11 Burst results for "Annie Malone"

"annie malone" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

06:28 min | 6 months ago

"annie malone" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"Have been involved but of course now you know thirty years has gone by since then so some those are some of those who are older but that was the idea and it was there was more there was a love story with. Cj walker that you know that he was developing and so that was there and more of her politics and more of her philanthropy which to have seen so we so we get the. but alex. I did all this research for hours. I nine months off from my job as a producer. Nbc and moved to new york for a few months and there were still some of the elders who were living. I went to twelve different cities. These people people who worked for the company so it was really A very special moment and some people may remember stanley. Nelson's film two dollars and a dream that his very first documentary. People know his miles. Davis and hugh back stanley's macarthur fellow but his very first documentary with two dollars and a dream about madam walker impart because his grandfather was. Fb ransom madame. Walker's attorney so how same elders for his film and you can see it now on youtube and he put it up on youtube a few weeks ago and there are more than four hundred thousand views. So this is will not have to stop this. And i know you guys a friends but he has since become my friend. No other conversation. That i've had on this show has fascinated me so much except for drummer. Believe dr henry. Louis gates junior a witcher. Sharing with me has a lot to do with ancestry. And that's what we talked about of course but these history figures that are interacting like in real time in these stories. It's just blowing my mind and these are the types of stories that skip shares right. Well listen listen. This is so much the story that i really want to re do. I mean i spent her was great in south main. And i think for me she really embodied the spirit and the courage to nasty about a walker but the story lines were really different than what i would have imagined. It sorta got stuck on that. Annie malone adamant imaginary relationship that really didn't happen and very little about people like ida b wells who matamoros new and the way that booker t. Washington was portrayed and a little bit of W e b d boys. I would've developed those relationships a lot more and a lot more with the philanthropy. Because i think that people don't really know just how amazing those breakfasts were in that first interesting out of slavery and rather than default to two women fighting each other. Yeah i think he could show the amazing things that were going on. And i think that history people assumed history is boring because they didn't like it in school but real dynamics the drama all these famous people. They all didn't get along with the how it is anyway. It's how it is real life. But some of them did and they really lifted each other up. And i would have loved shown that sort of empowering women have our in each other so that's why there has to be me doing another version of so much more story to tell so. Why not and. I've got to ask you again. I'm gonna stop again. You said it was optioned twice before this so the story. So when alex died in nineteen ninety two i had met his editor. Lisa who had done routes and lisa. And i had become friends is the result of ours and she's the one who signed my book on her own ground to scrivener so i began on that book when it came out as i was finishing it at the end of two thousand the book was actually optioned by columbia. Tristar for a cbs movie. And that back to me because it fell through. Which is what happens with a lot of la epoca lot and then about five years later. Hbo obstinate and this was going along. Well but There were two riders and the more senior of the writers actually guides and hbo wasn't willing to go forward and so then the option came at me again. and then we had about a decade of Black movies don't sell overseas. So hollywood interest and then right then selma twelve years slave the butler like oscars y happen at all of those. Those things happen and then my phone's ringing again. So that was in one thousand so you know what we need option now. We need the story of you getting mugabe because the movie enough itself. We need the bundles version. There's a higher near seventy some drama. They're definitely drama drama. You mentioned aim alone. There's some other things about the movie that quite on the menu. You wanna talk about sure. So yes so. The the most obvious thing the thing that got the biggest firestorm was the adding monroe carrot through who the writers the head writer and the show runners deciding was a composite character. Who was adding monroe. Because they said they've said in interviews that they wanted to lean into colorado them so even though in real life madame walker and annie malone were rivals and competitors both were in fact as you know very successful businesswoman and philanthropist who were equals in that sense and not their conflict had nothing to do with skin color and add anti malone in real life currently did not follow matt and walker to to indianapolis they were both doing their own things with an empowering women so upset a lot of people and i and that.

new york Lisa indianapolis annie malone two dollars Annie malone thirty years t. Washington Nelson stanley two thousand two women twice youtube alex both Nbc lisa Cj walker more than four hundred thousan
"annie malone" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"annie malone" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Chemicals so that hot you know we'll burn your scalp and then call me back to make a stray. That must have been a lot of heat damage. I remember we all anybody out there who knows Back in the day when our hair of us. Who are maybe forty or over. Remember knows about that hot. Comb in having your hair done with the hot comb. 'cause i know i have my hair done my grandmother. She had her own shop and she used to straighten our hair. And i remember you know we all remember we all know what is like to sit next kitchen or wherever in sit there would that towel over our shoulders in scrunching up and getting burnt hopefully not cope fearing not to get burned. Hopefully we won't get burnt with that scorched of getting that piece of hair in our call been kitchen in the back beyond just our hair can be stray and i was young so as a kid running around. I'll i'm playing in my hair. What we call term back to its original state. What less than two weeks. If that long in eighteen forty five hot combs were invented by the french and remain available to miracle. I didn't know it was that far back. I don't know. I thought it was like the link. Eighteen hundreds early to the nineteen hundreds but a apparently it was in the eighteen. Forty five It was mana. Cj walker black woman who approved the designed by whining teeth because the original design was a fine tooth comb creative prostrate hair now put a pin on that now. I don't know anybody who watch The oh netflix. Movie self made which was based on madame cj walker. I'm being the first black millionaire. One man who created. I'm here products. Actually it was any malone who was actually Mmc cj walker mentor. She's the one who actually create was the first millionaire who created Hair care products the black or black women for the hair. I'm just saying you know. There was a big controversy about that. So i just of checking it was. Actually you know. Annie malone but madame. Cj walker is more Well no but you know we all knew about the hot comb and you know the amount of damage in in the headache that we would get by you know before we get that hot. Comb your hair you got it. You know. Get those kinks out. So you had to keep you know yanking taking the common yongin. Your hair does cohen. That you know all those kings through your hair nor the potomac omidyar you know. Our hair is fragile. It is king. you know looking back on it now. We're a little more savvy about you know being you know having hair care of our hair but back then you know. Our parents are moms and grandmothers. They would just yank are hair. And i come back. We have a headache and was even before you got your hair straightened. So so after the hot comb then came the popularity of the relax sir. How many of us remember above relaxed. Their people still doing today. I remember when i trans- Formed from transition from having my hair pressed in curled to get in a relaxed through my hair I thought i was the stuff you know. And you know having my hair put knows cadet hot chemical in here the creek that lie. That's exactly what it is. Lie l. y. E. putting it in your hair and sting there four minute. Wait until the start burn. Then you gotta quickly rented al new your here be straight.

less than two weeks Annie malone today forty first millionaire netflix eighteen forty five hot combs Eighteen hundreds cj walker One man four minute eighteen first black nineteen hundreds walker french Forty Cj walker five
"annie malone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They could have chosen to include me and to listen to my concerns. About things that I thought were implausible for inappropriate and they chose not to not to do that. In many, many instances. My guest, Celia Bundles, author of On her own ground, The Life and Times of Madam C. J. Walker. It's also interesting when you think about the process of getting something to screen. I understand that the Siri's was originally 10 episodes. And that it had shrunk down to four. How did that shaped the way? The Siri's told the story. Madam office. I think I think they had to leave a lot out. And you know, I think anybody that all of the people that I know who work in how he would tell me what the fact that it even got made is a minor miracle on I get that, and there were so many talented people who worked on this Octavia, I thought was great in the roll. Every time she came on the screen, I would just you know for me. It lit up. It made the book come alive, the people who did the costumes and who did the sets and who were really trying to make sure who was so proud to work on the series, so a lot of work went into it. But ultimately it was timing for actors, availability for directors, availability and linnet finally was done. It was only four episodes, so obviously a lot of things got left out. You touched on this earlier, but I want to dive a little deeper into it. One of the biggest changes was this idea of her business rival who was a really real life was named Andy Malone. And then she becomes what they describe a composite character with the name Adam alone. The two letters don't really make that big a difference, Quite frankly, and they were really pitted against each other. And yet you mentioned the character of Adam alone is very fair skinned, and they get into this whole color struck and colorism issue. What was the actual relationship between the two women in really life? And I'm alone and I'm alone and Addy Monroe let my people wouldn't know but back searches for almost 50 years. I knew that there were people who really know Anne Malone's history who were waiting with bated breath to see what was going to happen, so I knew this was going to be a problem. Despite the description of it being a composite character, But in really life, Madam Walker, who would Sarah Breedlove poor washerwoman brothers were barber. She began to learn something about here. Care from them, and then She worked for a while selling product for Andy Malone in ST Louis. There were other products already like it on the market. Cuter cure is one that had been around for decades before that was very similar, so it wasn't a new formula. But Annie Malone had a company. Sarah was her sales agent. She moved to Denver and after she moved to Denver, she'd marry CJ Walker, who knows something about advertising. That part was true. But they seem to have had a falling out. And ultimately, Sarah decided that she was going to sell her own product. Well, both women ultimately were very successful in their business hired, thousands of women were philanthropist. But they went their separate ways. And that's really the end of the story. There wasn't necessarily Yeah, that's him. Now. You know if I dig a little more deeply, there were differences in the way they ran their business. Madam Walker. I have to say, I think was a better marketer. She was a more charismatic person. She was really very canny about who she hired in her executive team. Her attorney heard the manager of her factory was a woman who'd been dean of girls in it. Girl school, her decision to move to New York her international activity, So I think you know if you would compare them side by side. There is a reason that Madam Walker was more well known when she died at the height of her fame. In 1919. But you know, but they were both very successful women. What are some other changes You'd like? The audience to know about when they watch this film. Well, yeah, I think that there's such an opportunity now to show this first generation of African Americans. After emancipation who were founding businesses and educational institutions in a time of great black cultural creativity and music and theater and dance. And that they were just like today's black lives matter. Political activists who were founding organizations. In response to a lynching. So I would have liked to have seen much more about Madam Marcus philanthropy about her activism and to center people around that, who were Part of her inner circle. Women empowering women. That's really her story. The women who reached out to her when she was still a washerwoman and going to ST Paul Ame Church and in the choir in ST Louis. And then the women, the thousands of women she empowered to create a generation of well My guess is Ophelia bundles. She's the author of On her Own Ground, The Life and Times of Madam C. J. Walker. So the film comes out and You start receiving some Interesting and it's a little bit disturbing criticism from people. What did people think? About your involvement once they saw the film, and how did you decide to handle that Incoming fire? You know what people assume It's my book on DH. Therefore this I must be fine with it. I got some attacks from Andy Malone folks, and I'm like, Well, you know, I really did a lot of the original scholarship on Andy Malone when I wrote on her own ground, so I had recognized her as A very significant businesswoman. And there were other people who were upset about the colorism. There were members of Booker T. Washington family who were upset about his betrayal. I know some of them. I shared their concern. My good friend Stanley Nelson and Jill Nelson, whose grandfather was F B Ransom. They're journalists and filmmakers. As many people know their grandfather, FB Ransom with Madam Walker's attorney, He was a much stronger character. In really life, and then the critics really went after it. For the same reasons the same concerns that I had expressed during the scripting process to women pitted against each other colorism that didn't really exist. Some stereotypes that were Perpetuated so but I really as I say in the undefeated article, I really did not want to Few things before the film came out, because I knew how hard people at work and I waited to see what happened. And in fact, it was, as you say, Number one, the number one on Netflix that first weekend But then people on black Twitter like YouTube. Started picking it apart and that they picked apart. The things that I knew would be would be problematic and after I had are right after I saw that other people were having their say on it. I felt more comfortable to come forward and say what I was really thinking. If you could do it over again. What would you do differently?.

Madam C. J. Walker Andy Malone colorism Siri Madam Marcus Annie Malone Sarah Anne Malone Celia Bundles ST Louis attorney Adam Netflix Addy Monroe Denver Twitter Girl school ST Paul Ame Church New York
"annie malone" Discussed on Fanm on Films

Fanm on Films

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on Fanm on Films

"Hollywood work. And I had been through three previous kind of really serious options in in the early eighties Alex. Haley came to us when he was still riding high from roots, and I, did a lot of research for him, and we collaborated and talk and had meetings about this. But Alex died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, without having done the mirror mini series or the book, but it was still a he was a mentor to me and kind of open some doors, and among the things that happened as a result of that friendship was meeting his editor from Roots Lisa drew, and Lisa acquired a book that ultimately became a on her own ground, the life and times of Madame. Cj Walker which is the inspiration for self made. Made and to hot to different times that book was option I by Columbia Tristar and CBS television, and then later by HBO, but both of those deals fell through which is pretty common in Hollywood. That something gets option. But the but the rights came back to me, and then ultimately in two thousand fifteen several people were calling me and I decided that I would go with mark's older. Whose company wonder. Street was You know mark really loved the. Love the research and I thought that I would be involved because that was the only reason I went with. That is big. Right I was going to I thought I was going to be involved, but ultimately I was not included in the conversations and I'm still discovering exactly what went wrong with the s things are s the. I am Oh, wow I am learning that mark mark and his wife Christine met with Octavia Spencer, which was very exciting for me, and she was on board, but then I was not included in the next part of the conversation when she insisted and rightly so that they're black women as director head writer, and that was important, but I was not part of that. Decision and then when I did meet. On the phone with the head writer, we had a conversation and she was telling me what she was doing and I was saying. We'll hear the things that I think are important and apparently when I didn't embrace her idea of having the central part of the story. Be the conflict between Madame Walker and Annie Malone. She intentionally left me out of the conversation. With Warner brothers and Netflix with the Nicole Jefferson Asher and Casey Lemons all all of a sudden I couldn't get any information, and so that was what? They were leaving me out of the conversation because they didn't want me to contradict. Saying. Wow. that. Is You know that must be I can't even imagine how that must feel given the fact that you have put so much of your life's work into telling. The accurate and authentic story of Madam Walker to see how it was realized in the end, and that you weren't as involved must have been pretty disappointing I'm I'm probably putting it mildly. Infuriating is. Not. I mean I watched it unfold and I wrote an essay for the undefeated and DOT com. So I laid out my thoughts, but I was reserve. Many people have told me I was polite, and in that article and I and I was, but I have more to say that.

Madame Walker mark Alex Hollywood Octavia Spencer Christine Annie Malone Haley Casey Lemons writer Lisa Columbia Tristar Warner brothers CBS television HBO Nicole Jefferson Asher editor Netflix director
"annie malone" Discussed on Fanm on Films

Fanm on Films

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on Fanm on Films

"Get a little bit of anxiety because he seems to have been typecast. So every time you see him up. You're like Oh my God. He's he's GonNa. Be a horrible husband. Horrible a spouse of some sort. Of Nice man I know and perseverance fantastic, but most of his roles. He's not a good person. So I, had a little bit of anxiety when I saw right onscreen for the numbers. But I also. I know. There's been a lot of talk about that, but there's also been a lot of talk about from that series. The relationship between Madame CJ Walker an anti Malone. And the emphasis on a rift that existed between the two of them, and did Madame CJ Walker us some of the formula of Blah. What are your thoughts on that? What's your perspective on all of this? I would just add also the issues of color ISM that come up cogs which are so rampant throughout their relationship. Yeah, you know that the color is in theme of course is a real thing to deal with, but. But not in this case that just really was not part of their relationship. These women wore rivals. Collar was not part of the issue, but I think that was something that Nicole Jefferson Asher. The head writer wanted to focus on I. think she has some real feelings about that. And so she projecting that onto Madam Walker when it really didn't exist and I think that made a lot of people dismiss some of the. The parts of Madame Walker's life. I mean I. can't say dismissed the series because there's just so much about the series, it's just not accurate, but the relationship between Madame Walker and the real life Animal Malone is this when Sarah breedlove moved to Saint Louis in eighteen eighty h, he was twenty years old, and her brothers had left out to Louisiana, a a decade, or so earlier, they were older than she, and they had been part of the Group of African Americans wanted the first real migrations from the south of when people were during Jim Crow era when they were being pushed out in her family minister, and her brothers were really chased out of the state by the Ku. Ku Klux Klan many pink or going on in Nebraska or Kansas, but her brothers stayed in Saint Louis, and they became barbers at a time when black men dominated the bartering trade, and so she learned something think initially about the hair care business from her brothers, so that was not a new thing for her, and then she became a sales agent for Annie Malone, and she sold Malone's products for I think somewhere between a year and a half to two years part time in Saint Louis, and then she moved to Denver and she was initially selling Malone's Perot products and training sales agents in different places, but she also was working for a pharmacist named Shultz. Who owned the largest? West of the Mississippi River and he showed her that they were other products that already existed like cure. There were some black on products. He wasn't necessarily song them, but this formula, which was essentially an appointment like vacillation that contain sulfur that healed scalp infections, which was really the problem at a time when people didn't have indoor plumbing. They didn't wash their hair, very. Very often, so people were going bald, so that was what she was addressing, and that's what Malone's product address, but also many other products that already existed, so she wasn't She was doing her own thing. She got some advice from her brothers. She soap Malone's products. She got some advice from the pharmacist on tweaking the formula, but it wasn't original to malone either. Now the I think the other thing that's important to note I don't know. And I don't think we'll ever know why. The two women fell out with each other because Sarah was selling her product you can see in. There's actually they're actually letters to the editor of the Black newspaper with some amount of walker's customers, saying you know she's our favorite. Getting. She's the person who grew our hair. Thing that will never know is was there a personal rift between the two of them? When with some personality issue was malone slow on getting the products to her I? You know we'll never know that I will say this because I've done a lot of research on Anti Malone, and and one of the things that you know that I've always said when I've written about her is that she was a very successful businesswoman. She was a philanthropist, but they had really different. They both may really different decisions about they surrounded themselves with so one of the things one of the things that Madam Walker did that I think was useful in why she's more remembered. Is that she really? was quite a skilled at creating a C. Suite. Her executive team with her attorney FBI ransom who's not portrayed well in the series, but really was key the woman who was the manager of her factory Alice Kelly. You should have been in series, but who was let people who really could enhancer and whom she empowered she had. A great marketing genius and she win. CJ started acting up. She you know got into the side Malone on the other hand. seems to have had a series of employees who sued her A. Prime employees of sued her in nineteen thirteen, because she had promised him a certain portion of her prophets, and she didn't pay him, and so he sued or in that suit lasted for twenty years. She married Aaron Malone. Who undermined her with her agents? And he was really he was really kind of a shyster, and then she went to a really horrible divorce then she didn't pay her taxes. F. B. Ransom made sure madam. Walker paid her taxes. So there are both women very successful. Both women trained lots. Lots of women, but the you know sometimes the decisions you make that are unrelated to business can be a detriment to your business right and the proof is right there in kind of her personality as well whatever may have happened between the two of them. She had a whole other set of issues, but that tells you a lot about who she is, and in any case right and interestingly I think the reason why some of this was portrayed in that way in the Netflix series is that it's always the salacious parts. Right. Are Put on display because they know people be interested in knowing that two women. Two black women at that did not get along, and they had this this rift between the two of them, but I would like to know. Absolutely absolutely it. Because what you're saying now is is so beautiful and so empowering to know that okay. This is Eddie Malone. What happened to her? This is why her businesses did not thrive as much as madame CJ jaywalkers dead. This is stuff that we need to know you know not that Oh. They had a beef because this one stole this one's formula and a story. You were credited on the series. What what was your role in? How involved were you in the project? So you know I thought I was going to be very info. No..

Madame CJ Walker Annie Malone malone Aaron Malone Eddie Malone madame CJ jaywalkers Ku Klux Klan Mississippi River Saint Louis Nicole Jefferson Asher Collar Netflix writer Sarah C. Suite F. B. Ransom Denver Alice Kelly FBI editor
"annie malone" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"Think that people don't really know just how amazing those black folks were in that first interaction out of slavery and rather than default two women fighting each other. I think he could show the amazing things that were going on. And I think that history people assume history is boring because they didn't like it in school but real dynamics and the drama. You know some of these all of these famous people. They didn't get along with each says it. Anyway it's how it is that's real but some of them did and they really lifted each other up and I would have loved the shown that sort of empowering women of our ring other so that's why there has to be me doing another version of so much more stored itself so why not and I've got to ask you again. I'm going to stop you again. You said it was option twice before this so the story so so our when Alice start in one ninety two I had met his editor. Lisa drew who had done roots and Lisa and I hit become friends of the result of ours and she's the one who signed my book on her own ground to scrivener so I began working on that book when it came out as I was finishing it at the end of two thousand the book was actually optioned by Columbia. Tristar for a CBS movie. And that back to me because it fell through. Which is what happens with a lot. A lot and then about five years later H. B. O. Obstinate and this was going along well but There were two writers and the more senior of the writers actually died and HBO wasn't willing to go forward. And so then the option came me again and then we had about a decade of Lack movies don't sell overseas so Hollywood interest and then right then sound twelve years in slave the Butler and Oscarssowhite happened Black Panther. But all those those things happen and then my phone state ringing again so that was in two thousand. So you need option now. We need the story of you getting past book. 'cause that's the movie in and of itself. We need the Iliad Bundles version. There's city there's definitely some drama. There's definitely drama behind drama. You mentioned Malone. There's some other things about the movie that why quite on the menu. You WanNa talk right. Sure so yeah. So the the most obvious thing. The thing that got the biggest firestorm was the adding monroe character. Who the writer the head writer and the show runners decided was a composite character who was adding Monroe because they said and they've said in interviews that they wanted to lean into cholera them. So even though in real life Madame Walker and Annie Malone were rivals and competitors both were in fact as you know very successful businesswoman and philanthropist who you know we're equals in that sense and not there constantly had nothing to do with skin color at Annie Malone in real life certainly did not follow Mount Walker to to Indianapolis they were both doing their own things with an empowering women so upset a lot of people and I and I and that because I did not think that was the Waco overthrow go there you go but that part of the way things work in Hollywood like anyway but I am. I'm really I think there's so many amazing stories now so much. That's being option about these historical figures who the most of the world doesn't know about those of us who read his three. And you know do that kind of research we're fascinated by and we know they're fascinating stories with the rest of the world is like who are these people but the really pave the way for us and I think as these stories are being option. I'm really trying with my friends. Who are in Hollywood who are receptive and my friends who are historians and journalists to really try to create a dialogue that changes the dynamic of you. Write the book and we want to go away. We really don't want to hear you because you're interfering with our creative license and I don't think it has to be that way I mean. Obviously they're different mediums. But there's a what is it that people who write history and who have all those facts that can never end up in a movie. What is it that we need to understand about translating it to the screen? And what is it that the to do the translation could learn from why it matters? If you totally changed the history you know. Yes you could do Kakaza characters but if you totally changing history it's like saying the confederates won. The civil war last came when folks? We're going to do that and movie. This reminds me a lot of the back and forth around hidden figures. And how the white male character kind of turned out to be a savior of sorts but even the whole episode the whole scene around the the woman I think it was Katherine Johnson. Going to the bathroom right or wrong. That was and how that little nuance pretty much changed. The whole storyline which is kind of made a false and not and not true. And you and I get that there are. There are some things in order to make something dramatic for Hollywood. There's some things that are going to be changed so you just kind of go okay. I you know for the greater good but there are things that that were for me troublesome in the movie I mean aside from the Annie Malone thing that was the thing that most people reacted sure. Other things for me Now I will say I love the whigs. I love the I love seeing really prosperous black folks because most people don't know that there were prosperous black in a century. I you know I like to see that. There's sacrifice that goes along with building a business and you and so a lot of people related to that and they were inspired by that but here a couple of things. The character sweetness and I know people love Bill Bellamy but that's not a real character and EFI ransom Madame Walker's attorney was known for being a straight Arrow. His daughter said he took an oath as a teenager to never drink smoke or gamble and so Sofer which which allowed Walker to be on the road into visitor. And you know when you're trying to run a business you gotTa have somebody you can trust so he was totally trustworthy but to have them betting on the numbers and then to and then to have some illegal money implying that illegal money was necessary for the company to get started for me. That was problematic breaking his character. I mean literally his character. That's right literally his character and then one of the other things. That was problematic for me. Well the character was problematic adequate for me because I didn't have a girlfriend named Esther and conflict which was over two boyfriends so there's death but the other piece was the John D. Rockefeller scene and so people have said. Oh did Mana Walker. You know. Visit John Rockefeller. I didn't really live next door to each other about five miles away but I can get that if they had actually known each other but there were so many black people who she consulted you know. They're the publisher of the blackest papers. The leaders of black organizations those are the people whose values were aligned with hers so it was unnecessary to imply that John D. Rockefeller you know who wouldn't have had her over with someone influence she could. Those things back goes way because most people are not going to get in the weeds and not think about those things but I do think that kind of thing matters ultimately. You're the biographer. That is just holding the flame. No matter what you've done so this long stop but I what. I want people to be entertained. I wanted success but movie like anybody but I do I. Maybe I just feel like this for the ancestors that their story is untold and and we need to know and young people you know. Young people can go whatever we don't know our history and our history has intentionally been raised at margin. Awad so it's an opportunity to lift those ancestors up even with their flaws. I don't mind them having laws they had flaws but to really tell what were their struggles so you have done what briars dream of first of all there are plenty of writers industry me having a successful first of all then to take it through the idea of having an option two or three times and then finally having it land and then. It's a Netflix events right. I mean there wasn't too many people on social media that were not talking up saying I've got to watch. It was a really good premier. I would say advice or tips tips. Might you have for writers who are trying to cross that magical cast from book to movie but it is a minor miracle the idea all of these people who worked so hard on this Octavia Spencer was great. I love having Blair underwood is not a walk as bad as tables love edge. I mean real wonderful. I mean if you didn't have anybody actually exactly but it's also true that during the summer when they were filming he caught me to get more information about CJ Walker. The character play. So I really admired him for doing his homework and really putting that kind of care into Kevin Carroll who played FBI. Ransom was incredible. He such a great actor and then be the behind the scenes people that make up people to costume people. The Director of cinematography the production manager to we're both black women so there's a lot of riding on something like this in order to get to this point so I have great admiration and love for the folks who work so hard but advise people so what. I just put one foot in front of the other. I mean that literally I just I I never. I couldn't have told you that this absolutely what happened. I just knew that every time something fell through that I said okay. Well I'm just GONNA keep working. I didn't even think about it as a defeat. I just thought well. It just didn't work out that time but I'm still GonNa do what I'm doing to tell the story. I'm making my speeches. I'm doing my website. I'm getting ready for the next.

Hollywood Madame Walker Annie Malone writer John D. Rockefeller Lisa Mount Walker Monroe Alice Mana Walker Katherine Johnson Columbia Tristar editor cholera HBO Bill Bellamy H. B. O. Obstinate Blair underwood
"annie malone" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

11:33 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"So. Let's talk about how on your own. Brown the book you and I worked to get publicity around. How many years ago? Two Thousand and three thousand four something like that has now been brecon. Rename rebound. I believe because there's a new cover to reflect the new Netflix. Show self me right so my book is that we worked on Long long ago on her own ground the life and times madame. Cj Walker originally came out in early two thousand one and then the paperback came out in two thousand and two and now that there is a Netflix series. Star in the Amazing Octavia Spencer. We called staff made. Yes we love her she was great the publisher my publisher has put together two additions. One is a movie tie in edition without Spencer on the cover name South made and the other has an ill cover the original title on her own ground so it is essentially the same book as the original thousand one but I've written a new epilogue and I made a few corrections. You know in a two hundred ninety three page book there are few stakes that you make the first time around so I hope as a journalist I have made a couple of corrections more research. Because I'm writing. I'm almost finished with a biography on Walker's daughter L. E. Walker. It will be out next year away from here so yeah. I stuck in a few little things about her that I did that. Were in the first edition and this would be your grandmother. My great grandmother. Great Greg Greg Kevin Matt Jay Walk or Great-great-grandfather Lily Walker my great grandmother and then a Lilia Walker actually adopted my grandmother. My grandmother who was may so may appears at the end of the Netflix series. She goes to Spelman and she becomes president of the company. And then my mother Leilia and then me well okay. That's how I got it a little crosstalk. I knew there was more than three ali-aliens. We'll throw you ILYA number three. You says more research. What did you uncover that? You didn't know already so a story with a Walker. Even when I was writing on her own ground I was trying to establish the relationship between mother and daughter and my last chapter this sort of end of the book called the after Ward I wrote about tried to put her whole life in the twenties into about ten pages because I knew I was going to write another book and I didn't WanNA get secrets away. But one of the things. I discovered is that the way she's been written about in the past essentially as Madame Walker made the money her daughter Leila spent the money she had a lot of parties the end and I have to say nobody is that pathetic was very well educated and they were like that would just be you know but it was a kind of shorthand that people even some scholars work. I really respect in writing about the Harlem Renaissance. I guess that was just kind of a neat package to do a cliche often. It's because you're lazy so I think I like banning original Click Bait and not for the Internet. That's right exactly but what I discovered about her. She truly was a patron of the arts. And she hosted the first show or against the savage. The famous blacks gawkers. She was very close friends with a lot of the musicians and actors of that period. Because that we know Langston Hughes County Collins Orono Hurston. Even those are lied about her age. But by and large the writers were found a decade and a half younger than a Leilia Walker so her contemporaries were the actors and musicians. Who Really. We're kind of that first. Wave of talent for the Harlem Renaissance. So those people were adver parties performing in her parties and doing concerts on her homes. So those kinds of things were interesting to me to really place her as a as a patron of the arts and not just say some people say oh you know. She didn't even read books. But I haven't library so with her first editions of scientists but just put her in a box and then the other thing. That was so fascinating to me is. She really wasn't international travel. She loved Havana and in one thousand. Nine hundred twenty one and twenty two. She went to Paris London. Monte Carlo Rome for the coordination of the Pope Palestine high row and then Addis Ababa to to meet the empress of Ethiopia so she was saying that she was and she went first class on the on the S S era. The only black who is in first class so you know she is a really interesting story. Now she not. Her mother is absolutely true. She's not as driven a businesswoman. As her mother. She still is quite interesting all on her own. I can't wait to read it now. We gotta get back to Madame. Cj Walker and self made first of all. Tell me about many experienced. What was it like taking your book working with the lights of Lebron James and his team and then and TV Spencer and bringing this story to Hollywood. What was that like? So I know people think that because Lebron James's name is listed as an executive producer that I know but I've never met him never talked to him so I hear splitting paypal dot. Bff that that sort of added to the You know made it interesting to people that are gave some cachet but my book had been option the couple of times before and this is kind of a very typical. Hollywood story in the early eighties. Alex faily wanted to do a mini series about Madam office so I did a ton of research for him that he died at two without having written with that was in some ways. Okay because it was like I got a great mentor and some doors stop. You know what that is like black history. I like take that in four minute. I wonder what his take would have been like. You know it was. I think some of it is generational. This is what I love about doing interviews with you is that you have. You always say now. Wait a minute Minnesota journalist so I actually. I have the treatment that Alex did for the original idea and we so far as to you know he had this beautiful farm in Tennessee. That Marion Wright Edelman Children's Defense Fund now owns and they use it as a retreat. But we went to his farm with A couple of the Hollywood producers and directors who had been part of fruits and Reuben Cannon who had done the casting who now I think works with Tyler Perry and a couple of historians who I invited to come and we talked about how we would develop a story and you know he saw when it was interesting. He saw composite character. Which is something that I would have done for this series that that the writer in really having her vision but to have composite character who was a good friend and a mentor to Madame Walker when she was still a Washer woman and the Church women at Saint Paul Ame Church at St Louis. The people who gave her that vision that she could be something more than an illiterate washerwoman and the person he saw in that role at the time with my Angela. Oh this is so. This is no different people's ferry he was close to Quincy. Jones and Oprah. Winfrey was part of that mix because they had just done Color Purple and he and he and of course an Oprah Winfrey Maya Angelou. We're good friends so that was part of the mix of people who would have been involved but of course now you know thirty years has gone by since then so some of those. Some of those things are older but that was the idea and it was there was more there was a love story with. Cj Walker that he was developing and you know so that was interesting piece and more of her politics and more of her philanthropy which I loved to have seen so we so we get a but Alex. I did all this research for hours. I said nine months off from my job as a producer to be moved to New York for a few months and there were still some of the elders who were living. I went to twelve different cities that these people people work with the company so it was really a very special moment and some people may remember Stanley now since film two dollars and a dream like his very first documentary. You know people know his vials Davis and Hugh Jackman Stanley's a macarthur fellow but his very first documentary with two dollars and a dream about Madam Walker impart because his grandfather was F. B. Ransom Madame. Walker's attorney so same elders for his film and you can see it now on Youtube. He put it up on new to a few weeks ago. And there are the more than four hundred thousand views so this is. Kgo People Participate. This and I know friends but he has since become my friend. I'm no other conversation that I've had on. This show has fascinated so much except for drummer. Please Dr Henry Louis Gates Junior. To what you're sharing with me has a lot to do with ancestry. And that's what we talked about of course but these black history figures that are interacting like in real time in these stories just blowing my mind and these are the types of stories that that skit shares. You know right well. Listen listen this is so much. The story I really want to Redo Spencer was great in an in south main. I think for me. She really embodied the spirit and the courage and the Walker but the story lines were really different than what I would have imagined. It SORTA got stuck on that. Annie Malone Addy Monroe imaginary relationship. That really didn't happen and very little about people like item. Well who Madame Walker new and the way that Booker T. Washington was portrayed and a little bit of wkbd boys. I would have developed those relationships a lot more and a lot more with the philanthropy. Because.

Leilia Walker Octavia Spencer L. E. Walker Madame Walker Netflix Alex faily Lilia Walker Harlem Renaissance Hollywood Lily Walker Madam Walker Lebron James writer Brown publisher Langston Hughes County Collins Greg Greg Kevin Matt Jay Walk Marion Wright Edelman Annie Malone Addy Monroe
"annie malone" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on WJR 760

"Carol Kowalczyk you have arrived at the broadcast tonight with a couple of very interesting books Mohun time all about women so you're all about women and this broadcast we are honoring African American women and some pretty amazing moment so let's talk first about the first person you have come up with you've done some research and let's talk about this first person so I'm highlighted for amazing African American women and we all know you know the popular strong women in the African American community that made our history like Harriet Tubman Rosa Parks Oprah but I these women are people you might not have known anything about and I got my resources some two very cool books one is bad girls throughout history a hundred remarkable women who change the world and being a scientist myself women in science fifty fearless pioneers who change the world so the first books right in Cheyenne the second book by Rachel ignore top ski and the first woman I'd want to highlight is our first female self made millionaire happens to be an African American delight based on what I read about her madam CJ Walker in tell me a little bit more about her how did she make her money so she was the first child in her family born into freedom so she was born in eighteen sixty seven died in nineteen nineteen she overcame being orphaned in widowed before the age of twenty to become America's first female self made millionaire and how she did this is as a single mom she worked for a dollar fifty a day is a laundress and a cook so she could send her daughter's school lacking access to regular bathing facility she started losing a lot of hair so she went to find someone who could help her with her hair loss and at the nineteen oh four St Louis world's fair she met a woman Annie Malone who was selling cosmetic products for African Americans and they touted as the great wonderful hair grower so madam Walker quickly became a clients of of Annie Malone and the two got together and they developed this business of hair products really here are hot and the Walker system of here products ranged from a bunch of different things and within five years she expanded her company to include over three thousand sales agents and she had training pamphlets talked autumn refined skills and she became the first large employer of African American women and also was a generous philanthropist that too great stories cool that's very cool I mean from single mom what do I do they're finding someone and taking it to the next level in that story could have gone one of two ways right she could have gotten totally depressed and said forget it this is terrible and instead look which she did mmhm she wasn't going to get better good good good good strong woman so so then I have another one being in science are there are three that I'd like to feature that really made a difference in the community so the first is Jane cook right she's an ecologist so you want to know what she did and colleges so something with cancer right pass that I have no idea so this is in a remarkable woman she was born in nineteen nineteen and her great grandfather was the first African American to graduate from Yale her dad founded Harlem's hospitals cancer research foundation so she became the head of the cancer research in Harlem at age of thirty three miles and she developed new techniques of chemo administration so bag and then they would just inject people and and figure out how it went so she realized that instead of testing chemo drugs and the patient directly she tested only samples of their cancer tissue and this allowed her to quickly create the most effective treatment and she understood that individual people in different types of cancer all needed different therapies she later went on to develop new techniques about chemotherapy administration she became the original cofounder of the American society of clinical oncology and she was the first woman president of the New York cancer society isn't that incredible so she took the role and she took it where her grandfather and father let the journey and and rocked and rolled in you know back then that could not have been easy for her you know here's a woman and she's got this new idea and there are other people that are already very set in their ways so this is impressive and you know the nice thing is that she had her you know great role models and her grandfather and her mother who led the way but you know what her father passed away she could of you know the the and and include us to the hospital administration to write because they could have said you your dad passed away we're gonna find whoever to take over the the research arena by state they had her do it and it's such a young age to it thirty three and she just took all that energy and now we've got a lot of probably chemo therapy you know ideas or advances maybe from what she you know started she must've been brilliant no gun sounds like she was unbelievable massing unbelieving mazing now on to ophthalmology but we also have a young lady her name was Patricia bath and she was an ophthalmologist and an inventor so again new York's a pretty was a probably a pretty innovative place back then because she was born in nineteen forty two in Harlem and she got her medical degree in hot from Howard fellowship in Colombia and she went on to become the professor professor at UCLA in nineteen eighty six so she did in her research she noticed that African Americans were more prone to certain vision problems like glaucoma we were living in poor communities and couldn't afford regular eye care so these are relatively minor eye problems turned to blind as so what she did she went on to start the first community out reach volunteer based I program and she went and did went to parts of her home town in Harlem and she convinced people to get treatment she treated them and also convinced a fellow surgeon to operate on patients for free and she was the first one to go out to the community to say no I have the technology to have the knowledge I want to help you and she went on to co found the American institute for the prevention of blindness talk about somebody who made a difference in people's lives that's incredible this is amazing that something so you you get your eyes checked all the time and they they pick it up and but if this is just an important reminder that there are so many out there that are at the do not have the access to healthcare and and how important it is that you tell you but you know being a traitor I'm so proud of you know I I am I'm part of Wayne state medical school and and on the interviewing committee and and I gotta tell you one thing about when statement school that their look doing a lot of is they're doing a lot of these out reach programs so student based clinics and they go out to to the community I remember when I was in college slash medical school Dr check cost yeah on the cast clinic was there and it was just such such a rewarding experience because people who couldn't afford were so kind and so wonderful and so appreciative and and that's just one of many clinics that are that are out there for free in around this town that's happening everywhere and all of the different homeless shelters now a lot of the homeless people are getting good medical care because there are people like you and other doctors and nurses who are volunteering their time to help people who really do not have access to medical care and the medical students to I mean that is one thing in in stock just in the Detroit area but a lot of the medical schools in Michigan state and central they all have programs where where the students with attending overseeing them are going out to the communities because so it's so it's so heartwarming to know that the doctors who are training future doctors get it and and and so this woman Patricia bath was probably one of the in the forefront or one of the leaders in doing that the other thing cool about her she's an adventure so she was you know she she got up the ranks and she became a full professor at UCLA and she kind of got tie aired of the of the the the university setting so she went to Europe to do research and in nineteen eighty six she finished her invention the laser bagel probe there was a device that to remove cataracts which was a major breakthrough that help restore sight around the world so she invented this new technology to so it's just amazing amazing unlearned people incredible and what they do if they really have the will and the drive really good story now finally my favorite favorite story and in honor of of of black history month is and I was honored to have a real good to fill it not affiliation but knew her out home grown Dr Alexa canidae she is was always the most sweet hard working just normal person shoes driven she was tough in the hour from what I heard she has to be yeah yeah I for for her responsibilities but she is home grown in our home pride she is a neurosurgeon she was born in Lansing in nineteen fifty two a dentist father and a mother who worked in education and her parents taught doctor Kennedy about hard work and she can do whatever she would like to do and so her interest was trying to go into neurosurgery and she was at the time discouraged because it was too tall if it was too long and she refused to give up so she eventually accepted intern position at Yale new haven hospital she went there after graduating cool laddie from medical school in nineteen seventy five and I believe she attended the university of Michigan and then went on to do a fellowship in neurosurgery at the university of Minnesota so she became the first female African American neurosurgery resident in the United States and she became the country's first female African American neurosurgeon yeah I love it isn't that awesome yes and she went on and she you know did pediatric neurosurgery at children's in Philadelphia and then came back home to take care of her Detroiters so she start out Hanson bordered better story yes and then she moved on to the children's hospital of Michigan and she served as the chief of neurosurgery at children's in nineteen eighty seven to two thousand and one and I just got to tell you just so proud of her and she just you know when she would walk around two around the hospital she was tough but boy what what a wonderful wonderful woman and when we were in medical school she was a god he looked up told she was god because she was this a powerful women who knew what was going on and she canceled her division amazing in in inventing one had an issue she'd be there for those kids and she was so devoted to her practice has been affection was inducted into the Michigan women's hall of fame in nineteen eighty nine and received the American medical women's association president's award in nineteen ninety three so rumor has it now though she's retired in Florida she so well deserves my job right now is not a great home grown yes story of out of examines Markel they're all that great stories that you brought us today really impressive women women we can be so proud of and they they really you know we're passionate about what they believed in and they didn't give up and we wouldn't know about them if you didn't do a little bit of research and bring them to well I thought it was important to do yes wonderful idea doctor Carol Kowalczyk what are you doing for Valentine's day what are the plans you know what I haven't even thought about it life is like crazy I know you know I'm thinking of doing everyone's got work in my probably just going to you know make dinner how you say I love the work maybe you would give me an idea well I'm gonna happen I answer to give you ideas so we would have seen during ideas so I was looking for things to do that it's not the typical flowers and and candy and so are the Huffington post put out to the ten unique Valentine's ideas that are way better than going out to dinner so I was going to be a few do it a fitness class together so everyone focuses on Valentine's being eating but they thought if you want go ahead into the gym class together or something.

Carol Kowalczyk
"annie malone" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

13:09 min | 1 year ago

"annie malone" Discussed on WJR 760

"Carol Kowalczyk you have arrived at the broadcast tonight with a couple of very interesting books mmhm I'm all about women so you're all about women and this broadcast we are honoring African American women and some pretty amazing women so let's talk first about the first person you have come up with you've done some research and let's talk about this first person so I'm highlighted for amazing African American women and we all know you know the popular strong women in the African American community that made our history like carrot top men Rosa Parks Oprah but I these women are people you might not have known anything about and I got my resources some two very cool books one is bad girls throughout history a hundred remarkable women who change the world and being a scientist myself women in science fifty fearless pioneers who change the world so the first books by and Cheyenne the second book by Rachel a new top ski and the first woman I'd want to highlight is our first female self made millionaire happens to be an African American delight based on what I read about her madam CJ Walker and tell me a little bit more about her how did she make her money so she was the first child in her family born into freedom so she was born in eighteen sixty seven died in nineteen nineteen she overcame being orphaned in widowed before the age of twenty to become America's first female self made millionaire and how she did this is as a single mom she worked for a dollar fifty a day is a laundress and a cook so she could send her daughter's school lacking access to regular bathing facility she started losing a lot of hair so she went to find someone who could help her with her hair loss and at the nineteen oh four St Louis world's fair she met a woman Annie Malone who was selling cosmetic products for African Americans and they touted as the great wonderful hair grower so madam Walker quickly became a clients of of Annie Malone and the two got together and they developed this business of hair products really here and the Walker system of here products ranged from a bunch of different things and within five years she expanded her company to include over three thousand sales agents and she had training pamphlets talked ultima refined skills and she became the first large employer of African American women and also was a generous philanthropist that's a great story is that cool that's very cool I mean from single mom what do I do they're finding someone and taking it to the next level in that story could have gone one of two ways right she could have gotten totally depressed and said forget it this is terrible and instead look which she did mmhm she wasn't going to get better good good good good strong woman so so then I have another one being in science are there are three that I'd like to feature that really made a difference in the community so the first is Jane cook right she's an ecologist so you want to know what she did and colleges so something with cancer right pass that I have no idea so this is in a remarkable woman she was born in nineteen nineteen and her great grandfather was the first African American to graduate from Yale her dad founded Harlem's hospitals cancer research foundation so she became the head of the cancer research in Harlem at the age of thirty three miles and she developed new techniques of chemo administration so bag and then they would just inject people and and figure out how it went so she realized that instead of testing chemo drugs and the patient directly she tested only samples of their cancer tissue and this allowed her to quickly create the most effective treatment and she understood that individual people in different types of cancer only to different therapies issue later went on to develop new techniques about chemotherapy administration she became the original cofounder of the American society of clinical oncology and she was the first woman president of the New York cancer society isn't that incredible so she took the role and she took it where her grandfather and father let the journey and and rock and roll and you know back then that could not have been easy for her you know here's a woman and she's got this new idea and there are other people that are already very set in their ways so this is impressive and you know the nice thing is that she had her you know great role models and her grandfather and her shot other who led the way but you know what her father passed away she could of you know the the and and include us to the hospital administration to write because they could have said you your dad passed away we're gonna find whoever to take over the the research arena by state they had her do it and it's such a young age to it thirty three and she just took all that energy and now we've got a lot of probably chemo therapy you know ideas or advances maybe from what she you know started she must've been brilliant no god sounds like she was unbelievable massing unbelieving mazing now on to up the mileage G. but we also have a young lady her name was Patricia bath and she was an ophthalmologist and an inventor so again new York's a pretty was a probably a pretty innovative place back then because she was born in nineteen forty two in Harlem and she got her medical degree in hot from Howard fellowship in Colombia and she went on to become the professor professor at UCLA in nineteen eighty six so she did in her research she noticed that African Americans were more prone to certain vision problems like glaucoma of the people were living in poor communities and couldn't afford regular eye care so these are relatively minor eye problems turned to blind as so what she did she went on to start the first community out reach volunteer based I program and she went and did went to parts of her home town in Harlem and she convinced people to get treatment she treated them and also convinced a fellow surgeon to operate on patients for free and she was the first one to go out to the community to say no I have the technology I have the knowledge I want to help you and she went on to co found the American institute for the prevention of blindness talk about somebody who made a difference in people's lives that's incredible it's just amazing that something so you you get your eyes checked all the time and they they pick it up and but if this is just an important reminder that there are so many out there that are at the do not have the access to healthcare and and how important it is that you tell you but you know being a traitor I'm so proud of you know I I am I'm part of Wayne state medical school and and on the interviewing committee and and I gotta tell you one thing about when state med school that their look doing a lot of is they're doing a lot of these out reach programs so student based clinics and they go out to to the community I remember when I was in college slash medical school Dr check hacia on the cast clinic was there and it was just such such a rewarding experience because people who couldn't afford was so kind and so wonderful and so appreciative and and that's just one of many clinics that are that are out there for free in around this town dance happening everywhere and all of the different homeless shelters now a lot of the homeless people are getting good medical care because there are people like you and other doctors and nurses who are volunteering their time to help people who really do not have access to medical care and the medical students to I mean that is one thing in in stock just in the Detroit area but a lot of the medical schools in Michigan state and central they all have programs where where the students with attending overseeing them are going out to the communities because so it's so it's so heartwarming to know that the doctors who are training future doctors and get it and and and so this woman Patricia bath was probably one of the in the forefront or one of the leaders in doing that the other thing cool about her she's an adventure so she was you know she she got up the ranks and she became a full professor at UCLA and she kind of got tie tired of the of the the the university setting so she went to Europe to do research and in nineteen eighty six she finished her invention the laser bagel probe there was a device that to remove cataracts which was a major breakthrough that help restore sight around the world so she invented this new technology to so it's just amazing amazing unlearned people incredible and what they do if they really have the will and the drive really good story now finally my favorite favorite story and in honor of of black history month is and I was honored to have a real good to fill it not affiliation but knew her out home grown Dr Alexa canidae she is was always the most sweet hard working just normal person shoes driven she was tough in the hour from what I heard she has to be yeah yeah I for for her responsibilities but she is home grown in our home pride she is a neurosurgeon she was born in Lansing in nineteen fifty two a dentist father and mother who worked in education and her parents taught doctor Kennedy about hard work and she can do whatever she would like to do and so her interest was trying to go into neurosurgery and she was at the time discouraged because it was too tall if it was too long and she refused to give up so she eventually accepted intern position at Yale new haven hospital she went there after graduating cool laddie from medical school in nineteen seventy five and I believe she attended the university of Michigan and then went on to do a fellowship in neurosurgery at the university of Minnesota so she became the first female African American neurosurgery resident in the United States and she became the country's first female African American neurosurgeon guy I love it isn't that awesome yes and she went on and she you know did pediatric neurosurgery at children's in Philadelphia and then came back home to take care of her Detroiters so she start out Hanson bordered better story yes and then she moved on to the children's hospital of Michigan and she served as the chief of neurosurgery at children's in nineteen eighty seven to two thousand and one and I just got to tell you just so proud of her and she just you know when she would walk around two around the hospital she was tough but boy what what a wonderful wonderful woman and when we were in medical school she was a god he looked up at all okay she was a god because she was this a powerful women who knew what was going on and she canceled her division amazing in in inventing one had an issue she'd be there for those kids and she was so devoted to her practice has been affection was inducted into the Michigan women's hall of fame in nineteen eighty nine and received the American medical women's association president's award in nineteen ninety three so rumor has it now though she's retired in Florida she so well deserves my job right now is not a great home grown yes story about it examines Markel they're all that great stories that you brought us today really impressive women women we can be so proud of and they they really you know we're passionate about what they believed in and they didn't give up and we wouldn't know about them if you didn't do a little bit of research and bring them to well I thought it was important to do yes wonderful idea doctor Carol Kowalczyk what are you doing for Valentine's day what are the plans do you know what I haven't even thought about it life is like crazy I know you know I'm thinking of doing everyone's got work in my probably just going to you know make dinner how you say I love the work maybe you would give me an idea well I'm gonna happen I am going to give you ideas so we would have seen pouring ideas so I was looking for things to do that it's not the typical flowers and and candy and so are the Huffington post put out to the ten unique Valentine's ideas that are way better than going out to dinner so I was going to be a few do it a fitness class together so everyone focuses on Valentine's being eating but they thought if you want go ahead into the gym class together or.

Carol Kowalczyk
"annie malone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"annie malone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Household of entrepreneurs affected the way that you view, black businesses, and maybe your motivation for making this documentary. Well, you talk a little bit about my mother. My father was a dentist who always worked for himself. So that's kind of what I saw growing up was was African American man going to work every day, and and kind of dictating his own hours and working really hard. But, but, you know, having control over his life in that way. So I guess that was kind of as you say in my DNA, and my blood. That's that's how I grew up. That's what I grew up seeing control of one's life is a big theme. And control of one's economics is a big thing that comes up in your documentary as well. Whether other aspects about the black entrepreneurial spirit that resonated with you that made you want to document this history. More thoroughly. Well, I think my first job in the film industry with was with filmmaker William Greaves who was an. Pendant filmmaker one of the first independent African American documentary makers, and I saw him hustling for for for film contracts and boat, but working for himself working very hard, but working for himself. And I think that's all I was also influenced me define what we mean by black business beyond just a business that is owned by a black person in terms of the scope of your documentary. What exactly are we looking at? Well, I think we're looking at two things historically sell for the vast majority of African Americans history since the time of enslavement having your own business really meant selling to your own community. So it it usually meant a small business, but it was a business that was directed at African Americans. You know, you had a store yet a fish market. You might have a small cab company had a hair care and beauty salon. And then it kind of took off and got bigger. So we talk about we do talk about Madam Walker and Annie Malone who had Poro products. The black banks black insurance companies, but these are also businesses that were really aimed at African Americans and African American business. What we see in in? The seventies is kind of a change where African Americans are getting into mainstream businesses are working for big companies. We talk about burns who started out at Xerox as an intern and rises through the ranks Xerox to become a CEO of Xerox and others who are working Ken Frazier. Who's the president of Merck and things like that? That's one of the other aspects of the documentary before we dive in a little further, and here's some clips from the documentary that really stands out is it's not just a story about the struggles that black business people have been through and have those have been plenty. But also about some of these luminaries who a lot of people may not even know really exist that are doing big things in business. Yeah. I mean, one of the things that we tried to do is also talked to people who are in business today. You know, who are doing great things we end the film with a profile of Robert Smith who who has company vista partners is at this moment. I think the richest African American in the country. He has over four billion dollars of personal wealth. We're speaking to Stanley Nelson director of the new documentary, boss. His other works include freedom riders wounded, knee, the murder of Emmett till and miles Davis. The birth of cool one of the other themes in boss Stanley that comes out a great deal is the value of accumulation of wealth, specifically for African Americans as we know for hundreds and hundreds of years, it's been incredibly difficult both because of cultural racism and also legal discrimination legal exclusion to not only accumulate wealth. But also to pass that on to the next generation. And that's another big theme in the documentary. Right. Yeah. I think that that over and over again, we see black business kind of being knocked down are pushed down by discrimination and racism in this country. And there's a few examples of that one. Is Tulsa Oklahoma where African Americans formed what they called the black Wall Street, which was hugely using successful. You know, it kind of rivals the scale of anything we have today. But it was destroyed pretty much in one day of of rioting by white Townfolk, basically because they were jealous of the the business success of black Wall Street. Let me play a clip from boss. This is from Cathy Hughes who was a radio executive multimedia executive who started in radio, and there's a mantra that shows up again and again in the documentary here is that clip of Cathy Hughes from the documentary, boss. You do.

Cathy Hughes Xerox Robert Smith William Greaves white Townfolk Stanley Nelson Tulsa CEO of Xerox Oklahoma Merck Ken Frazier Madam Walker Annie Malone executive president murder vista partners intern
"annie malone" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:14 min | 2 years ago

"annie malone" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Joshua Johnson. In Washington a redacted version of the report from special counsel. Robert Muller is out detailing Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election and the potential of obstruction of Justice, the four hundred forty eight page report was published moments ago on the department of Justice's website with various forms of sensitive information, blacked out in a news conference this morning, attorney general William bar said that another version of the report with fewer reductions will be made available to a bipartisan group of congressional committee. Leaders will end allies the report and answer your questions tomorrow on the Friday news roundup. You should also keep an ear on your NPR member station today for the latest and keep track online at NPR dot org. Stanley Nelson has black business excellence in his blood. His mother was the last president of the Madame CJ Walker manufacturing company that company produced hair care products and cosmetics for black women. He's also got his own entrepreneurial side specifically getting nearly two dozen documentaries made over the last three decades. His first documentary was about the business. His mother worked for it was called two dollars and a dream the story of Madame CJ. Walker Nelson has won three EMMY awards MacArthur genius grant and received the national humanities medal back in two thousand thirteen his latest documentary returns to his roots. It's called boss. The black experience in business it premieres next week on PBS, and he joins us now from NPR New York to discuss it Stanley Nelson. Welcome to one A. Thank you so much. It's great to be here. We also welcome your questions and thoughts for Stanley Nelson and your experiences of being a black business owner or working in minority owned businesses. Some of the challenges some of the opportunities that you found or if there are any historical black business leaders that you look up to as role models. Email us one a at W A M U dot org. Comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one A Stanley told me a little bit more about your parents. I wonder if being raised in a household of entrepreneurs affected the way that you view, black businesses, and maybe your motivation for making this documentary. Well, you talked a little bit about my mother. My father was a dentist who always worked for himself. So that's kind of what I saw growing up was was a African American man going to work every day, and you know, and and kind of dictating his own hours and working really hard. But, but you know, having control over his life. Life in that way. So I guess that was kind of as you say in my DNA, and my blood. That's that's how I grew up. That's what I grew up c control of one's life is a big theme and control ones economics is a big fem- that comes up in your documentary as well. Were there other aspects about the black entrepreneurial spirit that resonated with you that made you want to document this history. More thoroughly, well, I think my first job in the film industry with was with filmmaker William Greaves who was an independent filmmaker one of the first independent African American documentary makers, and I saw him, you know, hustling for for for film contracts and boat, but working for himself working very hard, but working for himself. And I think that's off was also influenced me define what we mean. By a black business beyond just a business that is owned by a black person in terms of the scope of your documentary. What exactly are we looking at? Well, I think we're looking at two things historically, so for the vast majority of of African Americans history since the time of enslavement having your own business, really meant, you know, selling to your own community. So it it usually meant a small business, but it was a business that was directed at African Americans. You know, you had a store yet a fish market. You might have a small cab company yet a hair care, you had a beauty salon, and then it kind of took off and got bigger. So we talk about we do talk about Madam Walker and Annie Malone who had Perot products. The black banks black insurance companies, but these are also businesses that were really aimed at African Americans and African American business with what we see in in the seventies is kind of a change where African Americans are getting into mainstream businesses a working for big companies. We talk about our slim burns who who started out at at Xerox as an intern and rises through the ranks of Xerox to become a CEO of of Xerox and others who are working Ken Fraser, who's the president of Merck and things like that. That's one of the other aspects of the documentary before we dive in a little further, and here's some clips in the documentary that really stands out is it's not just a story about the struggles that black business people have been through and heaven knows they've been plenty. But also about some of these luminaries who a lot of people may not even know, really. Exist that are doing big things in business. Yeah. I mean, one of the things that we tried to do is also talk to people who are in business today. You know, who are doing great things. You know, we end the film with a profile of Robert Smith who through his company vista partners is at this moment. I think the richest African American in the country he has over four billion dollars of personal wealth. We're speaking to Stanley Nelson director of the new documentary, boss. His other works include freedom riders wounded, knee, the murder of Emmett till and miles Davis. The birth of cool one of the other teams in boss Stanley that comes out a great deal is the value of accumulation of wealth, specifically for African Americans as we know for hundreds and hundreds of years, it's been incredibly difficult both because of cultural racism and also legal discrimination legal exclusion to not only accumulate wealth. But also to pass that on to the next generation. And that's another big theme in the documentary. Right. Yeah. I think that that over and over again, we see black business kind of being knocked down are pushed down by discrimination and racism in this country. And there's a few examples of that on one is Tulsa, Oklahoma where African Americans formed what they called the black Wall Street, which was hugely hugely successful. You know, it kind of rivals the scale of anything we have today, but it was destroyed pretty much in one day of of rioting by the white Townfolk, basically because they were jealous of of the the business success of of black Wall Street. Let me play a clip from boss. This is from Cathy Hughes who has a radio executive multi-media executive started in radio, and there's a mantra that shows up again and again in documentary here is that clip of Cathy Hughes from the. Documentary boss, you.

Stanley Nelson NPR Xerox Joshua Johnson president Walker Nelson business owner Robert Muller Cathy Hughes Madame CJ Walker manufacturing Washington Madame CJ department of Justice William Greaves EMMY Facebook special counsel PBS