35 Burst results for "Annie."

President Zelensky's Pretentious Vogue Cover Shoot

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:40 min | Last week

President Zelensky's Pretentious Vogue Cover Shoot

"Let me change subjects and cut to what I think is the wildest, most insulting story of the week and probably the month. And that is the insane and weird idea for Ukraine's president Vladimir zelensky and his wife to pose for Vogue in the middle of a war where tens of thousands of his people have been shot beaten to death, raped and tortured or completely eviscerated by bombs, missiles, and air strikes. And God knows there's going to be some poison shit that's going to happen to pretty soon. Some poison bombs. If it hasn't happened already. But the minute zelensky heard that Vogue wanted him in the wanted him and his wife and the great Annie Leibovitz was going to shoot the pictures who could pass that up. I mean, when Anna wintour, when she calls, you drop everything. Including the welfare of the very people, you were elected to protect. Now, remember, this is the same magazine and the same editor who refused to have Melania Trump on its cover. Even though qualifications as a model are good enough or were good enough and are being the most beautiful First Lady ever who literally lived the American Dream should have counting should have counted for something too. But no, no, let's get this lenski's on the phone. I'm sure the war will be fine. It'll fight itself without them for a few days. What's the worst that could happen? I can give Vogue shit all day.

Vladimir Zelensky Ukraine Annie Leibovitz Melania Trump Anna Wintour Vogue Lenski
Andrew McCarthy: Jan. 6 Committee Did Not Set up a Fair Process

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:34 min | 2 months ago

Andrew McCarthy: Jan. 6 Committee Did Not Set up a Fair Process

"Andy McCarthy with Bill hemmer yesterday talking about what this January 6th select committee witch hunt is really all about. Yeah, this is not the committee that you're going to have suddenly Liz Cheney. You say, wait, this seems unfair. Maybe we need to look at other evidence. It has to be introduced as well. So it really brought a sort of an odd conclusion because it sort of emphasized, there isn't anyone to object. Same question, Annie McCarthy. Well, it was a much tighter presentation today because it was centered around one theme, this whole idea of stop the steal. And what they're trying to emphasize obviously is that the point they want to make is that Trump must have known that there was nothing to this because everybody around him who was credible was telling him it was nonsense and there was nothing there. As I've said from the beginning, they've got a very good story to tell. The problem is they've set it up in a process that is not a fair process that's aimed at getting to the truth and giving whatever contra arguments there are their day in court. And as a result, it's more like messaging than it is like a real investigation. And if you would try this in court, I could have been very impressive in court if there were no defense lawyers, you know? If you liked it. If you liked the government put on its own case, own witnesses own exhibits and then no cross examination and no defense arguments. I'd have been a thousand and

Andy Mccarthy Bill Hemmer Liz Cheney Annie Mccarthy Donald Trump
"annie." Discussed on xperi-test-v1-c

xperi-test-v1-c

08:12 min | 3 months ago

"annie." Discussed on xperi-test-v1-c

"Hello and welcome to changes with me Annie Mac. This is the place that we talk all things change. Hope you're doing good. Does change your foot. We're able to go to the pub soon, we're able to go to restaurants soon. The new normal is kind of on the horizon, sending love to all the parents who have pretty much given up on homeschooling. I stand in solidarity with you. The sun is out, let the kids play. That's what I say. Hope you're doing okay. I'm delighted to say that on this week's podcast. We are going to be speaking to author and journalist John ronson. So John ronson is an award winning writer and documentary maker, and the author of many bestselling books, including so you've been publicly shamed them adventures with extremists and the psychopath test. You can do what I did and just buy that you can buy like a bundle where you get like all of the boxes ever written in one big, nice package. He's done screenwriting. He's also become really successful and critically acclaimed for his podcast recently in 2017. He released the butterfly effect, which is a 7 episode podcast on how free Internet porn changed the adult film industry. And then his follow-up to that the last days of August was about the death of a porn star called August Ames, who was Twitter shamed for an allegedly homophobic tweet, so that was kind of when all of his previous themes intersected and so poor and so Twitter shaming all of that and it just kind of made sense for him I guess to do this last days of August series and it was so compelling such a brilliant listen. I kind of started listening to it and just got lost in it for about two days until I finished it. I binge listened to a podcast. My first ever binge listen actually that was I've been wanting to speak to him since then actually and having much enjoyed his books and having the feeling that those things that he's written about in the past have never felt more at the forefront of what's going on in our society. So I thought it would be a nice time to speak to him. We recorded this chat pre lockdown. He was in New York where he lives and we had a lovely time. This is John ronson on the changes podcast. Pokémon headphones, one, two, three. There he is. Oh, you sound great. Yeah, you sound crystal clear to me as well. That's good. I just did an interview with a former Nazi and the sound quality is much worse, but that's because it was complicated. He was in Texas and it's a long story. I would expect nothing less of you, John. Okay, let's begin. John ronson, we are so happy to have time with you. Thank you so much for your time to start with. Oh, it's my pleasure. It's very nice to talk to you, Annie. Do you mind if I start at the start? Sure. Where were you born, please? Cardiff. Cardiff. And what hospital can you remember? No. Obviously you won't remember because you were just born. But I remember my mother pointing it out to me once. I've got a feeling it was really close to Safire gardens, which was a great concert hall in Cardiff, where I saw, oh my God, David Essex and Joy Division and the specials and then I have to run around come sit at fell down and in the snow. And narrowly averted massacre of grandeur and fans. And I've got a feeling I just link the fire gardens with the hospital that I was born in, so I think they were really close to each other. Who was John Watson at school, what were you like at school? Oh, I was very uncomfortable in my skin. Very socially awkward. Not that happy. And then inevitably that ended up with me getting kind of bullied when I was about between about the ages of about 15 and 18, I'd say. I mean, I've read some of what you've spoken about with regards to that bullying, but it sounds like it was brutal. It was, yeah. I went to this all happened at code of high school and yeah, it was really bad. I mean, I was pinpointed as the most bully able person in my class. So it was not great. Thrown in lakes and blindfolded and thrown in the playground and it wasn't good. Yeah, I was awkward and banal and I was a mess back then. So presumably the police picked up on the fact that I was a mess and factored into their decision to choose me. How do you think that has affected you over the years now that you obviously have the benefit of hindsight and you can look back at those years? I'd say it affected me in both positive and negative ways. So the positive ways was that it sort of taught me, yeah, when you push to the edge of the playground and you're not in any group and you're just this person on their own, standing on the edge of the bloke out locking in. That's kind of good training for a journalist because we are supposed to be an aligned to any groups and off on our own as sort of a free spirit, I suppose. So in that way, I think being bullied is good training for a writer because it means you're suspicious of elites. Because it was the elite threw me into earth's park Lake. That was the positive thing on it propelled me out of Cardiff propelled me to move to London. Now, if I ever thought I'd stay in Cardiff, being so badly picked on it Curtis high, meant there was no way. So that's another positive thing. It sort of set me on my adventures. I guess the negative thing is that it does stay with you. I still have quite a lot of social anxiety and I find it hard to go to parties and stuff. And I'm sure there's some weird connection there, that's sort of everything. I remember when I was writing, so you've been publicly shamed. I met the governor of New Jersey. And he had been bullied, too, because he was gay. And it was just the two of us sitting in this cafe in Manhattan reminiscing about being bullied as kids and agreeing that that experience follows you into new rooms. And there was that the governor of New Jersey and mayor successful writer and we were both, I could tell pretty impacted still decades later by it. It does those memories follow you into new rooms when you meet new people. You feel you have a sense of inadequacy. Is there a sense of mistrust? Is there a sense of knowing that the kind of being aware of the cruelty of people from a young age like that of what people are capable of? No, I'm pretty trusting. It was more sometimes my problem is I'm a little bit too trusting like I'd be interviewing some not say and then be surprised that they turn out to be like really terrible. I just remember I remember when I lived in islington, I was out with my next door neighbor and I was complaining. I said, I'm making this thing about this religious cult and the leader is like being really mean to me and manipulative and my next daughter said, why are you always surprised? You had to be like Nazis and cult leaders and you surprised with it turned out to be unpleasant. So I'm trusting. Honestly, it's more weird, low self esteem thing, which was also, you know, has positive sides too, because it means you don't become egotistical. Yeah, of course. You know, my success is never gone to my head, in fact, I wish it would go to my head a little bit more..

John ronson Cardiff August Ames Annie Mac Safire gardens Twitter David Essex John Watson Joy Division earth's park Lake Annie Texas New York John New Jersey Curtis London Manhattan islington
"annie." Discussed on xperi-test-v1-t

xperi-test-v1-t

08:12 min | 3 months ago

"annie." Discussed on xperi-test-v1-t

"Hello and welcome to changes with me Annie Mac. This is the place that we talk all things change. Hope you're doing good. Does change your foot. We're able to go to the pub soon, we're able to go to restaurants soon. The new normal is kind of on the horizon, sending love to all the parents who have pretty much given up on homeschooling. I stand in solidarity with you. The sun is out, let the kids play. That's what I say. Hope you're doing okay. I'm delighted to say that on this week's podcast. We are going to be speaking to author and journalist John ronson. So John ronson is an award winning writer and documentary maker, and the author of many bestselling books, including so you've been publicly shamed them adventures with extremists and the psychopath test. You can do what I did and just buy that you can buy like a bundle where you get like all of the boxes ever written in one big, nice package. He's done screenwriting. He's also become really successful and critically acclaimed for his podcast recently in 2017. He released the butterfly effect, which is a 7 episode podcast on how free Internet porn changed the adult film industry. And then his follow-up to that the last days of August was about the death of a porn star called August Ames, who was Twitter shamed for an allegedly homophobic tweet, so that was kind of when all of his previous themes intersected and so poor and so Twitter shaming all of that and it just kind of made sense for him I guess to do this last days of August series and it was so compelling such a brilliant listen. I kind of started listening to it and just got lost in it for about two days until I finished it. I binge listened to a podcast. My first ever binge listen actually that was I've been wanting to speak to him since then actually and having much enjoyed his books and having the feeling that those things that he's written about in the past have never felt more at the forefront of what's going on in our society. So I thought it would be a nice time to speak to him. We recorded this chat pre lockdown. He was in New York where he lives and we had a lovely time. This is John ronson on the changes podcast. Pokémon headphones, one, two, three. There he is. Oh, you sound great. Yeah, you sound crystal clear to me as well. That's good. I just did an interview with a former Nazi and the sound quality is much worse, but that's because it was complicated. He was in Texas and it's a long story. I would expect nothing less of you, John. Okay, let's begin. John ronson, we are so happy to have time with you. Thank you so much for your time to start with. Oh, it's my pleasure. It's very nice to talk to you, Annie. Do you mind if I start at the start? Sure. Where were you born, please? Cardiff. Cardiff. And what hospital can you remember? No. Obviously you won't remember because you were just born. But I remember my mother pointing it out to me once. I've got a feeling it was really close to Safire gardens, which was a great concert hall in Cardiff, where I saw, oh my God, David Essex and Joy Division and the specials and then I have to run around come sit at fell down and in the snow. And narrowly averted massacre of grandeur and fans. And I've got a feeling I just link the fire gardens with the hospital that I was born in, so I think they were really close to each other. Who was John Watson at school, what were you like at school? Oh, I was very uncomfortable in my skin. Very socially awkward. Not that happy. And then inevitably that ended up with me getting kind of bullied when I was about between about the ages of about 15 and 18, I'd say. I mean, I've read some of what you've spoken about with regards to that bullying, but it sounds like it was brutal. It was, yeah. I went to this all happened at code of high school and yeah, it was really bad. I mean, I was pinpointed as the most bully able person in my class. So it was not great. Thrown in lakes and blindfolded and thrown in the playground and it wasn't good. Yeah, I was awkward and banal and I was a mess back then. So presumably the police picked up on the fact that I was a mess and factored into their decision to choose me. How do you think that has affected you over the years now that you obviously have the benefit of hindsight and you can look back at those years? I'd say it affected me in both positive and negative ways. So the positive ways was that it sort of taught me, yeah, when you push to the edge of the playground and you're not in any group and you're just this person on their own, standing on the edge of the bloke out locking in. That's kind of good training for a journalist because we are supposed to be an aligned to any groups and off on our own as sort of a free spirit, I suppose. So in that way, I think being bullied is good training for a writer because it means you're suspicious of elites. Because it was the elite threw me into earth's park Lake. That was the positive thing on it propelled me out of Cardiff propelled me to move to London. Now, if I ever thought I'd stay in Cardiff, being so badly picked on it Curtis high, meant there was no way. So that's another positive thing. It sort of set me on my adventures. I guess the negative thing is that it does stay with you. I still have quite a lot of social anxiety and I find it hard to go to parties and stuff. And I'm sure there's some weird connection there, that's sort of everything. I remember when I was writing, so you've been publicly shamed. I met the governor of New Jersey. And he had been bullied, too, because he was gay. And it was just the two of us sitting in this cafe in Manhattan reminiscing about being bullied as kids and agreeing that that experience follows you into new rooms. And there was that the governor of New Jersey and mayor successful writer and we were both, I could tell pretty impacted still decades later by it. It does those memories follow you into new rooms when you meet new people. You feel you have a sense of inadequacy. Is there a sense of mistrust? Is there a sense of knowing that the kind of being aware of the cruelty of people from a young age like that of what people are capable of? No, I'm pretty trusting. It was more sometimes my problem is I'm a little bit too trusting like I'd be interviewing some not say and then be surprised that they turn out to be like really terrible. I just remember I remember when I lived in islington, I was out with my next door neighbor and I was complaining. I said, I'm making this thing about this religious cult and the leader is like being really mean to me and manipulative and my next daughter said, why are you always surprised? You had to be like Nazis and cult leaders and you surprised with it turned out to be unpleasant. So I'm trusting. Honestly, it's more weird, low self esteem thing, which was also, you know, has positive sides too, because it means you don't become egotistical. Yeah, of course. You know, my success is never gone to my head, in fact, I wish it would go to my head a little bit more..

John ronson Cardiff August Ames Annie Mac Safire gardens Twitter David Essex John Watson Joy Division earth's park Lake Annie Texas New York John New Jersey Curtis London Manhattan islington
Second Booster or Natural Antibodies?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:18 min | 4 months ago

Second Booster or Natural Antibodies?

"There is a study out of Israel just released yesterday that shows that people who got a second booster had less complications from COVID, less severe symptoms, less illness, less hospitalization, less death. Who knows? I mean, at this point, I think they're flipping a coin. I decided, after I heard all this booster talk, well, you know, I'm vaccinated. I've got a booster. I had COVID over Christmas. Mild symptoms, I've got this big musical coming up next month in Dallas. I'm going to play suitless in a funny thing happened on the way to the forum, which is going to be a lot of fun at the majestic theater. Thanks to lyric stage, lyric stage dot org for tickets. It's going to it's going to be mounted the first weekend or the middle of the weekend in May. May, I think, 12 through the 15th or something like that. And you know, heaven forbid, I get COVID in the middle of that. Like I did when I played daddy warbucks in Annie, three weeks into the run, and I wound up getting COVID. And I had to miss the final weekend of performances. So that was, that was tricky. They had a understudy who came in and finished the run, which was great, but you know, with the antibodies test, 2500, my doctor says, Mike, you got plenty of antibodies.

Majestic Theater Israel Dallas Annie Mike
How the Cartels Are Targeting People in the U.S.

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 4 months ago

How the Cartels Are Targeting People in the U.S.

"From W M R it's a radio clip and there's some Congress people at the end I'll probably cut them off because I'm not too interested in them But I want you to hear how the cartels are targeting people in the United States with fentanyl with fentanyl lace pills with fake pills Check this out It was really the influx of the pills laced with methamphetamine targeting children To look exactly like an Adderall that I thought was just an insidious move on behalf of these drug cartels to target young Americans The DEA testified at a rare Senate field hearing in New Hampshire that elicit fentanyl is devastating the state and now the agency is seeing methamphetamine at an alarming rate coming from Mexico and China The ruthlessness of these cartels combined with the callous greed is destroying families and communities resulting in an increase of violence and crime here in the granite state and throughout our entire country Consensus Monday from elected and law enforcement officials was that the old model of incarceration and confiscation is not the way out of this modern drug war A critical component now is reducing demand and congresswoman Annie Custer says that starts with treatment access The Medicaid inmate exclusion is a draconian policy that hurts those with substance use disorder mental illness and trauma whose cycle in and out of our justice system The race for funding to keep up with the agility of drug cartels not bound by rules or budget is an ongoing struggle The issue a priority for senator Hassan We just have to keep at this with everything we've got And you all are on the front lines so are the men and women who you lead and we are very very grateful to all of you All right I'm not grateful to you lady Listen you can do more to stop it And people vote her out But now I want to talk about the bigger the crux of the issue here Drugs aren't the only

Annie Custer DEA Congress New Hampshire Senate United States Mexico Senator Hassan China Trauma
"annie." Discussed on The Glossy Beauty Podcast

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"annie." Discussed on The Glossy Beauty Podcast

"I think we're looking to kind of just build more of this kind of very sticky experience with soft services, but at the core is always looking for areas where someone has a problem that they don't have any solution for yet today. Sorry, and then in terms of expansion, I think for us, it's about meeting our customer where they are. And not creating limits like Annie was saying in the branding, not making our brand limiting actually appealing and inviting to other customers. So where soft services will be sold or where we're going in terms of product map is really guided by that. We're not trying to limit it's like our company, we're care company. We're trying to bring that care as wide as we can. And so yeah, there's definitely some exciting expansion that will be getting into in the next 24 months. So you guys aren't looking at a D2C only model. No, I think that's limiting to the customer. You know, if we want to we want to help as many people solve their body acne as possible. And if D2C only was the way to do that, that's what we would choose, but we don't believe that to be true today. Yeah, it's interesting how the industry has been changing. Obviously, glossier just had its big news with its big layoff of a third of its staff and saying that they're kind of pivoting their interested in wholesale kind of pivoting away from this tech company kind of model. Is that where D2C is going now where you want to get kind of retail partners and not have this very exclusive kind of online only model. I think for us, I think D2C is a funny term that also means many different things to many different people for us. It's about, I think we are a D2C company, even if we do sell through other distribution channels, the idea of you to see is.

Annie
"annie." Discussed on The Glossy Beauty Podcast

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

05:02 min | 4 months ago

"annie." Discussed on The Glossy Beauty Podcast

"How did you guys select the first products in the collection? Yeah, so as Annie was saying when we first started working on soft services, we did this like post it no exercise of what our problems that were having below the neck are friends, our husbands, our mothers that don't have solutions and we kind of had maybe like 40 post it notes and then as we start to zero in on what our product road map really look like, we started crossing that with what is the market size for each of these issues, how many people do these issues affect what is a seasonality of the kind of these issues and yeah, just like through various forms of qualitative or quantitative data to figure out like where are what issues are maybe like of the most need today. And so we started by really zeroing in on, I would say like keratosis pilaris and body acne is two main issues that we wanted to go out of the gate with. And so the smoothing set is like the products that we launch with, the buffing bar, this with the solution and the carrier cream, which would be like the ultimate keratosis Polaris fighting solutions, but also those products given that they're incredible exfoliants work for a variety of other issues..

Annie
"annie." Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:34 min | 5 months ago

"annie." Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"In the meantime, here's a conversation I had on the next big idea podcast. It's with science journalist extraordinaire Annie Murphy Paul, who challenged my deep seated belief that we do our best thinking inside our brains. If you like it, you can hear more episodes of the next big idea wherever you're listening. Hey,.

Annie Murphy Paul
"annie." Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:30 min | 5 months ago

"annie." Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Annie, let's talk about gesturing. This is, you really have good tidings for gestures. You say that we're bilingual. Even those of us who only speak one language were bilingual because gesturing is effectively a second language. Yeah, or you might even say our first language because it was first in our first in our evolution and then that recapitulates itself in infants and children that they gesture and communicate quite a lot with gesture long before they can say words. It's so interesting. And you cite research that shows that people who gesture more speak more fluently. They make fewer mistakes and the active gesturing helps us think, right? It's part of the process of thinking through what we're going to say effectively. Right. Yeah, I think we're so used to thinking of gesture as the means of communicating to others, and it is that. I mean, there's research showing that people remember what you say. The points that you make when they are accompanied by gestures, they remember those points better than points that are not accompanied by gesture. But gesture is equally as important or maybe more important for our own thinking. And I think it's so fascinating that our most advanced ideas are newest ideas, the ones that we can't quite put into words yet. They show up in our gestures. And then we use that kind of self created information to inform our verbal account. So we're actually helping ourselves think when we move our hands. And that's why it's unfortunate that often gesturing is looked down upon in our society. It's looked upon as seen as sort of gauche or uncouth, you know, when actually it is the pathway to speaking more fluently and more eloquently. Well, as someone who is literally knocked cocktails out of people's hands, while gesturing a little too enthusiastically, I consider this to be great news. Because I've caught myself historically kind of tamping down the gesture impulse, because it feels almost sort of grandiose or something. But it's this very primal thing that we all should encourage. And you point out that actually socioeconomic differences and how often parents use their hands when talking to children may be producing what we would call a gesture gap. Exactly. Yeah, I mean, I think most people are familiar at this point with the idea that you should talk to young children, you know, the talk as much as possible, expose them to as much spoken language as possible. But we haven't gotten that message about gesture, but as you say, children are very attuned to gesture. In fact, often they'll use their own gestures to elicit words from their parents when they're learning words. So they'll point to something, the parent will supply the word. And then that researchers have found that that word often shows up in the child's vocabulary not long after. So they're actually using their hands to tell their parents what to say. And so the more the parent gestures, this is the research you were referring to, the larger they're spoken word vocabulary when they start school. And there is a socioeconomic difference in terms of how often parents, gesture, affluent parents tend to gesture more lower income parents tend to gesture less, and that's reflected in their children's rate of gesturing. But the good news is that with just a pretty basic instruction, all parents can learn to gesture more. And then that's reflected in their kids gesturing and subsequently in their vocabulary. So it's really just something that parents need to be made aware of. And you also point out that in as the world has become more digital, that we need to reframe our zoom cameras a little bit to give ourselves a chance to share our gestures. And you point out that learning platforms should also take advantage of the power of gesture. Yes, that's especially true. I think with online language learning, foreign language learning, which seems like such a perfect opportunity to incorporate gesture, but doesn't seem to do so, you know, programs like DuoLingo and Rosetta stone, there's all this research suggesting that when you pair a foreign language vocabulary word with a gesture that vocabulary word is much better, remembered. And there's been interesting research on using a cartoon avatar to teach language the avatar makes a gesture and then the student repeats it. And that increases how well they learn the vocabulary words. So those are some ways in which we could be using gesture and for whatever reason we're not right now. So interesting. That reminds me of the great detail that actors tend to remember the lines they deliver on stage more accurately if they are delivered with a gesture or some kind of physical movement. Which gets back to this notion that we are that we evolved as physical monkeys in space. And we think we think through movement, it's wild. Right. Well, luckily, we monkeys are getting to move about in space more now that like the world is opening up again. Yes. We're spending less time on Zoom and this brings us to your second big idea. You say, we can also extend our minds with physical space. It's common in our culture to compare the brain to a computer, but this is actually a deeply flawed analogy. You can think about it this way. A laptop operates exactly the same way, whether it's open on a desk in an office, or whether it's on a bench in a park. It works the same way whether it's set next to a sunny window or whether it's being used in a dark dank basement. But human brains aren't like that. They are exquisitely sensitive to context to place. And one of the most fertile and fruitful places to think with is nature, the outdoors. And that's because over eons of evolution, our brains were tuned to the kind of sensory information that's available in the natural world. Spending time in the hard edged, highly designed built environment, drains our mental resources, and spending time in nature actually replenishes them. But we can also deliberately arrange the interior spaces we occupy in ways that extend our thinking. Research shows that it's especially important that we feel a sense of control, a sense of ownership over the space in which we do our learning or working. It's also important to incorporate into these spaces, cues of identity, that is objects or symbols of who you are, what you're doing in that space, what your role there is. And also cues of belonging, objects or symbols that represent your membership in a group that's meaningful to you. In the extended mind, I also write about making use of what I call the space of ideas. And this refers to the process of getting information out of our heads and into physical space. Whether that space is a sketchpad or a whiteboard or a set of post it notes or even a physical model that you're interacting with. And this kind of offloading as cognitive scientists call it, has several benefits for our thinking. One is that it relieves the burden of keeping that information in mind. Getting it out of our heads and onto.

Annie
"annie." Discussed on The Podcast On Podcasting

The Podcast On Podcasting

02:59 min | 6 months ago

"annie." Discussed on The Podcast On Podcasting

"Valuable <Speech_Male> takeaways that <Speech_Male> another podcaster <Speech_Male> can <Speech_Music_Male> use <Speech_Male> to become a better <Speech_Male> podcaster. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> ABCDE <Speech_Male> framework was <Speech_Male> fun to go through <Speech_Male> to listen <Speech_Male> to how <Speech_Male> you do your <Speech_Male> podcast each and <Speech_Male> every time <Speech_Male> that systemized it. <Speech_Male> If you ever <Speech_Male> come back on the podcast, <Speech_Male> I'm going to talk more <Speech_Male> about how you <Speech_Male> and Julie got <Speech_Male> to that eye <Speech_Male> contact. I <Speech_Male> know it's going to <Speech_Male> happen next. <Speech_Male> Because there's a <Speech_Male> lot of people that listen <Speech_Male> that want <Speech_Male> to have <Speech_Male> better <Speech_Male> co host <Speech_Male> interactions. <Speech_Male> I certainly was <Speech_Male> terrible at it. <Speech_Male> I'm just going to be completely <Speech_Male> honest. <Speech_Male> I hated it. <Speech_Male> It's remarkable that you <Speech_Male> guys do such a great job <Speech_Male> and maybe next <Speech_Male> time we'll <Speech_Male> dive into it a little <Speech_Male> bit more. <Speech_Male> Thanks for sharing your <Speech_Male> story what you did before the <Speech_Male> podcast. Thanks <Speech_Male> for talking a little bit <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about the two different <Speech_Male> avatars that you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> serve and how <Speech_Male> your podcast <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> able to serve both <Speech_Male> of them and bring <Speech_Male> both of those people <Speech_Male> into your <Speech_Male> world talking <Speech_Male> also about <Speech_Male> what made you decide to <Speech_Male> have a podcast <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> challenges that you <Speech_Male> had to overcome in <Speech_Music_Male> the beginning <Speech_Male> and that quote that I <Speech_Male> got. What was it? <Speech_Male> I've written it down. <Speech_Male> Those things <Speech_Male> were in the way because <Speech_Male> we didn't have <Speech_Male> a strong enough <Speech_Male> why. And <Speech_Male> the challenges that <Speech_Male> you still struggle <Speech_Male> with, even <Speech_Male> today, the <Speech_Male> best and worst parts <Speech_Male> of podcasting. <Speech_Male> I liked <Speech_Male> the best one. It was all <Speech_Male> about the network, the worst <Speech_Male> one, it was like <Speech_Male> having to turn away <Speech_Male> people, but I think <Speech_Male> it's good because <Speech_Male> when you turn <Speech_Male> away people, you're going to make <Speech_Male> sure that you're <Silence> bringing your <Speech_Male> a game. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> tools that <Speech_Male> you shared. But <Speech_Male> most thing that <Speech_Male> has never come onto <Speech_Male> this podcast ever <Speech_Male> is that <Speech_Male> type of follow-up. <Speech_Male> I've never heard of <Speech_Male> that before. I love <Speech_Male> it. I'm going to <Speech_Male> state it one more time. <Speech_Male> She says, <Speech_Male> basically, <Speech_Male> she reaches out <Speech_Male> personally, <Speech_Male> but not to everybody, <Speech_Male> only <Speech_Male> to those that <Speech_Male> she really wants to <Speech_Male> make sure that this happens. <Speech_Male> And she basically <Speech_Male> says something <Speech_Male> like, would you mind taking <Speech_Male> a few seconds to do a <Speech_Male> testimonial? <Speech_Male> Or <Speech_Male> I provided three <Speech_Male> a B and C, you could <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just pick one. <Speech_Male> I think that's <Speech_Male> new that's helpful. <Silence> And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> it's like you're spending <Silence> <Advertisement> that extra time, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> it's going <Speech_Male> a long way <Speech_Male> for what you <Speech_Male> guys are <Speech_Male> trying to accomplish. <Speech_Male> So that was <Speech_Male> certainly remarkable. <Speech_Male> If you're listening <Speech_Music_Male> to this interview <Speech_Music_Male> today, a <Speech_Male> Annie's <Speech_Male> full bio <Speech_Male> is already in the show notes. <Speech_Male> Just scroll down, check <Speech_Male> it out. Annie <Speech_Male> and Julie's website <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is also in <Silence> the show notes, scroll <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> down, check it out. <Speech_Male> The link to their <Silence> podcast, life <Speech_Male> and money <Speech_Male> is also <Speech_Male> in the show notes. Go and <Speech_Male> check it out. And please <Speech_Male> do me a favor. <Speech_Male> Leave an honest rating <Speech_Male> or review, like <Speech_Male> just take a second to <Speech_Male> after listening to an <Speech_Male> episode or two and just <Speech_Male> leave a review. <Speech_Male> Let us know what you think about <Speech_Male> their podcast. <Speech_Male> And then <Speech_Male> just so you know <Speech_Male> this is <Speech_Male> an odd number <Speech_Male> episode and on the <Speech_Male> even numbered <Speech_Male> episodes is always me <Speech_Male> pouring into <Speech_Male> you just one on one. <Speech_Male> So stay tuned. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Don't go anywhere. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'll see you on the next <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> episode. Two <Speech_Male> quick things <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> before you go. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Number one, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> if you are looking

Annie Julie
"annie." Discussed on The Podcast On Podcasting

The Podcast On Podcasting

03:14 min | 6 months ago

"annie." Discussed on The Podcast On Podcasting

"Would you mind taking a few seconds to provide a testimonial for us for our business? And these are busy people. So I don't want to give them another thing that they have to do, or they feel like they need to do. And so what I do is I try to make it as easy as possible. So I say, you know what? You can write your own or you can just pick from the three options below. So I take the time. And I write three testimonials, just one sentence each. And I say you can pick one of these a B or C or you can write your own. And more often than not, they'll write back and they'll say, oh my gosh, I had such a blast on the podcast, I would love to leave you a review. Let's go with option B and boom, there we go. Now we have this awesome guest on our podcast, but now we also have this quote of them talking about our business saying Annie and Julia are the real deal. If you get a chance invest with them, something like that, right? That maybe they didn't say on the show, but here they're endorsing us because we made it so easy for them. And so we've been able to build up our testimonials in our social proof that way. In addition to that, I would say probably the biggest thing I recommend people is to make it so that you as the podcast host, all you have to do is come in, sit down in your chair, pull up your microphone, hit record, do the show, stop the recording and your part is done. That's the ideal. And that's why we work with your team Adam. We love working with your team because prior to this, I was running a lot of that management myself and every show I'd be like, oh my gosh, another episode. Okay, so I got it, figure out the title. I got to make the art. I got to hire somebody to do the editing. I got to get somebody to do the show notes. And it was different people. So I have to coordinate. Okay, this VA over here is doing this piece, okay? Are you done with your PC? Okay, great. Are you done with your piece? All right. Okay, let me piece it together and let me finesse it. Let me edit everything and let me post it, right? And so the first few weeks totally doable. I was like, I got this. I can do this. And then things got busier. And I was like, I don't want to do this anymore. And I started to get resentful, right? And that's what happens. And I was like, well, I know it took us so much work to get here to launch this podcast. I want to make it sustainable. I want to make it so that it's fun for us so that we enjoy doing this and we bring our best selves to every episode. And in order to do that, we said, okay, how can we make this easier on ourselves? So we can really leverage our strengths and then leverage other team strengths for what they do best. And that's why we work with your team. And then now we've leveraged people on our own internal team to invite guests to send out those reminders and the guest guide and all of that. And so once you get to that point where you've got the system going, that is gold. Anna, you've spent so much awesome time diving into each and every one of these questions.

Annie Julia Adam Anna
"annie." Discussed on The Podcast On Podcasting

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"annie." Discussed on The Podcast On Podcasting

"Doing all of this organic promotion for you on your behalf. Like we just do so much on the editing plus. So you might be able to win that or the other option is our full service all inclusive. It's all inclusive. It has everything. Branding, marketing, editing, all of that stuff. So anyway, if you want to be entered to win and you haven't done it yet, the first step is to leave an honest review on Apple podcast, the second step is, well, that's already going to happen. You're already going to be added. And then if you want 5 more entries just like Stacy, our winner last time, she heard her review on the podcast and so she just went ahead and screenshotted it and let me know, hey, I heard my name. I want those other 5 and she got it. And then she ended up winning. So good stuff. Let's jump back into the episode. Congrats and good luck. And actually, I have a good friend that is on the show today. Annie Dickerson. And I'm really excited to get into her story. One of the takeaways that you'll see is that she and her business partner planned to not do a podcast. They plan to only get on other people's podcasts in somewhere along the way that change. And their podcast last I checked was ranking top 1% in the entire world, which is insane, their ranking across multiple different countries in multiple different categories like the business category. And I'm going to ask her her process. What did she learn along the way? Because I wanted to pour into you and I want you to be able to gain from Annie's story. So Annie, first off, welcome to Shang glad you're here. Thanks, Adam, I'm thrilled to be here with you and your listeners. It's going to be fun. The first question that I wanted to ask you is just you really don't have just one business. You're really doing more than one thing. Is that right? That's great. So our core business good investments is where we help.

Annie Dickerson Stacy Apple Annie Shang Adam
Is Covid Testing Unnecessary at This Point?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:02 min | 7 months ago

Is Covid Testing Unnecessary at This Point?

"Now, some people, I guess many people judge him by my text messages on the MyPillow text line, are anti chest. You don't want to get well, you just want everybody to get it. Well, the FDA commissioner said the other day, everybody is going to get it. So maybe you're right, maybe testing is stupid, but don't you want to know if you've got COVID? I sure do? That's what I did when fourth week of the run of Annie. I was so worried about mission performances. I'm flying back and forth from South Carolina to Tampa, there I am taking a COVID test, positive. Now, people are calling me bonkers for thinking testing makes sense. I mean, honest to goodness. I don't quite get that. To me testing is, and you can get these. I'm going to tell you right now, if you're in a CVS, Dwayne Reed, Walgreens, buy a couple of test kits. Buy as many as you can. Or am I all wet on my

FDA Annie South Carolina Tampa Dwayne Reed CVS Walgreens
'We were trapped': Trauma of Jan. 6 lingers for lawmakers

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 7 months ago

'We were trapped': Trauma of Jan. 6 lingers for lawmakers

"Lawmakers lawmakers all all remembering remembering the the trauma trauma of of a a year year ago ago wondering wondering if if they'd they'd survive survive the the capital capital right right most most house house members members had had already already been been rushed rushed out out of of the the chamber chamber but but about about three three dozen dozen Democrats Democrats were were above above the the floor floor in in the the balcony balcony rioters rioters were were banging banging on on the the doors doors as as police police build build barricades barricades I I was was at at that that moment moment where where I I realized realized we we were were trapped trapped at at that that that that we we weren't weren't getting getting out out Colorado's Colorado's Jason Jason crow crow a a former former army army ranger ranger who who served served in in war war zones zones went went into into range range remote remote I'm I'm gonna gonna have have to to make make a a stand stand there there we we got got to to fight fight our our way way out out crow crow says says he he was was ready ready to to pull pull the the trigger trigger if if needed needed but but the the lawmakers lawmakers did did get get out out to to running running through through the the tunnels tunnels below below the the capital capital honestly honestly we we thought thought we we were were being being chased chased new new Hampshire's Hampshire's Annie Annie Kuster Kuster says says her her phone phone rang rang her her son son was was watching watching the the riots riots on on TV TV I I said said I'm I'm I'm I'm alive alive honey honey I I can't can't talk talk right right now now we're we're running running for for life life I'll I'll call call you you right right back back but but I'm I'm going going to to be be okay okay Sager Sager mag mag ani ani Washington Washington

House House Chamber Chamber Jason Jason Crow Crow Army Army Crow Crow Colorado New New Hampshire Annie Annie Kuster Kuster Hampshire Sager Sager Ani Ani Washington Washington
Mike Is Feeling Much Better After Mild Case of Covid

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:17 min | 8 months ago

Mike Is Feeling Much Better After Mild Case of Covid

"An unscheduled time off due to COVID, we decided to set up a little bit of a rig in my bedroom where I remain in quarantine feeling like a million bucks, frankly, after the first couple of days of some mild symptoms, I'm feeling a 100% and so team Gallagher graciously invited Gallagher back to the Gallagher show and helping me out today is my dear friend and business manager and tremendously popular morning host in the upstate of South Carolina on 94 5 the answer W GTK. It's the one and only Joey Hudson, so it's a bit of the mic and Joey show. You know, Joey, you every one of your shows by saying God's got this, God's in control. Sometimes when you think you have plans and you make plans to celebrate something like Christmas, sometimes God says, nope, I've got a different idea. Well, and things can change quickly and you're right. Look, you had no idea a week ago that you're going to be asking me to step in, you'll recall, you started texting me Wednesday night saying you had a high fever and you weren't feeling good and the next morning I'm sitting in my barn, which we expected to be here in Greenville to finish up the last week in Annie. And you were home in quarantine. It's bizarre because this is happening real rapidly and in many ways this is deja vu all over again, as you said earlier, but on the other hand, it feels different this time. It feels like more and more people are getting COVID. Almost everybody that I've heard of has had the same experience that I've had mild symptoms, so there's two things I think is the big takeaway as we enter Christmas Joey. Number one, not be conquered by fear because chances are you're going to have a very mild time of it like I did. And number two have a plan. You know, don't get caught becoming positive and realizing you have COVID and you don't have anything in place because frankly, for me, the first thing I thought of was, how do I get to a Regeneron treatment center, which I did the day after?

Gallagher Joey Hudson Joey Show Joey South Carolina Greenville Annie
Caller Reviews South Carolina Children's Theatre's Production of 'Annie'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:18 min | 8 months ago

Caller Reviews South Carolina Children's Theatre's Production of 'Annie'

"I was in the audience with my grandkids, and my adult children and you were fantastic. The whole cast was good. The production itself was beyond a children's theater. And anybody that can get a ticket should go. You're so confident. You were dead immortal. You were in character. Yeah, no, I love that. I love that part. It's a great story because it's and I, you know, there's a monologue in the show about being alone. And you know, when I lost my Denise, it's like you think about that. You think about what's if you don't have anybody to share your life with, you might like the line is on the show. You might as well might as well be alone and broke again and back in hell's kitchen. So thank you, pan. That means a lot to me. The audiences have been incredible. It's been so fun and I think you're right. This does not feel like children's theater. No, not at all. And there were all ages. There were old people like me and there were little kids and we talked about it when we left that every one of them. Thank you. Merry Christmas to you and your family, Pam. That means a lot to me. Thank you very much for calling in and

Denise PAM
Consider Donating to Mike Gallagher’s Angel Tree Campaign

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:33 min | 8 months ago

Consider Donating to Mike Gallagher’s Angel Tree Campaign

"Country and every year that we've done this. The Mike Gallagher show leads the way. So far, 2315 children are being delivered Christmas gifts and the gospel because of Mike Gallagher's show listeners. That number is actually incorrect. Because we can add 1200 children thanks to the generosity of big time donors who are coming to see me in Annie here in South Carolina. $30,000 worth of donations. That's an extra 1200 kids. So add the 1 million 203,000 500 and 15 children. We're almost halfway of our huge goal of 7800 kids and it's only December the second. December the third, here we go again. We're all early December 3rd and we're almost halfway to our goal. Please go to Mike online dot com and click on the angel tree banner. Let's have a Friday celebration together. We got a lot to celebrate about. We got lots of good things to talk about. And making these children's lives filled with the love of Joel a joy of Christmas and God's love and their parents telling them they're not forgotten. That could be a big game changer, just like these COVID pills are going to be a big game changer. Please step up, go to Mike online dot com. Click on the angel tree banner at the top of the page. And thank you for your support. For your generosity for

Mike Gallagher Annie South Carolina Mike Joel
Lisa and Nancy From Naples Help Mike Gallagher Lead Against Hugh Hewitt

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:38 min | 9 months ago

Lisa and Nancy From Naples Help Mike Gallagher Lead Against Hugh Hewitt

"What if we offered a trip to South Carolina to a donor who would like to step up and make a huge donation to our prison fellowship ministry? For ten to that for $10,000, you and three of your family or friends will fly you to South Carolina will put you up in one of these beautiful box seats. You'll have your own private box. You'll see Annie. You'll see my performances Oliver warbucks will put you up in a beautiful hotel probably with a Weston point set in downtown. I'll take you to dinner. And it'll be a great VIP experience for you for your tax deductible donation of $10,000. And there are people who have a blessed life and God has been good to and they are able to do that. And I put it out there for a couple of days. Nobody really took the invitation. Then we got an email. From a lady in Naples, Florida. And she is in. $10,000. And when she was talking with Joey Hudson about and Tom triad up from our team, she decided to double the donation. It's 20,000. She wasn't sure if she and her family could make it. Now it looks like they will be. So, to Lisa and Nancy of Naples, Florida, I am overwhelmed by your generosity. I'm grateful, and as I look at the totals yesterday, Hewitt's catch it up on me. Now, the 20,000 is going to widen the lead.

South Carolina Oliver Warbucks Annie Joey Hudson Weston Tom Triad Naples Florida Lisa Nancy Hewitt
"annie." Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:21 min | 9 months ago

"annie." Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"John Andre asked Annie Wonka. Why the navajos seem to welcome new ideas so much more readily than other Indians. Well, the changes are so fast, and I'm quite sure and now who's her real love that we can not stand still. We've got to live this black, it can go along with other people. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is a manica. This month we're covering indigenous women from around the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman who was a prominent leader in the Navajo community and a voice for Navajo people in the U.S. government. She worked to improve her people's health while respecting and preserving Navajo culture. Let's talk about Annie Dodge juanita. Annie was born in 1910 on a Navajo reservation. Her father, Henry Q Dodge was a prominent leader in their tribe. Annie grew up herding sheep on his ranch. When Annie was 8 years old, an influenza epidemic swept across her community, killing thousands of Navajo people. Annie witnessed many of her peers fall sick and die. Later, Annie enrolled the university of Arizona and graduated with a degree in public health. Then in 1951, Annie ran for a seat in the Navajo tribal council and won. Becoming the second woman ever to be elected. Two years later, a tuberculosis epidemic struck the Navajo reservation. Annie was appointed as the chair of the health and welfare committee. She began learning everything she could about tuberculosis. She would drive alone across the reservation, which stretched through Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, visiting hospitals and tuberculosis patients and studying the disease and treatment options. During her research, Annie began to observe that many Navajo tuberculosis patients distrusted government run hospitals, and wouldn't complete treatments in those spaces. So Annie launched health education campaigns to specifically target Navajo populations. She created a Navajo English dictionary of medical terms. She helped produce short films narrated in Navajo about health education, and she launched a weekly radio program. She even organized a baby contest, where physicians would screen babies health and offer medical advice. On top of all that, Annie traveled around the reservation, explaining to people how tuberculosis worked, and how western medicine, like x-ray machines could help. While Annie was doing this work, she also observed the living conditions of many of the people she was visiting. What she witnessed led to the development of other programs in the Navajo reservation to provide adequate sanitation vaccinations and infant care. Annie was always conscious of Navajo culture and traditions, and her programming always considered the existing practices of the Navajo people. She focused on integrating modern medicine into existing Navajo traditions. During her time on the tribal council, she connected government physicians and volunteer doctors with traditional Navajo medicine men, so they could all work together to improve the health conditions of the Navajo people. But Annie's influence expanded beyond the reservation. During her career, she also was a member of advisory boards of the U.S. Surgeon General and the U.S. public health service. At a time when Congress was overwhelmingly male. Annie regularly walked the halls to confer with presidents, heads of government agencies and U.S. representatives to be a voice for the Navajo people. Annie served 7 terms on the Navajo tribal council, from 1951 to 1979. At one point, she ran against her husband and won. In 1963, Annie was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her groundbreaking work in public health. In 1984, she was designated by the Navajo people are legendary mother of the Navajo Nation. Annie passed away in 1997 at the age of 87. All month were highlighting the legacies of indigenous women..

Annie Navajo tuberculosis John Andre Annie Wonka Jenny Kaplan Annie Dodge juanita Navajo tribal council Henry Q Dodge health and welfare committee U.S. government university of Arizona influenza New Mexico Utah Arizona Colorado U.S. public health service tribal council U.S.
Joe Biden Will Read Anything on a Teleprompter

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:25 min | 9 months ago

Joe Biden Will Read Anything on a Teleprompter

"How about President Biden? This is a classic. Remember, Will Ferrell in the very funny movie anchorman? And he would read anything off the prompter. Anything that was on the teleprompter he'd read it. This is classic. Check this out. Here is Joe Biden in action. He may have heard the CEO of Walmart yesterday on the steps we've taken. He said I quote, the combination of private enterprise and government, working together has been really successful. He went on to say all the way through the supply chain. There's a lot of innovation. Because of the actions we've taken, things have begun to change. And to quote, in the past three weeks, the number of containers sitting on docks blocking that movement. He says in the quote, he says end of, quote, literally, end of, quote, that's actually a daddy warbucks has a lie like that. He's in the radio studios and he's reading he's reading. I'm willing to offer a $50,000 reward to the real persons who are Annie's parents, drop page. And warbucks says drop page because back in the old time radio days used to drop the page and it would say that on the script, so Biden was doing daddy warbucks. Drop page.

President Biden Will Ferrell Joe Biden Walmart Warbucks Annie Biden
Mike Gallagher Teases Clip From "Annie" Opening at South Carolina Children's Theatre

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:32 min | 9 months ago

Mike Gallagher Teases Clip From "Annie" Opening at South Carolina Children's Theatre

"All right, so this brings me to this production of Annie. We got a little clip that I want to play to give you a little taste. This was from the dress rehearsal last night of Annie, my pal Joey Hudson came in, shot a little video from warbucks is big number in the first act, which kind of gets a lot of my juices flowing because I love the song. I have a love love affair and hate affair with New York. But I get to do this number that celebrates the greatness of New York as he's trying to show little Annie. Little Orphan Annie, what a cool city, New York is. So here's a little taste of warbucks, and then I'm going to make an offer for you anywhere in the country to come see me in Annie at the South Carolina children's theater in the upstate of South Carolina. First of all, here's a little taste of Annie with yours truly as Oliver warbucks. In life, which are from. Her events, are impact brothers.

Annie Joey Hudson New York South Carolina Children's Thea Oliver Warbucks South Carolina
Mike Will Star as Daddy Warbucks in the South Carolina Children’s Theatre Production of 'Annie'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:39 min | 11 months ago

Mike Will Star as Daddy Warbucks in the South Carolina Children’s Theatre Production of 'Annie'

"I am very excited. That plans are coming together. Tickets are on sale for anne and south carolina the south carolina children's theatre and yours truly will once again be playing. Oliver warbucks the billionaire. Who adopts little orphan. annie. They're gonna christian this beautiful new theater. That was ready to go but was of course delayed because of the pandemic. We were supposed to do this last year. But now the production of annie is going to be presented in all of its glory. Listen a lot of challenges. But we're going to do it. And we're going to do it safely and effectively and powerfully. And we're going to have a great production in a brand new theatre on gusta in greenville south carolina and is gonna take place between thanksgiving and christmas. Which is the perfect. Time to mount a production of annie. One of america's most beloved musicals. I make a pretty good daddy warbucks. And i'm going to get my head shave so you're gonna see me bald as a cue ball pretty soon and i'm going to give you a heads up if you're in the upstate. I'm already been trying to snag. Some tickets for friends and family and tickets are going pretty quick so s. c. children's theatre dot org is the site for the tickets to get It's it's only a couple of hundred seats in the theaters brand new theatre beautiful intimate theatre state of the art. And i can't wait. This is going to be a great celebration between thanksgiving and christmas in the upstate. south carolina. If you listen to his on ninety four five the answer let me give you a quick heads up. You wanna snag tickets quickly. Probably good espec- children's theatre dot org. Se children's theatre dot

South Carolina Oliver Warbucks Annie Anne Greenville America
"annie." Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"annie." Discussed on This Week in Startups

"App store rankings. You give them data. They give you back analytics about your product. And then the concept is they were supposed to be taking all of that data from all of the eight million apps they claim use the service like downloads and usage statistics. How many people open and all that stuff revenue estimates and then they would sell that data in an anonymous fashion to traders looking to place. That's his day so people who do you know. Major major trades of course by data from many different sources. You may have heard of this before or satellite companies. Were taking pictures of parking lots and giving the parking lot data or maybe port data. How many ships were coming into a port to as a proxy for economic activity whether it's at a target or a city or country and so then you can place a bad on that which means you know any information. You can publicly gap. That's not insider trading right not. Exactly it's just you getting an edge through information there's a fine line between what's insider and what's really clever dated to get. You could sit outside of a tesla dealership. Count the number of people going in and out and do that every day or if you happen to be across the street from tesla dealership or starbucks would if you put a camera there and you literally counted the number of people coming out or built software to do that and then make trades based on it. Seems like a logical thing to do. If you see the of people coming to a starbucks every day increase you know you might want to increase your bet. Just counting cards is technically illegal in blackjack cards deck you could make a strategy on that. But of course the casino in kick you out in this case the casinos. Ese and they'll look at the rules. So app annie Not sure exactly. What the company's valued at right now but we found out last investment of sixty three million out of five hundred or so million dollar valuation. Their series. a. Here's went wrong. According to the sec presley's app annie schmidt understood that companies would only share that confidential performance data with app. Annie if it promised not to disclose their data to third parties. Okay so if you were running your app and you're uber or twitter or some nascent company your com or head space. Whatever it happens to be. You're using app. annie to optimize yours. View would not want third parties to have your data as a result at danny promise their customers that the confidential data will be anonymous and aggregated before being sold to trading firms according to the sec release. What does that mean okay. We took all the games. Visited the number of hours being played on games on iphones versus android phones. Here's the number of on demand companies or ride sharing companies. But they thought they were all being anonymous obviously they weren't So contrary to these representations the order fines that from late twenty fourteen through mid twenty eighteen app annie used non aggregated anon- anonymous data to alter its model generated estimates to make them more valuable trading firms according to the race at any new that their customers were making investment decisions based on their estimates and they even share strategies on how the firms could use the estimates to trade ahead of quarterly earnings. According to the sec. Release so Here's a quote from the director of sec's enforcement division here. At any schmidt lied to companies about how they're confidential data was being used and then not only sold the manipulated estimates to the trading from customers but also encourage them to trade on those estimates often touting how closely they correlated with the company's true performance its stock price in other words. She was out there telling people use my data by. You're gonna make more money. Trading stocks is that insider trading. No it's not information from the company But in a way is sort of like a secondary level of insider trading. It's kinda hard to describe right because people gave that data but they gave it under the auspices of it being anonymous. So you know do you do insiders have an advantage. Of course they do. Of course they do anytime. You have a lot of money at stake and in some kind of gambling trading environment people try to get an edge and some people actually take pride in getting an edge. That is illegal or not available you know depending on if you want to be charitable Or if you wanna be super cynical about it in terms of fraud you know. This is serious fraud. Fraud on the level of our nose where the service doesn't work And you're basically put people's lives at risk no Tana's bernie madoff our nose in my mind. Premeditated fraud Put those you know in the six seventy eight range of somebody doing something super unethical and they got busted and there's no indication here if that person has been banned But usually there's a band with these things like they would be oto. Actually there is a ban at any schmidt did not admit or deny the findings any. We'll pay ten million schmidt will pay three hundred k. And schmidt will be prohibited from serving a director or officer of a public company for three years. So i would say that's a speeding ticket more than A real serious action. It's a speeding ticket. I don't know if it's a slap on the rest slap on the wrist would be. Don't do it again I would categorize this as a speeding ticket. Which if you own a ferrari and you get like a serious speeding ticket and you get your license suspended for three years. That's kind of painful right if he if they impound the car. This is kind of like your ferrari doing one hundred fifty on the streets. They impound the car you lose your license for three years so it's.

sec tesla starbucks annie schmidt App store schmidt Annie annie danny twitter bernie madoff Tana
Travis Barker Flies on a Plane for the First Time Since 2008 Crash

Chicks in the Office

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Travis Barker Flies on a Plane for the First Time Since 2008 Crash

"It looks like travis barker is flying again first time since plane crash. Two thousand eight. He was spotted getting on kylie air whenever you want to call it. Kylie's private plane with corny. kris jenner. Core gamble going from la to kabo in this. I mean this. Is you ch- and i feel like groups. The connection that travis and courtney have because he never getting on a plane again. Yeah this is insane. I mean it's huge. Because i'm glad he took that step. Obviously it's a very scary thing when you're involved in an accident like that could be really hard to probably take that first step on. I'm sure it wasn't easy at all. But i feel like it proves how serious corinthian are and the love that they have each other in the trust that they have because he has to trust them according so much to be like. You know what you're right. I'm gonna get on this airplane. Everything's gonna be fine and they're going to have a great trip now. And i'm i'm happy for them. There isn't really much to say about this. Besides it's a very big step for him. And i guess for their relationship as well. Yeah i think people really also forget how bad that plane crash was either. Like you were fan and travis burger. Now you are kind of getting involved because of him dating corny but he travis barker was in that plane crash was covered in jet fuel on fire. He was left with third degree burns on sixty five percent of his body three months in the hospital. Twenty six surgeries skin. Grafts like really really really bad and of course like made sentence if he was like i never wanna get on on a plane again. But he's willing to do it for

Travis Barker Kris Jenner Kylie Courtney Travis LA Travis Burger
Think Jamie Spears Is Stepping Down as Britney's Conservator? Not So Fast...

Chicks in the Office

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Think Jamie Spears Is Stepping Down as Britney's Conservator? Not So Fast...

"On thursday triumphant. Cries were heard foreign wide as news circulated jamie spears agreed to resign his controversial post. Everybody freaked out. Happy is also noted that he is willing to step down on the time is right but the transition needs to be orderly and include a resolution matters pending before the court. Nbc news confirms with his legal team that he hit that. He is not stepping aside at this time. He's not stepping down. Unless the court approves payment of the attorney's fees that he's seeking of one point two million dollars and his compensation so he's conditioned his exit on the court approving things that britney has previously objected to so He basically said he's willing to step down if britney pays him the money that he thinks he should be getting which is what she is in court of posing in the first place. So that means jamie spears has not step downs from brittany's conservative Yeah i what happened. Everybody said it was a danish beer stepping down and then like a daily. It wasn't it wasn't like a day later when people were like. Oh let's read the

Jamie Spears Nbc News Britney Brittany
Apparently, If You're Unvaccinated, You WILL Get Sick

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Apparently, If You're Unvaccinated, You WILL Get Sick

"I think dr voucher held a briefing over the weekend that the virus does not touch sophisticated. Democrats the virus only gets floridians. The ruben that like ron disentis. That's been the virus touches. Actually said that on cnn. I know that'll shock you. That it was cnn or new york times reporter her name. Is annie something. But i think her name to be karen karen carney. We're going to call. her name. is annie kearney. She's a reporter. She's actually the white house correspondent. She's a very big deal at the new york times and she did some reporting. She's he didn't some journalism journalism along. Martha's vineyard you see because it seems a little strange. I want to ask my progressive friends. You're so worried about masks and mandates and forcing teachers to get vaccinated hired somebody on the radio this morning. Driving into work say well of course the teachers need to be vaccinated if they don't get vaccinated they're going to get sick with cova so now we're being told that if you're unvaccinated you will get sick. You will get sick. It's a foregone conclusion. I didn't know that that was news to me. I guess that was more important. Non misinformation non-vaccinated teachers are going to get covert unless perhaps your sophisticated.

Dr Voucher Ron Disentis Karen Karen Carney Annie Kearney CNN The New York Times Annie White House Martha Cova
"annie." Discussed on Arrested DevOps

Arrested DevOps

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"annie." Discussed on Arrested DevOps

"To the community. Absolutely you know people who have the time to pick something up in and see if it's worth it. And just when i think of open source contributions i think of how you feel wrote some really long documentation on the Microsoft docs site. And annie came in and made a one word. Pr that was literally just a clarification on the docks and she thought. oh put the sims as one word. And i thought you know what. This is an important clarification. Yes you should absolutely this question make this change like that can sometimes be the most valuable thing of all is removing a little bit of ambiguity or confucian. Yeah now like how. There's been. This pivot order embrace of of people now being recognized as contributed. Who just doing.

annie Microsoft
Jamie Lee Curtis Reveals Her 25-Year-Old Child Is Transgender

Doug Stephan

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Jamie Lee Curtis Reveals Her 25-Year-Old Child Is Transgender

"Jamie Lee Curtis as an announcement. What's the scoop? She did the cover for an AARP magazine. Coming up the August September issue and the cover story. She discussed her life. Her husband, her two kids, Her oldest daughter, 34, year Old Annie, and Her 25 year old daughter, Ruby, who was born her son and is now transgender daughter. Uh, how do they feel about that? She seems to be here out. Yeah, And she said that she and her husband have watched in wonder and pride as our son became our daughter,

Jamie Lee Curtis Old Annie Aarp Ruby
What Is Going on With KKW Beauty and Kylie Cosmetics?

Breaking Beauty Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

What Is Going on With KKW Beauty and Kylie Cosmetics?

"We've been tracking too. I mean they're all it's all kind of one story but has divided into several different stories. This point which is the acquisition the investment and then the acquisition of k. k. w. beauty and kylie beauty into cody. And how cody which is a conglomerate that owns lots of different brands obviously k. w. and kylie were kardashian brand seed beauty was the their contract manufacturer and now it's become very complicated. See beauty was suing k. K. w. an kylie over sharing trade secrets with cody. And now they're sort of genius or not so genius trying to rebrand Katie only and reformulate to be like vegan and clean but when we all really know what they're doing is they have to make formula so that they're not using see beauties. ip and like they can serve accord allegedly. I didn't even put that together. Just released this morning and i was like. Oh of course. They're going to get on the clean. We're all using the in the air quotation marks. But they're all going to go down that train. But i didn't even put it together that it would be because they can't use those formulas from yeah. Yeah and if there's one person who i don't think gives a f- about clean beauty. It is kylie jenner. I love her and chris. I don't think i just do not think that. That is where their heart always make. Fun of courtney for being that girl i yeah. I think that they're just fine with With with all the with all the the beetle juice or whatever they use in yeah die. There's post in. Their kitchen

Kylie Cody Kardashian Katie Kylie Jenner Chris Courtney
"annie." Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"annie." Discussed on What'sHerName

"Then. She lands once again in america on a steamship in san francisco and this is an interesting overlap because this is the era of chinese immigration to the island. Or how do episode right annie. Londonderry came in on an immigrant. Ship so now she's going to criss cross the american west on her way to chicago and on a map it makes no sense at. She takes a very circuitous route. I mean that the sense of not direct. Yeah where do the railroads go very insightful. Figured i mean. She did cycle some long stretches and we know that because she had companion cycling clubs that were biking with her but yeah i think she took a train. When it was in el paso texas. She met with the warmest. Welcome since marseille and her. Her lecture there turned out to be a major news story not so much because of her though but because of who was in the audience A very famous man. By the name of john wesley hardin. What are the most notorious outlaws the old west. He killed dozens of men but later in his life had become a lawyer on the job training. Now john wesley hardin is in love with a married woman and he wants to murder her husband he needs a good alibi. Wow and on a night in july of eighteen ninety-five. He had his lover's husband murdered. He hires only the best four. That harden has hired all law enforcement officers. Where was he. He was at the lecture. Being given by annie londonderry the the woman going around the world that a bicycle sounds like another told him. It was all over the news. This notorious outlaw. In the front row at ami londonderry's lecture but this one was true. A real brush with fame and But she just cycled cycled on her way. We actually have no idea when she rolled into chicago three weeks early. She had won the wager. Ten thousand dollars. She said plus all the money she made along the way chicago. September twelfth eighteen ninety-five today misled the dairy later wheel down at the wellington hotel. But thankful cy mrs cup chomsky. Her real name looked far from feeling well as she claimed to be. In fact she looked like a sick woman. Her arm was broken and bound in a sling. And the last three hundred miles were written with it in that condition. It's kind of sadly anti-climactic now there's no parade. There's no celebration and she's she's really broken down did it. What next in an interesting postscript bicycle trip the new york world said hey this lady can tell a story of a girl stunt reporter. They would have called her and wrote a series of hyperbolic feature stories and some of them were bylined. The new woman. She also returned to boston to her husband and family and had one more child. She must have regaled her children and her neighbors with stories of her adventures to the variant. Wow i got me thinking what if your mother was an unreliable narrator holy unbelievable witness to life reminds me of one of your favorite movies. I was gonna say big fish. Yeah and is that. A blessing or a curse. It's a blessing to everybody except their children. We know that stories are powerful. I i personally feel like stories. Are the most powerful force in human history but their relation to the truth is important. But it's complicated. Yeah and i think it's very easy to enjoy the story and to go. The story is the most important. In retrospect right. Like i can look back and go. Oh this is all delightful and the stories from the past. But yeah in the moment when they're actually affecting people an actually affecting you. The truth is a lot more important. If if it's going to derail your life but philosophically. Psychologically speaking also read some really essays. Elaine de botton's essay about how we engage with life. He talks about how there are those who can make much of little and there are those who make little of much Even life and that. Maybe it's a gift to be able to take little scraps of life hands. You nothing now. Can you take the scraps that you have and turn it into something big and meaningful. Life didn't hand her wealth or fame. It didn't hand her power opportunity and yet she turned it into now world fame. She took she took nothing and made herself and her life into this incredible adventure just through her sheer chutzpah. What combination of genetics and environment. What has to come together to create someone. Who's so willing and able to defy all the conventional norms of her time. I i don't know if she even knew. I mean it's so this is probably. She were alive today. You know sometimes wonder what you. Would there be a diagnosis. Actually how much was she aware of who she really was. As opposed to the character she had created. Yes he's It very hard to sort of say sam sir. To who was andy cohen. Maybe this is why none of us have ever heard of her. Why peter's oil and had to dig so deep to uncover her story even in his own family. Yeah it feels like she's such an interesting human. Yeah who is annie londonderry. I dunno know. Do any of us even know where our character in. We're true self begins. We're all creating our personas all the time right. Yeah.

Elaine de botton san francisco america chicago john wesley hardin Ten thousand dollars annie londonderry boston ami londonderry harden one july of eighteen ninety dozens annie September twelfth eighteen nin four men one more child wellington three hundred miles
"annie." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"annie." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Annie Cordero is Puerto Rican singer and activist based here in New York. Her last album L'm, a check A took a hard look at our political and social divisions soften somewhat by the album's strong dance beat. But now Cordero has put down the machete that is offering us all a big hug. That's how she describes her new single as some or it's love. Dance rhythms of still there. But after the year we've had her message this time is a simpler and more comforting one. It's all about love. Listen. Honey Cordero and her new song ESA more. It's Love. It's part of our weekly music round up, You can see the whole thing new sounds dot Award. 39 degrees right now. In New York City, Fog and mist to continue chance of showers Today is we're getting up to behind the 46 degrees. There's a flood advisory in effect until 10 30 this morning Tonight Partly cloudy low of 25 degrees tomorrow, Sunshine a high in the mid thirties. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm.

Annie Cordero New York Cordero New York City 39 degrees Today 46 degrees 25 degrees NPR News Honey Cordero ESA tomorrow L'm, a check A mid thirties this morning Puerto Rican 10 30
"annie." Discussed on Decorating Pages

Decorating Pages

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"annie." Discussed on Decorating Pages

"Role. Let's let's hope Be Audio recorded A. I think you can hear Annie's voice. She sounds like such a sweetheart and her concept of just wanting to be a nice person and a nice boss. I mean that seems so sweet and I been lucky enough to run into many a good person. Not just a good production designer or any position But being being nice and being respectful in this business and in any business is really what it's all about. And what a what a sweetheart for taking time to just talk to me from Australia about that. Those poor fires we had a whole conversation beforehand Fires and her family was affected and just so nice of her to take the time to to speak with me. I should also mention that any was nominated for an directors guild award in two thousand and two and one for Moulin Rouge. She was the director. How amazing to work on that film. So the second nomination and she's previously one so good luck to everyone Who's competing this weekend? And if all around fantastic work I'm in awe of every everything that's nominated and not so. I hope everybody has a good time. And let's be honest. I hope the good place wins. I hope you've got an earful. I'm Kim On for decorating pages. Decorating pages sponsored by steady flow to Mickey got him luxury pufus available now at stogie. Floaty DOT COM..

director Annie Moulin Rouge Mickey Australia
"annie." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"annie." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Annie and when it came out the next year you could drive down the Sunset Strip for any street in America for that matter without hearing ends on mistake a bull soprano blaring from so many convertibles to gear up for their reunion tour next month here's the song that got it all started she to his collaborations in experiments with electronics sells a continued today check is been a beacon of originality in jazz as long as any of us can remember on keys force tonight is Jeff bapco who told me that when he switched from learning classical piano.

Annie America Jeff bapco
"annie." Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

12:39 min | 3 years ago

"annie." Discussed on No End In Sight

"Hi i'm brian and this is no end in sight a podcast about life with chronic illness quick reminder that i just started patriot so that i can hire somebody ready to help me catch up on transcripts so if you've been in during the show and you have a couple of bucks to spare each month i'd be so so grateful if you'd sign up as a patron at the patriots dot com slash no end in sight. I don't have any fun perks up yet but once i figure that out i'll make sure that any early supporters don't miss them today. I'm talking to annie smith about autism ehlers's. Dan lewis syndrome feeding tubes and incorporating diagnosis into your identity and as a quick quick content note for this episode we talk a fair bit about weight loss both as a symptom and as something that inspires a lot of unsolicited feedback <hes> it comes zip kinda twice once just inner chronological story and once while we're talking about feedback but then i'd say after that we don't talk about it again. If you just don't want to hear that kind of discourse us before we start here's my disclaimer. This podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis or treatment man. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or symptoms.

annie smith Dan lewis