36 Burst results for "Annette"

Counter Strike Wellness Check

The Center Ring esports podcast

06:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Counter Strike Wellness Check

"You know it's also been rough though this year which that's counterstrike I. Feel like the year twenty twenty, really the entire calendar year has been a rough go for our baby boy counterstrike I feel like we have had very little positive stories to talk about with counterstrike so I figured. Normally. We do this. You know two or three times a year the state of CIS where we kind of let everyone know, hey, this is what's been going on. This is an update for everything I didn't feel like that was really the proper way. Do I feel like we need to do a wellness check? Right now like CS needs to go see a doctor and get a checkup because it's been rough. Yeah I mean it obviously Kovic been rough on everybody but see s one of the most appealing factors is the the rivalries between. Countries and you Brazil like that's Kind of create a story line within itself like it's it's just so big. It's not like League of legends where the leagues are really a hundred percent split up and then they only meet each other at these really big events throughout the year for counterstrike they're consistent rivalries. You can have a you rivalries on the rag like it happen every event for the most part in. So from that standpoint, it's affected it more than other games, but then you just have the consistent storyline at their storyline at the storyline that will get into that really just hurt like emotionally feeling it you. Know like I'm feeling emotional about this game because there's so much going on in, you want counterstrike to remain at the top. If you've been a fan for counterstrike as long as we have in, you see little in the armor right that we hadn't really seen before there really hasn't been much competition not only within the genre, but in east sports as a whole, very few games can stand up to that bar in in your starting to feel that slip a little bit. It's not it's not gone obviously it's not even like really lowered itself from where it's at but you're seeing. Chinks in the armor that you feel like, Hey, if we don't fix some of the soon, we could have a bigger problem. long-term has anything that we've we are about to talk about. Affected your. Viewing mentality just one that would be the first thing I want to bring up is the most recent coaches cheating scandal when you're in an online era in although I always told myself like people find a way to take advantage of the system right I was thinking more along the lines of like people had twitch dreams up and they were like getting information that way in that's like stuff that's really hard to control and monitor. But like what can you do if your valve Annette instance like there's not a whole lot if people are playing from homes or off site facilities like you can only do so much so I don't blame them in that instance with the coaches cheating scandal. It really hurt the integrity of the game like there's just so many people involved and I feel like we're just getting to the start of the scandals between the coaching cheating in the MD l.. match-fixing stuff that we're about to hear more about we don't know enough yet but will hear more about this affects the game like this becomes a problem. 'CAUSE now you'RE GONNA see people lose jobs over it. You're GONNA see vowel maybe make stricter coaching rules over this INALSA look at you like you cheated. That's not a good thing right like all these coaches and teams not just coaches, coaches, teams like next time. You make a big fuss about something. This is going to get thrown in your face until this like Aeros. Changed your moved on but yeah that that will leave more of a lasting impression on the game I. Think we're done with me is like definitely has like you see some of these teams and some of these events like I like. I don't know if I'm as. It's still like like the finals and everything are still super exciting. But yeah, it has kind of like in the back of my mind no matter how much I don't want to think about it. It's like, okay. Well, what what is going on that I'm not aware of at the moment. And I know we had Craig on last week or last episode, and he kind of gave his outsiders ingle on it and that kind of made me think to like you know. To me like I understand you're not what's the saying you're not trying if you're not cheating. You're not trying if you're not cheating. Yes. Sounds, but it's also sounds wrong. You get what? You get what I'm saying and I do agree with that statement. However. It also leaves a very bad taste in my mouth that this is apparently been a bug now for years. So you can't just say, oh, it's part of the online quote unquote era it's been around for years valve has been made aware of it. Now, valve could've nipped in the bud a long ago had been guys were aware of this coaching bug do not do it. If you do it, we will restart the round or if it happens will restart the round. If you don't tell us, you're gonNA forfeit no be punishment. That's when I'm like okay. The onus is now on the team and the coaches. But. The fact that valve has known about it hasn't made a ruling like that. I'm like all right. Well, then apart from an organization responsibility to be like, Hey, you did cheat. It's like I'm torn right like cheating is never okay but at the same time. Cheating you're not trying and it's just like I I'm almost like. Split down the middle backwards again whatever you go. I'm almost torn straight down the mid on how to feel about this I know valve made a statement. Did they mention anything about knowing this? Yeah they did they knowledge that they said you know it's it's unfortunate in frustrating that we did not respond to this bugs sooner. Now again, we think that responding offer at least two years later. The only reason they're responding now is because. Their hands have been forced. There was a but with that statement in it says, but bugs or the reality of software in until their resolved, we need to be able to trust the players coaches I have a huge problem with that because yeah although bugs are. Part of. The reality of software sewer bug fixes you know you identify a bug, you go in and you fix it. We understand that things can happen. We understand that you introduce a new gun into the game like the Ra and you have to deal with scaling and getting it just right like it's not everything is going to be perfect but we're talking about a game breaking bug from a competitive standpoint in a multibillion dollar industry that you chose to ignore for so long

League Of Legends Brazil Kovic Annette Craig
Fresh update on "annette" discussed on The Takeout with Major Garrett

The Takeout with Major Garrett

01:07 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "annette" discussed on The Takeout with Major Garrett

"Side by side for the lead? Here we go. Let's go on the outside is Gregson on the inside, they state side by side. It is a snarling pack of cars behind him. But Briscoe is going to take the lead again. Just like he did on the last restart, pulls away from the field takes the lead here. Just eight laps to go, Gregson, his 2nd 3rd right now is going to be Daniel. Him. Rick. Two guys out front have made already a 66 car like gap between themselves and the new third place car. That's hemorrhage site. Chase Briscoe standing up on that throttle down that nella straightaway. He wants to win this one today and put it to bed. He's got about a seven car like lead over second place right now, Noah Gregson, then is Daniel seven laps to go last lap. Ross Chastain nearly hit the wall in turn for went sideways and lost a lot of spots Leaders back in one, It is still Chase Briscoe. Richard Boswell gave him fresh tires. When Chase Briscoe is feeling a bit bit of a vibration right down the back stretch. It's once again, Here's Briscoe. Way out in front of place. Noah Gregson, Way out in front of third place. Daniel Hamrick, then Michael Annette's there. Justin Allgaier,.

Chase Briscoe Noah Gregson Daniel Hamrick Hemorrhage Daniel Richard Boswell Justin Allgaier Ross Chastain Rick Michael Annette
Denis Shapovalov survives five-set scare against Taylor Fritz

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

Denis Shapovalov survives five-set scare against Taylor Fritz

"At the US Open men's play number 12 Dennis Shep of All of of Canada, got by number 19 Tailor friend to the U. S and five sets 62 in the fifth. Chap. Avala moves on. He'll meet number seven. David Go fan in the fourth round. Women's play number for Osaka number eight. Martic number 17 Kerber number 28 Brady advanced around for Jennifer Brady. Knock it off. Caroline Garcia 6363. She'll make Kerber in round for Osaka will meet Annette Conta ve in the fourth round. At the

Osaka Jennifer Brady Caroline Garcia Avala Kerber Dennis Shep Annette Conta Tailor United States Canada David U. S
Atlanta area schools to begin virtual learning

Atlanta's Morning News

00:10 sec | Last month

Atlanta area schools to begin virtual learning

"County Superintendent says students will not be back of the classroom anytime soon go Annette's among the system's looking at phasing in on campus learning beginning next week and the latest

County Superintendent Annette
Shatter-Proof: How Glass Took Over the Kitchenand Ended Child Labor

Gastropod

05:36 min | Last month

Shatter-Proof: How Glass Took Over the Kitchenand Ended Child Labor

"I am a Coloratura Mr Beast not Annette's. Well, whatever you are on record sal show Debra sent you over here. He didn't. You told me was your age. I nine and in spite of what you think. There are some professions where practice does make perfect. Julie Andrews pretending to be a man pretending to be a woman and still managing to shatter a wine glass with her gorgeous and super powerful voice at least in the movie Victor Victoria. But you know you can't believe everything you see on the big screen like breaking a wine glass with just a perfect flat yeah. I always been a long held ambitions. Break wine glasses of the sound. Some of you longtime gastropod listeners might recognize that Voice Zoe. Laughlin. Is none other than the star of our very first episode who said that mango sorbet tastes sublime on gold spoons hers is the voice that is inspired the purchase of a thousand golden spoons or at least a half dozen that we know about though is not just spoon aficionado. She's a material scientist and director of the Institute of Making at University College London, and this episode we were excited to talk to her again not about gold spoons. But about glass I mean even though I should've understand it on paper. Everything about glasses still sort of extraordinary mysterious like just the fact that is transparent when pretty much everything else isn't transparent is extraordinarily we have a lot of questions this episode for one. How did something? So seemingly delicate and breakable get to be so ubiquitous in the kitchen and also how come you could never put a drinking glass in the oven, but you can cook in a glass dish. What does the? Invention of the bottling machine have to do with a beautiful stretch of protected sand dunes along the shores of Lake Michigan or with the rise of Ketchup and Coca Cola and the abolition of Child Labor for that matter and more importantly can you actually shatter glass using sound did zoe pull it off by the way Cynthia you might not have realized this but this episode is dedicated to your mother glassmaker extraordinaire. Of. Glasswork on display in my house as we speak and I have at least five pieces of fused and stained Tama Graber, glass mom, this one's for you. What is glass? All glass everywhere in the world is at least seventy percent made of sand that's been melted down and it's mixed together in a way that the atoms don't have any kind of order them, and that's what gives rise to it being transparent. You've already heard from Zoe now it's time to meet our other two intrepid glass enthusiasts who will be inducting us into the mysteries of this material. This episode been Speiser journalist and author of a very enjoyable book called the World Grain, the story of Sand and how it transformed civilization and an Isa Ramirez, material scientist and author of another totally delightful. Book. Called the Alchemy of US humans and matter transform one, another Zoe and Isa and bins are all about glass. You cannot overstate how ubiquitous glass is and how important it is to the modern world in which we all live I'm just looking around the kitchen where I'm standing there glass bottles holding olive oil. There's glass windows they're glass fixtures around the glass lightbulbs to everything from you know salt shakers and I glass lenses to things like twenty ton telescope lenses in the world's most powerful telescopes. It's in the fiber optic cables that connect to the Internet fiber optic cables made it literally of Spun. Glass. So really without glass we wouldn't have modern civilization. So we've established that this miraculous foundation of modern civilization is made of melted down sand with a few other ingredients thrown in but to go back another step, and this is a strange question but what is sand and is all sand the same thing? The Word San means just any small pieces Greens right of any hard substance so sand can be. Anything, you know it can be flint it can be courtside anything any kind of stone but the most common form of sand. Most of the sand in the world is courts, which is silicon dioxide and to make glass. That's what you need. You need court sand and you need a specially high security court sand. This seems very fortunate. You need court sand to make glass, and that turns out to be what most of the sand is primarily because courts is so hard that it just outlasts all the other rocks is they're all getting ground down together. You do still have to clean the courts end. Up a bit and get out the last remaining impurities and you have to add a few other ingredients to lower the melting temperature of quartz, and then you heat it up, you need a huge amount of heat. So while I like one, thousand, seven, hundred degrees Celsius which mostly in Fahrenheit I mean it's over three thousand degrees Fahrenheit based bloody hot. Eventually the sand melts and then it re congeals and a weird thing happens when it turns into a solid again, courts is a crystal but glass is not what a weird structure because it's not a crystal crystals are actually made up of atoms arranged like soldiers. In rows but glass is sort of like picture of kindergartners at resets, atoms are all over the place, and so that's what makes it unusual but it's that chaos in the arrangement of atoms that actually gives rise to it having the property of transparency.

ZOE Scientist Debra Julie Andrews Mr Beast Coca Cola Tama Graber Isa Ramirez United States Lake Michigan Laughlin Annette Victor Victoria Institute Of Making University College London Child Labor Cynthia Director
A Master Class in Resilience With George Mumford

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:56 min | Last month

A Master Class in Resilience With George Mumford

"George. Nice to see you. Too, we were just chatting that the last time we saw each other was over Indian food and right before the world fell apart in the winter So I'm I'm curious I WANNA, ask you a question I've been asking a lot of people recently, but I don't mean it in a perfunctory way in a real way I want to hear the answer which is, how are you so much has happened since I last saw you. including the pandemic, and of course, the all of the tumult following the killing of George Floyd. So I just want to check in and get a sense of how you're. I'm really good actually A. I'm feeling great. And I say that. In. Spite of everything that's going on I. Feel Really. Really. Really. Great. And I am. Able as I like to say, hold the heard in generate the hope. So may would feel things. So few things have happened the last time. I saw you a I think it was after Kobe Bryant had died so I had that was like I say the last Sunday in January. And then the next week, one of my highest grew friends passed away during the week after that, my sister passed away. So I've been dealing with a lot of that even before the covert thing hit. But what are the things did I noticed in very? Hesitant to share with people was that even though those things happen, there was A. I was experiencing piece really didn't get touched by those things. And I and you know and I had done I mean just a little self disclosure. I knew my mother passed away. It would be very challenging because of when I was living at Cambridge insight meditation center. In eighty nine, different six years it was November, twenty, second nineteen, eighty, nine, I started dealing with the what they call a deaf awareness meditation practice. What you start the reflect darn. If I did that we're all going to die We don't give beyond death in that sort of thing because I knew when my mother passed, it was going to be really challenging. and. She didn't pass into two thousand and one. So I had a little time. To work on like twelve years. And I think that I continue to work on that and I think it. Manifested in two thousand twenty. where I could see the fruits of the practice. So a lot of times you do these practices are you develop these ways of being? and. You're not really sure. I'm not really sure how it's going to hold up when when the crab is fan. So. You said a lot there. I just want to point one thing out and then didn't follow up on a couple things you said. A lot of people were upset when Kobe Bryant. Passed away in the helicopter crash. The vast majority of people were simply fans. You actually knew him and taught him how to meditate. So it was a different. I. Just want to highlight that that was personal for you. Not just something that happened as a fan. Yes. Yes. It was very personal for me because we're really close. I get the work with him I work with the Lakers, but also I've had in just be when I was writing my book. he had called me and the asked me to come up. To Newport. Beach way lived and hang out for a couple of days because he wanted to start working. He was still it was in the next to last season in the league, but he was about ready to retire. So I got out and I got the hang out with him a little bit and talk about things. And be interacting with him in his own base where he didn't have bodyguards and wasn't a crowd was just he and I and the people I work with but Annette on Tribu stored with the Lakers. So he asked me so I asked he got the helicopter with him and to bail up to L. A. because he had a game. So really close in when he when I heard about his death I was actually at the University of Richmond watching the women's basketball games when I got the text. Analytics felt like this is a bad joke in this state right and. So that's how I found out about it and it was it was pretty devastating in that same time. I feel like I could continue to do what I needed to do. Create space for that, hurt. And generate dope and first thing I said was I hope his family's not with them. And then I found out his daughter seven other souls were a helicopter.

Kobe Bryant George Floyd Lakers George. Nice L. A. Annette University Of Richmond Cambridge Newport Beach
Police Seek 2 Suspects After 17-Year-Old Shot and Killed In Stoughton, Boston

WBZ Midday News

01:52 min | 2 months ago

Police Seek 2 Suspects After 17-Year-Old Shot and Killed In Stoughton, Boston

"Ready ready to to graduate graduate from from Avon Avon High High School School this this August August will will be be laid laid to to rest. rest. 17 17 year year old old Christian Christian vines vines of of Randolph Randolph was was shot shot and and killed killed yesterday yesterday afternoon. afternoon. Now Now police want to know who pulled the trigger double BBC TV's Ken McCloud with more on the crime as police scoured a silver Honda accord for evidence a mother ducked under the crime scene tape. It was her car and police deliver the news. It was her son found shot dead behind the wheel. You know something? Please say something. That's my baby. That's my baby. If you know something three, say something, she doesn't know why 17 year old Christian vines came to the Walnut Creek condos in stone, but several residents called 911 when they heard gunfire just after three o'clock. Responding. Officers quickly swarm the neighborhood toting rifles when they learned to men had run from the scene. A nearby childcare center and the student library were even locked down briefly, but police found nothing. D A was asked if any evidence pointed to motive. The shot answer is unknown at this time for Annette Vines, the knowledge that our son had been killed inside her car in this unfamiliar parking lot. Was just too much total shock. That's alright, Khun say, because I don't really know much. What Annette Vines does know is that our son always had a smile on his face and was set to graduate from Avon High School on August 8th. Course. This gun shooting yesterday was witnessed. Not the actual shooting, but two suspects were seen fleeing the crime scene that led to a very heavily armed search of the area by local and state police in canine. The Jones School in town library were locked down after the shooting as well. Again. Police and the D A. Says this was not a random act. They believe that there is no threat to residents. Boston police

Avon Avon High High School Sch Annette Vines Randolph Randolph Avon High School Ken Mccloud BBC Walnut Creek Jones School Khun Boston
Portland protesters tear down ‘racist’ statue of Thomas Jefferson

WBZ Afternoon News

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Portland protesters tear down ‘racist’ statue of Thomas Jefferson

"High school protesters not to the Thomas Jefferson statue right off its pedestal a protester wrote the word slave owner on the pedestal president Jefferson owned more than six hundred slaves during his life political expert Dr Jim Moore from Pacific university expects to see more statues and symbols come down we're seeing it continue not only here in the United States that's happening around the world people are hitting the streets and saying we need to rethink is important to our society Annette Newell for CBS news

President Trump Jefferson Dr Jim Moore Pacific University United States Annette Newell Thomas Jefferson CBS
Wearables as Early Detection Health Systems

Future Ear Radio

07:48 min | 4 months ago

Wearables as Early Detection Health Systems

"And so you know to frame this discussion Obviously with the whole pandemic going on right now Were in the midst of I. Think a whole lot of different trends that are being accelerated in. You know for me personally. I've been writing. Blogging about biometric sensors. And the idea of wearables serving the role of preventative health tools really since the onset of future in so now it's becoming clear as ever that there's this is a really important role particularly during pandemics in health crisis that I think these body weren't computers can play and so I think to kick things off I WanNa to go to you Ryan about just the idea of the different types of metrics that sensors like the ones that Alan cell produces can capture I would love to hear from you know particularly around metrics respiration rate but oxidation You know these different metrics that on the surface. You hear them okay. These you know. A body worn sensor can now capture a respiration rate. What does that actually mean and input it? In the context of why that would be an important metric to know Particularly with you know something that is a respiratory illness like Ovid In how we might be able to be a little bit more proactive with our approach. Here you know in terms of understanding what's actually going on with our bodies and maybe using these tools as part of a early diagnostic system in in just a better way to diagnose and detect anomalies in the data that there might be something going on even before you might be showing symptoms so Ryan. Why don't you start with maybe just a a an overview of some of these different metrics? How we've even gotten to the point to be able to capture these and then what we can glean from those types of metrics. It's a really interesting topic because the One of the silver linings if you will in this In this pandemic or and now is really highlighting the capability the current capabilities of existing Wearable sensor technology that in many cases has been around for years if not long if not decades or longer in the case of something like the pg sensor technology that we make that has been around and finger clips and your lobe clips that measure vital hind in hospitals and healthcare facilities for for decades Those things so the ability to measure things like heart rate and heart rate variability and bought oxygenation in wearable devices has been around for decades. What what this current environment is is really putting focus and and really highlighting is the capabilities of those devices and And also the the ability and the importance of Wanda to data Capture across those different metrics. So it's one thing to to look at someone's heart rate or let's say their body temperature or their respiration rate at a given point in time but what Where these are really adding additional value? And that's really getting highlighted in. This environment is understanding at an individual level. What that data looks like over time. And in a longitudinal sense where you can get an individual baseline on a person and understand how they're different Let's say they're different resting heart rate or heart rate variability changes in an individual Those may be different between Me and you an Andy and Chris All all of us are going to have different baselines at an individual level but the ability to see. Not just what what's going on when someone goes to visit a doctor or in this case where we are discouraged from going into into hospitals and healthcare facilities what that looks like a longitudinal basis for an individual and that gives In many cases much better insights into how individual is responding to whatever. They're whatever they're currently doing or whatever their current environment Maybe doing to them so That gives unique insights and the capability has been there for many years. What this current environment is really putting a highlight on is what are the what those capabilities and mean on longitudinal basis and also in a in a remote monitoring scenario where an individual doesn't have to come into A hospital or a health care facility to see to see a healthcare provider. That can all be done remotely today and we're really seeing The acceleration of telemedicine telehealth and the And the use of wearable sensor data in those contexts to be able to get that data and and I see how an individual's baseline is changing over time. Yeah no I think that makes a Lotta sense and Chris I want to go to you. Now you know. Kinda going off of what Ryan just described with how we can capture all this information before recording. You had mentioned a study that you had just conducted with Va. That I would love for you to expand upon a little bit here and share with the audience About what we can then actually gleaned from this information and in how you worked with. Va To make some pretty meaningful insights based on this type of information that were now being able to gather from these different sensors so you're just to build them what Ryan sharing these. The sensors themselves have indeed been around for for decades the EKG writer DC. G HAS BEEN AROUND FOR I think. Essentially now And while traditionally these types of sensors have been used in impatient environment. Where you have somebody who's lying in a hospital bed where you know it does it does make sense to use something like resting heart rate When you introduce these types of technologies in the real world where people are moving around Going to the mailbox or walking upstairs. They're they're they're sleeping they're awake. How do you capture these? These data sets in that environment in a way that you can actually make sense of what's going on. So the big leap is in the artificial intelligence that the neural nets and machine learning that we can now apply to these data streams to do what Ryan ascribed Annette is build a personalized baseline for an individual from which then you can detect very subtle anomalies in so If his IQ our first FDA clearance was in an algorithm that did exactly that and that was invalidated in this. This va sponsor. Study that you just referenced. In so with that Algorithm. What we're doing is a platform is ingested continuous vital signs specifically cartwright respiration rate in activity. And doing that from a wearable biosensor and it builds a personalized model of their cardiopulmonary physiology as relationship between these different vital signs to detect subtle changes that are are indicative of compensatory behavior within their physiology that can be predictive of

Ryan VA Chris All Alan Cell Wanda Writer FDA Andy Annette
A deadly virus is killing wild rabbits in North America

The KFBK Morning News

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

A deadly virus is killing wild rabbits in North America

"Now a deadly virus is threatening to wipe out entire populations of rabbits across multiple states now this virus does not impact humans at all it's just a rabbit virus but they're very worried about it at the California department of food and agriculture here's Dr Annette Jones but because this virus is already been established in wild animals and it's already in multiple states it's probably a virus that we're gonna have to live with for some time that means if we're gonna live with that for some time we just need to be thinking about

Dr Annette Jones California Department Of Food
Chicago Postal Worker Unique Clay, Mother Of 3, Dies Of COVID-19 Just One Week After Giving Birth

Brian Noonan

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Chicago Postal Worker Unique Clay, Mother Of 3, Dies Of COVID-19 Just One Week After Giving Birth

"A thirty one year old woman is the first postal worker in Chicago to die of coping nineteen unique clay died four days ago less than a week after giving birth to her daughter unique tested positive for coke at nineteen but was sent home from the university of Chicago hospitals three days after the baby was born her mother Annette says she has a lot of questions I like to sneak

Chicago Annette University Of Chicago
ErisX CEO Thomas Chippas on Creating Regulated Crypto Markets

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

05:43 min | 5 months ago

ErisX CEO Thomas Chippas on Creating Regulated Crypto Markets

"Your absolutely anything to say. Initially the blockchain pat as you recall I started chatting. Unabashedly was in me. Talk about the block. Chain crypto thing beyond whatever it was twenty fourteen twenty fifteen whatever it may have been in for me looking at a blockchain side of things at the time I was falling back upon my experience in Capital Markets. Where trying to have multi party processing of financial transactions that had different life cycle events that were causing inefficiencies inefficiencies on capitalisation inefficiencies on risk management inefficiencies trade settlement and. I really saw potential in the technology But those early days were so crowded with wild claims and over amplified desires to change everything overnight in a capital system. That by design changes slowly right the appetite to change risk management settlement processing and things like that from a regulatory perspective. The slow if it's working even inefficiently that's better than an unknown thing that maybe more efficient lets you prune it. Let's ball Annette. Sort of view trickles to the folks in the Capital Market Space. The process banks clearing-houses changes. What happy but I was intrigued. Started down the path and certainly really proud of the time is spent working with the team at Exxon who I think is a great job pushing or the DOT story injury specifically. We've done a lot of things. There have started a crew valve those early day assumptions about potential this technology to improve things like CVs process in equities processing and other uses for me certainly being aware as you point out there were two businesses a trade block which is really market data into sees ems within the space and then separately the dot company. That was very focused on the inside but always sort of I over my shoulder looking at what's going on with trae blocking the trader in me just was constantly intrigued at the market structure of the way the markets were operating in a physical level. The lack of inter connectivity. The volatility all sorts of things that were very different than equities options futures rates. What have you? I was more familiar back my mind and I'd say you know on my own time a my own homework. I kept looking at the markets Personally and then just as the rest of the maturation process started to move from that period to two now in explosive growth in non US exchanges US exchanges various of understanding of the economic impact of something like non-sovereign store evaluate. Could have you for me. Just keeping a constant. I reached an apogee when the opportunity for Aris ex game. Just was the only thing I can see myself doing. Because it is truly the intersection of market structure not to build something different in. Do in the crypto space so now passively watching guilty more focused obviously on the criticized. Things unabashedly started Ornette let's talk about the the institutional landscape. Because there's there's I think three core things but you know fill in the gaps here for a more nuanced understanding three core things that have prevented institutional purchasing and the first step in the on ramp. Historically one has been data integrity which not only impacts compliance teams in terms of other things about marketing market. But much more importantly makes it difficult to prove. That trade was executed. Best bitter offer so sedated integrity and Is probably number one which trickles upstream to the changes are actually providing that data the second is institutional custody and just how a money manager can get their legal teams comfortable with actually making purchases in just evaporate the add some some type of hack and the third is On the regulatory side so you know in the US and most of western Connie's most parts That's been you know y you could argue largely solve at least for Bitcoin but other assets are gonNA be a slow and steady process to get institutions comfortable in reality. It doesn't really matter because the first step is almost always bitcoin. If you're talking about institutional allocations beyond that there's a whole slew of tools it needs to be built in in reality actually smooth that user experience for a large asset manager or a large bank or or per hedge funds and. We're just starting to see products like air sacs liquid back to building like civility coming market. That are are are satisfying adequately satisfying this niche and and I say niche Maybe like an air quotes because we all know that it should be. The biggest driver of long-term value in gross and ultimately the electrical contacts on the rest of the industry has given the enormous amount of money that has been sitting on the sidelines. Historically

United States Exxon Trae Annette Ornette Connie
"annette" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:25 min | 5 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The closest she came in these three attempts to actually crossing was about three quarters of the way which took ten and a half hours later. Kellerman would say she thought she had the endurance to swim the channel but not the raw strength in her nineteen eighteen book. How to swim she wrote this. She didn't think a woman would ever successfully swim the English Channel. She was proven wrong. In one thousand nine hundred eighty six when gertrude? Etter Lee crossed in fourteen hours. Thirty nine minutes not only swimming. The channel but beating previous record time by more than two hours. Today there are lots of women swim across the English Channel including swimming at three consecutive times like swimming. It across one way and then going back and then going back cross again which is astounding to me so in. Kellerman first attempt to swim across the English Channel. The male swimmers who were swimming that night were allowed to be nude but she had to wear a swimsuit that shaved her skin just terribly and this brings us to her efforts to make suitable swimwear for women which we will talk about more after a sponsor break support for stuffy missed in history. Class comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans. Home today is so much more than it was yesterday. But it rocket mortgage home is still about you during these challenging times. We're all experiencing the top priority. Rocket Mortgage is the health and safety of the communities. They serve and while things are changing quickly every day. One thing that will never change is their team's commitment to giving you the best mortgage experience possible that's why if you need mortgage support. Their team of experts is there to answer questions and offer solutions. They understand the hardships happen. And they are here to help. Whether that means working with you to save money on your mortgage or finding a new way to navigate payments if you have questions. The team at rocket mortgage has answers. They know how important your home is to you because you are important to them if you need mortgage assistance. The home loan experts at rocket mortgage are available to help twenty four hours a day seven days a week from their home to yours. The team at rocket mortgage is with you visit rocket mortgage dot com slash history to learn more call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and consumer access dot. Org Number Thirty thirty this episode of Steffi Mystery class is brought to you by best fiends. I like my job but sometimes I need a quick break and one of my favorite things to do. A break is something that involves puzzles and best. Fiends is a puzzle game. That is very casual. You can play it whenever you want to. For whatever amount of time you want to be long or short it is a game made for adults but it's full of adorable bug characters which are my part of it. They are fighting off slugs in a game that you progress through with a series of ever changing puzzles. This is a unique and exciting experience. That's unlike other puzzle games out there. The game is updated monthly with new levels and events so it never gets old. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. Download this five star rated mobile puzzle game on the apple APP store and Google. Play four free that is friends with our best fiends.

Rocket Mortgage Kellerman Lee gertrude apple Google
"annette" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

06:06 min | 5 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Two kilometers down the Tim's from Putney to black, wall. In nineteen o five a net at about age, eighteen became the first woman to make this swim, although it did indeed bringing a lot of media attention, this swim. Itself was terrible. The Thames was filthy and Annette later said she felt like she'd swallowed big mouth full of oil from the surface of the river. She also had to dodge a lot of flotsam, garbage, tugboats and barges along the way. But the word a sports editor from the Daily Mirror approached her with another idea. The Daily Mirror was the first paper in the UK to use photographs than illustrations and the editor thought that articles on net complete with photographs of her in the scandalous swimwear that we're going to talk about a little bit more later. That would sell a lot of papers, so we offered to back her in attempts in an attempt to swim across the English Channel along with paying for and writing about swims along the coast to train for it. This entire enterprise was wildly successful in almost every way an training swims down the coast or huge crowds, and the articles and their corresponding photo sold lots of papers. She swam an average of forty five miles or seventy two kilometers per week, increasing the distance of each swim until she'd done the twenty four mile stretch from Dover to Ramsgate. At that point. She thought she was ready to try to conquer the channel. Although that's a slightly shorter distance than her swim down the Thames swimming in the English. Channel is far more difficult due to the very cold water, the waves and the tides. She made her first attempts to swim across the English Channel along with six men on August twenty, four, thousand, nine, hundred, zero five. They all started their swimming about three in the morning. All from different points along the coast based on where they thought the currents, and the tides would be the most advantageous. Each swimmer was accompanied by a steam tug at a rowboat. In case they fell into some distress along the way, and then periodically hot chocolate or food could be handed down to the swimmers from these boats to keep their energy up. An advertiser had given an chocolate to eat along the way, but the combination of chocolate and the choppy water really made her seasick the further she went the bigger her pay would be though, so she kept herself going through that seasickness Bhai thinking the longer you stick, the more you get. She stuck it out for about six and a half hours, and she was paid thirty pounds. This was the first of Kellerman three attempts to swim the English Channel. And as with her, swim down the Thames. She was the first woman to make the attempt. The closest she came in these three attempts to actually crossing was about three quarters of the way which took ten and a half hours later. Kellerman would say she thought she had the endurance to swim the channel, but not the raw strength in her nineteen eighteen book how to swim. She wrote this. She didn't think a woman would ever successfully swim. The English Channel She was proven wrong. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, when Gertrude Etter Lee crossed in fourteen hours thirty nine minutes, not only swimming the channel, but beating previous record time by more than two hours. Today, there are lots of women. Swim across the English Channel. Including swimming at three consecutive times like swimming it across one way, and then going back, and then going back cross again, which is astounding to me. So in Kellerman first attempt to swim across the English Channel The male swimmers who were swimming that night were allowed to be nude, but she had to wear a swimsuit that shaved her skin just terribly, and this brings us to her efforts to make suitable swimwear for women, which we will talk about more after a sponsor break. Support for stuffy missed in history class comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home. Today is so much more than it was yesterday, but it rocket mortgage home is still about you. During these challenging times we're all experiencing the top priority. Rocket Mortgage is the health and safety of the communities they serve, and while things are changing quickly every day. One thing that will never change is their teams commitment to giving you the best mortgage experience possible. That's why if you need mortgage support. Their team of experts is there to answer questions and offer solutions. They understand the hardships happen and they are here. Here to help whether that means working with you to save money on your mortgage or finding a new way to navigate payments. If you have questions, the team at rocket mortgage has answers. They know how important your home is to you because you are important to them. If you need mortgage assistance, the home loan experts at rocket mortgage are available to help twenty four hours a day seven days a week from their home to yours. The team at rocket mortgage is with you. Visit rocket mortgage dot com slash history to learn more call for cost, information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and. Consumer Access Dot Org number. Thirty thirty. This episode of Steffi Mystery. Class is brought to you by best fiends. I like my job, but sometimes I need a quick break and one of my favorite things to do. A break is something that involves. Puzzles and best fiends is a puzzle game. That is very casual. You can play it whenever you want to. For whatever amount of time you want to be long or short, it is a game made for adults, but it's full of adorable bug characters, which are my part of it. They are fighting off slugs in a game that you progress through with a series of ever changing. Changing Puzzles this is a unique and exciting experience. That's unlike other puzzle games out there. The game is updated monthly with new levels and events, so it never gets old. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters download this five star rated mobile puzzle game on the Apple App, store and Google play four free. That is friends without the our best fiends..

Rocket Mortgage Kellerman Daily Mirror editor UK Annette Tim Putney Gertrude Etter Lee Dover Apple Google Ramsgate Steffi Mystery
"annette" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:57 min | 5 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the bypass. I'm Tracy Wilson. I'm calling FRY Summer's coming at least in Theory Scheuer Shoe. Summer has definitely arrived where you are. Incidentally Yeah I mean I guess technically it's still cooler than it usually would be this time of year yet. It is not warm at all. It's fifty seven degrees right now. We're recording this on. May Thirtieth. Yeah like I think our high today might be eighty which sounds hot to some people but for Atlanta at the end of May. That's really not. Yeah Yeah it's it's been. We've had an unseasonably cool May Up here in New England anyway. at least in theory summer is either on the way or here for most but not all of our listeners. It seems like a good time talk about swimming. We yes specifically we are talking about a net. Kellerman who gets a lot of credit for developing the woman's one piece bathing suit and then for making it socially appropriate for women and a lot of the English speaking world to put on an outfit that you could actually swim in drowning and then go out in public that way and perhaps kind of ironically. She was Australian where it is definitely not coming on summer so Australians. We have some Australian history today. That is Seasonally incongruous for where you actually live. Yeah unless you happen to be a somebody who's downloading late in the game in which case store. Jerez our for you as well Annette. Kellerman was born in the suburbs of Sydney Australia. Choose coyly about her birthday. And it's variously cited as July fifth or sixth of eighteen eighty six eighteen eighty seven or eight hundred eighty eight The six is the most frequently cited date. Her father. Frederick was a violinist born in Australia and her mother. Alice was a pianist and music teacher. Who was originally from France when she was young and it had to wear braces on her legs because of persistent weakness and not only were these braces painful to wear but she also found them embarrassing. The cause is unclear. A few sources cite rickets or polio and later on in her life she speculated that he might have been a calcium deficiency her according to her own account actual doctors at the time said that it was because she had been allowed to learn to walk too early or that she had chalk in her bones. Neither of those are real. Things would have caused her to leg braces so totally unclear but the braces were a real part of her life. As you get when you go to cartoon doctors like chalk in your bones sounds like such a cartoon diagnosed and chalk bones is a nickname for like one. Yeah congenital bone condition but it has nothing to do with what she was experiencing a totally different set of symptoms. So very weird. Yeah whatever the cause of her disability. Eventually her father visited a doctor who recommended swimming lessons. And it I was really terrified of this plan Probably because it meant exposing her legs to people wish she did not want to do because they were visibly undeveloped and she begged not to have to go but her parents and the doctor were. All Certain. Swimming would really help. So she and her brothers were taken to Frederick cavs bath so they can learn to swim and the cavs were actually a whole family of swimmers. They're in the international swimming hall of fame for their combined contributions to the sport. It's like a net a lot longer to get the hang of swimming than it took her brothers. They were both able to swim on their own after a handful of lessons but it took a net close to twenty but once he knew how to do it as predicted. It really did help her build her strength in her legs and with the water supporting her she could move around without having to wear the braces and that would later describe her gradual improvement through swimming as a process of intense joy by the time she reached the age of Thirteen. Her muscle development was more or less typical for a child her age although she was susceptible to muscle strains and had to wear very tightly laced boots until she was eighteen. A lot of the swimming strokes that are recognized and used competitively today. We're still new or in the process of being developed and refined. So what a net learned at. I was basically the breaststroke. And that was the stroke that she used mostly when she was exercising. At first at about the age of fifteen she started branching out into learning other strokes putting dedicated effort and sue practicing them and getting better at them and soon. She told her parents that she wanted to start competing in swimming. Her first swimming race was a local event and she wanted. Annette's father had been incredulous when she said she wanted to enter a swimming race. He thought his swimming is something she was doing because of her disability not as something she would seriously pursue for her own sake but once she had that first win under her belt he was instrumental in her progress as a competitive swimmer. Essentially becoming both your trainer and her coach as soon as she started seriously competing and that started winning races and setting records in Nineteen ninety-two at the age of about sixteen. She won a one hundred yard championship for New South Wales and also set a world record for swimming a mile with a time of thirty two minutes and twenty nine seconds that same year she started participating in Long Distance. Swimming races and public diving demonstrations her time in the water wasn't only about competition though she started doing mermaid shows in Australian aquariums along with other aquatic performances while she was still in her teens although she was winning races and making a name for herself as a competitive swimmer she wasn't really able to earn an income from doing so so a net and her father moved to England with the hope of finding more lucrative opportunities to compete and perform. Once they arrived in England they had a really hard time getting started. Although in that already held multiple records in swimming they didn't know anyone and a net didn't have a local reputation to try to build on. So we're a father hatched a plan to drum up some publicity. She would swim twenty six miles which was forty two kilometers down the Tim's from Putney to Black Wall in nineteen o five a net at about age. Eighteen became the first woman to make this swim. Although it did indeed bring in a lot of media attention. This swim itself was terrible. The Thames was filthy and Annette later said she felt like she'd swallowed big mouthfuls of oil from the surface of the river. She also had to dodge a lot of flotsam garbage tugboats and barges along the way but afterward a sports editor from the Daily Mirror approached her with another idea. The Daily Mirror was the first paper in the UK to use photographs rather than illustrations and the editor thought that articles on net complete with photographs of her in the scandalous swimwear. That we're going to talk about a little bit more later. That would sell a lot of papers so we offered to back her in attempts in an attempt to swim across the English Channel along with paying for and writing about swims along the coast to train for it. This entire enterprise was wildly successful in almost every way an training swims down. The coast drew huge crowds and the articles and their corresponding photo sold. Lots of papers. She swam an average of forty five miles or seventy two kilometers per week. Increasing the distance of each swim until she'd done the twenty four mile stretch from Dover to Ramsgate at that point. She thought she was ready to try to conquer the channel although that's a slightly shorter distance than her swim down the Thames swimming in the English Channel is far more difficult due to the very cold water the waves and the tides. She made her first attempts to swim across the English Channel along with six men on August. Twenty four thousand nine hundred zero five. They all started their swimming about three in the morning. All from different points along the coast based on where they thought the currents and the tides would be the most advantageous each swimmer was accompanied by a steam tug at a robot in case they fell into some distress along the way and then periodically hot chocolate or food could be handed down to the swimmers from these boats to keep their energy up. An advertiser had given an chocolate to eat along the way. But the combination of chocolate and the choppy water really made her seasick. The further she went the bigger. Her payday would be though so she kept herself going through that. Seasickness Bhai thinking the longer you stick the more you get. She stuck it out for about six and a half hours and she was paid thirty pounds. This was the first of Kellerman three attempts to swim the English Channel and as with her swim down the Thames. She was the first woman to make.

Kellerman Annette swimming Daily Mirror England Tracy Wilson cavs editor New England Seasickness Bhai rickets Australia Atlanta Jerez Frederick Alice France Sydney Australia polio
"annette" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:22 min | 5 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Was an aquatic sensation. Over came physical challenges early in life to become a record setting swimmer and a barrier breaking actress she popularized synchronized swimming and revolutionized swimwear fashion meet the one and only a net. Kellerman a net. Marie Sara Kellerman was born in eighteen. Eighty six in Merrillville Australia. A suburb of Sydney. Her father was an Australian violinist and her mother was a French pianist and music teacher. As a child Annette's legs weren't strong enough to support her so she wore metal braces as a form of physical therapy and conditioning. And that's parents took her to a local pool. She later described that experience. Saying only a cripple could understand the intense joy I experienced after I learned. I go swimming anywhere anytime. The swimming really did help. Strengthen a nets legs. She was a natural in the water and she had a flair for the dramatic throughout her life and that would combine her sport with feeder to entertain the public by the time. She was around fifteen years old. She was winning races in setting speed records. She was also performing diving exhibitions and swimming in twice. Daily shows with fish at an aquarium her skill and ability to entertain set a net part and she further made a name for herself as a fashion icon at that point in time. Victorian societal norms were strict. When it came to swimming tire women were supposed to Don pantaloons and a loose dress so as not to show their figures a net found that overly burdensome and created a new kind of beating costume hers left her arms exposed and was very tight warlike one piece bathing suits today if they extended down as shorts or pants and that was actually arrested for indecency while swimming on each during a Uso trip to Massachusetts in one thousand nine hundred seven volynets spent much of her life making varied contributions to fashion entertainment and society at large. These achievements stemmed from her incredible talent at her sport among other feats and that set the world record for the Fastest Mile. Swam and help the swim records for a number of major rivers around the world after moving from Australia to England. She swam a daily circuit from town to town along the coast in preparation for an attempt to swim across the English Channel. She eventually did try and fail to swim across the body of water though she made it three quarters of the way despite that failure a net kept on swimming and winning races. She swam in a seven mile race through Paris in front of five hundred thousand spectators and tied with another woman to sixteen men after. You're up a net headed across the Atlantic to the US stateside annette focused more on the performance part of rear. She wowed audiences by stunt swimming and high diving. She also allowed many with physical appearance. A Harvard professor deemed a Net. The perfect woman because her measurements were so similar to those of the Venus Diallo. Naturally this proclamation helped draw in even larger crowds. Those who couldn't make it to a live show. We're in luck. A net took her talents to Hollywood at the height of the silent movie era. She appeared in multiple films though most are now considered lost. Because there's no known footage still in existence. Most of her movies had plots connected to water and she often played a mermaid notably and that was the first major actress to appear. Fully Nude onscreen annette continued swimming and performing until the nineteen forties. She credited the sport with changing her life in nineteen eighteen. She said but for swimming. I might have been hobbling about on crutches today instead of skating. Dancing and indulging in twenty five mile constitutional in addition to making my regular livelihood as a moving picture mermaid or flirting with toto. The funny fish through the walls of the glass tank at the New York hippodrome later in life a net became an author speaker and owned a health food store in Long Beach California. She continued to swim till nearly the end of her life. In nineteen seventy a net and her husband who had been her manager moved back to Australia. A net died in nineteen seventy five. She was eighty nine years old. Annette Kellerman popularized her sport and buck norms for her gender paving the path for future women swimmers success. She was honored by the International Swimming Hall of fame and she has a star on the Hollywood walk of fame all month were talking about explorers and contenders for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing. Checkout our Encyclopedia Amanda Newsletter. Will Manteca Wheatley. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram. At encyclopedia were Manica..

Annette Kellerman Australia Marie Sara Kellerman International Swimming Hall of Merrillville Sydney facebook Manteca Wheatley Massachusetts New York hippodrome nets Harvard Don pantaloons Atlantic Venus Diallo Hollywood US Paris
Explorers & Contenders: Annette Kellerman

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:50 min | 5 months ago

Explorers & Contenders: Annette Kellerman

"Meet the one and only a net. Kellerman a net. Marie Sara Kellerman was born in eighteen. Eighty six in Merrillville Australia. A suburb of Sydney. Her father was an Australian violinist and her mother was a French pianist and music teacher. As a child Annette's legs weren't strong enough to support her so she wore metal braces as a form of physical therapy and conditioning. And that's parents took her to a local pool. She later described that experience. Saying only a cripple could understand the intense joy I experienced after I learned. I go swimming anywhere anytime. The swimming really did help. Strengthen a nets legs. She was a natural in the water and she had a flair for the dramatic throughout her life and that would combine her sport with feeder to entertain the public by the time. She was around fifteen years old. She was winning races in setting speed records. She was also performing diving exhibitions and swimming in twice. Daily shows with fish at an aquarium her skill and ability to entertain set a net part and she further made a name for herself as a fashion icon at that point in time. Victorian societal norms were strict. When it came to swimming tire women were supposed to Don pantaloons and a loose dress so as not to show their figures a net found that overly burdensome and created a new kind of beating costume hers left her arms exposed and was very tight warlike one piece bathing suits today if they extended down as shorts or pants and that was actually arrested for indecency while swimming on each during a Uso trip to Massachusetts in one thousand nine hundred seven volynets spent much of her life making varied contributions to fashion entertainment and society at large. These achievements stemmed from her incredible talent at her sport among other feats and that set the world record for the Fastest Mile. Swam and help the swim records for a number of major rivers around the world after moving from Australia to England. She swam a daily circuit from town to town along the coast in preparation for an attempt to swim across the English Channel. She eventually did try and fail to swim across the body of water though she made it three quarters of the way despite that failure a net kept on swimming and winning races. She swam in a seven mile race through Paris in front of five hundred thousand spectators and tied with another woman to sixteen men after. You're up a net headed across the Atlantic to the US stateside annette focused more on the performance part of rear. She wowed audiences by stunt swimming and high diving. She also allowed many with physical appearance. A Harvard professor deemed a Net. The perfect woman because her measurements were so similar to those of the Venus Diallo. Naturally this proclamation helped draw in even larger crowds. Those who couldn't make it to a live show. We're in luck. A net took her talents to Hollywood at the height of the silent movie era. She appeared in multiple films though most are now considered lost. Because there's no known footage still in existence. Most of her movies had plots connected to water and she often played a mermaid notably and that was the first major actress to appear. Fully Nude onscreen annette continued swimming and performing until the nineteen forties. She credited the sport with changing her life in nineteen eighteen. She said but for swimming. I might have been hobbling about on crutches today instead of skating. Dancing and indulging in twenty five mile constitutional in addition to making my regular livelihood as a moving picture mermaid or flirting with toto. The funny fish through the walls of the glass tank at the New York hippodrome later in life a net became an author speaker and owned a health food store in Long Beach California. She continued to swim till nearly the end of her life. In nineteen seventy a net and her husband who had been her manager moved back to Australia. A net died in nineteen seventy five. She was eighty nine years old. Annette Kellerman popularized her sport and buck norms for her gender paving the path for future women swimmers success. She was honored by the International Swimming Hall of fame and she has a star on the Hollywood walk of

Annette Kellerman Marie Sara Kellerman Australia International Swimming Hall Of Merrillville Sydney Hollywood Massachusetts New York Hippodrome Nets Don Pantaloons Harvard Atlantic Venus Diallo Paris United States Long Beach California Professor England
Coaching with Lucien Lu - Piano Teaching Via Flash Briefing

Alexa in Canada

05:08 min | 6 months ago

Coaching with Lucien Lu - Piano Teaching Via Flash Briefing

"Right so here we are with the one and only Lucien Lou. Lucien for people that were at project voice. You are no stranger to those people there. Because you're the guy carrying around all the camera gear and doing an amazing job of capturing all the content solution. Welcome to the PODCAST. We have a really cool project that we're going to work on together. Nobody take a moment here. Tell everybody who you are terrier. Really appreciate that. The shout and everything. It's just been super amazing to actually work with the one. And Only Dr Carrie Fisher Terry V as they call him on the streets Stupor Super Amazing. Learn tons of things and I enjoy being. Ll Rock for the few days that we were there. So superseded about flash briefings and who? I actually had a question. As Piano Teacher I teach panel of how can I actually get on this flash briefing How can I make it Alexa skill? Like so many questions as an entirely new person it just completely I do not know anything about flash briefings or waste so who else to go to turvy so awesome. That's that's awesome. So this is this is this is the idea. I think this is a pretty neat idea because what we're going to do is I want to help out Lucien Lesions and awesome guy like I say. He's a big big part of the team. Now part of the Doctor Terry Fisher brand team and election candidates for cells in everything that's going on and Lucien wants to as he said create a flash briefing and this is going to be an opportunity for the audience to listen in and hear about what goes into creating a good fuss briefing in the process in what you need to consider. And what's important? What's not important and how we can do this. So Lucien right now the way things are because I think this is good for people to know. Do you have much of a presence on the voice devices because it's interesting to note people where you're starting from a complete scratch. Man I have no podcasts. Have NO FLASH BRIEFING GROUND ZERO RIGHT NOW all right? But you're on tick tock and I have to say that when we're in Chattanooga crazy you happen to run into a fan that new. Your doc is not true man so so huge style that actually super crazy it is amazing that you guys see that But Yeah Tick Tock. Video is my more my presence. Youtube is grim. And Tick Tock but man. I'm saying like audio being the next thing asked where I wanna be okay. Perfect and being a piano teacher. I mean it makes a lot of sense okay. So here's the so. We got the premise. You WanNA create a flash briefing. You WanNa get on voice so just share a little bit of your thoughts now like what? What do you want this flash briefing to do? What's the purpose of a vast region definitely so Every day I I WANNA be able to give advice to people trying to learn piano and so whether it's a tip that helps that helps you learn how to practice better our sight reading your training. It's something that will help you become a better musician. A tip that allows out of practice. I'll give you an exerciser play. Not In the name exercises everyday. Great Great and Annette's sounds perfect little short little bit little tip and somebody can can go ahead and so one of the things that I always talk about. When I'm thinking about you know creating briefings to help people help helping other people to create by sweeping is what problem are you solving and I that may be self explanatory for this but it sounds like the idea here is. You're trying to help a person who's wants to learn how to play the piano. Be More efficient with that is that is that sort of a fair statement hundred percent on all right and does it matter if they're like a beginner or more advanced person or have you thought about like who would who's going to be geared towards us right so this one is going to be geared toward toward the beginners the people who are jumping onto. Actually this APP called simply piano so many kids are so many new adults jumping into piano are learning from APPS and so i. I don't doubt that they would be the ones to be jumping on board with a voice device take advice and to learn more about Danone and transition from just an APP. Just a game that they play into an actual skill that they have so. That's right where I see appropriate That's awesome and obviously one of the things is you know if they're going to be listening to your first briefing. They wanted. They wanted to be listening to something. That's got some expertise and we didn't say this you have. You do have a lot of expertise. You have the credentials so maybe just share that with us. Like what makes you a guy that can teach piano appreciate that? Yeah man it's So my background. I've been playing piano since I was four. Twenty four years old right now. Seven plan for twenty years. I at age. Fourteen cheese three diplomas in piano. Meyer St Performers Gt Teachers in my global licentious Lennon. College music so it's it's been a huge part of my life and I do have an Asian parents asiapac upbringing. So it's like A. It's kind of like a mandatory right right of passage kind of thing. I really appreciative in super fortunate to this kind of background and I just really want to get back to this community that that where learned from so Yemen. It's Janelle teachings been part of my life is only

Lucien Lucien Lou Lucien Lesions Dr Carrie Fisher Terry Terry Fisher Alexa Youtube St Performers Gt Teachers Danone Chattanooga Yemen Janelle Annette Lennon
"annette" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

10:11 min | 7 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"That I think some people. He was actually too hard on and he was quite hurtful to people. But with me I I felt more like it was helping me because I thought he was right because when you start doing period work suddenly you sit a little more stiffly and you may be speaking more pedantic way which he saying. That's not that stopped doing that. That's not how people behaved. They behaved like we are behaving now. and so. I'm I'm very grateful to him for that. He was kind of a Taciturn Guy. But authentic wonderful man. Did you feel like you had to scheme over the arc of your career because of the limitations for actresses? And the fact that you started kind of as a you know as a grownup like you're whatever thirty ishers thing when you when you started and so like you started playing like hot babe roles And then you know it was not very long after that you are playing mom roles And then there's like a long desolate stretch ahead of that in a lot of actresses careers. Those are the kind of parts there are. Did you after like come up with a scheme of like? This is how I'm gonNA figure this out or was it. How Business Game Now? Just sort of follow things as as they came and I also did plays in Los Angeles. I wasn't going to. I wasn't going back to New York because I couldn't I didn't want to be gone But as my kids were going I I. It took a while. I didn't do one for about ten years. Think took me. Yeah that's right Then I started doing plays again so I would occasionally play which also was kind of great for my own sort of sense of work and what. I enjoyed what? I was interested in pursuing but I found things along the way I was lucky and and things came to me that I really loved and there were a few things I didn't do. I suppose I would have done but that I you know I barely remember what they are. There's a few that I didn't want to do because I just couldn't of the timing. I did molly my kids. So that's another thing like you have four kids and during the time when they were little you know. I was looking at your. Imdb and Mike between American beauty ish and The kids are all right Ash You know you're you're in a movie every other year something not two or three a and I understand why anyone would make that choice. I have kids myself but it's You know it's a scary parallel choice for an for an actor whose reliant in part on having some juice to get a good part you know what I mean like. There's a lot of talented actors Well Yeah I just sort of would stop and start and I remember after my last one was born. I think it was a couple of years I took a couple years off which is a blur slide. You know four kids But Yeah I was lucky. 'cause I always wanted to have kids. I still dream about babies. I it's like the most recurrent theme in my dreams is. There's usually a baby involved somewhere and I'm taking care of them more Something anyway so yeah. It was just so in my nature From when I was little I wanted to have children. I was a babysitter. Sir babysitting when I was really twelve. Live practically oh and even before that. I worked in the nursery at church so I was just always enamored of that and and that felt very natural to me. You know so yeah I did. I made You know fewer movies there But that's fine. Going away is good going way especially being in the spotlight and stuff. It's just you know it's nice not to be one of your kids is transgender. And he transitioned when he was a young teenager. Mid Teenager And one of my kids is also trends. And when she transitioned like it really made me realize how much of my idea of coup other people were including people who were really close to me who I really cared about like my kids. was wrapped up in gender identity. Like as a person with no you know and not even at the beforehand like no Ideological or even on very little even practical discomfort with the idea of being transgender. I mean you know I'm a I live in Los Angeles. I'm from San Francisco. You know what I mean like. I had trans friends and stuff but like one of the things that really struck me was feeling weird and guilty. About how much of my idea of my kid who's a human being was tied up in my as it turned out erroneous presumption that She was a boy right and I was like. Oh Wow not just with her but I was like. Am I doing that with everyone in my life right lake am I? I think I'm I'm pretty. I'm a pretty cool dude. Who's pretty has a pretty liberated minds but like oh well in a way. It's the one of the great gifts of having Trans Kit because then You be I know I know for me that I wasn't even aware of how I saw the world in this binary way and really when you think about it it makes no sense that everyone is on a spectrum and all of us and that at different points in our lives some people you know some people recognize their own feeling like they're trans at a different point. Some people suppress it or some people. Just don't even really kind of come to that until they're older. I think that that's a beautiful thing. I really appreciate that about having a trans kit that I really began to understand. That gender is something that happens in your mind and that a lot of people who are trans. That's their experience. And that this notion that there are males and females and that if you know the the the gender identity that you're assigned at birth is the the one that you are when you love someone so deeply who you see is having this experience Not just him but many other people too that I that I've come to now. I feel like I really get it. I feel like Oh wow. That was just such a such a limited way of looking at people. Maybe if that connects to what you're saying at all you know and it really is. It seems very natural to me now that some people are Trans on some people are Cisco and it doesn't have anything to do with the way you look or the way you present or whether your fam- or Bush or masculine looking or feminine looking or any of that Which is another big sort of stupid stereotype about transpeople so I love that I feel very grateful to my kid for opening my eyes. Now I've got to meet all these terribly interesting people through my kid because of this world to him. Well I appreciate you talking about that and I also really appreciate you coming on. Polls thanks I. I was so happy to get to talk to you and I appreciate your extraordinary work. Thank you and thank you for asking media to your show with you and it was really fun talking with you. Thanks Annette Benning. Hope gap is in theaters now. we didn't get to talk about it in the interview but she was so amazing and brilliant in the amazing and Brilliant Film Twentieth Century Women which came out a few years ago. If you didn't see that so there's too hot Annette Benning picks for you enjoy them. That's the end of another episode of Bullseye. Bullseye is produced at maximum fund dot Org World Headquarters Overlooking Macarthur Park in beautiful Los Angeles California where they were shooting the rookie the network procedural starring the very funny and charming Nathan Fillion when a network television show comes to town. It is quite the operation. Our show is produced by speaking into microphones. Our producer Kevin Ferguson. Hey seuss Ambrosio is our associate producer. We have helped from Casey O'Brien. Our production fellow is Jordan. Cowley are interstitial. Music is by Dan. Wally also known as Dj w our theme song is by the go team our thanks to them and their label Memphis Industries for letting US use it and we have decades of interviews in the can that are available to you to listen to for free. Mike Mills the writer director of Twentieth Century. Women are also was on the show. I'm sure he had some things to say about an betting. Although I don't remember what they were I do remember that. It was a great conversation. You can find all those on our website at maximum fund dot Org And you can find them. You know when your favorite podcast APP or wherever else. We're also on facebook twitter and Youtube just search for Bullseye with Jesse Thorn and keep up with the show. I think that's about it. Remember all great. Radio hosts have a signature science bullseye with Jesse. Thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by NPR..

Los Angeles California Jesse Thorn Mike Mills Annette Benning New York producer San Francisco Twentieth Century NPR facebook Imdb Nathan Fillion Kevin Ferguson seuss Ambrosio US Macarthur Park Casey O'Brien Cowley Cisco Memphis Industries
"annette" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

09:00 min | 7 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Welcome back to Bullseye. Jesse Thorn guest is the great actor Annette. Benning she started in. The kids are alright. American beauty and Twentieth Century Women. Her newest film hope gap focuses on the end of nearly thirty year marriage. It's in theaters. Now you worked in a theater for a long time after you left conservatory. Doing especially a lot of classic theory to Shakespeare Festivals. And stuff like that one of if not your first screen role was on Miami Vice. Was that literally your first or among year. I oh for sure. Among my first dot was supposed to be another girl and for some reason backed out or couldn't do it at the last minute so yeah. I think I just called my agent and I really was just starting and so yes. I remember going to Miami and being in a hotel on the beach being low. This is so amazing and you know service because I didn't know what I was doing but I was like the bad guys girlfriend. I think I just had. I never got to meet you. Don Don Center fancy I was just part of the kind of the bad guy crew. Yeah that was. That was fun. It was just a couple of days. Great News we're GONNA listen to a scene. You are indeed the bad guys girlfriend. The bad guy is a is a corrupt cop and And there is just some really great episode work here. We're going to take a listen to that definitely has not aged at all in the last thirty three years. I don't like it every time extended control. That's not what I'm talking about. The cop they killed yesterday. I thought the one in Broward was a mistake but I don't think so anymore. I have no control these people where they do not blame your young boy scouts very serious. I can't go on like this dear. I feel like Miami Vice is like I. Somehow we've had probably five actors on this show who are incredibly accomplished actors. Whose first part was on Miami kidding. And I think it's because Miami vice was this weird combination of the most like regular television show in the world because like at the end of the day. It's it's a police procedural but also lack Luis Guzman. I partly because and it was because Miguel. Pineyro was writing on it and was like his old buddy meeting as well it was. It was considered very stylish right and the and the way. The guy's dress looks really good. Yeah really hip compared to I don't know what like Adam twelve or something. Yeah how did you feel about that at the time? Like did you feel like. I'm getting a big break and I'm going to be a screen actor now or did you feel like well. I backed into this job and I mean my advice and I'm glad to stay in a hotel for three days and then get back to doing pl- let me see. I was probably if I don't remember what part of the year it was so I had never done any. I was in New York. I got a an off Broadway play moved to Broadway and so that took a while that whole process but it was like so I think it must have been just before that that I got Miami. Vice are right around that time so now. I really hadn't ever you know really. I still was very green having done anything on camera. I was still just kind of auditioning and kind of trying to get something so I didn't have any experience or anything. I mean you had been working for a while by the time. Yes started starring in movies. But you had not been working on screen for all along. No no no no not even that I mean but you know when I got a movie I really really had barely done anything so I was learning on the on the job learning which is fine because I knew how to act. At least I knew how to do that and I thought it was so cool that we had to get up so early. I don't think it's cool anymore but I remember thinking. Oh God we have to get up at four. This amazing we have to get in the van at four forty five awesome. Let's drive around the lake or whatever it is. I thought that was so I was just you know making SAG minimum. I thought this is the best. I was really excited. I still am but it's not the same man. Did you have specific goals or were you like just riding a writing wave? Well I had to make a living so I was just trying to you know. Make enough money to kind of You know needed to make some money. no well. I just trying to get the best that I could and there were some things that I went up for that. I just didn't get that weren't very I think very good. I don't really remember now. What exactly they were were but there were some things I would have done. That would have been considered an attack here so that I just ended up not getting but my first movie was Dan. Ray John Candy movie which was Super Fund to make The great outdoors. That was such a kick you know was such a great experience and fun and And adventure and great was it. How did the experience of being in a movie like having a big part in the movie? How did that compare to your expectations of what it would be like or your imaginations of what it would be like When I went the next film I did was called Valmont. Which was this period drama directed by Miller's Foreman? He had just done. Amadeus was this epic period movie and I had literally never been to Europe and I was going there to play a French aristocrat from John Candy to ask for advice. John what do I do here And I had auditioned so much for millage formed by the time I got the part that I sort of knew kind of how he worked and he was very demanding and smart. I just doored him but he was tough and he did not mince words. He was not from the American School of Butter. Them up and make them feel really great about themselves. And then you'll get the best and he knew I was very inexperienced but So I learned a lot from him because he would just we would do something and he. No no no natural natural. We were all phony basically I think and so at least I was and he was. He was trying really hard to make us natural and he was a wonderful man. I learned a lot from him. It was an incredible experience. I mean they literally had the Taylor for the movie was in Rome so the first time I went to Rome I was just going to a fitting which is blows my mind now. Blew my mind then But I definitely sometimes felt like. I can't believe this is like a mistake that I have this and was there anything that you did in those very early years of your career on a set. That was totally wrong wrong. In the like silly in the moral sense of that murder anyone You know I remember on the on the pilot that I did. They said sit into the shot and I thought I don't know what that means and I should know what that means. Could you just sit into the shot? And so I just kind of sat forward in the chair and of course what I remember. Is Everybody kind of chuckling? But not I don't know that they actually did but in fact is all that means is the cameras on the cameras. Set it set on the chair and when they say action you actually are seen entering and sitting down into the chair in the shot. Sit into the shot. But I didn't know what that meant. So those little things that you learn the take. I don't know a half of a day and then you can. It's like Oh someone says hit your mark or sit into the shot or whatever it is. You know what you're doing. It's not like rocket science. The acting part of it's much harder but I learned a lot from working with meal OC- because he would we would do it a lot. We did a lot of takes and he would if it if it wasn't right he was very tough it all of us that worked on the movie sort of bonded over that because he was so critical but he was right as I say always defend him because he was right and I really appreciate.

Miami John Candy Jesse Thorn Benning Luis Guzman Don Don Center Annette OC Broward New York Pineyro Miguel Adam Europe murder American School of Butter Rome Dan Foreman Miller
"annette" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

09:36 min | 7 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Hope. Is a movie about divorce. Police Not really the movie that comes to mind my say about divorce. The marriage in question has been going on for nearly three. The husband and wife are both of retirement age. They have an adult son. Who's come back home to visit them. Edward the husband is played by the English actor Bill Nye. He's distant little checked out and preoccupied. His wife Grace is played by my guest Annette Benning. He leaves her early on in. The film focuses on the wreckage. That is left behind. Bannings character is blindsided. She had a plan for her life. And this wasn't an and that's sort of the films focus. Can she move on? What does your new future look like? It's an intense character. Study and part of what makes it so compelling is that banning is so in tune with her character in hope gap. You're more than just a witness to her pain. You feel it. Here's a pivotal scene from the movie. Edward tells grace he's going to leave her. I know this is a shock but I do truly believe you'll come to see as the best i. I'm no good for you grace. I don't give you what you want. Don't give me what I want. Because you're not even trying. You found a way to sneak out of it. Well I won't let you. I've made up my mind. Well you'll have to unmake it. Won't you this decision involves me? You have to consult me this. Chris only make it worse. You can't just walk away after twenty nine years. You have to try and that manning. Welcome to Bullseye. It's great to have you on the show. Thank you very much. I have Comedy PODCAST IN MY CO host. On my comedy. Podcast Jordan Morris has a running bit on the show where he talks about a recent film that he saw with British actor playing an American character and when he does it he says This is my impression of his impression. But it's sort of like yeah. Yeah yes and I wonder. It's so unusual for an American actor to play an English character Whether you had to hype yourself up to take part for that reason. Yeah I think that's a good way of describing it. I mean I've done it before but every time I do it. I you feel I guess I feel and I gotTa have SORTA reapproach it because it's the character it's the story it's Always bit different but you know I worked on it nine. Had A coach I worked with beforehand. I liked very much and put a lot of energy into that and gave it my best. The thing that would worry me is that you have to get it to a place where there is no concern for. I presume that you have to get it to the place where there is no concern for the technical so that you can be a craftsperson fillet exactly and not be thinking about it. That's the goal for sure. Did people correct you? Onset does go on. I invited everybody to because. Of course they all had very real accents So I was very you know all over everybody saying. Please correct me if you if you hear something. Let me know. I'd be more than happy to hear that and So I just sort of trust to my comrades to kind of give me a poke if I needed one and thinking also in a movie you can always correct it afterwards. If there's a problem and so yeah so one time. Dick Van Dyke told me Dick Van Dyke. Who by the way is the most delightful? Nicest man is incredible. You can't you can't believe how thoroughly he's delivering on the promise of talking to Dick Van Dyke but Dick Van Dyke told me he's like yeah. Nobody told me I was doing a batch. I know I feel for him. Get so much teasing about that. I don't care I want. I want team. Dick Van Dyke so kid who cares to totally on that. Ti Door Him. So in this film your character is in a very long and somewhat troubled marriage in locked into a locked into kind of a pattern of miscommunication. Where your character looks for connection by Poking Bruises and Bill Nice character? Your your husband walks away and is distant and is nice but doesn't engage and I wonder which of those you identify. More with in real life That's a good question I'm probably say well I definitely sometimes avoid confrontation to Fault so I think I'm getting a little bit better with that but Yeah she does. That's a great way of putting it. She does not him. She sort of GIG was. She's at a point. I think when she took that she does that. And I know that I think that annoys some people about this woman. I kind of like that that. She's that's her thing that she's doing that and maybe to a fault but then there's an argument to be made. Obviously I tried to player that way that yeah well. She's she's trying to fig- she's trying to scratch what's under. The surface is trying to get scratched the scab to get what's underneath there because something. She's intuitively understanding that. There's something wrong. One of the things that she does as a character is kind of you know either I was gonna say suck all the air from the room but she kind of inflates everyone chasing you know what I mean like she really. She really expands outward to fill the space. Whatever it is and she doesn't do it maliciously at all But that just is the nature of what she does and I wonder how you feel about being a movie star and knowing that like every room you walk into your movie star And so do you have to like modulate or be aware of that fact that you can have on a room by virtue of your you know your career. Sometimes I'm aware of that but most of the time not was the time it doesn't feel like that and also I I don't I don't see myself as that kind of presence in a room even if people recognize me I I tend to kind of not always but sometimes I kind of want to be smaller. Like if I'm going into a room I don't really want to attract attention And most of the time I don't you know it's all like like I don't feel that all the time I'm really lucky that I just you know kind of live my life in Grocery Store. I see my neighbors and I have a pretty normal day to day kind of existence and then ever on so all. I'm doing something where I go and suddenly like people are taking my picture. It still seems kind of funny I'm very happy to not be in that position of like you know people making a fuss And I'm lucky because I haven't had too. I mean I've especially having all these kids and now that my kids are grown. I'm really feeling it because as my as I was having children I would be in and then I would disappear and then I would go off in my life and It was a wonderful always a wonderful kind of respite. But you visit work in show business. Do you mean and then I would just be on the floor with my kids so that was always just for me such a joy that I could kind of walk away and I still feel that except that. Now I'm not chasing these children It's just a different life. It's it's great. You're a Kansan right originalist born in Kansas. So what got you to San Diego and eventually San Francisco. My Dad was offered to go first of all. He went from Iowa to Topeka to run an office for an insurance company. Then they went to Wichita they were only in Topeka for a year. Went to Wichita for six years and then we moved to San Diego because he had a choice between moving to Denver. I think it was in San Diego to run an office. And he picked San Diego so we moved there in nineteen sixty five. Chania goes whole thing sending a whole thing. It's a but it's very conservative and it certainly was then. I think it still is an a military town big military town. You know it's beautiful it's sunny and the beaches are awesome but it's definitely conservative and so during the Vietnam War you know. That's where I was in San Diego and I remember visiting the Veterans Hospital Downtown. Where we were there. We were brought in to kind of go in and talk to. I was like in junior high.

Dick Van Dyke San Diego Edward Bill Nye Annette Benning Grace Wichita Topeka Bannings Jordan Morris manning Chris Iowa Veterans Hospital Downtown Grocery Store Denver Kansas San Francisco
"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:34 min | 8 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"I'm supporting us. And because we are in the subject I want to give a couple of shoutouts is because we actually have new new members new people that are supporting us and just to just to keep you up to date. If you don't yeah no yet. We are independent Parkas. We need your support to continue to do this work and we are now now in Patriot. So you can go to Patriot and file at Tina's who lunch and you can become a member so you can support us by becoming Ming a member for one dollar and that is a shadow level so for one dollar we will give you a shadow and eve you want to become our commodity Eh. That will be three dollars again. You will get a shadow plus you will get to listen to previews like this episode. That are Patriot. Members got to listen to actually last year. And if you WANNA be The next level it will be our marina level and that will be for ten dollars colors a month and again for ten dollars. You will get the shutout you will get. The previews of the episodes exclusive episodes that nobody else listened stew and also stickers from Latinos who lunch and if you notice we actually lower the prices and be and we are very very thankful that a lot of new members actually jump on board on this Latinos who lunch boat. Why did I say that? I don't know but I'm very happy and very thankful and I want to give a couple of. Oh shout out so I to Alexandra thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much for being commodity and a as well thank you. Thank you for being commodity. Celeste list the age shoutout to you grow Duceppe pies. Edeka is also have edeka Jay this in the shower level. Thank thank you so much governor allow Gabriela airs. Thank you go mothers a big shoutout to you. We also have Hector de Luise. The EAGLES COMPA get shutout. Louise also mighty mighty. I was thinking about the other day. It's so funny because we have all of all of the show so for all of her friends but anyway mighty thank you so much mighty soul Michael. Hey Dude thank you thank you..

EAGLES Hector de Luise Tina Louise Celeste Gabriela Alexandra Edeka Michael Jay
"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

14:56 min | 8 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"One of the the ways you go from there is people go but he didn't mean any harm he shouldn't have been lynched. He was just a boy you know and so so it gives you some place to go with that brutality -ality or if you're looking at Someone who's been linked you can be like but he didn't really attack a white woman but he didn't really steal a horse and it gives our our minds kind of a place to To rest right if you take that that away if you say he was murdered he was tortured brutally by the state it by a group of people who cheered who laughed who took pictures who sent postcards who still have a memory memory of that day as though it were a picnic right and someone says well what did he do and you say nothing. Where do you go right? Your your your. Your mind is left with that brutality right And where I go is is racist right. This is racism awesome right. This is racism. This white supremacy This isn't he was accused of a crime he didn't commit. This has nothing to do with crime punishment. And you see that to this day. You see that to this day in the news. It's always when you see mass shootings right away is he's trying to find the justification where they came from what they were doing. And and and it's always like trying to find those. No one says that he races the real problem which is within within the system. Right right absolutely I mean you see You know officer involved shootings right. And and and there's this moment while he was selling loose cigarettes. Well Sandra Bland might have been rude to the officer right instead of pausing where we need to pause this person was murdered though right It lets us go off on these weird side side. Track Diversions right as opposed to like we know who the criminal is. It's not Eric Garner not Sandra Bland. It's not trayvon Dan Martin. You know they didn't move their hand in a weird way. There wasn't a shadow. They didn't whether yeah it's none of that it is it is a systemic white supremacy. It's a racist COP. Say it right And I and so I think that's what's been very difficult about working through The lynching of Mexicans in particular because that logic uh of the intervention you do is prove that they were innocent right An I don't do that right. It one of the things I've done that I find really an important exercise. much of the lynching that happens in Texas in what would become Texas later. was a for landowners so there were Mexican landowner. Some through Spanish land grants some small ranchers. Those folks were getting attacked so that their land could be taken And so one of the things I've done is I've taken a table There's an another book that talks about some lynching and and violence against Mexicans and it'll have like their name the date they were lynched and what they were accused of rights. So it'll say someone's name the date and then it'll say horse thief life or cry and there and there's a whole index of these right just case after case like that and and always like but we're saying they didn't really do it but you're publishing page after page with the lie right So what I did is I created table that that has the same fought looks the same and instead of what they were accused of I put how many acres they owned and so that creates it's a different narrative right says the man's name person's name the date they were killed seventeen acres. If you're an artist that will be your installation installation right there. Just like reproducing all of that but taken away that information because then that helps us free contacts to allies the history especially how has been told to right right. It's so important to understand that that there's these logics embedded and so it's it's not enough and this is where I say. I had a false false premise. It's not enough to just do these like recovering history projects. which is where I started? You really have to think about the logic of even the way. Good scholars have tried to intervene. Ri- and so like for instance even with thinking about the definition of the word lynching it's not used generally for Mexicans or for Chinese who were lynched in mass numbers in Colorado and California not used for native people in Mexico. Yes in Mexico right and so we don't use the word lantion so so so it's never defined as solely A weapon against African Americans but it becomes right sort of embedded in that logic Part of the reason it is embedded in that logic is because there was a There was an anti lynching campaign that happened and Jesse James was the head of it and she was raising money right and so she was asking people give me money for my anti lynching campaign rain perfectly sincere right but she needed the definition to be narrow because she wanted wanted to get to a zero lynching year so she wanted to be able to say like we met our goal. We went. You know you can't do that if you have an a wide open definition right so you want to make it as narrow as possible. So it's a teleological project to get you to zero right so you you want to narrow definition so for instance she had a definition that said You have to find the body so what happens happens a lot with Mexicans is their families watched them get taken from their homes right. Men are taken from their homes. They're pulled out of bed by a whole group of ranchers are Rangers or whatever right and they watched them get taken and then there remains are found. A month later that doesn't count as Lynching Shing because it's not public. It's not part of the spectacle my God so I know you have to catch a plane But I want to make sure to give some number. Commendations is thinks that we should be watching right now. Is there thinks that we should be reading right. Now that we could We could give give to our audience so they could continue. Especially because I know there's going to be a lot of people very interested in you know we're gonNA come back because I'm going to New Mexico and and we're GONNA get into unsettled do and we're going to get into other stuff but I really wanted you to explain who you are. The huge impact you had on my scholarship and my persona and what I do here in the podcast for that. I think you very very much and I wanted to say that publicly because I talk about you a lot in the park as you and curse always come back But now I wanted to take this opportunity and ask you to share some of your influences or things that you think we should be reading or watching he You know there's A. There's a really nice website in terms of this topic in terms of this subject matter called refusing to forget and that has some really wonderful maps of the areas of Texas has some some of the statistical numbers of victims And dates and times and so. That's really good sort of Raw materials that I think are open for a lot of analysis WH- would just where I found myself right moving away from the recovery project of finding numbers and names and moving into more analytic space And then you can also look at on twitter. There's something called the nineteen nineteen project in that was a project My colleague Monica Martinez and I did together and what we did was we live. tweeted one hundred years later. the legislative session. That tried to examine the amount of violence against Mexicans. Right and so we had had the full three thousand page transcript and we sat and we live tweeted it at the exact time. It happened a hundred years later and we did that. this February beurey and that was a really wonderful project so that's still lives on twitter. You can look at that That has some of the cases that are known and some of the analyses. Galaxies of them. you know. In terms of books to read there's a wonderful book called lynching in the West And that's by Ken Gonzalez Day who is also a photographer and artist and podcast. So he is so his podcast is a little different. Yeah it's a lynching tour So what you do is you you turn it on. And he will take you through L. A. to various places Lynch's lynchings occurred. And so he will be. It's like a walking tour of lynching sites of La. It's it's really beautifully done. There's maps on his website and his book Lynching in the West really pushes it. This idea that that we need to have a more expansive understanding of what Terroristic Racist Violence has affected many communities right. And even today you know we need to think about this to understand what we're now calling hate crimes which I think is a misnomer because it requires you to. It's narrow again right. It requires you to prove intention -ality right so so someone could very clearly be targeted. Because they're gay right very clearly very obviously but unless the person says I killed him because he was gay. It's not a hate crime right and then there's always you can't prove what happened in their mind right so hate crime we never got anti lynching legislation in the US. Even though many people tried what we finally got after the killings of James Bird Matthew Shepard was we got hate crimes legislation relation but that was so narrow because you have to prove the intent was was was racist homophobic etc.. Right so so. So you know thinking about those there's a there's a wonderful Movie on Jasper Texas. That that you can watch That tells you more about the James Byrd cases while working we find you and your scholarship because on shore a lot of people will I'd be interested to read some of your stuff so find me on twitter at Ala Lonnie data It's a secret that I'm a Scorpio and I'm under five feet tall. So at Elec Grenada and then I'm also at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. And so I'm in the American Studies Department there Jing my work. Wonderful students. Wonderful Colleagues There's a website If you Google me there my where my website lives on the UNC server And I'm always open to hearing from people and and really interested in talking about violence because while it is Difficult to think through and to to digest right is particularly some of these events And looking at the details of them I I really think we need to understand. Understand the breath and the scope of What one of my professors tiny bogues called the pressing of the flesh? The the idea that the violence of white supremacy and racism and homophobia and Misogyny is personal. Right it's depressing depressing of the flesh and so we need to understand that that that polices whole populations it changes how we move in the world it. It means I keep. I don't keep my hands in my pockets because I don't want people to think I'm shoplifter right. I mean there's all these it polices so much of our lives. It polices where we we feel safe living or holding hands right So to me. It's very important that we understand the place of violence silence in American life and with the sound of that siren outside in Honolulu very timely. Again I thank you very much for your time. Thank thank you very much for your friendship and everything you do in and I promise you we're GonNa see each other in New Mexico we're GONNA keep eating. We're going to keep talking about quote autumn quote hybrid foods. And then we're GONNA get into it and other topics because there's more that I wanNA talk about it and I know after our listeners here this once they went to ask more from thank you so much thank you so much. It was so wonderful to hear more of your work this weekend. To okay Let's talk later by Bluetooth Bluetooth Blue Book on a mega. She's amazing Thank you for this interview. You thank you for letting me release his episode a month before it was supposed to be released but I see sewn scores Cuando seven and what are you GonNa do. And I'm very happy that you got to listen to that Some of our Patriot members got a preview of this interview and And here is the full thing. So thank you everybody that is being..

twitter Texas Lynching Shing Sandra Bland New Mexico officer Mexico Rangers trayvon Dan Martin Jasper Texas Jesse James La US Google Cuando James Byrd Honolulu Eric Garner James Bird Matthew Shepard
"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

13:34 min | 8 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Of those It there's no there's no agreed upon definition of the word lynching which is very very interesting and that comes to matter later in the research and I didn't know it would But a lynching can can NBA of any instrumentality. Right so it can be a hanging. It can be a shooting. It can be a stabbing. But what's critical to lynching changing is that there is a a victim but the act is meant to terrorize that victims community. Right so it's sort of like like there's more than one victim for lynching so if someone is killed it's meant to be public is meant to be seen it's meant to be witnessed because it is a terroristic heuristic message to the community. That person is a part of it is like a message of power and control over the population right so so so actually the the tortured disfigured the dying. The killed body becomes a message to others right. And so you know it's to me. It's a uniquely American form of terrorism which has very high numbers during the reconstruction period both both in both north and south United States but what's interesting about The lynching of Mexicans in the southwest is is the time time periods a little more elastic. It's a little wider So some of the I really intense lynchings happen after the Alamo right and so after the battle of the Alamo. There's a battle at Goldenrod which is the more I think important one And what the what. The folks who are fighting for Texas Independence and those folks are immigrants right right there. Scotch the Irish. They are the immigrants in medical so they're not in Texas. They're they're in well right but those folks Who Kill Oh Mexicans? are not in combat or battle. They're they're killing any Mexican and then they're leaving their bodies Out as a terrorist excited to other Mexicans right and and that's really profoundly huge during goalie ad and afterward what that does has its sets a grammar for how Mexicans will be killed in the southwest. And how they will be killed. is is using various forms. There there are hangings they're shooting. They're burning really brutal. Forms of violence. it was interesting about the the lynching phenomena Mexicans is it it happens more often groups than it does for African Americans who are lynched inched And it happens with this frame of of combat which I find so interesting. You know there's The pretext of why people are lynched. Lot has been talked about that in Afrikaans scholarship about how there's always this pretext that someone has violated a social norm winked at a white woman or look look at a white woman or threatened right into his. Yes yes the Protection of Woman Ray. Right in in the Mexican context in the attacks of Mexicans. You don't get that so much right. You don't get this this. There are some cases but there's not this sensibility. Ability of creating a pretext that Mexican men are threatening white womanhood. Very different one of the major things you you get is this pretext that The men are bandits right. That's so important The men are smugglers What does it come from from? What is because what I'm thinking about the some of the negative negative stereotypes that are born in this country against Mexicans? A lot has to do with the Mexican American war. This need needed to expand towards the West. That's when you go from death when you have the construction of I mean from what I know. The construction of Mexicans as being lazy is not taking care of the resources etc but this idea of one d though that is still present in Hollywood today through not Ecole NOCCO so Narratives what is that born right. I mean I'm so glad that you know when we met. We were working through visual culture right because I had been and training as a historian and I hadn't really thought about the role of the visual. And so when you look for where where where the Mexican as the bandit is invented. There's some really interesting antecedents in Travel logs and travel journals right. So there's all these these settlers again immigrants moving into what was then northern Mexico and they're always like looking in the bushes always afraid that the Mexicans are gonNA come steal dealership right there in Mahyco right there invaders. You shouldn't be there right but they're always sort of like has of the sensibility. You've like. Oh you know we. We came in with all this stuff. And will these people creep up on us and take it and then and so there's those kind of travelogue antecedents but then then you have This film made in nineteen seventeen called the martyrs of the Alamo which has nearly every stereotype type of a Mexican every pejorative stereotype in the United States. has this kind of originality visual moment in that foam and that film is Is subtitled the birth of Texas. And so it's made Like birth of the nation. Yes and in fact it's it's Tsk co-produced by the producers of birth of a nation and so so martyrs of the birth of Texas Center on us is really important in that film. He's Lazy he's a rapist like there's actually it's a silent film so it has these little cards of what's happening and it says stuff like the Texans and of course there's no Texas but the Texans Find Santa Santa Ana in an orgy you know. And that's like how they introduce Santa Ana in that film. And it's an it's a white man in in Brown face of course course but Santana's lazy He's a rapist and he and then it actually says like he's a drug fiend the drug fiends Santa Ana Ah Blah Blah and and they are and what happens in the the way. The film moves forward is part of the reason Santa Anna and his his army. Lose at the Alamo is because he's like he's just had a drug orgy and he's he's like too hungover to win eh the album right exactly You know so so sort of all those things and so and this film is now. When I was first looking looking at it it was hard to find? it's actually a youtube because when you told me about your That's how I showed it to my students. Yes so it's on youtube now you can see the full the full film In in Austin they have been playing it at these like hipster movie houses with live music music. So they'll bring in like live music and you buy a pint of beer and you watch martyrs of the Alamo. I look how custody right right right. And so quite so. So but what happens is like in the in this film. You not only have like the bandit the drug the drug drug fiend though rapist laziness you also have A visual grammar that we see on TV you see so oh so you have the mission of the Alamo and you have the white settlers inside the mission and the the Mexicans are pushing shing toward this mission. Which again is in Mexico right? But they're pushing toward this mission to try to expel the white settlers and the entire. Your film is this is watching. Mexicans GO OVER THE WALL watching Mexicans on little ladders and then watching Mexicans tunnel kind of under right. And so it's all this grammar of walls and breakages in walls. And will they sneak around this way So so very early on in the silent film era that idea of Mexicans not only as bandits trying to steal your stuff but Mexicans as always trying to breach the boundary in some way right at in this film. There's there's it's kind of an end djelic quite baby inside the mission. Of course there's a white woman There's a brilliant scene and this is like a spoiler alert if you you if you go see it on Youtube like mute it for a second because there's this brilliant move there's this little white baby they keep showing you know getting close up shots of the little. Hey baby cry. And then. There's this moment of brutality. Where one of the Mexican soldiers actually picks up the white baby and throws it onto a bayonet and you don't see it lands but you see the baby like going toward the point of? Oh it's my favorite part of the whole like right but but you know that kind of brutality It just get set so early and so when Lou Dobbs was still on Fox News every night. That's what it looked like every night like he would just say the word Mexican and it's Mexican invasion Mexican can invasion and that is set up in that film and we still see that right. I mean we're still talking about invasions and walls in an and ton. Aw yes the tunnel right Which one I was afraid Ian? I would say it was all about a heterosexual. Fear of penetration attrition right like a white male anxiety of penetration which I still like to say sometimes right but yeah like this I. Those ideas are so early and what they do is they actually invert the history right. There's an inversion that because that's not Texas right just historically in that moment that's not Texas. That's Mahyco right. The the invaders leaders who are the settlers suddenly become the imperilled right and then The folks who are defending Mahyco goal because they're Mexican become the invaders right and so it's like this inversion of history. That happened so early. Same thing happens as with lynching right which is and this happens Every time I talk about lynching particularly with my My colleagues colleagues which is a surprise. It doesn't actually happen with my students. But when I talked to my colleagues about lynching one of the things I do say talk about The victims right so you know how I try to look at particular case studies of Mexican. She can men who are who are killed By Lynch irs and one of the things I don't do is I. Don't say what they were accused of. Because that's the first thing you see the case or you see the the the picture of the Lynch Body and you're like well. Why do they do? That's the first place that we go. And what does it do right right. Well yeah I mean that's a that's the same version right because the because my my colleagues always do that. There's a picture and I question doing cuny. Well what did they do. And and then I'll kind of pause and they'll realize that's a bad question and then they'll be like but what were they accused of doing right so they chided like nuance but what it does. This is an invert through. The criminal is if you're looking at that photograph looking for the criminal is the Lynch right criminal. Is there right. But but you're applying a logic that has inverted who the criminal is right and so people look at it and they go. What did they do and I say nothing? And it's sort of like well. Where do you go from there right? Because then they're like well the way lynching. Scholarship has always worked is. Do you prove the person's innocent right so think about The story everybody knows of Emmett till's lynching which is understood as a really important important moment for the civil rights movement right And and his mother having this incredible courage of Making sure that that the torture was displayed for the nation.

Texas youtube Mexico Lynch Mahyco NBA United States Goldenrod Santa Anna Santa Ana Santa Santa Ana Lou Dobbs Texas Center Fox News Hollywood Lynch Body Ecole NOCCO shing
"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

15:08 min | 8 months ago

"annette" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Let me tell you this sad journey of this episode you. You won't get to listen for a while but anyway so back in November. I had the idea the idea but I. I've been thinking about this episode for a while. So the idea of doing the problematic faves and actually I had forgotten. Lumina had created similar episode actually two episodes dedicated indicated to music to musicians to songs. That are problematic but we always seeing income. Open the wholesomeness Kingston yet as alleging so I wanted to do something thing like that and really go deep into the Colonia of the songs. Just how like the pedals that are portrayed them those songs actually come from like five hundred years ago right. Uh so finally it happens I I produce this month so it was all. It was all episodes about music and even window. I had said that I wanted to construct from Google song to song. I realized that I didn't have enough information so I wanted to do research for later so I decided to do the problematic anyway. So fast forward. I talked to five if I was like okay. Let's do it everybody's going to be sad because you're not going to do the that. Go one better so we record. It was a wonderful episode. We've got into all these details about a lot of things that are happening right now. Hashtag American third. He get claim PAPPASITO's kicker in West K. Mickan Buddha's annual Caldo and out. You got all corrupted way. I fucking cried. Bench occurred because I was so excited but in less cost us things happen for a reason. And I promise you and unpromising promising here that I'm going to bring back some of those episodes and that episode that we recorded and nothing happened so just stay tuned. Because I'm going to we're going to get into it. We're going to get into some of the long history of some of these issues that you hear in songs Galas. Oh yes and Clintonistas weddings weddings. He does so I was like Fuck Iota game. They're making the deal the lotto so I was was like by Lethal Colorado. Because I remember I had a fucking bad as interview that I did with my friend and naturally and I think I've talked about this before because this whole thing about anti-colonial no anti colonial gestures supposed to D- colonially is something that I learned from her and in a way it's not necessarily a methodology to study things yet but it is something something that is catching on. I've seen more and more scholars use that instead of talking about the colon your studies or decolonize this or decolonized that sh they started to talk about anti-colonial we talked to. We talked with Anna Lopez for example about the anti colonial gestures that she does as part of her job in the Newbury but anyways so I netted night where together in a panel in the Association of American Studies in the in. The panel of this conference took place in Honolulu Hawaii. USA Komatsu Fro but anyway so oh my husband and I flew over there and we met with a net and she let us stay in her hotel because nobody has money to pay for airbnb in as in hotels over there because shit over there is again expensive because in the middle of nowhere literally in the middle of nowhere so we stayed with her. Now is like no Momma Data Zuma than we are going to sit down and we're going to have a conversation because I net has incredible incredible scholarship even though she's in American studies she. She's a tune to art history so she studies writings images about lynchings lynchings of Mexicans. And one of the things that you will learn in this episode is that the lynchings that occurred in the early twentieth century in places in in states like Texas says many times. The number of mceachern was higher than other minorities. And it's something that we don't hear much after that is not to erase. There's not to erase the pain of other communities. But very few times when the conversation is around lynching we talked about Mohican so a net that is doing God's work and she is producing amazing scholarship surrounding this topic. So why don't we listen to this interview. It it is about. I'M GONNA say thirty seven or something like that Minutes she's going to a mason recommendations about things to listen to about books to read and people to follow on instagram and twitter. And then after that I'll come back with my conclusions and I'll give you a couple of exciting being announcements again. I'm sorry but technology fucking hates me and there's nothing I can do I still in Chicago Illinois Chair. I should go to bed not that good as you remember. What movie night battle so? I don't care that I'm recording. This and I'm editing this two to three in the morning I love it and please please enjoyed this interview and hopefully you'll enjoy this interview as much as I did while we were in Hawaii where wait let me let me give you that. Little Makita do hello. Latinos will launch audience. This is the first time I think I've ever done an interview without shoes. The reason is because I am heavily engaging here in Honolulu and the reason why I'm here in Honolulu is because I presented in a panel on native resistance. Bud Bud enough of that. I wanted to introduce my guests. We have a small interview. And it's a person that I talked to you about before. If you remember number we had a conversation with annuloplasty they librarian Of the IR collection at the Newberry in Chicago. And we talked about anti-colonial gestures and and you've heard me say that over and over again not talk about the colonial talk about anti-colonial gestures. I actually learned that from my friend. I'm Ed Rodri- Guess I add Alaa. So I netted I met in Grad school hung ago. I think it was in the early two thousand right something like Ebola. We both have white hair now. We didn't then. Yes it's it's it's pretty sad lower bingo communist Santa Claus. Yes so we met in Kirsten buicks class on race and gender and we started talking because we both work on on images of violence which we will get into. But but let's get into the most important things. What are we just eat? We just had It is rice ace with like a hamburger patty on top and then a fried egg which wasn't runny. which was a disappointment? Right was it just me. I was disappointed. It wasn't running But it has baulked is a slightly soft fried egg and then a beef gravy with onions and mushrooms and a side salad. And what do you think of it. It was amazing. I A local for the first. I told the airport last time I was here and I wanted to and then we were back home and we made it like three times but I I make my gravy with with uh-huh Bacon Grease yet. Well yes also where we had. Our local MANCA was sort of like look like a juice bar so I I was afraid. It wasn't going to be greasy. I was afraid it wasn't going to be Bacon which was true. It wasn't but what it did have was an ample amount of salt and it did and it reminded me of. I don't know if you've had this where you grew up the first cafeteria right. Where like and my parents used to take us there after church because you didn't pay for kids so they just put stuff on our trail? Be Like you're having this. You're having this. You're having this right but I always got the Salisbury steak was mushroom gravy. That's what this was like and that's the thing about Hawaii like off of posts hosts mid twentieth century. How wuyin hybrid military fast food items type of food right? Yes because my father was born here so his dad was a marine So there are these Mexicans out at in the Pacific. His Dad's marine. I don't know what he did wrong but he got sent back to Mexico but my dad was here for twelve years of his life right so so he remembers the way that things that were rationed foods became part of the local foods. Right things like ground. Beef things like like hamburger things like spam right So we grew up with a lot of spam and we see a lot of spam here and here there's like seventeen kinds of spam. You can get there's a Jalapeno spam. There's Teriyaki Spam So yeah it it. It is really interesting to think about the way that like canned hand foods that was coming as part of the military occupation which continues Really transform local foods. And that's what I think about every time we'll get more soobee which we've gotten three times my husband we're obsessed with it but it's because we forget for example that that Eh Japanese built this town ride so they've been here as working force for one hundred years so that's why you have this weird combination. Should I had the best thing I've had so far was spam Masugi but it has eggs bacon and avocado. Yes yes yes yes yes yeah and you you you see that. That's why love local Manco and even though immunize be What some people may deem as how than-thank Hawaiian does it kind? I remember like that's the kind of cultural shifting things that I like in cuisines that are like to to have. That's why Love tex-mex food because for for some people may not seem authentic whatever the fuck that means and we talked about this over and over again but it is. Those adoptions two different casinos. That's why I love new Mexican food too and we've had entire episodes just talking about new Mexican food because we get Mexicans in New Mexico saying this is not Chile Colorado. Hashtag my dad right now. It's funny because when you when you say you know why we were here. It was part of this native resistance conference but one of The colleagues I know who who is indigenous of the upper North American area near the Canadian border. She had all all these photographs of herself doing authentic indigenous things here and it was so interesting to me because yesterday she was posting photographs of finding macadamia nuts. Like in the wild which was in the park off the resort. And she's like found like in the wild and I was late to a panel. Because I always picking Macadamia nuts. And then she she had all these pictures of her trying to open them and peel them. And whatever and then I'm talking to Manuel your husband and he's like those came with this is right. Those are not Hawaiian. Traveling with my husband is just like discontent because everything like this plantar now from. I'm here that trees from here. That is Never Amir. Any reminds you that we are in heavily colonial setting but people are so obsessed with living the Hawaiian fantasy honesty. That they forgot that yes. Yes like walking down the street with him as like why Wa wa right because you're like Oh this authentic thing and it's like it's not it's not that's so funny but anyways so let's get into your research because it's super fascinating and I think a lot of a lot of people have not heard what about this material that you've been working and I know you move forward you move on and you working on other things but I really WanNa talk about on your research on the lynchings things over Mexicans in In Texas ryden specifically in Texas a lot. But there's also plenty of cases in New Mexico and what would become Arizona Definitely California what's interesting about that project. Is it started with a complete false false premise. And and I'm really proud to say that that I started with a false premise and my false premise was There's this phenomenon that is a footnote in in Carey McWilliams North from Mexico and in this one footnote he says more more Mexicans pins were lynched in the southwest Than African Americans were lynched in the south and he gives no data. He doesn't doesn't tell you how he comes to that conclusion right. It's just this little footnote your leg. What a what a what? And so I and so I kept so I start with this false premise of like. Can I prove this number right. Because it's like it's making the the first problem problem with it is. It's making this comparison as though they're two distinct populations and they're not right Like in the eyes of the state. It's the the person that is lynched. Is the same thing right right and also you know we have a good number of African Americans Akins who were populations fleeing enslavement who were fleeing south into Mexico where slavery had been unlawful long long before the United States right before we continue give us a little bit of a timeframe and like explain a little bit more like what a lynching is without necessarily getting too graphic for coming over. You can get rough or whatever. Well I mean that's what's interesting too is that Were used to kind of this visual language of lynching which is he's like a a a person hanged from a tree right And very often that is accompanied by a definitions that come from to ski or the NAACP and both.

Honolulu Hawaii Mexico Texas Hawaii New Mexico Chicago Colorado Kingston Google Lumina NAACP Pacific Bud Bud airbnb Salisbury Clintonistas instagram colonially Zuma
Annette Rodrguez

Latinos Who Lunch

08:54 min | 8 months ago

Annette Rodrguez

"Hello. Latinos will launch audience. This is the first time I think I've ever done an interview without shoes. The reason is because I am heavily engaging here in Honolulu and the reason why I'm here in Honolulu is because I presented in a panel on native resistance. Bud Bud enough of that. I wanted to introduce my guests. We have a small interview. And it's a person that I talked to you about before. If you remember number we had a conversation with annuloplasty they librarian Of the IR collection at the Newberry in Chicago. And we talked about anti-colonial gestures and and you've heard me say that over and over again not talk about the colonial talk about anti-colonial gestures. I actually learned that from my friend. I'm Ed Rodri- Guess I add Alaa. So I netted I met in Grad school hung ago. I think it was in the early two thousand right something like Ebola. We both have white hair now. We didn't then. Yes it's it's it's pretty sad lower bingo communist Santa Claus. Yes so we met in Kirsten buicks class on race and gender and we started talking because we both work on on images of violence which we will get into. But but let's get into the most important things. What are we just eat? We just had It is rice ace with like a hamburger patty on top and then a fried egg which wasn't runny. which was a disappointment? Right was it just me. I was disappointed. It wasn't running But it has baulked is a slightly soft fried egg and then a beef gravy with onions and mushrooms and a side salad. And what do you think of it. It was amazing. I A local for the first. I told the airport last time I was here and I wanted to and then we were back home and we made it like three times but I I make my gravy with with uh-huh Bacon Grease yet. Well yes also where we had. Our local MANCA was sort of like look like a juice bar so I I was afraid. It wasn't going to be greasy. I was afraid it wasn't going to be Bacon which was true. It wasn't but what it did have was an ample amount of salt and it did and it reminded me of. I don't know if you've had this where you grew up the first cafeteria right. Where like and my parents used to take us there after church because you didn't pay for kids so they just put stuff on our trail? Be Like you're having this. You're having this. You're having this right but I always got the Salisbury steak was mushroom gravy. That's what this was like and that's the thing about Hawaii like off of posts hosts mid twentieth century. How wuyin hybrid military fast food items type of food right? Yes because my father was born here so his dad was a marine So there are these Mexicans out at in the Pacific. His Dad's marine. I don't know what he did wrong but he got sent back to Mexico but my dad was here for twelve years of his life right so so he remembers the way that things that were rationed foods became part of the local foods. Right things like ground. Beef things like like hamburger things like spam right So we grew up with a lot of spam and we see a lot of spam here and here there's like seventeen kinds of spam. You can get there's a Jalapeno spam. There's Teriyaki Spam So yeah it it. It is really interesting to think about the way that like canned hand foods that was coming as part of the military occupation which continues Really transform local foods. And that's what I think about every time we'll get more soobee which we've gotten three times my husband we're obsessed with it but it's because we forget for example that that Eh Japanese built this town ride so they've been here as working force for one hundred years so that's why you have this weird combination. Should I had the best thing I've had so far was spam Masugi but it has eggs bacon and avocado. Yes yes yes yes yes yeah and you you you see that. That's why love local Manco and even though immunize be What some people may deem as how than-thank Hawaiian does it kind? I remember like that's the kind of cultural shifting things that I like in cuisines that are like to to have. That's why Love tex-mex food because for for some people may not seem authentic whatever the fuck that means and we talked about this over and over again but it is. Those adoptions two different casinos. That's why I love new Mexican food too and we've had entire episodes just talking about new Mexican food because we get Mexicans in New Mexico saying this is not Chile Colorado. Hashtag my dad right now. It's funny because when you when you say you know why we were here. It was part of this native resistance conference but one of The colleagues I know who who is indigenous of the upper North American area near the Canadian border. She had all all these photographs of herself doing authentic indigenous things here and it was so interesting to me because yesterday she was posting photographs of finding macadamia nuts. Like in the wild which was in the park off the resort. And she's like found like in the wild and I was late to a panel. Because I always picking Macadamia nuts. And then she she had all these pictures of her trying to open them and peel them. And whatever and then I'm talking to Manuel your husband and he's like those came with this is right. Those are not Hawaiian. Traveling with my husband is just like discontent because everything like this plantar now from. I'm here that trees from here. That is Never Amir. Any reminds you that we are in heavily colonial setting but people are so obsessed with living the Hawaiian fantasy honesty. That they forgot that yes. Yes like walking down the street with him as like why Wa wa right because you're like Oh this authentic thing and it's like it's not it's not that's so funny but anyways so let's get into your research because it's super fascinating and I think a lot of a lot of people have not heard what about this material that you've been working and I know you move forward you move on and you working on other things but I really WanNa talk about on your research on the lynchings things over Mexicans in In Texas ryden specifically in Texas a lot. But there's also plenty of cases in New Mexico and what would become Arizona Definitely California what's interesting about that project. Is it started with a complete false false premise. And and I'm really proud to say that that I started with a false premise and my false premise was There's this phenomenon that is a footnote in in Carey McWilliams North from Mexico and in this one footnote he says more more Mexicans pins were lynched in the southwest Than African Americans were lynched in the south and he gives no data. He doesn't doesn't tell you how he comes to that conclusion right. It's just this little footnote your leg. What a what a what? And so I and so I kept so I start with this false premise of like. Can I prove this number right. Because it's like it's making the the first problem problem with it is. It's making this comparison as though they're two distinct populations and they're not right Like in the eyes of the state. It's the the person that is lynched. Is the same thing right right and also you know we have a good number of African Americans Akins who were populations fleeing enslavement who were fleeing south into Mexico where slavery had been unlawful long long before the United States right

Mexico New Mexico Honolulu Bud Bud Pacific Grad School Kirsten Buicks Bacon Manca Newberry Salisbury Ed Rodri Hawaii Texas Chicago Carey Mcwilliams United States
New York Adoptees Anxiously Await Opportunity To Request Original Birth Certificates

Morning Edition

02:21 min | 9 months ago

New York Adoptees Anxiously Await Opportunity To Request Original Birth Certificates

"Hake starting today if you were adopted and born in New York state you are now allowed to apply for an original birth certificate you have to be eighteen WMI sees when Hogan reports some adoptees I've been waiting for this moment for a long time in the past adoptees had to petition the court to get their birth certificates the process was costly cumbersome and those petitions were rarely granted that's because previous New York state law required original birth certificates be sealed once an adoption occurred to him Monty well part is the New York representative of the American adoption Congress he says that nineteen thirty six law created a culture of secrecy they were trying to remove the stigma of illegitimacy from the adopted person and whatever their intentions were this was an extremely misguided and very very hurtful policy social media and DNA testing services like twenty three in me have already made it much easier for adoptees to find their biological families so many adoptees are looking for other details about their births many people don't even know what hospital in the morning what kind of day they were born how much they weighed or just simple information like that that the non adopted people take for granted Annette o'connell is the spokeswoman for the New York adoptee rights coalition the fact that I will actually be able to have in my possession and it was sent to record of my birth is just like a motion only overwhelm both she and Tim Monty while part say they plan on requesting their birth certificates right away but another adoptee says she's not so sure state assembly member Pamela hunter cosponsored the new law the answer is I don't know hunter who represents parts of Syracuse and the surrounding area says it was never about her own story but it was always being able to afford people an opportunity if they wanted to now they can and now I can New York state health department is encouraging people to apply for birth certificates online although requests can be made by mail or in person adoptees born in the five boroughs will have a separate application process through New York city's health department the birth certificates won't be released right away the state estimates it may take four to six weeks to fill

Hogan Representative Annette O'connell Pamela Hunter Syracuse New York City American Adoption Congress Tim Monty New York
An Interview with Adam Driver of 'Marriage Story'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

10:49 min | 11 months ago

An Interview with Adam Driver of 'Marriage Story'

"I M Peter Travers this his popcorn where he tell you what's happened in the movies and my guest. Today's Adam driver who has his own film festival between now I guess. Is it the the report that opened the first store that opens I Mirror story opens I in theaters. Then I think is net flicks on December first and I think report is soon after that a couple of weeks after that and star wars after that star wars after that. So how does that happen. Suddenly it is an atom drive for festival US too much too much too much of my face. It really sad. I think Mary story almost close to two years now. Mill wanted to wait a year and give them a lot have a lot of time to work work on it so it just the way the schedule worked out just turned into too much of my face. One time you're carrying around just closed in. Burn this right. Yeah Ah Yeah Yeah like a month and a half ago or so what he would do downtime. No I haven't I haven't had any. I've been having downtime. So it's so it's dry because there is none but I'm going to take some time the needle issuing something now but after that I'm going to take some in some time off and look at a tree. I just can't imagine that happening for you. I don't know if it's this like mid Western mentality in in me that And not to generalize the Mid West of like oh you go to work you get up and go to work in you come home and you're tired and then go to sleep you wake up and go to work so to me. It's Mike Land. Yeah it's it's not so like oh you work a lot. Well yeah that's what you do you do right you go you go to work like the idea of taking months off at like It's is just not wasn't was never in my delays or taking time off wasn't like a something that I'm used to I guess just marriage story he's here in the a poster and then this picture let's start with that one okay. I don't WanNa blow smoke or anything but it's to me. It's one of those rare times where movie turns out perfect. Well I do not know if when you were making it felt that way but it just everything just came together in such a way that it seemed that all had to be that way yet I could never predict which way it was going. Well that's a very nice compliment. No it didn't seem that it was perfect when we were making it. Ah I knew when I got the script that this it was a just as a document just as scripted was beautiful but then shooting it when we actually had to say the language. I was surprised by how difficult it was and then every usually shooting a movie. There's maybe one or two scenes that you know is coming up and you kind kind of Over think that senior. You're anticipating it too much then it's always you know running through your mind. I have that scene coming up for this movie. Every day seemed to be. I was that scene. I'm like Oh this scene is coming up now and then but no no. It's too soon in the shooting schedule. We need more time before But that is also a sign of great great writing where every seen as necessary and vital and the stakes are incredibly high. And that's what you kind of want where there isn't any fat is is it just because it was that emotional matched. Yeah because there's again. The language was beautiful in and of itself. And what's great about Noah's writing as a And how he directs is the the words of the words. And that's fine because I'm you know with W- come from a theater background so I'm used to the play the play but what the intention is behind the the lines can change. And the more you say when you actually have to save Say it to someone else and this one it was It was more emotional than I thought it was going to be because it's so beautifully written descriptions that Charlie has Nicole or you know beautiful. How the scenes with his sonner beautiful? It was hard not to kind of get swept up by it painful. Yeah very funny funny. Paint uh-huh and all of that is happening almost at the same time. He did a really great job of writing a very specific story from various. You Know Specific Lens. It was such a great guide of how you can project all of your relationship to divorce without getting too specific personal but it it was just. It felt very personal personal for everybody. That's why I think well I don't want to give away. Except it's about a break-up you know it's a marriage store that's what people. Yeah BR divorcing separating but really I mean I think movies are always kind of about a lot of things and it's also about you know how love can transition Russian into something else and how painful that can be You know one character is kind of is building themselves up in the other kind of breaking down you know a mourning warning of the loss of love is is also kind of what happens and in underneath hopefully all of the scenes. Where the are you know going through this kind of clinical ritual of getting divorced? There's there is this love underneath that. Hopefully hopefully you feel there still. Is this Connecticut thing that they for so long have had this relationship. That's felt second nature even just being room with each other just not mentally making a choice that that's not a reality anymore as hard. Yes we've seen movies about divorced about split ups marriage things that break up when that happens I think the audience anybody watching it can feel those emotions so I was gonna ask you to when you had your last seen. Do you take Charlie home with you. Is it hard to say goodbye to him. The good thing about working a lot is that there's something else to to distract you from From that I I have a good ability to as soon as it's done to try to drop to try to drop it and I'm always ready need to move on regardless of how much I like shooting. It was tough to shoot but I mean I loved working on this. I'm working with no is my friend. scarlets great Alan alda's Gr- like our radio to Laura dern you know it was a great cast and I loved going to work but I'm always ready for it to be over and so I I think I've just trained myself as soon soon as that's done like flush flush it out of your your mind except with something that you know you're gonNA do again. Something like Star Wars than you put it in the back of your mind somewhere and it kind of stays awesome because we have to keep working on it but stuff like this I try to flush it out of me. Burn this as soon as it's done to flush it burnt. Well let's switch to the report report okay. Political Thriller based on a True Story. So who is this guy that you're playing got him. Dan Jones who who was tasked to write what turned out to be the most comprehensive report for the Senate Intel Dianne Feinstein and the Senate intelligence eligible committee About the as post nine eleven torture program. He went through well. Acquainted to an urban library of information was like six million pages wrote a report. That's just over six thousand pages than it was condensed because it became a partisan issue in and condense to something over five hundred like forty five. I pages that's actually in a book that you can buy on Amazon of the actual torture report and then Scott the writer director can convince that down to who like one hundred and forty five page script so had. There's a lot of things that he could have put in there that maybe were more salacious but there. He was very disciplined and picking facts. That were undisputed that you could throw a dart at any line and there was references footnotes footnotes to back it up. And so that's kind of what it's about his his investigation. And that's what happens. I should say the dog ID investigator the little I guess in total will be seven years. Yeah there's no life no this guy is just determined to do something that when people look back on that time they said well. I know that it's enhanced interrogation waterboarding all that stuff. It just didn't work now. We didn't know that right right right. We didn't and him trying to get get that through like you say a partisan issue Dianne Feinstein also and Annette Benning is tremendous and she's really great but it's like a seventy s political thriller. It's like all the president's men it's like digging out the truth and making that exciting right. Tough is is the. Yeah which is why we knew. That's what happens but no one will really care if we don't you know track what maybe the movie is. Also what about someone being disillusioned by the institution that they grew up to trust having to find his moral compass within. How was he trying to leave his emotions out of it also address? What is the moral compass of our country you know there's a decorum that DSP follow? We can't just go in and like being on a table and say we did this. And that's it. You know when people believe him. There's a process and there's a chain of command that he has to follow and you know in isolation doing all that not really having an avenue to express yourself except to your boss an inevitably you know kind of comes out but then he kind of has to walk it back. It's all. It's all things that were fun to play or where you think about you. Know like the big themes of the movie with marriage story you. I don't try to think about it you to try to just find the humanity in seems that you're shooting and then hopefully like those are playable actions to play a guy who says desk a lot you you know it's a writer and people will come by and say can we watch you. Do this really bore order dropping the blackboard and yet there's so much tension movie and again it's tasking an audience to pay attention and then rewards it so good on you pick those two things to do. Well I mean I mean I was lucky to be involved in both of those things you know. Scott and and nowhere to people that were you know they they. It came both of them came from an urgency. So I'm I'm well. I had nothing much to do with it when I was thinking about those three movies that you happen to be in Star Wars. It's this big size giant movie. You just as comfortable doing that as you are

Dianne Feinstein Charlie Scott Writer Senate Peter Travers United States Adam Mill Mary Alan Alda Mike Land Laura Dern Connecticut Noah Investigator Amazon President Trump Annette Benning
Tusk to Johnson: Brexit not 'stupid blame game'

BBC Newshour

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Tusk to Johnson: Brexit not 'stupid blame game'

"Britain's chief bricks of the guys said to David frost is holding for the talks in Brussels today on the government's two proposals for leaving the European Union on October the thirty first the prime minister Boris Johnson the German chancellor Angela Merkel levels have been discussing how to break the current deadlock box at the same time the government officials told the BBC that the British government is preparing for a break down of those talks this week it follows the publication of a series of texts in the spectator political magazine on Monday from an official in the prime minister's office which claimed that and I could if the deal dies in the next few days then it won't be revised let's speak to a political correspondent rob Watson said rob what Annette is going on well I think this is a a truly dramatic moments and the press pros that someone I know it's been a pretty dramatic all along to them but this is an extraordinary moment because this tax ma'am I want to be like to call it does come from a senior number ten official we think it is from a Michael Dominic Cummings Mister Johnson's chief of staff and if you remember the man he was the brains behind the vote leave campaign want significant because you have to be blind as a pact not to see the message coming from number ten and that is that the vessels that with the E. or about to fail are they going to say it's it's gonna be the E. U.'s fold and that we have I'm going to play tough we're going to try and do our best to still leave the European Union even the facts will out of jail the end of October and if we have to fight a general election we're gonna blame those in the U. K. who stood in the way as they would say it of practice at and those in the European Union he stood in the way of brexit I mean it is a truly still missing moments to them clearly aware of this the European Council president Donald says because accuse Mister Johnson of engaging in a stupid blame game he has a lot I can finish the rest of the tweet for you Julian because it's not extraordinary that's how it came out of that it's at stake is the future of Europe and the U. K. as well as the security in and trust of our people you don't want to Dale you die once the extension you don't want to revoke clove obvious which for those who don't know lance and as you know well enough you guy and of course very pointed to land and that's missed the Tuscan knows of calls that Boris Johnson who this is directed that started lacks it indeed here in Oxford to Mister Johnson than full could possibly blame the European Union for the break down all of negotiations but that doesn't life make life any easier for him necessary doesn't know and I think look a bit of context him and I think one of the reasons why Downing Street has got so incredibly aggressive it is it also reflects the fact that Mister Johnson is in a tight spot on that to some extent he has lost control of the brexit process it's sort of it suggests that these doubling down on the back of the sort of basically taking the view look my very political survival depends all on delivering brexit and that's why I'm that's why anti the gloves are off but it's immensely risky it may put off the vote says it may be put off even some of his own government so I will Britain believing the European Union on October the thirty first question I'm glad time was running out I don't know okay well we'll have to leave it there with a bit of a gap the term rob anything subs on political correspondent rob

Britain David Frost Brussels European Union
A Review of Stephen King's 'It'

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

A Review of Stephen King's 'It'

"Today. We're discussing it star orrick harry anderson dennis christopher where should missour- annette o'toole. Tim reid john ritter and richard thomas special appearance by tim curry. The as pennywise was lonnie anderson busy like we're. We're all the sitcoms. What isn't a horror movie could get alan thicke directed directed by tommy lee wallace who does more comedy than horror no halloween three now. I guess depending on how you slice comedy. This is the the now playing co host. That's down to clown arnie and stewart and this the host who still insists he sees the ghost jacob. We're here a movie that has been so requested tested even before we started doing stephen king and then once we did. I can't count the number of times i've heard have you guys reviewed it and this is going to be the show with the most fun inflection an ever as we constantly emphasize the proper noun it yeah it is it for me. It certainly was the steven king book that i read that maybe wanna go back and read everything that he had written part of the appeal was i had just turned thirteen sixth grade and i had never taken on a book as is big as that book. My dad was a member of book of the month club but then showed up like a phone book on our doorstep over a thousand pages fourteen hundred pages weighing over four pounds at retail and you know aliens had just come out the month before and a movie and this really kicked off my horror movie phase like these were the things things that made me get so deep into horror in my teenage years i had talked to you about stephen king before this. I remember bus rides talking about it and then i remember one day you showed me your copy of it and there was a character who killed himself and you're like and he wrote this on the wall and there was a drawing join in the book. I'd never seen a book that had a drawing in it where the text goes. It looks like a letter age and i'm like i don't get it was an age. You're like no. It's it's the word it in blood and i'm like oh. That's pretty cool fast forward six months. I moved to florida. I didn't know a damn soul. Twelve hundred page book was exactly up my alley. I read it summer of eighty seven and that's the last time i read it until this year when i reread it for these reviews and i am once again the king newbie or the never have been i have not read it but i do feel like this is the one yes sure there's the shining but when i think of the shining i don't i think of king i think of kubrick the same with carrie i think of those movies but it because until two thousand seventeen eighty didn't get good adaptation. We'll talk about the nineteen ninety-one anyone but i do feel like this is the steven king book. I mean it's the scary clown which sure there's john wayne casey but this is such a trope. I feel like in horror now. I'm i'm sure this is a weird originated but i think he did popularize that whole concept. It's funny. You say that i was going to ask you. What's the first thing that comes to your mind. When when you think of it i wanna just put out there. One of my favorite things about stephen king and his first decade of output was to look at the cover because there were so many of them and i never knew what they were about hadn't seen many of the movies so it was fun to try and decipher from that picture on the cover. What is this one going to be about it. First edition hardback did not have no clown on it. It had the alien hand right clawed hand. It looked like a gremlins movie. It looked like he was was reaching his clawed hand out of sewer grates and that's how i read it.

Stephen King Steven King John Wayne Casey Tim Reid John Ritter Lonnie Anderson Dennis Christopher Pennywise Annette O'toole Alan Thicke Arnie Tim Curry Tommy Lee Wallace Richard Thomas Florida Kubrick Stewart Four Pounds Six Months One Day
"annette" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"annette" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"In november because otherwise none of this none of these bills are going to be able to to come to the floor all gun safety bills that have been proposed in both in the house of the senate especially in the house go into what's up committee fair. They never see the light of day because the republicans have a majority on on that committee and from our leader at moms demand action has been in these studies subcommittee meetings. Tell the delegates on those committees really sort of laugh off and show disdain for these gun on safety gun safety laws because they fear that any gun safety legislation is just gonna mean. They're going go on it. Flipper yourself to century slow to get their guns ticking away from him and it's just not the case so i noticed that the current income at this position in who you are running against in this race i believe his name is emmett hanger. He has been running unopposed a lot. I think in two thousand eleven he we didn't even have a primary and then in the last race in two thousand fifteen he there was no democrat. I don't think that even opposed him <hes> but now you're here are people all excited that there's a democrat running in in this district or they surprised what what has been the reception to your campaign. General in fact senator hanger hasn't had a democratic challenger versus two thousand seven so if in twelve twelve years i have we've been targeting a strong democrats democrats independence attendance just to let them know that finally after twelve years if they do have a choice at the ballot box and people are very excited. Actually i knocked on one door yesterday in fisher still and the gentleman open the door and he said he made i don't have to write my cat's name on the ballot. This time i le i said no or you could actually have somebody that you can and you can circle the little dot on on the paper ballot and it's not your cats name so the response has been been very repulsive and i believe i've got a really good chance because people are ready for change and even if if i go to the door and they say well senator hangers done great things that they also come back and say well yeah. He's been there for twenty twenty three years. It's probably time for him to retire is so toes. A little bit about your election is in november so it's coming up fairly quickly a and you know. I think a lot of people are excited to have some elections. This year to sort of test. What's going on. People are all thinking ahead to twenty twenty money but but it's good to have stuff to work on right now so so what are some ways that people can help out your campaign if they're local or if they're not local what would you would. Would you like them to do to help you out well if they're if they're not local. Donations are critical. We're looking <music> at an aggressive direct mail campaign for a october so we really need funds in order to be able to do that or also looking at digital campaign that we need funds for that as well. If they're the local area we need people people out knocking on doors because the mo the more voters that we can reach by knocking doors the the bigger the turnout's gonna be in november. People can also help us write postcards. That's another way of doing direct mail neil phone banking hosting events being able to come to somebody's house and talk to their friends and neighbors went on one having them get to know.

emmett hanger senator democrats senate twenty twenty three years twelve twelve years twelve years
"annette" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"annette" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Affecting home sales because the first thing that realtors are asked in this area is about internet service. It's affecting small businesses. A lot of people don't want to open a small business in this area because <hes> of the poor internet service and it's affecting our school kid if kids at home don't have internet. They have the two options where i live in madison county. They can either go sit outside the library parking lot where they keep the wifi on twenty four seven or they go to mcdonald's donald when it's opened and in fact the biggest usage of our libraries. Wi fi is at four thirty a. m. This is what people come to the parking lot sit in their cars. They check their email. They check their facebook. They checked the news before they go off to work. Northern virginia nya second issue i hear about is healthcare last year. Medicaid was expanded which means over four hundred thousand virginia's virginians silent can have access to quality healthcare but there's a lot of people don't qualified including me and my husband. My husband was quote. Unquote retired from his job in two thousand seventeen our only option for health insurance with the affordable care act. If we didn't qualify for subsidies we wouldn't.

donald facebook virginia madison county Wi Medicaid mcdonald
"annette" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"annette" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Have to drive forty five minutes to an hour earn half to get to a specialist when you need to go for your chemotherapy. Treatment would be much nicer to they have access to something in your community rather than having to drive over the mountain to someplace like u._v._a. Charlottesville from the valley so a lot of people would like to see <hes> are the access to <hes> to healthcare increase infrastructure in rural communities is it's always a concern <hes> interstate eighty one. I've been driving for over twenty years and i can tell you that interstate eighty one needed to be address since i got my driver's license so looking at rural infrastructure and really prioritizing it and understanding that the longer we put it off the more more expensive and a little more dangerous it becomes i wanted to talk some about sort of the the cost of running for office and i think that people hear so much about presidential races and how wildly expensive the twenty twenty presidential races that they don't really realize you you know how far your money can go in state legislative race but i noticed that on facebook when you were getting like toward the end of july you're posting actual dollars raised i in the month and that sort of thing and it's actually quite a bit cheaper presidential race can you can you can you talk some about the importance of fundraising for state legislative races in kind of the money goes toward and why you would encourage people to donate to your race sure so oh so being the difference in cost between those types of races is of course i don't have to reach nearly as many voters as gentle candidate but when you're donating to a local campaign you're donating directly to mail your donating directly to <hes> helping speaks directly to our voters so my district those from albemarle county right outside kind of charlottesville all the way to the west virginia line covering three county hurt the three county and the i'm not of money i spend in gas is probably <hes> more than i spend on a lot of other things but when you're donating to a local campaign the state level campaign <hes> your dollar i feel it's a lot more effective because we're using it. Direct outreach were also hiring staff members hiring people to help us <hes> if the day to day stuff done so that we can be on the doors and talking directly to voters every yard line newsy is at least five dollars every campaign t shirt u._c. is at least twenty five dollars then you you know and and there are male programs and things that we have to have to get you the people that we can't reach that we that we either can't physically get for their doors or we've tried to knock their door and they weren't home or own calls. Were answered. They're they're a lot of different ways that we need to be able to reach those voters what those dollars are going towards. Are there other ways that people can help out your campaign of course encourage them to go right this very second and sign unin donate money. Is there anything else that they can do to help absolutely if you live anywhere near where i'm running. I'm not doors. That's the most effective way to win. Is i didn't get out knock doors talk directly voters and help them understand how important local campaigns are local politics affect you more than national politics. The decisions that are being made at the state level affects your day to day life a lot more than i think people realize. Writing postcards.

Charlottesville albemarle county facebook west virginia twenty five dollars forty five minutes five dollars twenty years
"annette" Discussed on IOT Podcast

IOT Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"annette" Discussed on IOT Podcast

"Existing smartphone and annette salvio in the data that you had you guys have reams of agricultural data on this or not even agricultural just pictures of weeds in you trained using your data we have built this algorithm spirals ourselves so for years weapon going out taking pictures of weeds of insects and diseases around the planet than to build those recognition algorithms one of my biggest things is thinking about how the iot can actually improve the world not just our allies which lovely that we can actually make things better in power you guys kind of trying to think about the bigger picture of us on this planet generating a lot of proprietary data through the servia scouting app with early couple of hundred thousand users across hundred countries we have donating all this proprietary data to a data ngo ho quantify planet twentyfive makes this data reveal lable open innovation to universities for a better agriculture and for most sustainability negra which i imagine you could also see the new super we'd while you know we had a couple of universities approaching us and said look you guys get a cup of ten thousand pictures off all nine flora everyday hoodoo please send us those pictures you're actually have no idea what you have in front of you because through crowdsourcing this university believe will detect a new species which so far when known to us has that happened yet not to my knowledge yet but we are confident that it will happen over the next couple of months roz actually from the yield the nas jillian company that is trying to do what i imagine is just incredible it is an end to end understanding of the food system basically all the way to win is a consumer would eat and i look at that and i'm like holy cow that's the internet of things but i'm also like is that even realistic so touching me about where this could go and how this could connect beyond just the army is a consumer i wonder what he'd be confident that i'm reading the right things for my body and i also only be confident that what i'm eating is.

army annette salvio
"annette" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"annette" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"Mm mm arab besides do with serious and often distressing incidents if you feel at any time you made support please contact your local cross of center for suggested phone numbers for confidential support police say the shy nights for this episode on your app or annette web so it today's episode deals with the crime committed against the chalk the won't be suitable for all listeners mona go to mature worn right and even recently changed this grey building on the right it's fifteen or block of check a was an ice cream place so kids were frequently hang out there that's where they get their escape if the you'll notice is at the street sending a pretty narrowed out here they're more design for the old them in a lot of these houses down in ceremony and built in the early 1900s so the streets become a lot narrower turn right to to the extent if two cars are coming at each other you know in both directions one is going to have to pull off so people can't go as fast in these areas in yes shrimp i dream for the driveway.

annette
"annette" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"annette" Discussed on Risky Business

"Annette walker through a couple of there so i think that that the interesting thing about this this week such an what might the analysis quite quite succinct was that there is a strong mapping out between the version of the l s than the version of the fia for it's a cliff these hot wet now apple is the only platform that really we can do that on scale because they control the whole stack they control convenient outwith phone west soft wet and uh in a in a change uh around 2050 that we wholeheartedly support they stopped making uses update that phone west separately than that allow us um um you know is very very easy for people to not update affirm wears it requires lots of extra steps and this is what you're seeing the wind's a world in its you i have to go to a motorboat manufacturer or maybe the laptop other device manufacturer that and get a separate satellites microsoft is not in a position to be pushing out if i affects all is different combinations of hot weather that run windows at who's in a in a very nice position that it is able to do that because it controls the whole stack so they were able to keep keep the phone my update in the same way that they were keeping the software exit would which is great and something that we we call the discrepancies a y v had taken the versions of of of systems one not running the expected burdens of esi definite you knew raised questions so that looks the from everything that we looked into when we will recession the update process than how afi with you.

Annette walker apple windows microsoft