater that was a the the delta of a river so there was a river that then spread out and came over the sides of these of this can walls and laid sediments down and it's in those kind of sediments that researchers have found the signs of ancient life here on earth and that they hope to find it there in these different colors and layers that they can identify but by texture than by their mineralogical constituent. So adam. What would that science outpost look like on mars. And how how would we build a structure to make it habitable. That's such a cool thing to think about. You'd really you'd like to not have to take everything that you need with you because it's really hard to move things from a gravity well into space costs a lot. Wait is the issue mass. So it'd be really great to be able to use the materials that are there to transform the soil or the rocks. they're into the structure. You can imagine kind of digging down into the ground into the regular. Maybe one of the canyons. Because part of the problem with not having an atmosphere is mars is positively lit up with ionizing radiation like everything from sunburn to cancer. So you wanna be out of that as much as possible be shielded from it be nice to not have to build shielding do it. It'd be nice to have a place where there was already water. There seemed to be places where there's frozen water there now. Those would also be places where there might be living things. You don't wanna mess that up. But if you if there wasn't if they were sterilized but there was liquid water. You could use the ice. That was there. You could use chemical processes to transform carbon dioxide in the regular into oxygen. Potentially that's something that There's instrumentation on perseverance to try to learn how to do. And then all of that would then be studded with with science doing stuff in the same way that like south pole station is or any of the other antarctic stations. That different countries have to study to the weather to study to look outward to have a telescope. there that you could see through thinner atmosphere and not have to deal with bad seeing conditions that happen here on earth you could imagine doing the kind of geological mining for potential resources even again getting them homes difficult it has to be. They have to be so valuable that it's worth sending the rocket and then sending the rock at home somehow. Maybe that's you know. That's possible.

Adam Cancer
The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

Frank Beckmann

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

"Boxes, Tanya J. Powers explains Wired to this week, Antarctica was the only continent in the world that did not have any reported cases of the Corona virus. That's no longer the case. Hundreds of scientists and researchers live there. And now three dozen people at a Chilean bass have tested positive for covered 19. The U. S National Science Foundation told USA Today that it's Antarctic personnel stations don't have contact with Chile and stations. Those who live in Antarctica have tried hard to keep the virus out because it's a remote region where medical capabilities are limited and people shelter from the elements in close quarters. No other country that has people in Antarctica has reported any cases there. Tanya J. Powers. Fox News. The people The number of people following

Tanya J. Powers Antarctica U. S National Science Foundati Usa Today Chile Fox News
"antarctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"antarctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Drives to these really blue eyes feels and so the ice viewed that don't have any snow covering on it and and then you go into research and you basically systematically searched these blue isis on. So you're on your on your own and then you just go down elaine. Basically imaginary lane you rate is your bad way and you can think of is like a conveyor belt so meteorites land on this is a half over billions millions of years and think of it as a cake so if you have chocolate chips in a cake on chocolate chips will be at the surface. Some rebel the interior of the taken. Some he'll be at the bottom of the cake. Now if you start slicing the cake from the top you will expose chocolate chips at different levels in the if you continue to slice and that similar the ice and saw the meteorites frozen at different levels in the ice the ice floes very racially from the center of the content towards the coast but if the ice encounters obstacle like a mountain range. So that's the big transantarctic month If the ice encounters that mountain range the isotope gets pushed up against the mountains and the window snow. Dry it obliterates. The is you know. Basically evaporates the is and so then. The ice starts pushing right and so you. This way exposed the meteorites at different levels and they're all concentrate on the surface and so you have to do is then just literally gone. Find these extremely old ice fields where the ice is starting to supplement because it is kind of stalled against some of these mountains and you just have to go in recover these meteorites and so we go in a search pattern where we all in one line in audra forward sort of the same speeds and everybody looks left and right in front of and behind you to find these meters at a sitting on the ice If not snow covered you know. Usually black rocks sitting on blue eyes is easy to see. They are also fox. Because you have someone from the mountains they fall down right and so every time you see iraq you stop you go. Check it whether it's from earth. Not and then. What is the distinguishing factor between determining whether it's an earth rock where the and that's a good question so when meteorites hall so when they when when you have a meteoroid that goes through the atmosphere a heats up it gets extremely hot so the outside melts and it creates dislike black glassy crust. And we call this a fusion crust And so the rock doesn't have any sharp corners because they all got rounded through the entry through the atmosphere in zone it lands and has partially shiny glassy crust. No no sharp edges. Everything's rounded and usually the crust breaks open by impact so part of the.

elaine audra iraq
"antarctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:12 min | 4 months ago

"antarctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Formation history and And so looking at these rocks that billions of years old. You know we can try to figure out not only how planets in general forum how crust forums but also how earth want and what was it like in early in its early history. I think i think that's a really good way to put it. Because i think you know people get whether that fix them. Every day we just had the tropical storm affecting much of the east coast. I often find that People don't make the connections into why we're studying planetary bodies and science and some of the things that this is just my experience. Scientists also when people sort of see research and development that doesn't to their perspective affect their through immediate live. Always will why are you doing that. But i think you did a nice job of framing that. I just thought about this This show is certainly not going to do anything for those people that occasionally s urologist just if we studied meteors in your rights. Because that's something that i know of meteorology folks out there that you've gotten that question a timer to whenever there meteor showers and things because meteorology certainly has the word year in it. But you kind of derived from this hydra hydro year hydra meteors of these water constituents in the atmosphere and it has a history that i actually wrote about in a forbes article several years ago on the origin of why we are call meteorologists and study weather but you mentioned julianne on top of dr julian gross from rutgers university. But you mentioned that you are not in new jersey right now you are in texas. Tell us a little bit about what you're up to their aso currently. I'm only from rutgers. I'm a texas in houston and not become the deputy curator for the apollo sample collection with nasa. So nasa is basically buying my time from rutgers for about two years so i can help curate The apollo collection the samples and preserve the samples end advertisement to the community. And right now we have. You know we're getting ready for our domestic the artemis mission and we have the program i think for for this folks with this is a crowd that might be listening to whether he has no idea what artem assists could give us a quick thirty second radio. That is absolutely i mean. Everybody knows the apollo missions Re run to the moon to return to to bring back samples and so artemis is a return to the moon mission which is bringing the first woman and the next man to the moon. Ideally by twenty twenty four so Artemis is the sister great in the greek mythology of apollo So it was very fitting for nasa to to name this mission artemis and we trying very hard to get ready for that mission We are at currently. I'm helping to develop some of the tools or the materials that the tools a made from that the astronauts will use to pick up samples because we have to be very careful so that those samples don't get contaminated with material from earth right And then On also working and trying to help curate the apollo samples themselves.

dr julian gross rutgers nasa the east coast texas julianne rutgers university aso new jersey artem houston Artemis
"antarctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:25 min | 4 months ago

"antarctic" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Needles in a haystack. Searching for meteorites on earth is not an easy feat. how about searching for those meteorites while in the frigid wasteland of antarctica. That's what my guest today. Did this past. Winter doctor julianne gross as an associate professor at rutgers university and she studies the formation and evolution of the planets in our solar system. What the meteorites in the arctic have to do with her research. You're going to find out about that. Plus what living in the true frozen tundra is like julian. Thank you for joining some podcast very welcome. I'm glad i'm here. Well we like to go all over. The place with this podcast. It's called weather geeks but for those that. Listen on the regular. If you're listening in for the first time we we go into every nook and cranny if it's any way related to whether climate science atmospheric sciences in this is one of those shows today. Let me give you a little. Bit of. Julian's background before. I ask her the question that i ask every weather geeks guest and i'll give you a little heads up because i'm going to ask you. How did you get into space studies in geology with something as a kid some experience but before i do that we just give you some of her background. She's an associate professor and senator at rutgers. University's department of earth and planetary sciences. Off to find that what that means because it's in my production notes Vassar at the city university of new york graduate center a research associate. At the american museum of natural history new york she received her phd in geosciences and her masters in meteorology meteorology for university of bocom or germany. Off the get my sixteen year old daughter to help me pronounce that because she takes german so anything i got wrong. Please correct me but first of all how did you get into this space studies in geology. This the question. I always ask her whether guests. Because it's usually some experience as a kid. So i think always been really curious about how things were in general Like when i was a toddler. I like to take things apart. You know figuring out how they were all has been really curious about nature and how nature works in general and so growing up I wanted to become an astronaut or farmer. Those were my two big dreams And yeah so. I ended up in geology.

julianne gross rutgers university antarctica department of earth and planet university of new york graduat arctic julian university of bocom Julian Vassar rutgers american museum of natural his germany new york
Meteorite Tea Provides Scientists Information on Solar System

Innovation Now

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Meteorite Tea Provides Scientists Information on Solar System

"The golf ball sized rock that appeared coal black against the white antarctic snow would prove to be one of the best preserved media rights of its kind. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped our future in the lab at nasr's goddard space flight center. Astrobiologists like danny glavin worked to decode the mysteries. Meteorites might hold we call it making meteorite t so we actually we crush a samples up. There are a little tiny chips about a centimeter. So that we crush into a powder using a mortar and pestle something like the consistency of flour and then we put it in water and steel tube and we heat it to one hundred degrees c. At that point. We take the liquid From the pertinent and we extract it and we analyze it using gas chromatography liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to try to separate all the individual organic components that are in that meteorite. T four glavin. Meteorites are like history books that fall from the sky and deliver chemical information about the early solar system seems like every meteorite sample that we started we find something unique and different

Nasr's Goddard Space Flight Ce Danny Glavin Golf Glavin
"antarctic" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

06:14 min | 9 months ago

"antarctic" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"That situation. He doesn't have taken Vin Duluth. Things he was called Colino Brady and he took these one thousand, one hundred and Eighty Calorie Colin bars that'd be made especially for him, and so they had loads of protein loads of good stuff in. It was just going to eat these bars all the way across. But one morning he just got the munchies and he just started eating all of these COLLINA's. Oil nuts dried cranberries cocoa powder, and he decided to we just loads and loads of them, and he had about two thousand calories worth one goal, which is about the equivalent of eight big MACs, and then the next morning while you know what happened. While it's not exhibiting the kind of self control. You expect, but he. Oh. Colin is very controversial figure. And Antarctic lawyers certain is yeah. Because so he. Plays to be the first person to have crossed the Antarctic, fully unassisted and unsupported so originally went to this Norwegian guy called Borges Ostlund, and that was in the ninety s I think, but then they changed the definition to say the unsupported hat without even a kite, so boogie had used a kite in like two occasions very very briefly to get himself so our snow. We just explain how that works because sounds like he's just having fun with a Kaiser. Was, he allowed to take his Yoyo with. Sorry it's been transposed. Not Let you stop. You found a hobby so I guess you're you're on your sled, or and you harness the wind. That's going in the right direction to pull you along with your kyle to help you if you have extra. And he traveled a lot further to do his trip than Brady. Who's just on his and a lot of people see okay as the person who radio achieved this and o'brady's quite self promotes and he's written this book where he says. Everyone said it couldn't be done national. Geographic's interviewed everyone who advised him they were like no, we told him. It's pretty simple. Yeah, pretty straightforward, and it was like there were times I was told they wouldn't be able to rescue me. And then someone's done an interview. Saying getting rescued in the on talk to kind of like ordering, and but these days you just you just cool some. that. Is Very hard to see on the map, though, because against a featureless white background he could. BE A. Huge Shit stain in the next. Cleaned his and. You know you were saying about. You could use the wind with these kites. Do you know how you can tell which way the wind is going in and TACTICA? Well, there's a few ways you can just put your. Finger in hold up, but if you're not if you want to keep the finger true, yeah, one almost foolproof way is to look at which way the penguins appointing so if there is a storm coming in Antarctic, the penguins will drop to their. And they will point their beaks in the direction that the wind is gonNA come because they know storm coming in. They don't want to get blown over I was reading this. This was an Antarctic. Scientists called Lizzie Meek who was writing about this, but isn't that cool? You do see mich laying the little penguins of in those rates on it right? The first person possibly to set foot on the Antarctic continent might have been was at Qa `producer-pays fletch. This is so random, but just go in my notes I found ages ago. There was this amazing discovery in the nineteen eighties western bones found in Antarctica, and until then we thought that the very first Antarctic landing was a sealing expedition in eighteen twenty, and they found these bones, and they dated them to somewhere between Eighteen fifteen and eighteen twenty five. Five, and now the bones of a twenty one year-old indigenous Chilean women, which is just extraordinary, because no one had gone new the continent, we didn't think until then and suddenly this young Chilean women that knows weren't earth. She's come from or how she got the. There's a suggestion that may be the steelers who were European. Sita's hood found someone from Chile. More survive in that kind of environment and taken home with them and left her, but we just have no idea. Wow, that's such. Find that incredible mystery. Yeah! I found a page on Pedia, which is the list of crimes in Antarctica. Because as we were saying before there's all these sort of you know to the point where you can order an to get rescued. All these research stations that are planted walk you can. Rescue Yeah. It'll right backwards. Sorry what I bet is it's the points of you could almost theory. It's sort of that sort of dense with places. And Yeah, so there's all these research units where scientists hold up for ages, and as a result, there's a big list of the crimes that they've committed which is always really hard, because they're isolated for so long, but the first crime on the list was from nineteen, fifty nine, and it was a Soviet research station, and it was between two scientists who got into a massive argument. Then fight over a game of chess. Just got so heated that the guy who lost became enraged, said to have picked up an ice axe and attacked the guy, and it's really hard to tell actually whether or not the the wound was fatal, because there's two different stories have been presented as a result some say. He survived some say he didn't but afterwards chess games were apparently band. Soviets again Prussia that. Feels like not the main issue. People to access only for weapons encourage Chan Yeah. Nobody just like the I like the little communities that are out there that you rarely hear about in two thousand fourteen there, a scientist who decided to launch launches tinder APP. While he was out there, and he matched with someone on on Antarctica. Yeah unfortunately. They were helicopter ride away forty five minutes, and they were leaving the next. Nuba,.

Antarctic Antarctica Colino Brady scientist Vin Duluth COLLINA Prussia Colin steelers Borges Ostlund kyle Pedia Geographic Chan Chile Lizzie Meek Sita
"antarctic" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

06:58 min | 9 months ago

"antarctic" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Picture on the Atlantic City of fourteen dogs pulling a single tire that just shows how being. It was that they had they had to go backwards as well. That was the really. On that in the article, actually, there is a photo of abandoned. Just after they decided look, we're not gonNA. Take it back and then there's a lakes photo where it's kind of slightly buried by snow, and then there's a final photo where it's almost completely buried by snow, and there's like a little hatch where people can go in and out, and then someone went back. Like in the forties to if it was still there, and they could find, and actually it was kind of. They could still use it. Really I mean they couldn't really use it much in the first place, but it was still kind of working, and they found that again in the fifties and nineteen fifty eight. But now they literally don't know whereas, and it's probably covert under some snow, or it might have drifted off on an iceberg or something, but we literally don't know where this thing is. Is Amazing maybe penguins of made it into a home. That would be nice, wouldn't it? Up? This theory that the Soviets knew where they were and Stola. Why it's. Do you know the first motorized vehicle Antarctica as far as I. Know, it actually went with Shackleton. Are Really yes, so this is in his first on talked to expedition in one, thousand, nine, hundred seven, and it was an Johnston car, which of the makes of the first cars, in Britain it was basically a bit of pr for the car so quite inconvenient for the show expedition. Skis and had special oil that didn't freeze and had a silence on the exhaust that doubled as A. So it siphoned the warm around to the front of visa. they took it with them, and so they had to bring it on the boat. They had to unload some of their crucial supplies and equipment from the boat to make room for this car. They brought with them. They got it off the boat. Could it on the snow and Much James's vehicle? He mentioned they start spinning the wheels, and they just went deeper and deeper into. they they okay, we'll. We'll talk with this forbid. Maybe we'll get it working. They lasted two miles of pulling along with them before Shackleton's career. Wink can just leave this behind, please. They they have found in the snow. But I car in the Antarctic, the was car in the Antarctic from a shackleton very recently, it was Patrick Burgle who was? Shackleton's great-grandson. You, guys must have read about this. It was a modified Hyyndai. Sons Affay, but he actually did monies to get it working right, so they said that the only modification was that they made the tires really really big on really really loads of Erin site so as as much as you could. It could roll over your and you wouldn't feel it. That's how much I was in the. US and not men would never sink into the ground and imagine they had a lot of treadle as well. Didn't they said basically, this is exactly like a normal hyandi Santa Fe from the tires, but then they did say there is one of the modification runs on jet fuel. But the reason is because jet fuel doesn't freeze quite as easily as normal fuel. But with with that in that kind of atmosphere. Lesson its punch when you put down the accelerator. Yeah, they went only on average about twenty twenty five miles an hour, take. Ages. They went. Five, thousand eight hundred kilometers across whether they went to the very end I have gone to the middle and back IPAD. That was dull I bet it was exciting with the first couple of hours and then old shackleton's grandson. What was my granddad thinking? Tedious. He's a marketing executive guy. Yeah, powder explorer. In passenger seat of a car? For A few weeks they've basically gone. We have a car which can do this. Anyone can do it really. Who could we got to do? It doesn't do any of them. Have Relatives left the people he went? Nice, but they did have one thing. Sorry, just on this really quickly of they did have one thing that they had a number of these vehicles going across, and had to be roped together because light you set the Cumby crevasses, and apparently one of them fall into a crevasse, but look at it was kind of rope to all the cars so they. They can pull it out, so it was kind of dangerous I think yeah, yeah, yeah, definitely, that's very self sacrificing at the other cause, because it could happen the other way right if the cross is big enough, and you're in the front car and you've made a over and then dragged back in by the tailgaters well. Come on your team across toxic. I'D Could be what car. I think we've learned in touching the void episode of. I don't have the right attitude dipoto expedition. Despite does about driving backwards I found the guy who's driven backwards for the longest time. A taxi driver in India cooled. Harpreet Dev who has driven everywhere backwards for about a decade now. He's. Just. At the end the. On your meter on your taxi. To, give you money. So, he's been issued with a special government license to drive anywhere in reverse in his home state and he has. He has the pickled siren on his cab to warn people. It's so surreal seeing footage of him driving backwards all the time. He's reversed the gearbox, so he's got. You know five gears in reverse one forward. and. He says the only disadvantage to this great career he's got is that he gets frequent pains in the neck, extremely bad back problems and suffers what he calls severe vomiting. I do. I think about that with the severe bomb is he's facing in the direction of his passengers? Pool the glass window. I definitely must have missed the detail. There were Why is he driving backwards? Sorry, now had no, did you? He thought it would be fun, and he thought it would be a fun gimmick, and then despite the dangers of it, the government of the area also thought that was a great idea, an praising him. Yeah yeah I I could. If one person is doing something extremely weird and dangerous, but everyone else knows he's doing it at least that everyone else can mitigate their actions to to help him right. It's is written on the side of the cab that this is a a backwoods taxi. I think you can see that when he's coming toward. He didn't try to drive back with Pakistan to promote peace, but he did not have the permission to cross the border, so was. The. We're talking about people going across Antarctic. A few seconds.

Shackleton Antarctic Atlantic City Stola US Pakistan severe vomiting Antarctica Johnston India executive Affay Britain Patrick Burgle Erin
Parents!

The Past and the Curious

03:37 min | 10 months ago

Parents!

"Exploration is dangerous work. There are unknowns challenging landscapes severe weather to contend with, and that's just the tip of the iceberg at extreme locations or just factual, non metaphorical icebergs and everything gets much more difficult. Early. Expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic circles near the north and South Poles were some of the most incredible undertakings in history. Of course there were plenty of failures, but every time someone tried. It helps the people who came after. Learn a little bit more. By the early nineteen hundreds several different parties from many different places had succeeded in exploring the frigid areas and returning to tell the tale. Eight! Adele Tuck was born not too far from this brutal cold, She I opened her eyes in eighteen ninety in Alaska, not far from the city of nome, which is on the West Central Coast at one time. Alaska was known to Americans as seward's folly because Secretary of State William, seward purchased the land from Russia for seven million dollars in eighteen, sixty seven. People thought it was a terrible mistake and a waste of money, but when golden were discovered, there seward was like who's laughing now y'all seward's folly more like seward's stroke of genius that you all were super wrong about L. K. man. We get it. Anyway Alaska would still not even become an official US territory until Ada was a teenager, she was initiate one of the indigenous groups of people native to land. But growing up, she never learned the survival ways and traditions of her tribe. She was raised by missionaries people who moved to the area to set up a school in order to convert people to their religion. It's a circumstance that happened to many native Americans and as a result, many traditions were lost for generations some forever. In school eight learned to read and write English read the Bible and learned cooking and other domestic skills, the reading and writing served her well, but as you might have guessed in a story about exploration, these domestic skills would not go near as far in helping her as more traditional skills like hunting, tracking and survival might have. As a young adult! Sixteen! She married a man named Jack Black. Jiang. Yep. You heard that, right? Jack Black Jack. No. He was not a cartoon outlaw, nor was he a professional poker player. He was a dog musher hauling freight across Alaska on a sled pulled by dogs. Together! They had three kids. Sadly, only one survived a boy named Bennett. But one day, Jack Blackjack left the family high and dry. Up and left her in the middle of nowhere which in Frigid Alaska can be a pretty serious predicament. Though he was not the greatest of guys she did keep his greatest of names and earned her future fame as Ada blackjack. When Jack blackjack deserted her. She was forty miles from their home in known, and she and Ben Walked the entire way back in the bitter Alaskan cold to make matters worse than it was very sick with burke. And infection of the lungs, so ada quite a small woman carried the boy much of the way.

Alaska Seward Jack Black Jack ADA Jack Blackjack Jack Black Adele Tuck Ben Walked Russia Nome West Central Coast Burke Bennett L. K.
The Ice Shelf Garden

National Trust Podcast

04:52 min | 11 months ago

The Ice Shelf Garden

"Job seats working in life support systems that may eventually support astronauts on missions to the Moon and Mars. These are places where poor is unlikely to see who were in action, but in Twenty Fifteen Paul was given the opportunity to join a crew on a mission where be in charge of testing a life support system that would help subsist. Subsist an isolated crew in one of the furthest flung frontiers, not humans pull was going to Antarctica the continent often tactic half is next best place you can garbage very similar to living and working on the mood to wasn't quite the Moon Amas. It wasn't even the job pool was expecting. The official title was systems engineer about the most commonly used as laws on Octagon A- die, I was doing gardening and growing vegetables and OCTA. Pool was going to be part of a team that would be tasked with building and Transport Espace. Greenhouse called even I s to Attica Bay on the eskimo Ice Shelf in eastern Antarctica. The I S S would be stationed at a research base where poor and the crew would spend twelve months, but for nine of these months that'd be is elated from the outside world and poor would be solely responsible for the cruise supply of fresh fruit. There's just one problem garden in wasn't pose particular forte. I've done some some gardening. A child in the garden I would say I had not much experience with that. So in just a few weeks had to master the scientific gardening art of Arrow, politics. So. Soil normally already has all the nutrients the plans need, and when you water, the soil, water dilutes the nutrients and make them available for the roots of the plants can use the nutrients to grow, but with their opponents things were differently. The roots are basically hanging free in the air and are sprayed with water and nutrients every two minutes, so it turns out Paul. Skills as an engineer were perfectly suited to the task of Space Garden. We have a very technical greenhouse, the control the climate, the temperature immediately you the CO two level all systems that keep the plants alive so that they can produce food for the crew. So after months of preparation, it was finally time for poor to make his way to Antarctica. Even the first leg of this adventure could be an epic seven day journey. Surfer cool. It was faster flight from his home town of Bremen to meeting. From unique to Cape Town. Then, a native of three days for his Antarctic bound flight. From south. Africa is still nieve about six hours flights. And Star this just felt like another routine flight. Bomblet flight number to go to a normal check in desk. Instead of auditing, the normal flights, your flight, one doctor. Then you sit in this APP plane of people from different to countries. They'll really excited. Enter the aircraft with some cloves. The crudes cooling down the path. That everybody is changing. All, clothing governor nerves. I'm boss for plunk him. I'm a professional social psychology to University of boss ambassadors, main area of research is into the psychology of habit or people don't realize how many have is we have? And that comes to the to the fore when you are the want to change behavior or have to change behavior I often have an overestimation of how easy or how good we are in changing. What's what we usually do, so we? We overestimate our willpower, says one of the most effective times to get the better of your habits is at a time of drastic change so when you're devoid of all the routine and triggers that allow your old habits to prevail. Happy sign not triggered by your patient or your willpower, your intentions, but trick triggered by cues in the environment. The Eight o'clock cure for instance is trigger to to go to work or certain moments in the day you to to take snack. They have not think that you decide. It's not willpower. It's it's environment. That's that's cues. The TRICO sits so pause lockdown Antarctica an hour lockdowns in our. Our homes would create these almost blank canvases for creating new

Antarctica Pool Paul Attica Bay Trico Systems Engineer Africa Engineer Space Garden Cape Town Transport Espace Official University Of Boss Bremen
Scientific Hiccup

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Scientific Hiccup

"All Welcome to kiss Miss Misery. Sime your host kit chrome hoping you're healthy and staying sheltered in place today. I'm going to talk about scientific hiccups and I'll begin with the woolly mammoths arose about five point. One million years ago in Africa according to the curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated throughout Europe Asia North America. Their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing the woolly. Mammoth we know today. They began roughly two hundred fifty thousand years ago. Mammoths went extinct about ten thousand years ago. Hoops that's the first scientific hiccup more like three thousand five hundred years ago. Scientists now believe in isolated population of mammals persisted on Wrangel Island off northeastern eastern Costa Siberia and deep in Canada's Northwest Territory and World Heritage Site than Hani Valley. They were there until about three thousand seven hundred years ago. The ten thousand year more of extinction is in most textbooks though. But let's take a closer look at that date. The prominent theory that made it into most textbooks and the cyclopes. Pedia is ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through Eurasian orth America driven by the last ice age. What scientists called police to seen ice age following the food supply? If that's the case that it makes sense that some ended up in the valley because it was never touched by the last ice age and yes sponsor the mammoth have actually been found in that region. But this isn't the first theory published in a textbook as fact that is founded. It's been believed yes. Baited into text books that the continent of at Artika has been covered by ice for millions of years again. Oops scientific hiccup. The Perry reese map drawn in. Fifteen thirteen shows a northern coast of Antarctica. Ice-free the most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be so accurate three hundred years before and articles discovered but that the map shows the real coastline under the ice geological. Evidence has confirmed. How could that have happened or been charted in an ice free age four thousand years ago which is what science states? That was the last time that Arctic was ice free officials. Science has been saying all along that the ice cap which covers the Antarctic is millions of years old. The Perry reese at Arctic amount shows it the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it that could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time. Furthermore accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice-free condition in that Arctic area the northern tip ended about six thousand years ago the question is who mapped Queen Maud Land of Antarctica. Six thousand years ago which unknown civilization had the technology or the need to do that. I want to state at this point. That the Perry map has been validated as being real and brought back to that data. Fifteen thirteen it is not a about that which made twenty years. I pushed office something true. I want to touch on just one. More scientific kick up nestled in the ancient city of Papun Kabul. Libya are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of pyramids each block. Wade from two hundred to four hundred tonnes. Nothing unusual there. The city dates back to five three six ad yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found giant staple liked clamps. That it in place and we're used to hold the blocks together. Wait a minute. How could the indigenous people with no knowledge of metallurgy have created these clamps and worded the metal used for them? Come from? But this isn't the only case of clamps be used to hold giants Jones together and Cambodia's Angor Watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the side of the temple from a nearby mountain bias. Here's waterways close inspection. The stones that are scattered around the side has revealed carved indentations receptacles for metal clamps. Says kind of interesting. How about an eerie coincidence? Just outside the magnificent ruins of anger. What Stanton Asian Pyramid temple known as boxy CAM gone now from? Cambodia travel eight thousand miles to Guatemala and the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at to call is the temple of the Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid Guatemala. The similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that don't exist in other pyramids or temples however most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up to the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on top once there you could see. There's a small door goes inside the pyramid and there's another internal structure that looks the same basically. What you have here is an ancient civilization in Cambodia and another in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles away featuring credible similarities that no one has been able to explain. Thus my idea of being a scientific hiccup because when you read in the textbooks is different than what facts

Perry Reese Cambodia Africa Stanton Asian Pyramid Temple Pyramid Guatemala American Museum Of Natural His Europe New York Pedia Artika Arctic Guatemala Wrangel Island Papun Kabul Hani Valley Antarctic Tacoma Canada Queen Maud Land
Science News Briefs from around the Planet

60-Second Science

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs from around the Planet

"From the Dominican Republic. A Sunken Museum Adlakha. Later Underwater National Park will preserve in place a ship that sank in seventeen twenty five complete with real and replica. Artifacts kept under water for people to explore submerged artifacts often degrade faster when removed from the sea from Greenland new simulations indicate that Iraqi valley detected under the islands icesheet may contain sixteen hundred kilometer long subterranean river flowing from central greenland to its Northern Coast from Greece. Archaeologists uncovered gold jewels and beads in a large building on the now uninhabited. Minoan island of Chrissy a location. That about thirty five hundred years ago was devoted to making purple dye from sea snails called Miramax from England. Researchers found seventeen hundred year old chicken eggs along with other ancient objects in a waterlogged pit in southeastern England. A few eggs broke during extraction releasing a sulphurous smell but one remained intact making it. The only complete egg found from Roman Britain. We can't do archaeology without breaking some eggs from Australia to help boost Sydney Harbour's endangered seahorse population. Scientists bread baby seahorses in an aquarium and built crab trap like hotels to protect them as they adapt to the wild and from Antarctica. Scientists test drove a meter long wheeled rover that streamed live of the depths as it rolled along the underside of Antarctic ice. The Buoyant Rover for under ice exploration could someday explore frozen overseas on worlds such as Jupiter's Moon Europa

Greenland Sunken Museum Adlakha Dominican Republic Southeastern England Underwater National Park Minoan Island Miramax Chrissy Sydney Harbour Iraqi Valley England Roman Britain Australia Greece
Antarctica melts under its hottest days on record

A VerySpatial Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Antarctica melts under its hottest days on record

"A first up in the news as we've been talking a lot about The questions of climate change global warming and various effects. There's been a lot of talk recently about what's been going on in Antarctica so record warmth and stuff in this past week Nasa actually release some images to very starkly show some of the impacts of at least this warm spell and they're really amazing to look at so They focused in on Eagle Island. Which is part of the far north of the Antarctic peninsula and basically did An image pair to kind of illustrate the effects of the prolong warm spouses. Has It just been one day? I mean it's been An extended time period and just looking at pictures of Antarctica in February. Right where you're seeing all this bare ground and everything is just really Illustrates kind of what we're trying to understand with The effects of what's going on. Well let's let's put that in context a little bit. It is February so it is summer in Ourika so you do expect a little bit of melt. But they're saying they're messy little bit or riddle bit inch of melt per day. That's a lot of it. Not that's the opposite of little bit. That's a ton literally in total and that in the winter we do go to this page. You can see on the right hand side Actual Pons of snow melt sitting on top of the glaciers. In addition I will say that I think it's also in the news this week. another calving on Pine Island Glacier. So again you're having those issues as well so As we monitor these things we're really really trying to understand the long term implications and all that kind of stuff but It just highlights just how important remote-sensing And our ability to see these things over time. is really crucial to understand how there is changing. So that's part of it too is is again highlighting just the importance of having the satellites and their biddle ability to capture these

Pine Island Glacier Eagle Island Nasa Ourika
Antarctica Sets Record High Temperature: 65 Degrees

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Antarctica Sets Record High Temperature: 65 Degrees

"This is a startling it was hotter in an article last Thursday than it was in New Mexico sixty five degrees Fahrenheit according to researchers in the Antarctic peninsula it's a record high temperature if it can be verified NPR's called wire explains when you think about a sixty five degree day plenty of things probably come to mind Antarctica likely is not one of them and there's a good reason why that would make it the hottest temperature that we have seen over the link to record that we have for an article that's Randy serve any he specializes in weather and climate extremes for the world meteorological organization Arjun time researchers reported the temperature at the very northern tip of Antarctica and it's partly sermones role to verify that report we'll get a panel of experts put together yet are the best in the world they will look at the data they'll discuss it and tear it apart and then they will recommend to me as to whether or not this should be a valid observation now it's also important to remember that this is just one data point here and it's the result of very particular weather conditions but it does match up with what scientists have been seeing their overtime it's one of the fastest warming areas on the planet Alexander I served as the head of Antarctic sciences at the National Science Foundation she says the region has been warming for decades and the previous record height was reported just a few years ago this warming climate requires some practical adjustments for the researchers we we've definitely had to kind of re think a bit what we provide people with that means more geared to deal with the kind of rain and sleet the warmer weather brings I've been going down for ten years and even I have seen the changes I bring different clothes now do I certain says there are also other bigger consequences of this warmer weather in Antarctica contributes to a warmer sea water in general which means melting glaciers and rising sea UL's worldwide it also means more extreme events for serving and his team to verify when I started this project all the way back in two thousand and seven I thought we would have maybe an evaluation once every few years and now we're having multiple observations of extreme climate every year so don't be surprised if we see yet another record high in Antarctica soon called wired

New Mexico Antarctic Peninsula NPR Antarctica Randy National Science Foundation Alexander I Head Of Antarctic Sciences
Antarctic base records hottest temperature ever

WBZ Afternoon News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Antarctic base records hottest temperature ever

"A research base in the Antarctic records of the hottest temperature ever for the continent CBS news meteorologist Jeff Vera Delhi says climate change's the culprits huge planes why they're so concerned about these rising temperatures near the South Pole we're worried about destabilization of the Antarctic glaciers which could happen sometime in the next couple of decades it could be centuries we're not exactly sure when it's going to happen but when it does happen it could very quickly racy levels by a couple of feet which would be disastrous for anybody living along coastal communities the mercury hit a record sixty five degrees on the northern tip of Antarctica

Jeff Vera Delhi South Pole Antarctic CBS
Antarctica hit nearly 65 degrees, likely breaking heat record

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Antarctica hit nearly 65 degrees, likely breaking heat record

"It appears Antarctica has broken a heat record the temperature there hit nearly sixty five degrees this week Claire Knowles's with the world meteorological organization says Antarctica is warming more quickly than scientists predicted the amount of ice lost annually from the Antarctic ice sheets increased at least six fold between nineteen seventy nine and twenty seventeen the previous temperature record for Antarctica was said in March twenty

Antarctica Claire Knowles Antarctic
Earth just had its hottest decade on record

News, Traffic and Weather

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Earth just had its hottest decade on record

"The world got a lot warmer last year all continents had a record high average land temperatures ABC's UT harden has more the average temperature in the past decade was over fifty eight degrees Fahrenheit that's nearly one and a half degrees higher than the twentieth century average according to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration December two thousand nineteen was the earth second hottest on record after December two thousand fifteen polar sea ice continue to melt the arctic and Antarctic oceans showing the smallest average annual sea ice coverage between nineteen seventy nine and two thousand nineteen at oceans taking the fronts is he content the highest ever recorded the world's five warmest years have all occurred since two thousand fifteen Nissan

ABC Nissan Antarctic
Antarctic Is Ripe for Invasive Species

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Antarctic Is Ripe for Invasive Species

"Antarctica is a lonely continent but the Antarctic Arctic peninsula. The little tale that juts out towards South America is a hub of human activity more than fifty scientific research. Stations are based there and in recent travel season forty forty. Two thousand tourists visited mostly from cruise ships. Problem is when humans go somewhere hitchhikers. Come with like a non native flightless midge and insect sex that is already taken up residence in the peninsula region and its biomass greater biomass of all the other environment in the soil. It's already kind of taking over the nutrient cycling in non bombed. Kevin Hughes is an environmental researcher with the British Antarctic survey. He and a team of experts recently reviewed a list of one hundred and three marine and terrestrial terrestrial species that might be poised to take up residence on the continent from that list. They pinpointed the thirteen. Most likely to arrive established themselves and become invasive in the next decade at the top muscles which stick to ships and could carpet shorelines and smother native species Antarctic shores and shallow. Hello waters could also fill with crabs which have existed in those habitats for millions of years so the communities are just not used to these sorts of predators coming in on the potential for crops drops to jump away at most sitting on the seabed is quite a frightening prospect on land. The scientists flagged a might a spring tail and several species of button weed plants. As potential potential invaders. The full list is in the Journal. Global Change Biology. After kind of remember the on target is really WANNA ask great wildernesses that we have on the planet. We WanNA keep this place. Please pristine frosty research because it's tool to so much about high. The world works are climate works. High Ecosystems can be together and how they function so. It's just just incredibly important that we just keep it as pristine as we possibly come but that task keeps getting more difficult because climate change is slowly dying the frozen continent making it easier for invaders to gain a foothold.

Antarctic Arctic Kevin Hughes British Antarctic Survey Antarctica South America High Ecosystems Researcher
Askov Finlayson Creates Climate Positive Outerwear

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

08:18 min | 1 year ago

Askov Finlayson Creates Climate Positive Outerwear

"Hey Eric welcome to good together. We're excited to have you. Thanks Laura Beer. Super excited to Have you with US Eric. I Know Laura I told me about your company and I saw the park I was like Yes yes lizard into tomorrow. Wonderful inscription be with you. Thank you yeah. We're we're very excited to talk all things. Climate positive outerwear today. And I think you know for for Liza and hi this is a really and I mean I think this is GonNa be an interesting episode for anyone because we all need a jacket for the winter But I think there's been a lot of chatter recently about out You know innovations textiles innovations from companies. That are be cores that are really interested in providing more climate. I'm at positive solutions. I'm Eric I wonder if you could just introduce yourself and give us a little bit of information about your company. Sure was you said we're we're or a climate positive outdoor apparel company. We specialize in winter. Parkas were based here in Minneapolis Minnesota. Where where the need for good? Winter Outerwear is is a very real thing And we try to offer. In addition to our climate positive model with with the environment. Mind we also try to offer offer a really great value by bypassing the retail markup offering our products directly to consumers through ECOMMERCE and we have a flagship store herein when you're in our neighborhood of Minneapolis so We are awesome. I was very impressed with a mission statement. I was just reading last night Can you tell me a bit more about positive. By I think you are guys offset carbon emissions. There is a lot of layers of like doing good with your business model. Yeah we try to keep it pretty simple. I mean this was an idea that that evolved over the past few years We started did making our own products in twenty thirteen and as we started to experience success especially around a products that were of this place which we like to call all the north of the United States We wanted to think about how we could harness that momentum for good and so we began a program that we called in two thousand fifteen keeps the north cold and we began a giving program. We had a nonprofit partner. We felt really good about that and we were definitely having a positive impact but we really wanted to challenge ourselves to think about. Where are we actually keeping the cold on a on a net basis if you really did the math and it it causes to do a pretty thorough south audit and we took the intention of giving program in the beginning And this idea of north cold relief which we saw as a promise. We're making our customers and we wanted to really be able to back thaddeus and show our math in a in a transparent way and hold ourselves accountable to our customers and also to the planet and so what you know with the program evolved into is is every year doing a carbon footprint self audit doing everything we can to reduce our negative impacts through our our operations as as a business and then within qualifying that impact and turning it into one hundred ten percent net positive Financial commitment to organizations Asians are leaving their leading solutions to the climate crisis. So it's really at its at. Its most simple. It's a self imposed carbon tax and it's a way that we can you Hold ourselves accountable and and be able to stand behind the promise to our customers that were actually contributing on a net basis to the solution rather than being part of the problem. Okay and I had a question so what what would you say. Is the number one offender in your business right now as it relates to carbon emissions. Like where have you guys tried. Tried to focus. I mean I know it. Sounds like there's quite a few areas but what sleep. Maybe the top area. Well you know I'll give you a couple of examples of of what we've done one was just in our in our operations here or in Minneapolis. We've switched to one hundred percent sustainable power for all of our our offices in our operations here is a business at our headquarters now comes from wind energy actually all produced you're Minnesota And then the other big area of focus has been our supply chain and especially materials serials. We looked at some of the products. We were already making. And how could we could. We switch over the most Low Impact of materials hospitals. We switched some products to recycle materials. That previously hadn't been been made from like a virgin acrylic. Now is made from one hundred percent recycled material if you look at our our winter north hats but then when we introduce this parker this past year a chance to really start from scratch on a new product and and how could we embed all of the best decisions with climate impact in mind into the materials manufacturing the partners we were working with. And so if you look at the park where we make. It's one hundred percent recycled outer material. It's one hundred percent blue signed certified lining which will become one hundred percent recycled next year. We found the the fabric to be able to achieve that. And then the thing. I'm probably most proud of was material. Really innovation that we were able to achieve Throw partnership with three M which is a company base-year in Minnesota and it's the first time ever that they've offered one hundred percent recycled featherless down insulation And so you know to to have have a real material. Innovation in in terms of sustainability in one hundred percent recycled in our first year was an accomplishment. We were pretty proud of yeah. Yeah that's amazing and I. I didn't know that three M was based out there so that that's good to know and I know in the past. They've been major innovators in various. Sort of No chemical engineering and things like that But I one of the things that you mentioned that I want to kind of dive into is talking about materials specifically that make up the the Parka Arca and one question that we get often on brightly is around you know the usage of animal based materials so oftentimes for Parkas arcus this equates to feather feathers being used down and so I wondered if you could speak a little bit too Why you guys chose to not go the feather row? How on maybe what your point views on that? Yes so you know. It's there's sort of two parts. There's one there is I think the ethical question which you've raised which you know I it relates to with the installation choice. Do you use you know feather down inflation versus a federalist we've chosen to go with there's also a number of companies that use for Roths We also chosen not to use for our materials. That very much isn't ethical choice for us and I would say on the down. It's a combination of the two. You know there's there's the ethical will impact of how those feathers are sourced But also for us it was really just actually a performance questions when we began our research on this product. We went to the person who I know that knows more about Winter Outerwear and surviving and thriving in harsh winter conditions His name is will stegar. He's a legendary Arctic and Antarctic explorer. A based here in Minnesota someone. I've known many years he led the first confirmed dogs. That expedition to the North Pole. The first crossing of Antarctica so just really in the all time top echelons of exploration and and so we went up to his homestead in in northern Minnesota and went through his expedition archives and went through all of his gear and he'd actually always used Three M synthetic attic insulation in his archive of back. Then of course it wasn't available. One hundred percent recycled that's new to us this year but he always chosen not to go down as we asked him why that was and he felt that the you know the risk of down especially when you're in those type of conditions environments is that as soon as it gets wet it loses its loft and it it it stops being as warm and so for him. It was very much just a performance question that he said Synthetic inflation was every bit as is warm and actually was more versatile and served his needs better. So that's really where we went down the path of making that choice based on just research much of what performs the best

Minnesota Minneapolis Eric Laura I Laura Beer United States North Pole Liza Partner
Would going vegan reduce your carbon footprint?

The Naked Scientists

03:24 min | 1 year ago

Would going vegan reduce your carbon footprint?

"Now with us this week. Our talented take care. Tim Reveal. He's from new scientists. Great to have you back to your great to be here. Thanks and what have you had on your radar the New Scientist lately. Well we've been testing out the idea that going Vegan improve your carbon footprint reduces the amount of Co two you are responsible for and some of us in experiments in the office where we recorded everything. We ate laboriously for for a week and then the following week everyone went vegan and recorded everything they ate too and then a specialist specialist analyzed. Everything we've eaten and looked at how our carbon footprint was affected. How does that actually work? Why would going Vegan translate into superior carbon footprint and for person who's normally Amita so there are certain foods that When you look at how they are produced how much food for example it goes into making them so be for example we have to feed a cow and then ultimately you kill counter each the meat things like milk you also have to keep alive? All of those correspond to energy that goes into producing about food and some foods are more heavy in terms of the energy. You need than others and how big was the difference. It was a really large different. So those people who are meat eaters who went Vegan as has a carbon footprint was reduced by around seventy percent narrow so people who have vegetarian already like myself who tried to go Vegan for a week to see whether it made much of a difference and for those people that have their carbon footprint too so it does make a big difference. Do you think sustainable giving people stick with it because it is quite hard. If you're not used to eating night that to embrace a healthy vegan lifestyle isn't it. Yeah I find it really difficult. I find it really easy to go vegetarian. I find it really hard to go Vegan for a week. Found like you. You have to become an expert whereas you can sort of a casual vegetarian but I think what we found is that by reducing things a little bit you. You still make a difference so you don't have to go to to the extreme of becoming one hundred percent vegan to reduce your carbon footprint. If you're interested thanks so any tech questions and perhaps even Vegan questions. You can put those two tim. Well is the say elegant but who's also with us from British Antarctic survey and it's going to about climate. You vegan is that right. That is so important. I can for the environmental impact for dominantly. I also find that it really helps my health so so I'm a boxer in my spare time and I find it a lot easier to stay in my weight category but I mean the main motivation sedation was the environmental impact of course environments been in the news. A lot has not not not only because we've seen Paris and the implementation of the Paris Agreement but we've also going on or has been going on for a while now no stranger with these fairly dramatic fires. Of course I mean. Climate changes all over the news. And I don't think it's going away anytime soon. And these sorts. Lots of dramatic events like within Australia the happening more frequently so then going away when you are working at British Antarctic survey what actually do you study Odi predominantly. I'm looking on the Santa Maria Antarctica U- climate modeling A lot of the time but trying to understand how melting occurs in Antarctica what specifically is causing that melting and I've got an atmospheric physics background. So it's it's usually whether I'm boxing foxing to go with. Yeah Yeah of course above her weight on climate science. That's

Scientist TIM Santa Maria Antarctica British Antarctic Antarctic Paris Antarctica Australia
"antarctic" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"antarctic" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"That pretty bad on pretty bad stuff here's an interesting story within ice that covers his salty liquid Antarctic lake scientists have found and revived microbes that were at least two thousand eight hundred years old mine the discovery announced today points to probable life within the other ground underground lake there and suggests at the Antarctic now an underground lake they found life there and they thought it out it's a similar eco system scientists think to one that might exist on Mars basically one of the scientists involved here said to be Jon crisp you of Montana State University the the cold there in a frozen state they'll come back to life if you add water so yeah cat arctic and their it I mean on the one hand here we're having trouble with all kinds of new diseases and weird stuff in this country right now god knows enough is going on right and so we're drilling down in the ice to great depths at the bottom of a frozen lake in the Antarctic and we're dragging things up and melting them and to look like of that guy kind of kind of a then in mind away even even if we weren't doing that with our little stoves and whatever else we're going to you just warm up these bacteria that were dredging up from the bowels of the earth check this one out because we're not there won't matter anyway headline in the science journal nature is record melts in arctic in Greenland so you see even if we don't go up there in a hurry the thing along with our little stoves it's going to melt all on its own anyhow ice covering the Arctic Ocean in Greenland shrank by record amounts for the summer new research shows the rise in I should let the rise in seasonal melting has led some experts estimate that twenty percent of the arctic sea could be lost gone gone gone by twenty fifty twenty fifty that means that a lot of you live right now may well see the arctic in all the ice in the arctic start to melt in there we will have a brand new CD no a so that's the kind of change that's you know they now know is under way.

Antarctic Montana State University Greenland Arctic Ocean arctic Jon
A Shortwave Christmas Carol

Short Wave

09:08 min | 1 year ago

A Shortwave Christmas Carol

"Hello anybody there so matty. Yes ma'am last week Brit and I connected to a radio station she's visa. I am radio in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania have a conversation with space physicist and electrical engineer Nathaniel result. Thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be here and in two two thousand fourteen. His research took him to Antarctica cool. Yeah home to the South Pole and hub of scientific activity with research stations and field camps spread across the continent. New Zealand has a station down there. Several European countries due to scientists are asking questions. You can only answer in Arca and the Southern Ocean this time of year about wildlife wildlife like penguins. Yeah sure like penguins microbiology. tectonics the northern lights. Daniel was down there to look at the earth's magnetic field and polar regions. I picture this whole space. Mattie like science summer camp but spread across a desolate icebound landscape. What a dream? Yeah you're kind kind of summer camp and these people. They're far from home. which can be really tough? During the holidays so nathaniel when he was down there took part in a musical tradition tradition. That cues up every year on this day December. Twenty four South Pole station. We're ready and standing by thinks the Antarctic a Christmas carol basically the different stations in Antarctica. Sing to each other over shortwave radio. Oh my God this is legitimately the cutest thing you're seeing over the radio Transmission was from the Amundsen Scott South Pole station ahmanson shadow yacht ought. Here's a Christmas Carol from the Italian station. Mario's a Kelly singing an Italian Christmas Carol. I really liked service. I firmly believe this cute Nathaniel would have to agree with you and it's a beautiful thing and you know the different stations and people they have to have to watch out for each other because it's it's difficult environment down there and annual listening at McMurdo Station in a Blue Penguin Hoodie. Sure I'll add wondered if this caroline could be heard beyond Antarctica by shortwave listeners. And other parts of the world he wanted to know how far can these transmissions Israeli travel so how far away were people able to listen well. Before the Caroline Begin thin you'll put out an alert to shortwave radio listener saying hey if you I can hear this email us a lot of snow and people did. They were able to tune in. He got emails from the Netherlands. South America places far away from Antarctica. Some people were able to catch snippets of this singing at the bottom of the world so today. On the show shortwave. podcasts looks at shortwave radio how it works how it travels. And how anything of result is leveraging. A community of shortwave radio listeners for science. Emily Kwong are short. We've expert is nathaniel. Yes he's an assistant professor of physics and Engineering at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. Okay so obviously I know shortwave the charming daily science podcast. But tell me about shortwave. As in shortwave radio so since since the nineteen hundreds we've been using radio waves to communicate. The waves are all different sizes the lower the wave's frequency the longer the wavelength one. Of the unique characteristics. Of shortwave shortwave. Radio is that it can travel. The radio. Waves can travel long distances very long distances around the world because there are three to thirty megahertz hurts in frequency they travel through space to this electrically charged part of our atmosphere called the ionosphere and are reflected or refracted back down to Earth. If we didn't did not have the atmosphere these shortwave signals would travel off into space and not be able to travel around the globe but luckily for us. They can travel around the globe. They they propagate far distances and those with receivers on earth are able to listen. Nathaniel loves shortwave. Because you don't need a lot of equipment to send and capture one of these transmissions oh it can be incredibly simple. You need a transmitter on one side and a receiver on the other and a decent antenna and when I say A transmitter there. There are some people who they make their goal to talk as far around the world is possible with that as little as equipment as possible as low power as possible so maybe using a quarter of a awas and ten dollars worth of parts people are able to send signals that. Get the go all the way around the globe. This is the ultimate Lo fi form of communication gathering. Yeah and that communication could be anything broadcast propaganda spice stations emergency information weather reports rag chewing which is a term mm to describe people just talking about their daily life so radio twitter. Yeah the transmission just has to fall within the right frequency range to count ashore wave and there's an international community of hobby radio operators who seek out a special license from their respective governments to do this. That's called Ham Radio Ham. Yeah that's the hobby Of using this radio so nathaniel discovered that community on a boy Scout Jamboree Ham radio operator had set up a station in the middle of the woods and just turned all his crackling and buzzing sounds coming out of a radio and I heard him talking to these faraway places and and that was just really fascinating fascinating to me and he was hooked got his license in Nineteen Ninety Eight. Just a teenager transmitting to whoever's listening in the northern New Jersey New York metropolitan area area so just pure bruce springsteen propaganda it was mostly just his call son and seventy three. This is W. Two and AF whiskey to November Alpha Foxtrot threaten seventy-three means best regards. It's a pretty common ham. Radio sign off eventually he upgraded to a better transmitter through a wire out the window of his bedroom and attached hatched tree in his front yard and he managed to get a hold of a station in Hungary and it was just a very short contact. But you know that was pretty neat you just throw a wire out your window. And you're able to talk to guy in Hungary and and it worked in these moments stayed with him propelling his scientific methodology and his his career cool. Okay so tell me a little bit about that. How his nathaniel used shortwave for science in a lot of interesting ways because disturbances happening in the ionosphere on a sphere space weather solar wind conditions? All of that would affect radio waves so in Grad school he was able to show how a solar flare caused aradio blackout so cool. Yeah and during the big two thousand seventeen solar eclipse which I missed because it was cloudy. Tragedy so sad but Nathaniel hosted a community science experiment through his group Ham side. The group measured how the eclipse affected the transmission of medium and high frequency radio waves. And the way he's using radio for scientific inquiry is so innovative that this year the National Science Foundation awarded him a one point. Three million dollar grant deign to do what well he wants to bring. Universities and this network of Ham radio operators together to track. What's going on in the ionosphere where short waves propagate in a more day to day way which we we don't really do right now? No not really. We don't really understand what happens on short timescales like why is the fear doing this in New York City but doing doing something else in Pennsylvania overhead and Pennsylvania and. Why is that important to understand the ionosphere to that level of detail? Well we as a planet Senate are really dependent on things happening in space and disturbances in the ionosphere do affect communication satellites global positioning systems. which are used to land planes all these tools? We rely on to keep us safe and connected and so it's very important to try to understand how everything is is is connected together in order to make this systems more robust and and in order to make them work. And in order to you know transmit Christmas carols around the world essential I think a lot of Ham radio for me has always been about connecting people from different parts of the world together. And and you know if you if you even look at like why Ham radio exists if you actually look in the the laws I believe. It says that it's for international goodwill and It's important to try and promote this international goodwill kwon. Do you think our podcast connects people all around the world. I mean we don't have three million listeners. That's how how many people listen to him radio now yet. Not with that attitude okay. I know world domination is your project but I will say I got into radio because I enjoyed tuning in and not knowing what I was going to hear our podcast definitely. Does that help so I think so so from our team to whoever is out there listening in in the world happy holidays. Happy Holidays

Nathaniel Pennsylvania Antarctica Amundsen Scott South Pole Stat South Pole Station South Pole New Zealand Assistant Professor Of Physics Italian Station South America Pittsburgh Southern Ocean Hungary Mcmurdo Station University Of Scranton National Science Foundation Mattie Daniel
Climate change in the 2020s: What impacts to expect

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Climate change in the 2020s: What impacts to expect

"Climate change expected to dominate the can conversation in twenty twenty and beyond CBS news meteorologist thing climate specialist Jeff deli explaining what we can expect for the next decade especially it and as far as the arctic is changing the arctic and permafrost permafrost is frozen ground in the arctic tundra that now this year has changed from being a net absorber of carbon dioxide to being an animator which means that it causes climate change to spiral and go even faster and we have to watch out for destabilization of I. shelves in the arctic and Antarctic something we hope doesn't happen but if it does you level creeps up

CBS Arctic Jeff Deli
"antarctic" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on The Science Show

"And another science show regular Len Fisher was awarded an A O M and here lend reflects on an issue that again as we heard before involves multiple interests and how to get them to work together. Something that's clearly failed. When it comes to managing the Murray, darling. River system Lynn, it has fifty nine years since the first Antarctic Treaty was signed. It was a treaty of silence. Signed by the twelve countries who scientists have been active in the area during the pri- international geophysical year, the key provisions of the treaty with that and toxic us should be used for peaceful purposes, only and scientific observations and results should be exchanged and made freely. Available to get argue with that showy. In fact, nobody did except for the United States who signed up reserve the right to change their minds later of a suited them. The treaty was strengthened in nineteen Ninety-one. When a protocol on environmental protection was added by this Don there were thirty eight signatories with voting rights. They met again in Santiago in two thousand sixteen and agreed unanimously to further strengthen the efforts to preserve and protect the tactic, terrestrial and marine environments bearing in mind the designation of toxic as a natural reserve. Why am I telling you this as because almost all the countries that voted to protect the tactic in two thousand sixteen also voting members of the commission for the conservation of Antarctic Marine Living resources just last month? This grandly named organization rejected plans to create three new marine sanctuaries in the tactic. Why the change of heart? The sanctuaries would have protected foraging grounds and breeding pathways for species that includes seals penguins and Wales not to mention the swarms of krill that underpin the worldwide food. Chain their potential value in conservation terms is inestimable. But this was not the only factor. There were two aspects. The first was that the Commission's actions require the agreement of all participating countries. The second was that some of those countries put their uninterested ahead of the broad interests of the planet. It's a familiar story, according to Greenpeace's Freda Bankston serious scientific proposals for urgent marine protection but derailed by interventions which Bailey engaged with the science. In other words, the fishing rights of a few nations trumped any considerations about long-term future as a patent that applies to many areas of life. Anyone who's who've been involved in a divorce case will recognize the symptoms all the sweetness and light until money comes into the equation, then self interests kicks in and things can unravel quickly that amazes me that no one cottoned onto the full ramifications of this pattern until the color. Just Garrett Hardin spill them out as recently as nineteen sixty eight hardened spoke with the tragedy of the Commons a situation where if everyone logically pursues there on self interest than self interests ends up being the last thing that has being served as the direct antithesis of the free market where does this shooting that I've been competition? Will lead to the best overall result the truth? Is it often leads to the worst? How was building on the work of the mathematicians Johnny von Neumann, John Nash, both of whom worked in the Princeton institute for advanced study home to such luminaries as Albert Einstein for Norman invented game theory, which tells us the optimum logical strategies using social situations. Nash, the anti hero in the film, A Beautiful Mind showed optimum strategies can land us in distinctly, non optimal traps. The tragedy of the Commons is a major example, what Norman Nash could both be quite funny and self deprecating for Norman was hung Aaron and he wants to find the Hungarian someone who could enter a revolving door behind you and come out in front when I Nashes bitchy worry for the guardian newspaper. I mentioned his fight with mental illness and came across a quote where he said mathematicians comparatively sane as a group. It is the people who study logic that are not so saying, but study logic we must and find some way out of the paradoxes that it can lead to paradoxes where some into revolving door at the back, but through the pursuit of self interest. Come out in front that is until everyone knows cotton's onto their strategy of the door gets insanely jammed, and the crush, this is the sensually what could happen with Antarctic Treaty..

Norman Nash John Nash Antarctic Treaty Len Fisher pri Murray Lynn Garrett Hardin Santiago United States Wales Aaron Johnny von Neumann Don cotton Greenpeace Albert Einstein Freda Bankston
"antarctic" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on The Science Show

"And another science show regular Len Fisher was awarded an A O M and here lend reflects on an issue that again as we heard before involves multiple interests and how to get them to work together. Something that's clearly failed. When it comes to managing the Murray, darling. River system Lynn, it has fifty nine years since the first Antarctic Treaty was signed. It was a treaty of silence. Signed by the twelve countries who scientists have been active in the area during the pri- international geophysical year, the key provisions of the treaty with that and toxic should be used for peaceful purposes, only and scientific observations and results should be exchanged and made freely available. I'm ready. Get argue with that showy. In fact, nobody did except for the United States who signed up reserve the right to change their minds later of a suited them. The treaty was strengthened in nineteen Ninety-one. When a protocol on environmental protection was added by this time there were thirty eight signatories with voting rights. They met again in Santiago in two thousand sixteen and agreed unanimously to further strengthen the efforts to preserve and protect the tactic, terrestrial and marine environments bearing in mind the designation of an toxic as a natural reserve. Why am I telling you this as because almost all the countries that voted to protect the tactic in two thousand sixteen also voting members of the commission for the conservation of Antarctic Marine Living resources just last month? This grandly named organization rejected plans to create three new marine sanctuaries in they untucked tick, why the change of heart. The sanctuaries would have protected foraging grounds and breeding pathways for species that includes seals penguins and Wales not to mention the swarms of krill that underpin the worldwide food. Chain their potential value in conservation terms is inestimable. But this was not the only factor. There were two aspects. The first was that the Commission's actions require the agreement of all participating countries. The second was that some of those countries put their own interests ahead of the broad interests of the planet. It's a familiar story, according to Greenpeace's Freda Bankston serious scientific proposals urgent marine protection but derailed by interventions which Bailey engaged with the science. In other words, the fishing rights of a few nations. Trump any considerations about long-term future as a patent that applies to many areas of life. Anyone who's who've been involved in a divorce case will recognize the symptoms all the sweetness and light until money comes into the equation, then self interest kicks in and things can on revel quickly that amazes me that no one cottoned onto the full ramifications of this pattern until the color. Just Garrett hardened spell them out as recently as nineteen sixty eight hardens spoke with the tragedy of the Commons a situation where if everyone logically pursued their own self interest, then self interest ends up being the last thing that is being served as the direct antithesis of the free market where does this shooting that open competition? Will lead to the best overall.

Len Fisher pri Murray Santiago United States Lynn Wales Garrett Freda Bankston Greenpeace Bailey fifty nine years
"antarctic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"How you how you live or what are your concerns? Joe? Oh, I really don't have any large concerns. But as far as like, maybe that changing in the environment or the species. I don't really see anything changing. They are because it's only just deeper water level. But it when's it gonna stop it. Will it keep getting wilder mean level kiss keep continuously higher and higher is my concern? Right. Joe? Will let me turn that question. Thank you so much for your call to to Karen, fry. I mean, rising wise rising St. level has a lot to do with the melting of the Antarctic. I have that right Garin? But will will it ever? Will it stop? Are. We just going to see continuous rising levels. Yeah. Well, you know, the tagline what happens in the Arctic doesn't stay in the Arctic. And now we've been talking about atmospheric circulation and things like that. But I mean, the other the other sort of connection among many in terms of concerns about the Arctic for the rest of the globe is this notion of sea level rise. And you know, you know, melting of sea ice has already floating that's not going to continue to global sea level rise, but glaciers in Alaska Greenland ice sheets, and you know, other things like warming sea waters and things like that are certainly contributing to global sea level rise. And it will keep going. Yes. Okay. I mean, I guess that's what that would. Joe Joe is wondering can can it be stopped? But it's it sounds like perhaps not in the near future. But let's go to David who's calling from New Orleans..

Joe Joe Arctic Alaska Greenland Antarctic Karen New Orleans David
"antarctic" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"The boats the right way up and pedal for their lives to reach this place elephant island just off the antarctic peninsula and that in itself is a pretty godforsaken spot is just you know glaciers and vertical rock faces and you know the only running water is glacial meltwater and the only food is the old seal you can catch you know that's basically it but even reaching the island isn't rescued in itself was a trick involved as well i mean you know so they reach elephant orland shackled the knows that they don't forget the twenty eight of these guys shackled and plus twenty seven and he knows they just know what i make it through the window which is now only a few months away so he decides the only thing forward is to get in the vic worthy of those three small boats and undertake this incredible janney across the southern ocean from elephant island to play school south julia fifteen hundred k's away and you know he says a whaling station there anything's gonna reach that i can get a bigger ship sent south and that's what he manages but three big storms mountainous seas they all my sink many times almost capsized many times frostbite in just the most dreadful journey can imagine and they do reach south georgia against all the odds and it's just a dot in southland they missed it next places namibia another full thousand case further on so there's nothing else down there but they ride on the southern side of the land and they can't get round the coast to the north where the whaling station cells they have to go through the middle climbing the mountains with no maps in though equipment and no ropes and their ten no climbing experience and they do it into time that even run ole miss noonan hasn't been able to replicate rhino mess the greatest mountaineer in the world saying i was an amazing amazing journey and that's what you recreated you did that with the team as well we'll have been you know saying yes when you get asked to do it is you know very flattered that show colin family should also be especially his granddaughter who's the kind of you know center of the whole shackleton world now and so i said yes have to say there are many times late at night when you allow me the thought so you think sensible this is going to be you know we're gonna rebuild the small seth boat little toy marston ors and wear cotton smocks and woolens and leather boots and not take e pubs or neoprene on life jackets in his chronometer and a compass sexton to see the sonnen eight laude and didn't eat seal i'm environmental guy roddy go around eating seal meat obviously and the equivalent stuff and it was a pretty unpalatable dylan i know people listening to this right now all why would you do all this and i know it's because if your belief in the environment and you want to raise awareness about the danger of climate changes well so that was a part of both of those expeditions it was i think you definitely do it is a whole bunch of other things to ego in this physical challenge mental challenge in the end of the day you know you want your life to be to amount to what you expect of yourself you know you don't wanna let yourself down and as soon as you get the bug and you start understanding what you're capable of and you can only do that really embarking on a journey whatever that ginny is to be it becomes very empowering anything well let's just see how far we can push this and that she midnight you really and i'm sure many listeners will have the same experience if they embarked on their first journey and they'll find it doesn't get it out of this system that just want to be more and it's the same same of this and i found myself just join the next thing but bigger than the last in terms of the environment piece i realized very early on that you don't get way talking to people about hockey stick codes carbon dioxide emissions in these two it's just not interesting a lot of people but if you can talk about melting glaciers and putter venture and.

antarctic peninsula fifteen hundred k
"antarctic" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You know the idea of going to the south pole just sounds even today a little terrifying to me it's just too cold and the elements are so bad but imagine doing that without modern technology and modern clothing i i don't know how they did it it was much more precarious obviously as you can see it took a lot more preparation but the basic principles that they use are the same ones we use today you have to have depots laid out someone they went to the poll they came down one austral summer and laid out a line of depots to rely on and then the next summer they over wintered they actually made their attempt at the poll and in similar fashion when the camps we work out of the remote camps in the central transantarctic mountains so about three hundred miles from the south pole proper you know they have fuel depots for helicopters and aircraft laid out along the way so the basic principles are still the same yeah we because you have been there to study as well but what are dinosaur bones doing on the south pole it's a fascinating story and and the importance of those scott fossils is they were among the first bits of evidence that that told the scientists that the antarctic continent had not always been covered by ice that it had a different past pre historically and to access that geological history we have to go to the few places where the bedrock is actually exposed above the ice so the central arctic mountains is one of those places that are you saying that because i know the continents moved was was that landmass somewhere else where it was warmer or was it warmer down there it was very close to where it is today slightly off but the main difference was that it was connected to other continents and because of that connection water currents the ocean currents circulated in a different manner and so they warm water from the tropics from the equator actually reached the polls and so you had a much more temperate climate so you had forests you had animals including dinosaurs and various other fossil evidence that we have for for different types of animals i see some and that'll change about forty million years ago so the ice sheets that we see today are not that old i mean in during the.

antarctic forty million years
"antarctic" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Definitive answer is the one that they can trust but this is very dependent i think on satellite measurements absolutely prizes the satellite area we really didn't know what was happening to untarred gert all in the time of the first ipc assessment report invites antarctica and greenland we're not expected to respond to climate change at all since we've had satellites in the skies we now know that that's not the case you're measuring what sort of things we measure several different things about the ice sheets actually have been able to since ninety s we can measure the speed at which the glossy is a flowing and pouring into the sea we can measure the shape of the ice sheet whether it's shrinking or growing vertically and we can now measure or at least in the past ten or fifteen years we can measure the total weight of ice as well using gravity sensors in space and so these all three measures what you can do in your studies to see how they tied together yeah i mean each of the day different satellite techniques has a strength and each has a weakness some of them tell us more clearly about the processes which are happening to cools the changes some of them tell us more clearly about the overall number how much ice is being lost together we can i the weaknesses and play to the strengths of of the individual measurements and so they gives us more confidence in the fine lamps again i said i thought vast place is this ice lhasa happening everywhere or are there sort of sensitive part it's definitely not happening everywhere until it to we tend to see his three different ice icees eastern talk to cruise by far the largest part of on tactica it's about nine tenths of the ice we don't see much change there and that's mainly because the eastern tatyana sheet rests on an island that's above sea level so that size it we'll continental and continental antarctica the main i she'd but west antarctica is different story west antarctica has about five meters of sea level potential locked inside it and it rests actually on the seabed below sea level and exp periences changes in ocean conditions that eastern toxic it doesn't and we see most of.

untarred gert west antarctica greenland fifteen years five meters
"antarctic" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The temperature checking the penguins and other kind of purely scientific methods and so there's been a lot of stories a lot of room is about you know nazis going down there um being able to navigate under the i uh that there were hidden a waterways uh because the ice sheets had formed over the continent of antarctica uh but that the waterways yang should read the system on the antarctic continent which which is boss i mean the muslim is really need to appreciate that it and totic is twice the size of the forty eight uh contiguous us states so you know we're talking about a massive continent and it had a it had a river system and once the ice formed over the rivers of course uh wall on the surface you had nothing but ice but underneath the ice sheet you you had the river system which fill slowed and presumably and and these are you know again part of the stories the room is that uh the the nazis were able to find some of these uh you know submerged rivers and sameness submarines are down their stories the room is that uh the the nazis were able to find some of these uh you know submerged rivers and sameness submarines are down them to establish bases under the eyes um you know so this visit all of these stories of been floating around for for decades now but what happened that's really shifted things and got me interested in this in terms of a new book project were the scientific studies in 2017 that started coming out basically confirming that they they walls in ancient um kevin system under antarctica um that uh and and encotesa other studies showing that they they was this kind of on the water uh on the ice rubel system uh down there uh but the ones that really got my attention uh what was a study by these um australian scientists that came out in september of 2017 rainbow have i was studying slow birds this burning a little bit all similar that's right yes so these volcanoes ah ah just kinda like a generating a lot of heat and that he is the pace under the ice path and forming these huge kevin system and what the scientists found what these huge uh these kevin.

antarctic
"antarctic" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on KPCC

"Worry about than that's what they should be focusing on burgers for yogurt let's move on to some strange ann arbor animal behaviour involving the macaques in central pam unseemly monkeys are getting a little frisky within neighbors that is right here those what's gone so offer for awhile people i've noticed that these japanese macaques lic to ride on the seek a dear that live in the region but in the past few years researchers have noticed um uh a couple dozen cases of adolescent female macaques jumping on the deer and then moving their pelvis back and forth in a a sexual manner and they have also noticed that this when this happens when the the macaques tried to do this to um female deer or two adolescent male dear the deer tend to buck them off but when they jump on fully grown male dear they seem to let them be so we don't know the reason the difference we're not sure why only some of the deer accept it because most of the deer except the monkeys riding on them because that sort of um a mutually beneficial arrangement the monkeys will pick up skin parasite flick nets off the dear while they're up there so the dear get something out of the exchange who won you won with a monkey try to procreate wither dear right it's a weird question but the fact is that inter species sex does happen in the animal kingdom so you've got it sometimes between similar animals like horses and donkeys creating new walls but you also have this between completely dissimilar species in the antarctic they've observed on seals getting it on with penguins so i think this just sort of shows that uh animals like sex and their indiscriminate about it at times none of them puppies on your legs him during his heard further exactly so we know are we also have some no information about the interstellar object the.

antarctic
"antarctic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Welcome back to coast to coast george noory with you along with luna bolton how working under the south pole could be the largest volcanic region on the planet linda what is going on well scientists from the university of edinburgh in scotland had done the first study of the west antarctic rift with i and a trading radar and they have found what might be the larger spoke kannik region on earth larger than the east africa volcanic ridge they contained mount kilimanjaro y yeah and they analyze the shape of lovely i don't land beneath the ice using measurements from i penetrating radar and then they compared the findings satellite and database records as well as geological information from aerial surveys care their surprise they now have a count of one hundred thirty eight volcanoes that ranging from three hundred twenty feet at twelve thousand six hundred feet the peak they're concentrated in the region known as the west antarctic risk system it's banned two thousand one hundred seventy four miles from antarctic is ross iceshelf to the antarctic opinion opinion four and the melt rate of west antarctic is way glacier is currently responsible for about one percent of global sea level rise and satellite measurement show that it rate up i has doubled since the 1990 and the measurement show that he its rate of ice why has the potential to at several inches to global sea level what could that glaciers now be related to any one or more of the one hundred thirty eight volcanoes becoming more i'm an active underneath antarctic glacier and what happens if several of those west antarctic rift volcanoes become active and i now really accelerated most of them are covered by a mile of i short some of them the kipp kick out of the eye but you're talking about a hundred and thirty eight essentially saab a great show up surface glacier uh i underneath a glacier volcano and that's a question that one of the world's top glaciologist would like to answer is robert being on phd chancellor's fellow lay theology and g jail physics at the university of edinburgh in scotland professor bam was awarded the polar metal by her majesty the queen in 2013 for contribution to art take an antarctic diane here now from edinburgh scotland is professor robert being a we were amazed to find but there were as many as ninety woman new.

george noory luna bolton scotland west antarctic antarctic glacier kipp saab phd chancellor professor the queen university of edinburgh east africa antarctic way glacier robert edinburgh twelve thousand six hundred fe three hundred twenty feet one percent
"antarctic" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast george noory with you along with linda bolton how working under the south pole could be the largest volcanic region on the planet linda what is going on well scientists from the university of edinburgh in scotland had done the first study of the west antarctic rift with i penetrating radar and they have found what might be the larger spoke kannik region on earth larger than the east africa volcanic ridge they can claimed mount kilimanjaro y yeah and they analyze the shape of lovely at a land beneath the ice using measurements from i penetrating radar and then they compared the findings satellite and database records as well as geological information from aerial surveys carry their surprise they now have a count of one hundred thirty eight goal came we know that range and night from three hundred twenty feet at twelve thousand six hundred feet the peaks are concentrated in the region known as the west antarctic risk system it banned two thousand one hundred seventy four miles from and arctic is ross iceshelf to the antarctic opinion peninsula and the mount rate of west antarctic is way glacier is currently responsible for about one percent of guoco sea level rise and satellite measurement show that it rate up i has doubled since the 1990 and the measurement show oh that attacked rate of i why has the potential to add several inches the global sea level what could that glaciers melt be related to any one or more of the one hundred thirty eight volcanoes becoming more i'm an active underneath antarctic glacier and what happened with several of those west antarctic risk volcanoes become active and i now really accelerated most of them are covered by a mile of i short some of them the chip kick out of the eye but you're talking about a hundred and thirty eight essentially stop but at gratiot there stop surface glacier i i underneath a glacier volcanoes and that's a question that one of the world's top glaciologist would like to answer here's robert being m p h d chancellor's fellow lay theology and g o physics.

george noory linda bolton scotland west antarctic antarctic glacier chancellor university of edinburgh east africa mount kilimanjaro antarctic way glacier guoco sea surface glacier robert twelve thousand six hundred fe three hundred twenty feet one percent
"antarctic" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"antarctic" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"A blood vessel wolves but it has to be loaded with apple i protein a one so what's not good enough just a razor so even overall and crushed or raise it they don't make it more effective krill makes more effective it raises the hdl about seven points and walt's with the thing that does reverse cholesterol clint sport at polls the cholesterol out of the walls of the arteries in the heart helping prevent heart disease a very important we have non gmo crowe from the cleanest waters on planet earth it comes from the ants arctic and this is sustainable fisheries we have friend of the c certification it sustainable fisheries there's plenty of krill leftover for blue whales his bill the fisheries any antarctic that we get our crowe from there like you masses phil like little continents floating around in the antarctic is so huge you could never you can never wipe them so i'm very happy about them his not all fisheries are sustainable an are criminals really clean its pharmaceutical grade and it's super loaded with the oils and phosphate tides and choline for your brain and he asked his aunt in as a powerful antioxidant to protect you from pollution super loaded with these thing most of the crawls out there don't even writedown choline they don't even right down the monounsaturated fats they don't even right down the level of bastas anthem hours has an abundance for memory for brain health to protect you from pull lucien the lower the risk of heart disease and blood clots instruction haute attacked krill is not a blood thinner doncic confused it's not a blood thinner it's safe to take bloodthinning medication what does it reduces inflammation an artery walls and that helps prevent an abnormal blood clot it doesn't interfere with um your blood thinners very safe you take to curl a day it'll protect you.

apple walt heart disease antarctic lucien