18 Burst results for "Annie Liebowitz"

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You'll see the format no there it's looking right at the camera right at you again they're beautiful it looks they actually look like Annie Leibovitz shot them hurt herself wow and they they're looking right at you and their classes and just so well done so in entertaining too and yeah I pop up I got I downloaded the app on my apple TV so I sat on the couch sometimes and I I pull up Steve Martin take a little class and you know they're there for five minutes at a time and little lessons about for five minutes and then boom I I go to the next one so anyway it's a good gift a fun thing to do to be semi productive during this time master class now I brought up Bob Eiger because he gave a fascinating interview with variety in the Wall Street journal yesterday and and another podcast talking about what they do the what the Disney parks could possibly look like when they re open which out we were wondering that's with a new episode of two very godfathers is about what is going to be the normal until a vaccine comes around because you know the the reality is the parks will re open I mean the parks are going to reopen probably I would gas within three months and that's going to be way before we have a vaccine improbably way before we get any type of treatment to lessen the effects of the corona virus so what is it gonna be like you are a are people gonna want to go to a park a theme park with thousands of people around them and if so how is Disney gonna protect folks well he mentioned what they already do on cruise ships and that is biometric temperature taking all wow is that fascinating can yeah so when they come to the park they are gonna get their temperature taken yeah now is it full proof no because some a symptomatic people you know they don't have the temperature bought he parlayed it he did the parallel he said look you know we didn't really we didn't do bad checks or metal detectors before nine eleven and he's like and and but after that reality changes guests expect you to keep them safe and they will put up with minor inconveniences and a delay in getting into the parks if they feel safe and again they've already they're already doing this on Disney cruise line's this is nothing new for the Disney cruise lines but I thought hell I'll do it I don't care I mean if it's biometric yeah do it hi I'm kind of shocked that more advanced didn't do this already I mean we have the technology again it's not full proof but as a as a frequent gore of the parks I'm telling you it would make me feel safer I wonder how far away we are from fool proof on the spot right now tasks like checking your blood sugar can't diabetics they can do that will pretty much instantly right okay yeah that like to travel but yeah yes so as soon as we get those I'm guessing that virtually everything will be opened it's not while I'm just throwing this out here is it an invasion of people's privacy to check their temperature question allow them to come into a public that is of I don't know I don't think people are paying for that in there they are located in the heart of the yeah if you are doing this now you would have to be voluntary yeah yeah what it is I guess don it's a great question I guess it's the same thing of girls are going through your purse I mean that's it you can't get much more personal than going through a purse of your personal belongings in your you know what I mean but yet I can definitely be a deterrent for people but yeah yeah forget it I'm not doing that I think don is dead on right though if it's not voluntary then it certainly is an invasion of privacy is it not well I would need to be mandatory you can't have some people check their temperature and some not well I think the whole act of I I'm not a lawyer I just play one on TV I think the whole act of paying a ticket paying for a ticket to go into a private business yeah it's not of the day your your rights are you know you're making a voluntary dis decision you're making a voluntary decision to pay for that ticket in in though and then then the small print of that ticket it will probably say you will get your bags checked and you will be screened and you will get your temperature taken so if you make the decision the conscious decision to pay for that ticket I think you negate any lead you know any recourse but what is it what if it moves on to a blood test then I don't think people do that I think that's invasive yeah yeah I think that's a little invasive on because they already have the biometric scanners now for your fingerprint so if it also does temperature taking or corona virus yeah maybe to specifically test for that but I don't use a family that's why this I'm glad John donne brother because it's fascinating I mean I I don't really care but I but lex to your point I can see it being a deterrent for folks yeah hello there are a lot of people who will be like I'm not doing that no but I don't think that they need to worry about people coming to the parks in making money you know I think people are still going to go into I I think that they'll be a small amount of people say they don't want to and you know that's that would be their choice I'm really I you know obviously I I will go back on being very on chrome I could be going back anytime soon but I will go back and I am going to be so fascinated to see what the crowds are like what percentage of people will be freaked out for two three years until we get a vaccine you know hopefully yeah please please Jesus let it be a year year and a half on the short term let us get a vaccine he also imagine to like going to the park and uncle Jerry can't come in because of his temperature hot yeah our right the park now you're logged on your right I know people like that yeah so I I don't know for this walk from their car in there that little extra weight on them they're like I'm just running right now I wonder what their procedure I wonder what what and what the calf is that makes yeah that might be like oh sorry kids mom so the high temp well I would be more a thousand dollars right now to see to it we can't go see goofy right now kids mom yeah from a distance use a spell moms having a child in the flashes my talk on a seven one everything with great power comes great entertainment have you heard Donna and Steve lately check out this highlight there's another group of scientists that are working on a toilet seat that recognize your individual but finally how will it recognize your but you were about to ask that more the researchers say well at one mall we know it seems I thought you said that holds no more also see that you said mole okay I have it on my birthday list no wait a minute we need to start doing birthday after the store we stop yeah I mean you know first off I know you're younger so it still feels a little more pin the tail on and like we just chill out with that man yeah keeping those of us stuck at home informed and entertained thanks Donna and Steve find my talk on the app your smart speakers in your trusty old radio and at my talk on a seven one dot com my talkers because Sandra here with my mom Carla financial advisors with clear step financial and co host of the mom show heard Sundays at ten there is a lot of uncertainty in the markets right now yes a lot of ups and downs and some of us don't enjoy feeling like we're on a roller coaster without a seat belt no we don't we want to feel secure confident and happy with their retirement investments more like a merry go round maybe something like that a clear step.

Annie Leibovitz apple
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You'll see the format no there it's looking right at the camera right at you again they're beautiful it looks they actually look like Annie Leibovitz shot them hurt herself well and they they're looking right at you and their classes and just so well done so in entertaining too and yeah I pop up I got I downloaded the app on my apple TV so I sat on the couch sometimes and I I pull up Steve Martin take a little class and you know they're there for five minutes at a time and little lessons about for five minutes and then boom I I go to the next one so anyway it's a good gift a fun thing to do to be semi productive during this time master class not brought up Bob Eiger because he gave a fascinating interview with variety in the Wall Street journal yesterday and and another podcast talking about what they do the what the Disney parks could possibly look like when they re open which out we were wondering that's with a new episode of two very godfathers is about what is going to be the normal until a vaccine comes around because you know the the reality is the parks will reopen I mean the parks are going to reopen probably I would guess within three months and that's going to be way before we have a vaccine and probably way before we get any type of treatment to lessen the effects of the corona virus so what is it gonna be like you are a are people gonna want to go to a park a theme park with thousands of people around them and if so how is Disney gonna protect folks well he mentioned what they already do on cruise ships and that is biometric temperature taking all wow is that fascinating can yeah so when they come to the park they are gonna get their temperature taken now is it full proof no because some a symptomatic people you know they don't have the temperature bought he parlayed it he did the parallel he's like look you know we didn't really we didn't do bad checks or metal detectors before nine eleven and he's like and and but after that reality changes guests expect you to keep them safe and they will put up with minor inconveniences and a delay in getting into the parks if they feel safe and again they've already they're already doing this on Disney cruise line's this is nothing new for the Disney cruise lines but I thought hello all do it I don't care I mean if it's biometric yeah do it all right I'm kind of shocked that more advanced didn't do this already I mean we have the technology again it's not full proof but as a as a frequent gore of the parks I'm telling you it would make me feel safer I wonder how far away we are from fool proof on the spot right now tasks like checking your blood sugar can't diabetics they can do that pretty much instantly right okay yeah that like to travel but yeah yes so as soon as we get those I'm guessing that virtually everything will be opened it's not the one I'm just throwing this out here is it an invasion of people's privacy to check their temperature question allow them to come into a public that is of I don't know I don't think people are paying for that in there they are located in the heart of the yeah if you are doing this now you would have to be voluntary yeah yeah what it is I guess don it's a great question I guess it's the same thing of girls are going to your purse I mean that's it you can't get much more personal than going through a purse of your personal belongings in your you know what I mean but yet I can definitely be a deterrent for people but yeah I'll yeah forget it I'm not doing that I think don is dead on right though if it's not voluntary then it certainly is an invasion of privacy is it not well I would need to be mandatory you can't have some people check their temperature and some not well I think the whole act of I'm not a lawyer I just play one on TV I think the whole act of paying a ticket paying for a ticket to go into a private business yeah as of the date your your rights are you know you're making a voluntary dis decision you're making a voluntary decision to pay for that ticket in in though and then then the small print of that ticket it will probably say you will get your bags checked and you will be screened and you will get your temperature taken so if you make the decision the conscious decision to pay for that ticket I think you negate any Lee you know any recourse what is it what if it moves on to a blood test then I don't think people do that I think that's invasive yeah yeah I think that's a little invasive I'm because they already have the biometric scanners now for your fingerprint so if it also does temperature taking or corona virus yeah maybe to specifically test for that but I don't use a family that's why this I'm glad Joe don brother because it's fascinating I mean I I don't really care but I but lex to your point I can see it being a deterrent for folks yeah hello there are a lot of people who will be like I'm not doing that no but I don't think that they need to worry about people coming to the parks in making money you know I think people are still going to go into I I think that they'll be a small amount of people say they don't want to and you know that's that would be their choice I'm really I you know obviously I I will go back on being very on chrome I can recall back anytime soon but I will go back and I am going to be so fascinated to see what the crowds are light what percentage of people will be freaked out for two three years until we get a vaccine you know hopefully yeah please please Jesus let it be a year year and a half on the short term let us get a vaccine and I. T. also imagine to like going to the park and uncle Jerry can't come in because of his temperature hot yeah our right one of the park now though don you're right I know people like that yeah so I I don't know for this walk from their car in there that little extra weight on them they're like I'm just running right now I wonder what the procedures and the odds I wonder what what and what the cast is that we use for yeah that might be like oh sorry kids mom so the high temp well go anymore a thousand dollars right now to see to it we can't go see goofy right now kids mom yeah from a distance use a spell moms having a child in the flashes as we watch the corona virus spread to most of us have asked two questions what can I do to keep my family safe and what can I do to help others my talk listeners have been helping out families through diaper drives for three years now in Florida and Texas in the wake of hurricanes and now for the first time we're gonna help out families right here in Minnesota one in three American families have to choose between diapers and other basic needs like food in the midst of this pandemic so if you can please help these Minnesotans in.

Annie Leibovitz apple
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"So we were like chopping and show it I was coloring her hair, then and just, you know, doing every you know, what I mean hands on. But I I think if you ever asked what I'm really known for before may was texture because we would be on the beach shooting with her breads, and if you look at old pictures like the five girls that are naked all huddled, the hair's just the other conic. Yeah. I have a lot of iconic. Yeah. I'm saying the other one like there's too. That's another. Icon. Yeah, there's a lot. But you know, I was really known for texture. I would just grab things and put sand of the Herron oil. And you know, I'm very much like in the moment of what's going to make that hair. Look amazing in the moment. So to this day, Annie Leibovitz. Will hire me just to be on sets amo, Steven Meisel and just let just do the girls. One time Stevens shot fifty of the top models from like every age, you know, and it was just like taking the and just kind of shooting at just tweaking it not prepping it and doing it on set. So I'm known for giving. A gesture run set that gives that just it just makes. But that's two French. We need more like an LA rock and roll version of Jinnah say Quah, whatever that is. Mm enough. It's like an effortlessness that just kind of just changes everything, you know, what I mean? Yeah. You should see Jessica Deiter hair. Just Just like like. mine. Looking at Sally touching my hair looking for some approval like like this. Yeah. You just take that. And you just kinda thing it over the I was looking at me like what the? It's like it's like, I know you should see us happening here. But it's those moments that make the picture and her breads really taught me that I also was working with helmet Newton who lived in California for the three months. So Polly Mellon discovered me at vogue through her Brett's. And then she got Carleen surf on me. And then, you know, Tony Goodman. So there was that. And then where I got really blessed? Again, my career was not premeditated as that. I'd moved to New York because there's an Ostrom. I really like, and I I just started being more and more getting very fashion. Yeah. There's an Ostrom you really I've been going since nineteen eighty nine. Okay. So it's called city yoga, okay? It's a meditation place like a lot of like Laurie Goldstein, and I started there, but it's it's under. I don't talk about it. But I liked being there. Okay. Keeping me centered. And then I thought well, I'm gonna I want to move more into fashion and New York and everyone's like, oh, that's that's going to be really versus celebrity. You mean? Yeah. Because they did. So I got really lucky they started putting the celebrities on vote covers and then I got him with Steven Meisel in New York. And then once again, it all took off again, every magazine started doing that you were in the right place if I was writing. Yeah. I mean, you couldn't a plan that any better and then. I met John Frieda did product lines. I did you know, the share blonde with them. I worked with him. I was the PR creator for ten years. And then he sold his company put air quotes around PR, creators, that means somebody else created it. But then you tell people how to use it or you actually like worked on the formulas. I worked on the formula. Okay. So exclusively. For me. I can't fake it. Right. I don't have that kind of personality. So what's what are some of the products that you know, were some of your greatest hits so to speak from you know, that you've worked on John Frieda or your, you know, SRI even consulted for for other lines. I have you won't have John Frieda. You know, I was had an exclusive I did a few things. But I really I really always they were getting ready to do a product for me, John Frieda. And then they sold. So I then took a year developing my first line, I actually went into mouse. Which is so not me even though John was America to ask my question..

John Frieda Steven Meisel New York Annie Leibovitz Sally Ostrom Polly Mellon Laurie Goldstein Jessica Deiter Tony Goodman Stevens California Jinnah Brett America Quah Newton Carleen three months ten years
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

"Down. Spindles all the wall cavity brother place, Ville two. So it was just you and your brother both ways. I started a little before him, but are fiddle playing is rooted in those tunes more than anything. You. Learn redwing me learn milk cow blues, you know, starting off on the fiddle. There's a lot of the crossover from the western swing that ends up in those tunes that you learned for the fiddle contests as well, if you're friendly gang what weighing and time to ride that transcribe musical trail with Bob wills and the Texas playboys an era the Texas playboys on the Lone Star rag. Funny story that I've told it's not funny that met Bob wills. We went up to Dallas to meet him. He was making a record called for the last time. Wheelchair and we walked in studio. And they said wheels is the wheel, and he was really really ill. They say he's very tired. We're taking him back to his motel, and you can talk to tomorrow, they took him to his motel, and he had a stroke and McComb and two years later, we're playing the Longhorn ballroom, which was the Bob wheels ranch house in Dallas. And he died that day. All I care about for a sleep wheels. That what we on on a record is good material done. Well, well, it was was in Austin. The chilly part. Man, dub, pardon and not caring where? I like this music when I was nineteen and it wasn't. What was cool. I just think there's always saying the population that is attracted to different than mainstream music, and this we're certainly a unique band. I think the music in, you know, even though we're this record is a little bit of an evolution of some of that, you know, a little more eclectic as far as roots go. But I think that not only does the music speak for it self. But I think there's band is younger these days, and I think that people are age that see that they're really taking it seriously. And I think that just having good energy is what's attractive, maybe the most and this music is fun and let hardy she just turned thirty. When I started the ban in nineteen seventy started recruiting players. I could not find a fiddle player of my age. Now, I am the luckiest guy because I get the fine fine fiddle players when I was looking for the singer I had a little club in Austin. And I was looking on YouTube because sometimes it post, but was on stage. I'm back again in this lady ten she had a gig didn't pay much. Did it? I'm not sure I made any money guys. I saw it went up to the oh who is this girl? 'cause there's a equality to voice that is in between, Billie holiday wish wing center voice. And she picked up the film, and I was like oh, gosh she plays. It'll take. I grew up listening to sleep at the wheel. And and that was one of the things about I laughed. My mom told me when I was a kid. I wanted to play the kind of music, he clap your hands and stub your feet too. You know, this is that was developed in the thirties refined and in change through the years, but it's still alive right now. People still get up and dance in the aisles, which we love so much. It's hard to sit still to this music. I got that. Right. I got seven. Salmon. Thank bring Jae different. And that is it for today. Remember to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, you can find us at the frame, I'm John horn. Thanks for listening. We'll see you back here tomorrow. Tone Wednesday vote has there's at the last day at chatter. Saturday. So then. Yeah, everybody. Got seven in row. Salmon.

Bob wills Austin Texas Dallas Bob wheels ranch YouTube Billie McComb Jae Twitter Facebook John horn two years milk
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

"Tour. Truman Capote was supposed to be writing. Something for rolling sound never didn't make. He didn't make deadline. Right. Exactly. So I went to two or three cities, and I got to watch Robert Frank work. So in seventy five when Mick Jagger said would you be photographer? I was on board. I really wanted to do it. And I didn't know what I was walking into still very nice. I took my tennis racket with me thinking I was going to anyway, but it was twenty seven cities. And again, I think the underlying story in this show or this work with is headed is what it means to be young photographer and out there and taking pictures now, this you can see it in the earlier work that I thought that if you just become part of what's going on. You can take the best pictures and this almost kill me. I really was almost the death of me because I was really in over my head. And it took me a long time to get off the tour people said, oh, how is the concert? I never heard the concert. I didn't hear the music. I was so concentrating on taking the picture so much. I I never, you know. You know? And then I'll you're at the mercy ETA whoever's in the lighting, and they're all on drugs and his. Whatever I mean, I was just last question. I was talking on the way over here about a novelist. I know who said it's very hard for him to read something that he wrote even a year or two ago because he sees his mistakes and his development. Are you self critical that way as well? Do you look back at early pictures and say I should have done it differently. Or are you really pictures? I mean every day, you know, I was very lucky I had be a fighter as as. An art director of her few years and she had worked at Rolling Stone. And MS and a shoes, you know, this very famous art director from Harper's bazaar. She told me early on that the way you are going to to learn of what to do to go forward is you have to look back, and I took that pretty pretty seriously. And I all along the way I worked on edits, and my work and and done books and stopped at some point the first first one was nine hundred seventy nine hundred ninety twenty years of work. And I went back and looked to the work, and I saw then this work. And I said, oh my gosh. This is really interesting this repechage, you know, it's like I realized what I had sort of lost. You know that I wasn't doing that anymore. Couldn't go back to completely. But you can learn from anything come on the show is great. Thank you, very. Anti LeBron bits exhibit is at the house Ron worth gallery through April fourteenth coming up on the frame. The venerable country swing band asleep at the wheel hits the half century. Mark. Asleep at the wheel has been making country. Western swing music for nearly fifty years at this point. They've carried on a tradition which started in the nineteen thirties longer than the genres creator. Bob, wills the king of western swing? Mary back asleep at the wheel founder Ray Benson. And the band's fiddler and singer Katie shore visited the frame recently to talk about the band's latest album. It's called new routes. It features originals written by both shore and Benson as well. As a few cover songs by guy Clark and Johnny cash unifying. It all is a love for the foundations of American music. My name's Katie short. I'm the female vocalist in fiddle player. I leap at the wheel Benson. And I've lived has been for forty eight years down, so strange paths. With a heart of gold in ways of gentlemen, until the cat is nineteen sixty nine. College and was film director and then decided to play music, I've always played meetings. A child performing played folk music rock and roll jazz. But anything. And I said I wanna start a a American roots. And it plays the music seems to be forgot. Their self thirties forties inspiration on the western side, Bob wills, and it takes playboys and many others mulligan, and then but save deals morphed into over the years has been a fiddle based swing. Here is one of the fillers. And mouth of Trump. And so. I guess my first fiddle contest was probably when I was seven years old and growing up in Texas, my Granddad played the fiddle and used to play for us at home, and I really loved it. And so there was a fiddle community in Fort Worth. And the contest was a part of it. I want one in sixteen when probably will the cabbage down.

Ray Benson director Truman Capote Bob wills Katie shore Harper Mick Jagger tennis Robert Frank Fort Worth guy Clark Rolling Stone Texas Mark Ron Mary founder nine hundred seventy nine hund forty eight years
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

"Think of any pop culture icon from the past fifty years, and they've probably been photographed by Annie liebowitz, although much of her background is in reportage storytelling through photography. She's known best for her portraits and cover photos for Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair, she's photographed musicians actors poets and politicians alike from John Lennon to Meryl Streep to Richard Nixon. She was even spotted at a recent Beto Aurora rally. Now her early work is on display at Hauser and Wirth gallery in the arts district of downtown LA. The show is called any leave of it's the early years nineteen seventy to nineteen Eighty-three archive project number one, and it chronicles her work at Rolling Stone magazine and her transformation from a photo journalist to a portrait photographer. I took a walk through the exhibition with leave of its last week. And we started with a nineteen seventy antiwar demonstration where she'd taken pictures of Alan. Ginsburg and Eldridge cleaver. She was studying painting at the San Francisco Art Institute at the time. And I asked her how she went from paintbrushes to cameras I took a night class in photography and just found a photography as a young person so much more gratifying and immediate and it just felt right? And the people were a lot friendlier in the in the in the photo department, and then the painting the painting was pretty abstract and pretty angry. You know, it was the Vietnam war and the school was on the GI Bill. Of course, there were a lot of soldiers coming to going to school and a lot of drunk teachers, and it was a little scary for seventeen eighteen year old kid. And so the camera was very grounding every novelist can probably remember the first piece of writing that he or she sold every actor. Can remember the first part that they got paid for is there an image in this room that you can remember being one of the? I that you got paid for and which one I did not paid much. That's for sure it doesn't matter. But actually, it was not for free Rolling Stone. The breakthrough moment was really this work that I did at this rally in San Francisco is anti-war rally this one here. This actually was a cover of Rolling Stone. The my first cover of Rolling Stone. Well, I know where this is the university of California Berkeley. That's right. That's right. What really was impressed. With is. This happened the day before I went back to the school the day of the demonstration process, the film printed it and brought it into Rolling Stone the next day. And they were so impressed that because it was a very young magazine. It was a fold up rag paper. And so they just started giving me work to do. And and then I talked my way into going to New York with yon winter. He wanted to do an interview with John Lennon about the break up of the Beatles. And they were really special. Johny yoko. They couldn't believe Jahn brought young winner brought a kid to have their picture, and they were impressed with that with yawn. I think and they gave me carte blanche. It was a really important because it was set the precedent for what I expected how to be treated from then on out. I think what a lot of people don't remember from that era. It's not just Rolling Stone. But look in life magazine were seriously committed to photography, they would commission photographers, they really embraced photography as a form of journalism, and they gave photographers a lot of leeway to do what they wanted to do. And you were really in the right place at the right time in many ways that was certainly some of the photography that I admired so much. Listen, I want it to be a photojournalist. You know, when I started working for Rolling Stone. I wanted to leave behind the fine art work. I was not a good photojournalist. So I was going to have to tell more more my story from my point of view and left journalism behind an. Eventually turn to portraiture because it was a way of sort of having real licensed to do what you wanted in a photograph and not worry about crossing over to the other side. When I look at these pictures, there is a candor to them that seems like a relic that in some ways the way that celebrities or anybody controls his or her own image right now is so tightly choreographed. Yeah. You can't like you were I don't know if you just kind of embedded yourself. So they forgot about you. How did you get this kind of access because the world was different? But also have a feeling you had a way to make yourself disappear into their world. You know, I it really it was a different time and people were more open to just you know, letting you be there. I mean things are much more control now, and I'm trying to bring back the photo essay now, and it's really hard because just for that kind of thing. I did a cover story on Lena wait for Vanity Fair. And. I just told her what I wanted to do. And she said, okay. But that's rare. I mean, I just kind of hung in her house while she worked in Rhode and took a few pictures and went in and out. I mean, it's it's not like there for twenty four hours. We just go in and out of someone's life. I'm trying to incorporate some of that with people who will give us that. I just worked on a on a politician that that I had that kind of access that'd be better work. I can't say. Poker faces. I wanna play a good game. What is it about politicians that is unusual or interesting that maybe you don't find in celebrities? Well, my day in in the early work. They really had no idea about. What it was like to be photographed what it meant like they were just kind of like they had no idea. What what anything was? And and it was kind of like a free for all you could really just. I mean here you're seeing them Nixon resignation. But you know, it wasn't so locked up. You know, now like any well known person, it's hard to get this kind of access one of the things I love about some of these pictures like the resignation of Nixon. I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow. My recollection is you took all these pictures. And I want to say was hunters Thompson who is supposed to file the copy. And he messed his deadline. That's the story. And so you just ran photos because there was no copy. It didn't make deadline. He was at the Washington Hilton by the pool with a battery powered television set. And so we leave in good spirit, and with deep humility and t- never made it over there for for Nixon going off and Rolling Stone had held open like eight to twelve pages waiting for story to file and they ended up taking my pictures, just blowing them up. So is the first time Rolling Stone really use photography at you know, in a big way we're talking with any liba. It's about her show that early years nineteen seventy to nineteen Eighty-three archive project number one. How do you move from being a photo journalist to somebody who takes portrait's is? There are natural evolution as something. You learn in report Taj that you can do in portraiture, I think that's one of the sub stories in this show is is that you you get to see that you get to see this kind of sketching that think what I said, I was became a portrait photographer. I think doing the covers in the magazine is sort of pin you down to doing a moment with with your subject. And and I wanted them to be very good photographs and they became good portrait's. And they, but they were totally fed by by these pictures. Well, let's talk about what we're looking at. We're looking at a wall of pictures that are taken during a Rolling Stones tour backstage onstage hotel rooms. Well, let's let's put this in context in ninety seventy two. Robert Frank was the tour. He did film. Chris blues for the Rolling Stones. And you know, I went to two or three cities on that tour.

Rolling Stones Rolling Stone magazine Richard Nixon Rolling Stone John Lennon Annie liebowitz San Francisco Art Institute LA Alan university of California Berke Eldridge cleaver Ginsburg Rhode Hauser Johny yoko Meryl Streep San Francisco Jahn New York
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The Frame

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See see this is the frame, I'm John horn on today's show what the cancellation of Pearvel shows on Netflix might mean for the future of the TV business then from antiwar demonstrations to Arnold Schwarzenegger, riding horseback. Any Vits has photographed at all we walked through a new exhibit of her early work was not a good photojournaling. So I was going to have to tell more my story from my point of view and left journalism behind eventually turned to portraiture because it was a way of having real licensed to do what you wanted in a photograph and the country swing band asleep at the wheel is still rolling along fifty years after its founding all that coming up on the frame. With so many new players jumping into the streaming game including Disney, apple and Warner media. Twenty nineteen is likely to bring some big changes to the TV business. We called up Daniel Feinberg a TV critic for the Hollywood reporter to talk about what the future could look like to TV viewers. He's just finished covering two weeks of presentations from broadcast networks cable channels and streaming services at the television critics association meetings. We started with the news from earlier this week that net flicks. His canceling Jessica Jones and the punisher to marvel shows which not coincidentally are also Disney properties. There is no question that we are on the brink of some sort of key transition point. And regardless of what you choose to call it, whether you want to call it these streaming wars or the road to new cable, or whatever you wanted describe it as there are things that are changing that are going to dramatically reshape what the media landscape look. In five years in the same way that five years ago, it looked completely different. And I think that there's no question that the cancellation of the marvel shows on Netflix is a. Assign a gesture in a certain direction because these were very high profile shows for Netflix when they premiered and they were part of a big programming strategy. And now, suddenly all of the marvel properties are really part of aid Disney, plus or a Disney marvel streaming strategy, and so they don't fit with Netflix anymore. And I think that you're gonna see something with the tug of war over something like friends, I think that we are only at the beginning of what is going to be probably the biggest story in where television is going in the next year and a half probably. And that is basically that the people who create those shows used to see companies like Netflix as a source of ancillary revenue and now they see streaming services as direct competitors. So they're trying to pull their content back at their launching their own streaming services. Is that the bigger picture here? I think that is definitely the bigger picture. And all of the things that the Netflix and Hulu have kind of taken for granted as the foundation of their. Business model, you know, the for whatever we want to say about the apparently twelve billion dollars that Netflix last year poured into original programming acquired content is still a major portion of what people actually stream on Netflix. Whether it's whether it's friends, whether it's the office, whether it's all of the CW shows, and that's great for Netflix because it allows net flicks to have that kind of foundation, but it, but it's also a business that the people who actually own those programs want to be in. And so is Netflix original programming is it enough if suddenly the studio start taking away all of their prestige programs. Yeah. I don't know. Let's talk about a couple of new programs one that's on Netflix. It's called Russian doll and one on Hulu called Penn. Fifteen. These are shows that seem to be getting a lot of attention. Are they worth checking out? And how are they doing so far? I think they're absolutely were checking out, and I think we had absolutely no idea how either one of them is doing. Let's look says not put out a press release boasting that forty million people in some form or another have watched Russian doll. So I don't know all I know is that it's a really good show. It's a really smart show. It's a show that plays around with with format and with tone, and with style in very impressive ways. So Russian dolls. Definitely we're checking out, and I think Penn fifteen on Hulu is is a lot of fun to gimmick is the two co creators are basically playing junior high versions of themselves. Devil dis her last night at camp. How was even possible? I don't know what happened in the middle of her sleep. That's so unfair that happens to me surrounded by actual preteen and teen actors, and it's it's a really good show about the awkwardness of being a teenager. That's maybe aimed at older viewers who survived those years. I wanna talk about a couple of other shows that might be worth talking about FOX has a series called proven innocent pop has a series called flack and DC universe has a series called doom patrol or any of those shows are other things that you've seen jumping out in terms of midseason or early start shows that are coming out either. Now, or very soon one of the shows that if you've watched any BC in the past couple of weeks, and you're going to see as we move towards the Oscars this weekend that is getting a lot of buzz for ABC as whiskey cavalier whiskey cavalier. One of our best agents. I intelligence proven to be a huge asset to the bureau. You and your fiance recently parted ways. Yes, we did mutual most commercial, but I'm totally fine with it. We have the footage. How? It's a show that I would say succeeds at its goals, and that's something that I wouldn't necessarily say about say proven innocent, which is a very very run of the mill entirely forgettable legal procedural at the very least whiskey cavalier is pretty people Scott fully and learn Cohen or the stars are attractive and fun. And they're having a good time. It was shot in Europe. And it makes actual good use of European locations. It's got all of the depth of a very very shallow puddle. But on the other hand, it's fun. And it's the same with with DC universe is doomed patrol, which is kind of quirky kind of odd and of vast improvement over DC universe's, I live action show which was titans, which was all gloomy and glum and unpleasant. So there's something to be said for improvement one of the other things that happens at the as is that critics get sneak peeks, maybe it's some footage. Maybe it's a pilot of a show. That's not going to be on for a couple of months. Is there anything that you and your colleagues? Saw that might not be coming out immediately. But that you're really interested in seeing what more there is the series. Well, I definitely can't review. The one episode I've seen of FX Fosse Verdon, but I can tell you that that show which starts Sam Rockwell, and Michelle Williams is definitely going to be worth one that I'm looking forward to checking out. It's the story of Bob Fosse, Gwen Verdon. And so there's a lot of fifty sixty seventies cinematic, and Broadway and musical references and dancing and choreography. And I'm not gonna say anything more than I'm looking forward to seeing more episodes. Daniel Feinberg is a TV critic for the Hollywood reporter. He is also the president of the television critics association Daniel, thanks for your time and your insight. Thank you for having me. Coming up on the frame, any leave of its walks through an exhibit of her early work. Think

Netflix Disney Hulu Daniel Feinberg TV critic reporter Hollywood Vits Arnold Schwarzenegger Mon Fosse Verdon John horn Bob Fosse Europe Jessica Jones Pearvel titans Warner media Sam Rockwell
Through the eyes of Annie Leibovitz

The Frame

07:42 min | 2 years ago

Through the eyes of Annie Leibovitz

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See see this is the frame, I'm John horn on today's show what the cancellation of Pearvel shows on Netflix might mean for the future of the TV business then from antiwar demonstrations to Arnold Schwarzenegger, riding horseback. Any Vits has photographed at all we walked through a new exhibit of her early work was not a good photojournaling. So I was going to have to tell more my story from my point of view and left journalism behind eventually turned to portraiture because it was a way of having real licensed to do what you wanted in a photograph and the country swing band asleep at the wheel is still rolling along fifty years after its founding all that coming up on the frame. With so many new players jumping into the streaming game including Disney, apple and Warner media. Twenty nineteen is likely to bring some big changes to the TV business. We called up Daniel Feinberg a TV critic for the Hollywood reporter to talk about what the future could look like to TV viewers. He's just finished covering two weeks of presentations from broadcast networks cable channels and streaming services at the television critics association meetings. We started with the news from earlier this week that net flicks. His canceling Jessica Jones and the punisher to marvel shows which not coincidentally are also Disney properties. There is no question that we are on the brink of some sort of key transition point. And regardless of what you choose to call it, whether you want to call it these streaming wars or the road to new cable, or whatever you wanted describe it as there are things that are changing that are going to dramatically reshape what the media landscape look. In five years in the same way that five years ago, it looked completely different. And I think that there's no question that the cancellation of the marvel shows on Netflix is a. Assign a gesture in a certain direction because these were very high profile shows for Netflix when they premiered and they were part of a big programming strategy. And now, suddenly all of the marvel properties are really part of aid Disney, plus or a Disney marvel streaming strategy, and so they don't fit with Netflix anymore. And I think that you're gonna see something with the tug of war over something like friends, I think that we are only at the beginning of what is going to be probably the biggest story in where television is going in the next year and a half probably. And that is basically that the people who create those shows used to see companies like Netflix as a source of ancillary revenue and now they see streaming services as direct competitors. So they're trying to pull their content back at their launching their own streaming services. Is that the bigger picture here? I think that is definitely the bigger picture. And all of the things that the Netflix and Hulu have kind of taken for granted as the foundation of their. Business model, you know, the for whatever we want to say about the apparently twelve billion dollars that Netflix last year poured into original programming acquired content is still a major portion of what people actually stream on Netflix. Whether it's whether it's friends, whether it's the office, whether it's all of the CW shows, and that's great for Netflix because it allows net flicks to have that kind of foundation, but it, but it's also a business that the people who actually own those programs want to be in. And so is Netflix original programming is it enough if suddenly the studio start taking away all of their prestige programs. Yeah. I don't know. Let's talk about a couple of new programs one that's on Netflix. It's called Russian doll and one on Hulu called Penn. Fifteen. These are shows that seem to be getting a lot of attention. Are they worth checking out? And how are they doing so far? I think they're absolutely were checking out, and I think we had absolutely no idea how either one of them is doing. Let's look says not put out a press release boasting that forty million people in some form or another have watched Russian doll. So I don't know all I know is that it's a really good show. It's a really smart show. It's a show that plays around with with format and with tone, and with style in very impressive ways. So Russian dolls. Definitely we're checking out, and I think Penn fifteen on Hulu is is a lot of fun to gimmick is the two co creators are basically playing junior high versions of themselves. Devil dis her last night at camp. How was even possible? I don't know what happened in the middle of her sleep. That's so unfair that happens to me surrounded by actual preteen and teen actors, and it's it's a really good show about the awkwardness of being a teenager. That's maybe aimed at older viewers who survived those years. I wanna talk about a couple of other shows that might be worth talking about FOX has a series called proven innocent pop has a series called flack and DC universe has a series called doom patrol or any of those shows are other things that you've seen jumping out in terms of midseason or early start shows that are coming out either. Now, or very soon one of the shows that if you've watched any BC in the past couple of weeks, and you're going to see as we move towards the Oscars this weekend that is getting a lot of buzz for ABC as whiskey cavalier whiskey cavalier. One of our best agents. I intelligence proven to be a huge asset to the bureau. You and your fiance recently parted ways. Yes, we did mutual most commercial, but I'm totally fine with it. We have the footage. How? It's a show that I would say succeeds at its goals, and that's something that I wouldn't necessarily say about say proven innocent, which is a very very run of the mill entirely forgettable legal procedural at the very least whiskey cavalier is pretty people Scott fully and learn Cohen or the stars are attractive and fun. And they're having a good time. It was shot in Europe. And it makes actual good use of European locations. It's got all of the depth of a very very shallow puddle. But on the other hand, it's fun. And it's the same with with DC universe is doomed patrol, which is kind of quirky kind of odd and of vast improvement over DC universe's, I live action show which was titans, which was all gloomy and glum and unpleasant. So there's something to be said for improvement one of the other things that happens at the as is that critics get sneak peeks, maybe it's some footage. Maybe it's a pilot of a show. That's not going to be on for a couple of months. Is there anything that you and your colleagues? Saw that might not be coming out immediately. But that you're really interested in seeing what more there is the series. Well, I definitely can't review. The one episode I've seen of FX Fosse Verdon, but I can tell you that that show which starts Sam Rockwell, and Michelle Williams is definitely going to be worth one that I'm looking forward to checking out. It's the story of Bob Fosse, Gwen Verdon. And so there's a lot of fifty sixty seventies cinematic, and Broadway and musical references and dancing and choreography. And I'm not gonna say anything more than I'm looking forward to seeing more episodes. Daniel Feinberg is a TV critic for the Hollywood reporter. He is also the president of the television critics association Daniel, thanks for your time and your insight. Thank you for having me. Coming up on the frame, any leave of its walks through an exhibit of her early work.

Netflix Disney Hulu Daniel Feinberg Tv Critic Reporter Hollywood Vits Arnold Schwarzenegger MON Fosse Verdon John Horn Bob Fosse Europe Jessica Jones Pearvel Titans Warner Media Sam Rockwell
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

The WAN Show Podcast

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

"The cables had to be just like, piled up down here getting in the way of all this airflow and like collecting dust. It was just, oh man, so bad. And was this the one that had that stupid two and a half inch doc in the top of it. And remember, this is horrible this at a time when an SSD is like worth. It's waiting goal, right? There's like six, seven years ago can't into the top. So you just didn't? Yeah, you're just gonna and it was supposed to be like a gaming case. Let's take it to a land party. You can put your SSD in the top for your land party. And I'm like, are you nuts? People take locking cases to land parties so that they don't get their graphics card ripped out. They're going to put their SSD right on the top and a convenient little dock. McCann just rip it right out. Are you kidding me and who had an SSD for anything other than their OS? Why would you want that? In a conveniently removable dog, it'd be. Kind of an actually pretty cool series of videos. Yeah, sure. Retro rants I'm calm. I'm calm. I'm relaxed right now. Sam, chill. You'd have to be not come though. Flight. My apple watch is like breeze. Is it giving you health notice now it it started taking dictation. Oh, apple. Watch my apple watch. Why was it? Why was it? I don't know what isn't even doing. I love how useless my watches right now. The apple watch is is really interesting. So it still doesn't have an always on display, which is ridiculous. When you get a notification, if you close it, it doesn't show notifications that you got in your like history wheel. They're just not there. So that's really smart. And so because we did that video earlier this week where we intentionally put one of my calendars, am I? It's like actually useless because it's just completely full of this man. From Justin three regret all life decisions. Channel Superfund meeting higher. Nikki BAC drop expensive stuff, reopened, lioness's sex that got truncated survive the earth. Twenty six events got for tomorrow. Phone call with Linus from one week in the past fire at Colton fire Colton, both fire him and fire. Adam got another fire Colton by apples for tomorrow, drop something test, fire alarm as loud as possible. Burnt all, Linus to sandals. Thanks night blood. So under and just probably de-link that again, people, I probably what I won't. People are probably wondering why I'm wearing an apple watch while I'm working on my pixel XL very, I mean, it's not doing anything anyway. To tell the time. So twitch chat loves the retro rants. So he went by the way that they do that YouTube jet does as well. You know what? They probably also loved speaking.

apple Linus Colton fire Colton Nikki BAC McCann YouTube Sam Colton Justin Adam seven years one week
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:18 min | 3 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Garrett. You bet. We were in this'll over eastern in April and highlight of our trip, but being Trump any or Good Friday, we were there. We saw the procession of the mystery did this where they have the sculptures depicting the passion of Christ which are carried on these beautifully decorated slapped forms with like candles and flowers, and it's all carried on the shoulders of the men of the town, and it looks an absolute spectacle. You know, if you could picture you have like these beautiful sculptures, and you have the sounds of bands playing and choir singing and people solemnly praying. And and then you have to send the candles and the flowers and mixed with ocean air and the sunsetting parade wines around town and all the backdrop of this dutiful or rope town by the ocean. We was absolutely spectacular. I mean, we definitely will not forget this exp. For the rest of our life. I think it you sound like a travel writer that was beautiful and you know, I was there in trapping under same day on Good Friday. That's amazing that it was a you described it perfectly everything sort of sways from left to, right the guys marching with the with the float on holding, and then they slowly go left. I'm going left and right right now and all of the the people who gathered around they seem to go left. And right also, the whole place was mesmerized as Good Friday was remembered. I just thought it was one of the greatest spectacles I had seen. You can go any day of the year and visit the church and see those the procession of the mysteries, but to see them extra taken out of their stalls at the church and brought through the city. And as you mentioned, it goes for like all day and twenty twenty. Twenty funeral music that they played the whole time. It's a funeral and play that very sad music, and they sway to the music and people come in. They they take over for each other. Oh, yeah. Yeah, it's really neat. The whole involved, I think even if you're not religious to seeing like the effort that it takes like put on an event like this year after year for like, what is it like more hundred years into lay rich example of the dog. I love it and the thought that people gather on whether they're religious are not in be touched by it. It's a beautiful thing to Moscow. Yeah, I agree. Actually, they do the preparation of this one year before. I mean, we have this kind of a congregations, you know, and the each congregational tried to do the best the best call to the best of Megyn. Steinke juice is a community spirit. -solutely giving thanks for your call and reminding us of the beauty of the procession of the mysteries on Good Friday care. Thanks for the call. Much Sicily's our destination right now on travel with Rick steves. Our travel expert guides are native born, tomato pun and Sarah murder, who's helping me write a new guidebook to Sisley for next year. Sarah. When you're thinking about Sisley by the one great side that didn't make it onto Moscow's greatest hits was mount EDNA. The volcano now is such a wonderful sight. It's actually the top tourist destination in Sicily. They call it mama at that because she sort of is the mother of the island, and she affects so much of their soil and their atmosphere. And if you fly into Catania, she's the first thing you see and she's always steaming and putting on a beautiful show. Almost always even if she's not arresting and to experience as a tourist, you can obviously see her from Tara Meena. You can see from Catania just view, but you can actually get up close and personal, and there's a couple of different ways you can do it. You can take a car if you have one and drive up to a really easy area where you can drop your car into a nice little stroll around craters. Another thing you can do from that same location. If you're more adventurous. Take a cable car up to a higher elevation where you get onto four by four vehicles and they will take you to the summit. So that's an all day experience you can do. There are tourists that do that kind of thing. And if you're not really a person who's into hiking or craters, but you want to get a little more elegant experience of mama at now. You can taste the fruits of her labors, and you can do sort of a wine tour. The north face of Aetna is sort of a hot spot. I'd call it the Napa Valley of Sicily, near a town called run that, so you can go out there and visit wineries and beautiful restaurants, and it's a little bit more of a lazy sort of easy going way to experience that. Nah, she's a wonderful creature. Really, you can't speak about the mountain as living living things. Yeah, and they refer to it as almost a person really doesn't character. So Sisley is a hut destination. It's a work in progress multidimensional and it's got lots to offer. We've been talking with Murdoch and muscle Punto about Sicily. Let's just close with one favorite quintessentially Cecilia experie-. That you'd want to share with one of your travelers if you're guiding them around? Sicily. My favorite thing to do is actually into Mazas hometown, and I ran into him doing this very thing this past fall is there's a little bar called the bamboo entire Amina, and I have lovely memories taking my my son there. We sat out there and it's Grenada bar and that's something they have for breakfast, and you can have a dozen different flavors, they'll pilot in your glass kind of slushy or like, yeah, kind of like a slushies and it's flavors like almond and chocolate and the lira him like a Sunday put a big doll of whip cream. But here's the weird part for Americans. They serve it with a warm brioche egged button and you take that new dip it in or you pile the Grenada inside the frozen. Grenada, it sounds gross, I know. But it's so this counting for breakfast? Yes, I know. And every single day we rented an apartment next door to the bam bar and everyday my child when he was nine, he would get up early and go over and get two of us cappuccinos and big Renita to share. So that's my favorite thing to do in. Nutrition's Sealion style and tomato. Yeah, my favorite little. I mean, it's just to sit always in Meena in the main square in which people which people know doing the passage outta the parade. This is a great way to understand the culture. This is the way great way also on the sense to see them. Just a simple thing. I mean, you're soloist very reach about this kind of experience. So the passage watching people having the passage in the main course. Oh, you guys are fantastic, Sarah and Tomasso milligrams, and I'll see you in chillier Cecilia grad. Got Santa Clarita. Travel with Rick steves has produced had Rick steves Europe and heavens, Washington by Tim tappan and is a Kaplan wilder with Sarah McCormack. Our website is managed by Andrew wake and our theme music is by Jerry Frank special. Thanks Kate. You w in Seattle for studio health this week. You'll find more online at Rick steves dot com slash radio, and we'll look for you again next week with more travel with Rick steves each shit, Rick steves two guides take thousands of free spirited travelers on the score to us through Europe. One small group to time you can choose from both and forty different fixations in Europe's best destinations from Ireland to Greece and practically everywhere. In between begin your next trip at Rick steves dot com.

Rick steves Sicily Sarah McCormack Sisley Moscow sunsetting parade Catania Grenada twenty twenty Europe writer Aetna Seattle Tara Meena Cecilia experie Megyn Santa Clarita Kate Andrew wake
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

12:27 min | 3 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Shoe here on the show with us, our Email addresses radio at Rick steves dot com. We're heading to one of Europe's most interesting islands next and taking your calls for our travel experts on visiting Sicily, where at eight, seven, seven, three, three, seven, four to five on travel with Rick steves. It took me seven trips to Italy before I discovered the warmth end delights of the island of Sicily. I'd say the silliest tie with Irish as the friendliest people I've met in Europe, help us get acquainted with the highlights Sisley we're joined now by two certified tour guide experts to the island local boy Tomas o. Punti and seven Murdoch welcome John. Thanks for joining us to my. So if you were to describe for an American or Canadian hidden off to Sicily the best twelve days to enjoy your homeland, what would you do very quickly in twelve days. So stop the first from Palermo when you see this sixteen different domination that dominated Sicily, it's all a concentration, all of the cultures, layer cake and Palermo. And then I will go to trap any and then from three panel will go to agree gin and then I of prep is on the far west. And what do you like Trapani? I mean, trop any for many reasonable one because they have the billable salt flat ban. Okay. This is where they would harvest the Saul evaporated from the sea and everybody get that very important. Then from there would go to agree Genta Agrigento gentle. Ya fo the volley of the temples. Those beautiful temple sedating back to the faith, six century before Christ imperfect condition you go, there you said the temple concordia this about this temple was built yesterday two thousand that new looking and from five hundred before Christ. Absolutely. It's reminder that Sicily was a very important part of Greek culture onum. Yeah, it was a Greek colony. I mean, the Greeks arrived in Sicily in seven hundred thirty four beef or cry. Some of the greatest cities of Greece. Ace, five hundred BC were insistently. It'll caso from Gento. Where do we go next? Okay. From ugly, gentle, avid. Go to pizza are marina at the Roman villa Cazalet. So this is different. This is not ancient Greek. This ancient Rome. Remember the layers, the layers, this ancient Roman layer. Yeah. So we go to a beautiful villa that basically was built between the third fourth century Roman time. So three or four hundred after Christ is a Roman and this is a villa. What's so famous about this? The mosaics. I mean when you see those floor mosaics you know shining in the call that beautiful, bring caller or read cholera black color. You know this human figures. This was the home of like a man who sold exotic animals. Yes, exactly. Was probably we don't have evidences, but probably was the family of the emperor of family of them. So was an handing lodge or social function because of the expedition's we have a from Rama Tunisia. So we have many. About that. Okay, but there's all sorts of crazy animals showing in the mosaics. And then from our marina you would go to see it Coosa severed. Coolest Syracuse is the big city is a big seed into south and east part of the island of Sicily were basically we have crate grins because remember Sierra Pusa was in competition with ATMs. Remember the peleponnesian wars that so we have these Palermo too big city, but this has many impressive Greek ruin creek and also am barrack style. And then from there I will go to Catania from Catania tower. Meena telling me not the gem of Cecile and that sort of the romantic resort. Absolutely set on a bluff with the beautiful view over the sea with a famous glee Roman fee of her, it's just beautiful. Yeah. And then finally, and finally, of course, my homeland, the alien islands. This is something that you should not me senior tour of Sicily, especially if you have twelve days. So I would visit the first of all of the island of Selena what the movie the postal was filmed who came or right, and then would visit for sure. The island of Stromboli, which is an active volcano. These are little islands, just a short boat, ride north of east of Sicily. Yeah, and you go there by boat from my from Milazzo. There is a port of Milne's. So you embark? I mean, you bought your both from there and you visit, you can do even daily cushioned from there. Okay. So tomorrow that's a good itinerary. Now, several Murdoch. These are the places to see. What would you say as a tour guide are the most important experiences for a traveler to really appreciate Sicily, as opposed to Italy zone? I think the important experiences are getting to know the people of Sicily. I think the people of Sicily have a really different character and understanding the dominations Tamaz spoke about and the colorful sort of mixture of cultures. I think player Maza great experience even if it's a little bit of a scary cities little intimidating. Once you actually see elegance of it in the combination of the culture. That really adds a lot to your experience. So understanding the melting pot aspect of Sicily in multi-culturalism there, it's a really multicultural society. So the people are definitely a highlight for me. What about organized crime? Because we, we think of the godfather and everything for a traveler today. How does that impact your experience? Not at all. You don't see it at all. It's not something that you will encounter as a tourist, not even a little bit. Does it still survive as they're still sort of absolately sort of like territory isn't a different families have different territory or what? What's the behind if you understood organized crime actually, right now what's going on? Well, it still exists. Definitely. A lot of the organized crime has sort of gentrified in a sense where they've turned themselves into more things like construction companies, or they've invested their money and other kinds of corruption. Instead, it's corruption keping and the real drug kind of mafia that you hear about on television on the radio and so on is more centered around Naples. Actually the Cillian mafia is something that's not as centers that used to be. And really the only place that tourists will encounter the vestiges. Of the Cillian mafia. You'll see in Palermo is really big monument and a mural of fell Conan Bassolino the judges that were assassinated. But that was a turning point in nineteen Ninety-two for Sicily where the population decided that they were done. So when the population turned on the mafia, that really was the beginning of the end for the mafia, dominating the culture. Absolutely. And until then was sort of like Robin Hood and Sisley was ruled for centuries by stupid colonial powers, and this was just a way to survive basically, too. I think there was a sense of hopelessness in a way that there was no way to get rid of that problem, but but the people were galvanized after those judges were assassinated. And so this is not to muscle. You've grown up in Sicily. What change have you seen from a law and order point of view and from just an economy point of view in Sicily, big changes. I mean, I think in these luster, Tennessee, this last decayed. The conham of the island is improved a lot. I mean, we have a big improvement. Okay. We have a lot of the young people that want to emigrate won't to go, especially to impart. To Europe for a better job. But if we consider this point of view, I think that insistently they could work. They could work, especially in the recall -ture in a deadly culture is one of the main economical activity for us. But as you know, young generatio- young people, they don't want to be farmer. So that's why most of the people, you know, they prefer to city. So the, they find a better a better condition of life. I was just in Palermo and I remembered being covered with dirt and grime on the buildings and dark walls. And today it's pedestrian only it's well lit, Walzer clean. There's an energy, Damon, feeling exactly. The big change actually happen when Palermo petitionary was declared UNESCO world, Eric wedge. So the historic centre was given a special protection, the United, the nation at this was up -solutely the moment when that city change it a lot. I mean, you see by you go by night there. That is a lot of passage outta there. The passage in Sicily. His way to do it Sarah when you're in Palermo, how do you make a point to enjoy the passage outta? Oh, the passage to I love going out and enjoying the street food scene. That's one of the things I really enjoy doing either by tour just on my own hopping from place to place in trying a lot of the nibbles. I love the area around TI trauma Cima via Makita, which is the street with all the shops and they've really lit up the streets Palermo. I've been going there for maybe ten years now and I can't even believe it's the same city. Even the last five years I couldn't do their because my memory was so different from what I experienced this year. And when you're thinking about this new relative fluent insists, it feels like good times to what degree is that subsidized by taxpayers from northern Italy, probably quite a bit. And also I think that more and more money is going to Sicily from the European Union, especially as more attention is focused on it. Palermo is a cultural capital. This shared, it's being supported by funds from the EU. So it's a, it's a wonderful time to go to Sicily this travel excuse for talking with several Murdoch, and we're talking to us, oh, Punti. About Sicily or phone number's eight, seven, seven, three, three, three, seven, four to five Lorenzo is calling from Boise, Idaho the Renzo. Thanks for your call. Yeah. Do you have a comment or question about Sicily. I would love to never been into Italy a few times. I've just never made it that far south. Once I get down there is a pretty good transportation to get around. Always. I'm not a big car renter, so I need a way to get her out of these places. And what is the transportation like? And I get trained buses? What? How do people get around on their? I'm writing a book on Sicily right now in this topic, I was just discussing and Sisley can be a little challenging without a car. A car is a lot of fun and it's actually less intimidating than you may think that if you want to go car free, you absolutely can. And I have a really elegant solution for you. If you start on the far west in Trump any fly in there, you can use that as a home base for doing little day-trips in the area there. And that's a little bit more countryside. It's not really urban, then you can head to blame on the bus from Palermo. You can spend two or three days there to Montreal, which is a beautiful cathedral with mosaics. And then from there, it's an easy to our best connection to Catania on the far east. Eastern side, which has an easy airport that's only fifteen minutes from this. Our connection by bus to three hours. Cillian. Our impressive thing I was. I was on a twelve day tour of Sicily, ten or twelve days, and I was struck by how how short the drives are. It's an easy to get around in part because of the tax revenue or the money for infrastructure that comes in from the north that feels like the roads are overbuilt for the traffic. I mean, you've got great freeways for a little island with not a lot of traffic. I never noticed any traffic temps. You can get around easily. And Sarah said, if you don't mind driving, it's a great place to drive. I'd recommend doing it by car. But if you insist, of course there's public transit, you'd wanna let the existing transit routes probably help dictate. I think you're turnaround and I would definitely suggest you change the train system does not connect enough and it slow that's important in a lot of countries, Portugal, Ireland, Sicily. We a lot of times, think of train because we traveled in France, Germany, but no buses really work much better to agree. I mean, I agree. I totally, of course there are areas of Sicily where the train connection, good, fully sense. If you go from. Palatable to chief Olu. I mean, we have a when I went ride by train and the trainees about every half an hour when our that's grateful that I mean some aerial Cecilia very well covered because cheifs Lou is a wonderful complements, the bigger cities, and that I have beautiful memories of Jeff Liu as a wonderful, small fishing town basic. Yeah, it is still officiant down. Of course, the tourism is increasing. Still has this kind of beautiful medieval atmosphere of restaurant, fish restaurants. You eat your fish just on the water. Lorenzo. I hope that gives you some ideas on getting excited about booking. Thank you so much for your health. I'm getting excited talking about. Thank you for calling. Happy travels. Thank you. This is traveled, Rick. Steves we're joined by tomorrow Ponti and several Murdoch. We're talking about Sicily. Our number's eight, seven, seven, three, three, three, seven, four to five and garett is calling from Chicago internal Garrett.

Sicily Palermo Italy Murdoch Rick steves Europe Sisley Catania Cillian Genta Agrigento temple concordia Trapani Palermo petitionary Roman villa Cazalet Sarah Greece Rome Milazzo Selena
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

13:53 min | 3 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"To his boyhood home in Indiana, and then on up to Springfield, couldn't find his authentic log cabin, which apparently toured with p. t. Barnum and then found myself sort of didn't quite realize I was doing this at the time. But when I went to photograph Pete, Seeger's log cabin, I think it was sort of thinking the Pete Seeger was are are sort of modern day Abe Lincoln his garage was so cool. Yeah, there is a a workshop in his barn that couldn't help a photograph in its. Very filled with, you know, every little space is taken up with something. It's almost like looking through his ear into his brain. That's right. Exactly. And his grandson told me that what he loved about peace seekers, you know home was that you could put something down and ten years later, you come back and probably be in the same place. Did you call it emotional landscape? Is that the term used any? I guess it's it would have to be imagery that resonated the pull me in that that I, that I felt moved to take a picture without having to think about it too much. Really. It's like intentionally no faces. I mean, I, I would have thought you'd put a face of the people featured, but then on the other hand to show Lincoln's gloves, those gloves actually were in his pocket. The night, he was assassinated at the theater and is actually near. There's a bloodstain on on on one of the things, but you can really what I loved about the gloves. Was that you feel like you're looking at his hands? Yeah, you can. You can feel his hands on all the folds and creases. Now you talked about visiting a lot of homes and some of them worked for others didn't. My thing is Europe. You know, there's a lot of homes in Europe, and a lot of them are just owns of dead people and they just without spirit. But occasionally you walk into a home and it's like they're still there. That's right. Can you talk about a few places that that really felt like the spirit? Was there. Emily Dickinson's house for sure. Not not her house per se with her brother's house was the first one. This led me into this this journey period is that they hadn't really changed anything. I mean, the wallpaper was was writing off the walls, the it was. It was so Victorian I had no idea of Torian meant it was very dark and they were pictures hanging on every single, you know, part of the wall. So that really moved me. I mean, I just you could feel that they were there or had been there. There is a bedroom upstairs where Austin Dickinson son has had died, and it just felt to Erie to walk into it. You know, it's not that it was haunted. Exactly, but it just felt their their presence with almost like like they just stepped out for lunch and Russia's her at the easel or the pens on the desk, or are you take a peek at what are the contents in the drawer? I think the heart of the book is probably the Georgia O'Keefe set of fixtures to actually walk into her studio in ABA q. And and see where she lived and worked. It really did move me to tears. It was very enlivening. There was probably one of the best pictures in the book is, is this photograph of her pastels. Oh yeah, which she made. You can feel like Lincoln's gloves. You can feel her her fingers on this pastels and the range of colors are definitely the the palette, you know, from from New Mexico, you did a lot of extremely close up work, and I think extremely close up has a has a great intimacy. I mean, you look at that close up of Emily Dickinson's only surviving dress and you can understand the the humbleness of the age and the loving stitching that, oh, and into that. I know it's so not my kind of picture and I found myself going in is it feels like a big responsibility to go that close and try to explain yourself any liba is our guest right now on travel with Rick steves in an interview. We haven't heard since it first aired on the show in twenty twelve. She's telling us about a coffee table photo collection. She had. Just released called pilgrimage. The Smithsonian made an exhibit from her collection that toured to local museums around the country any. This is a travel show, and you did clearly did a lot of traveling to put this book together. Just from a listeners point of view, who's dreaming about traveling and wants to have an insight into some of the great homes or inspirational landscapes we're talking about what are three or four of the best homes that you'd recommend for people to be sure to put on their list. We'll concord is sort of like a concord. Massachusetts is just sort of a hotbed of these writers who live together at the same time, Emerson throw and Louise may Alcott, and that's sort of an extraordinary place to go visit. And it's not far from Amherst in New York City is like every blocked there is a historic home. I mean, you know, there are small in house museums, and they're remarkably well preserved. I mean, there's a lot of nineteenth century American history that intimately preserved from the looks of your photographs is that accessible to to every tourist. Is every every photograph in this book is accessible. Absolutely. It is most of these places they either have tours or you can set up an appointment to go. You know, the spiral jetties just sitting out there is all this. You know, it's it's not as his that lands is there. You don't need to take it for Walden pond, you know any when you looked at all of these great and prolific people's homes were you struck by how they decorated. I mean, does that give us much of an insight into their passion in there and their genius? That's that's a funny question because I having visited Monkhouse we're Julia Wolfe, had a writing studio in the back. I was very fortunate they they left me alone in the writing. CO two take pictures, and I took everything off of her desk can photograph the top of her desk and it was like riddled with Markson cigarette burns. And and then I went on to read her husband. Leonard Woolf writes about how Virginia Woolf was extremely messy. So when you look at this desktop, which I photographed in fact, it was kind of almost near squalor. Apparently it was what I understand, but the desk sort of tells you that and just to be there, if if you have a creative spirit and to be in the space of somebody who you really admire that in itself is like a pilgrimage. Actually, that's the name of your book pilgrimage. He's xactly as well. You go to to forge house in in London, and you can't believe you know that it's it's left the way you know it was when when he was live and there is the couch that he did all his analytical, you know sessions on that still there. It's kind of interesting. I mean, it's kind of an eclectic mix. I also went to Graceland. I went to, I had the opportunity to go to Ansel Adams darkroom and to see the dark room still intact. And I, I did have the opportunity photograph Ansel in that dark room in the seventies. So to see the darkened still there and and sort of photograph it as trying was that'd be a pilgrimage for you? Yes. Was this. There's some photographers in here. I like I like to play the piano and I got to go to the little cabin on the fjord that inspired advert, Grieg. I got to see, you know his piano and his view and his desk and the view that inspired him as he wrote. And then when you know his, aren't you close your eyes and you're right there now, that's that's a great description of what can happen. What I hope to encourage. You know, again, this was such a personal project. I, I'm surprised at anyone else's even, you know, looking at it or whatever, but but what I would like to encourage is, is people make their own lists and go off and whatever means something to them. And so of all the of all the visit to made, what was of you that really struck you? Like, wow, I never realized this had such an impact on that person's spirit or creativity. Well, I think that the exercise in Yosemite was was an interesting trial because I, I was with Jean Adams Angels' daughter-in-law. And the first time I went into semi and we woke up in the morning, I was going to go out and photograph the valley, and there were no clouds in the sky, and she Adam said to me, we'll any, you know, Anza would wait three weeks for clouds, you know. So then that's sort of stepping on this path that I wanted to get the valley with clouds in it. I went back actually ten days before the book was supposed to be turned in anyways. It's a lot harder than it looks like. So it was I had a great appreciation for for when you go to that spot where you look down the valley and of course you know, it's it's still with us because of people like Ansel Adams who gave us these images, but it's a mecca. I, I was never there by myself. There was always at least. One photographer and then the day I actually got the the picture I wanted. They were like maybe fifty or sixty photographers there. It is really a mecca for photographers, so beautiful. Then when you get an end to let him sky, I would suppose the photographers come out of the woodwork. Any liebowitz photo collection, pilgrimage features, no faces. But it captures the spirit of dozens of great people who are important to our culture with portraits of where they live and the objects that were part of their everyday life. You'll find more about it with this week's show at Rick steves dot com. Slash radio any. We looked at all of these people's homes and so on. And I'm wondering if any Leib of it was going to go to the home of the woman considered the most celebrated living photographer, your house. What would she find? What would she want to capture in her photo essay? What would they find in your living room? That's a tough question because you know, I having grown up in a military family where I traveled over a couple of years. I actually am a child of the road. I do love to get out and be on the road and hence this this road trip, I grew up driving across this country growing up my fam-. Could afford, you know, hotel rooms in. So we we slept in the car and we drove in, you know, my father was stationed at Fairbanks, Alaska than we drive down to Texas. He you'd be stationed at Texas, and then we in a block, see Mississippi. So I've, I've traveled pretty extensively through this country, and I, my children have have sorta forced me to to settle down, which is not a bad thing. It's a good thing. You know, I think I built my last home for my children and I'm trying this idea of staying put, you know, in giving them a consistent, you know life. But the home I have now is really something for for them to live in. Do you have your favorite photographs hanging around or is it a place where you get away from that and you're not any the great photographer? I don't hang my own photographs in my house. I, I can't afford the art that I really really love it. When my children started drawing early on, I, I love their their work because it seems to me that all we try to do as adults is trying to get back to me. Children in our meaning, and I started hanging their, you know, their work all over the house and my children's drawings and paintings are so magical, so. Wonderful. And when they come home from school with the drawings, I'm I'm framing them. So that's what's in the house is the art work is is my children's. And then I do have a very nice little photography collection of the Tigers. I've always admired of some Lynn Davis's in the living room. I have cardiac Rozan, Robert Frank, an avid on, so that's what that's what the children are growing up with. Who tried to create an a nest, you're trying to settle down? No, I am. I am try. I am trying sure. Look like a woman of the road on your photo in the book here with you in the boots in the back of the pickup there. Yeah, I'm more I am more that person. I, I mean, these road trips for the children. You know, taking, you know the children tonight. Agra falls. And you know, I, I do plan to take them out to do you know the mid west, and that's what I, that's what I've been dying to do is get. Eating them out on the road with me. Maybe they can give the photographer a fresh excuse to look at things they will. They and they did with with this day will all I can't wait to take them out driving to see this country is is is a great country. It was interesting is Annie Oakley in the book is two pages dedicated to photograph her trunk. I love it because, you know, she tried to settle down, but she, she never did she. She lived on the road. There's a Robert frost manuscript. At the the beginning of the of the book that I discovered the Jones library in Amherst. It's it's the poem in miles to go before I sleep and miles to go before I sleep in on the dedication page for my children. You know to Sarah Susana Samuel with the idea that we have lots more to do in as you thumb through this book. I'm coming through it right now. What do you see if you just thumb through the book? And you look at the beautiful images that you've collected in this book? What's the bigger picture. Here? Well, I think I didn't quite see it until many of the pictures were hung it as small book signing in New York, and I was looking at them up and I and I realized that it really it really was a search, and the search is not over and you know, don't ask me what I'm searching for, but you know, just to see how people lived and what they did with their lives and people that I cared about and just to collect notes. I mean, I was just thinking about the old faithful picture, which I, it took me two days to get those pictures. Again, I'm thinking about Ansel Adams and what he must have done with early pioneer photographers did when they first went out and discovered these places, wow, these images, tie things together and they keep things alive. They're everywhere. I mean, you know, these small historical places that they give you such residents and give you a lot of insight into who we are and what to do with ourselves next, any liebowitz best wishes with your work. And finding that NIST at home. Thank you. Shoe

Abe Lincoln Ansel Adams Emily Dickinson Rick steves Pete Seeger Europe Indiana Springfield concord Barnum Austin Dickinson Ansel Adams darkroom New Mexico Walden pond Robert frost Russia Ansel Leonard Woolf Amherst
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Yes. Oh, yeah, definitely fill gorgeous travel photographer. Thank you so much and best wishes with your photography. Your travels end highlighting the beautiful diversity in humanity on this planet. Thank you, Rick. We have links to Phil's work in the notes for today's show at Rick steves dot com. Slash radio up. Next, any liebowitz tells us what she photographed on a road trip across America from New England to Magara falls Graceland and the old southwest and later we're off to enjoy the photogenic island of Sicily. It's travel with Rick steves. She's who they call unto produce. The official photographs of people like Queen Elizabeth Bill Gates and Barack Obama and leading celebrities and entertainers. But for any liba she needed a road trip to see America in a new light in her book pilgrimage. Any brings us an intimate glimpse into the world of some extraordinary people without even looking at their faces any. Thanks for joining us. Glad to be here. You know, when we think any leave of its, we think faces and expressive bodies and so on, and this book you page through it, there's really not a face in it. What was your goal with this book? Well, it really was a an opportunity for down a different road. It was really an exercise in refilling myself backup. I, I was having a difficult time and you know, I just set out to look for emotional landscape and it started with the photograph I did at Niagara Falls with my children, sort of showing me that picture. And when I saw. What came out of it. It was that picture at Niagara Falls and also the pictures that I took it Emily Dickinson's house in Amherst. That sort of led me to believe that this would be an interesting journey to make a list of places that I've always been interested in or cared about her and just hit the road. Go out on the road and see what emotionally drew me in will. The cover of the book is certainly kind of a minimalist hit the road shot, and it is. It's just Niagara Falls, and it's the front end, the back cover in a collection of mostly homes and intimate little details about where mostly great Americans lived and were inspired. Why did you put Niagara Falls on the cover and the back cover of this book? Well, Niagara Falls is sort of a metaphor for me. I mean, first of all, I, we were on a day trip to Niagara Falls, and I was not having the best time because I was having difficulty with business meetings and and I was on the phone. I was being drawn away to talk on the phone and my children. They were having a pretty good time and they, they just sort of wall Stover to the falls and they were. They were mesmerized. They were looking at the falls and I, I walked up, you know, instead behind them and you know, looked over them and took a few pictures, and that's the cover of the book. So like any good Bob Dylan song, you know if it's either a beginning or an end, you know, you have to sort of decide, you know what you wanna make. I think what I love about the falls is that it's not taken for many special place. It's right on the walkway. This was going to ask you, this is everybody has this feud, but the way you photograph did it. It's got a sound track of its own even though it's just a photograph. Well, it's true with your seventy two, which I had this idea to go back to the seventy valley. And I worked on a Ansel Adams workshop in the eighties, and I remember stumbling across the view looking down the valley. And I, I remember thinking, oh my gosh, this is Angela Adams picture. This is, I guess, you know, almost anyone can take this picture. I'm Rick steves. This is travel with Rick steves. Were speaking with any liba of it any wrote, I'm interested in. How people live and how they do their work and how you translate that visually, whatever that is when I do my portrait work, which does have people in it, you know, I, I'm looking for the same things. I'm looking for the chair that they sat in. I'm looking for the view they looked out on. I've always been more interested in what people do and how they live more than necessarily who they are. So I, I don't really think of this work is being so different for my regular day to day work. He really is the no taking involved is sort of the peripheral vision you have when you when I go to take a portrait, you know, for a good portrait you have and this is what you're so masterful is catching people at ease. How do you catch a home Eddie's. One of the reasons I started the project and decided it was a good idea was that I was looking for a place or something that that resonated an emotional way that drew me and and some places it. It didn't work didn't work at all, and I had to maybe dig deeper or just walk away from it. I I seriously was was looking for Lincoln's, log cabin. I drove the whole heritage trail. I started at his boyhood home in Kentucky in, I'm sorry, his birthplace in Kentucky to

Niagara Falls Rick steves Magara falls Graceland America Phil Emily Dickinson Ansel Adams Angela Adams seventy valley Bob Dylan Amherst Kentucky official Barack Obama Queen Elizabeth Bill Gates New England Eddie Lincoln Stover
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And then I'll call over the interpreter and and let them know what I'm there for what I'm doing. When we think about traveling around the world and photographing people, I would imagine every culture has a different idea of what is beautiful. Do you have a sense of that when you're in a different culture is what is not beautiful from our point of view, but what's beautiful on their terms in terms of human right one of the things that happens quite a bit when I had out these Polaroid's I've given Polaroid's people haven't seen their face and they can't believe it's them. They'll have to have a friend combined look at it and point to it and say, yeah, that's you. There are people on this planet that don't know what they look like. Oh, yeah, that's fascinating. Less and less all the time. Yeah. But yeah, that's interesting. When that happens in terms of beauty, you know, I have this book enduring spirit, which is tribal people and indigenous people all over the world, which I carry with me and I'll take that and I'll let them look it. And they'll look at a say somebody from Irian Jaya say, and I'm in Africa. They might have bones coming out of their nose and a penis scored on and they'll laugh. Oh, jeez, that's the strangest things. How could anybody do that? Here they're sitting there with, you know, lip plate in their in lower lip. That's about six inches in diameter. So you know, we all have our own senses of what's beautiful. But what struck me when I look through your Tabet book was that there was a very fundamental beauty in each subject and it wasn't your standard American Beauty. They were not necessarily beautiful by, you know, advertising standards in the United States. But there is a fundamental beauty that transcended you know how smooth was their complexion. The aware of that when you're, yeah, that's what I'm attracted to. That's what I love taking pictures in the raw, itchy it is. It's just a very natural UN enhanced in any way. You look at it the way we're in Hanson beauty, but it's this beauty that we see in the rough is that a function of the strength of their spirit because sometimes you see somebody, they just go, there is one proud person. There's a person who's on top of things who's fulfilled. Yeah. Yeah, energy come through. Yeah. Oh, yeah, definitely. I don't know. There's something about being close to the earth and in that cycle and you know there's dirt on their face. Beautiful. It's just such a beauty when you are dealing with people in different cultures as of otographer, do you find different people have different fear or reaction to the camera? Some people just can make love with the lens and other people here the enemy. How do you get through that? What are the tab who's? And so, well, first of all, you know, I teach a lot in students are always wondering, how do you break the ice and first of all, you have to be comfortable with yourself in doing it. And that takes a little bit of practice. But I've been in so many different cultures and tribes and you know, I've never heard the term. I'm afraid you're trying to steal my soul to me. That's an a wives tale. Yeah, but you know, it was THEO Pia down on the lower OMO valley with the Mersey tribe for some reason. Zain when I was down there, there was a belief at that time that something would come out of the camera and blind them so they would when I would hold up the camera, they would duck their head. But other than that, you know, I find it much easier to take a picture of a person like this. Then a picture of somebody in our culture in our culture were worried about, okay, am I gonna look too fat, too. All right to this to that they're, they're mostly especially if I'm using a light, they're caught up by, you know, jeez, this is interesting, so their attention isn't on themselves. It's on me and it's an outward directed attention that gives a stronger image. Do you find it helps to give them some business smoke a cigarette, fling prayer wheel around or just be alone with the camera you. Meanwhile the while, taking this picture, I usually let him be alone when I'm doing portrait's.

Polaroid Irian Jaya UN United States Africa Tabet OMO valley THEO Pia Hanson Zain six inches
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I said to him you know dominic if you keep a jari i really would be interested in publishing it and he went out to the trial he did keep a dari and of course that was dominic down and uh the pc wrote justice was one of the most incredible stories of you know it was a sensation it was a cessation of the time and when i took over as vanity fair of course he was my first cool i said dominic i want you to be very first off rider and he was and of course he helped to define the magazine he really was one of defining voices the two of them were but he also as surrey like martin amos to to right for the magazine somebody you'd known from odd yes i did i invited modern amos and i also brought in nature if it writers who them became the sort of defining names of the magazine nightingale she he beat of boyer a td allman the great foreign correspondent alex she went off the great to another great writer of foreign stories like chico mendes or diane fossey when she died in in rwanda are alex to this regrettable dory that yes and that piece that he wrote became guerrillas in the miss the movie was eddie lee bowitz photographing for the magazine when i took over on a leave of its had come from rolling stone but have for some reason i never got it up pictures weren't ready being used i mean vanity fair before i got that was always hiring people and not not using them right i very first weekend i was working to redesign the magazine in the office and i opener draw and i found this treasuretrove a photograph by annie leibovitz of committee um there was a picture of of of pa we herman in a hanging upside down uh a uniform at from a lap that was a picture of what he go book into that amazing picture will be go begging the botham milk though is picture just these amazing pictures and i fell enough of them i.

martin amos boyer writer chico mendes diane fossey rwanda annie leibovitz dominic alex eddie lee botham milk
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:58 min | 4 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to the so vdc will and if you've been he's a rapid recap of what he means of the chefs sous kenneth talked about his massive moustache virgil new orient express superstar photographer annie leibovitz told us about her portray to previously pregnant through nia in a go became me and to strange if these past talked about children dick yes the founder of africa's biggest international keeney p decide who still with us in our legal area and here with me in london film critic marianne coming up in these self show in amman brazilian singersongwriter monica vasconcelos to about who did songs french artists sophie cow tells us why some of her work is extremely personal and intimate and explains why she invited complete strangers to come in sleep in her bed john when i made people sleeping by baid it was about having suddenly for people you don't know at all the possibility to see them in a situation that may be their wife as bad as never seen the voice of hollywood's men vince vaughn on nuts playing funny anymore and the newly would actresses who had talking about the cost in couch investors sell us and as soon as someone to from sao paulo brazil who as world service listeners you may be familiar with not just the her transporting climbed nato's because she made a beautiful documentary for his last year about losing her sight she lives here in london and has just released a compilation album cold the sao paulo tapes eight be john she spoke to the policies carrots matthews who asked her what the collection in enough l was all about it psalm our selection of brazil dong's written during the dictatorship in brazil between ninety six in ninety five they are the songs that helped to brazil this very oppressive regime under censorship uh political rights suspended and and many human rights violations seems a project that was begging when when did the fruits of this idea starts in 2014 we marked fifty years of the coin and i decided to celebrate the songs the writers of this something desirable they they actually somewhat of one pm at least was stabbed to guard one of them was imprisoned in sent to exile that's khaitonov it'll some lots of them had the name old by police weeks were altered but when you listen to the songs they are triumph they are gorgeous in.

brazil dong human rights sao paulo sao paulo brazil vince vaughn amman orient kenneth brazil annie leibovitz london nato hollywood john sophie cow marianne africa founder fifty years
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"If ply ray they all the most magnificent moustaches in england sheen have ag tortured splendor i can tell you from the experience of working with his start ii absolutely underlined the torture thing i hope we got the splendor thing french artists safey cal talks about has sleuth like ability to fully strange in investigate their private lives hollywood actor vince worn tells us about his flight sequences in brawl in sao 99 and 102 photographer annie leibovitz talks about the extreme photograph he took of donald trump and scantilyclad melania he was done for rogue we were photograph in malanje and you know what i mean this is our first lady you know is a big issue practically ready to give birth and we have the sublime brazilian singersongwriter monica vasconcelos by the san paolo tapes all that much more coming up on gene on stood mcintosh with the bbc news hello iranian officials say more than two hundred people are now confirmed dead in iran after a powerful earthquake struck just across the border in a mountainous region of iraq iranian officials say more than 1600 men buildings have come down electrical supplies have been cut and landslides are hampering rescue efforts ramaiah higham reports from fp law in northern iraq that the quake was in the iraqi province of sulaimaniya which borders iran with iran appears to have been hit much harder than its neighbour briggs were abducted laps and rescue efforts were delayed by landslides which cut off some roads hospitals were severely damaged and many people spend the night on the streets in iraq the town of that have been the hand was hardest hit with structural damage to buildings as well as the main hospital which lost power after the quake uh donald trump has told reporters he has a great relationship with the controversial philippines president rodrigo duterte a he was speaking uh to make data on the sidelines of the annual summit of south east asian nations washington has in the past criticized mr territories campaign to eradicate drugs that has left thousands dead espalande howard johnson is in manila donna coming here representing america as a top diplomat and.

vince worn america manila president philippines ramaiah higham iran bbc annie leibovitz malanje hollywood howard johnson rodrigo duterte donald trump briggs sulaimaniya iraq mcintosh
"annie leibovitz" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"annie leibovitz" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The fetched oh you got a very disturbing images of pretend truth let's get a rude out legit but a picture scary that picture so this is today um so i'm sure you remember this is how kind of like the pavlov dog a experiment say they you know that you would road and renewable centromin eventually when you ring the bell they celebrate eat the food face that can affect looking at key pitches thinking of your partner in the you'll have that nice essay sanction stay happy guerrillas and around your child's was that's about this is in the man i'm not talking about the print sunday story i'm looking at the one underneath that this fight should go he'll snowden does put any widow for the with this is an update on the fleet job and this is a developments in the medical world this is a trial by us scientists of a patch safe you don't like needles and he aged over we're told to in a gun get fleet tap every year and the the uptake that is slipping despite the fact that fleet can really not kenyan i not cure off in a way to munich pay tape weeks ago oh i could get proper proper fleeing mrs a patch a very simple patch the just put on the arrest and selfadministered and it for twenty minutes and then you may say be in a getaway with having to have horrible needles if that's not yet thing and justice justice effective things granite and funny tennis is senator to me more yes this is sad serena williams and seize on the front page of vanity fair and she's very very pregnant and she is without tech laid split say and it yeah it's very like the deming more one from back in the day and this is an absolutely stunning from page by the celebrity photographer annie leibovitz and it's been how does an image of female empowerment initial comes off the back of the serie recovering yesterday about this row that she's currency with john mcenroe john mcenroe this really controversial crash line by saying that serena would be like seven hundred in the world as she paid against men and see it she issued a statement saying dear john i do and.

partner tennis senator serena williams annie leibovitz munich deming john mcenroe twenty minutes