8 Burst results for "Annals Of Internal Medicine"

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:33 min | 4 months ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"I honestly haven't taken a deep dive into it. Some not in one hundred cents share house sound data is. I just mainly invaded driven. And so that. which yeah I haven't seen that data source I. I will tell you I take my wife takes it with zinc. There is not sufficient data from you to recommend it to other people. That's kind of where. Yeah. When you mentioned the prophylaxis studies on hydroxy. CORCORAN I don't know if you've discussed on this show or not the the the big one that people were talking about is the one that was done. In the University of Minnesota this publishing in England Journal of Medicine, and that was a one of the studies. The Doctor Ouchi of alluded to me said, look it doesn't work in late stage disease in doesn't work for prophylaxis but what many people don't realize that University of Minnesota study was essentially an anonymous online survey but only yeah, it was actually done with you recruited patients online you signed up and they were never seen by a physician. Most of the patients were actually not even didn't even have tests for resource Wearing cuts. And so basically diagnosing those patients with Kobe nineteen from. This the questionnaire. So these are the quality of those diagnoses was about similar like a web in the. Bath, what they're using and so then even then you know they used it in fairly healthy patients. So of course, the mortality was very low already. But if you take the, you know the combination of the fact that there was a lower mortality even though it wasn't significant is a small pool of patients, and then a lot of those patients probably didn't even actually true have overnights. You could kind of see how Benefit of hydroxy corporate might not fully be exposed in those studies, and that goes with their second study, which was then published in the annals internal medicine showed early us. Shortly after contract, we'll disease enters the same. Properly, I think only about thirty three percent of patients actually tested positive for SARS two actually number two patients are included as the negative putting who did them anyway. So the studies blacks views are not no bus fight any means and I, don't really think that they're sounded enough to dismiss hydroxy for a interesting. Very interesting. So you still are holding out on prophylaxis which seems I. Figured They'd be more studies that were I didn't realize it was a questionnaire. That's insane. Okay. So you're you're you and are exactly in alignment and by the way I have prescribed it and Kovic many times. and. Only one patient that I have treated gotten a real trouble and that patient unfortunately checked every box for risk factors of Cova storm of a set of kind storm including anti-us for Lipid Syndrome. And and and and I'm telling you the storm developed like in three days. It was fast boom there's just allow terrible. So. Okay. So let's we're gonNA, talk about tally figures as well. Yes so That's another thing that. So we came out with the paper said co-authored paper with a couple of others as well as Doctors Linko back in April when we were starting to see serology studies, and if you remember the mainstream media immediate attack them saying that they weren't good studies that they you know the antibiotics weren't that great in that. The actual mortality rate is higher. It's not the actual effects just with Saudi rate is now we can paper that said. It looks like the Pataudi. Rate across all ages is roughly about wait to. Hold us. Oh, let's let's. Let's emphasize that. So this is from zero to eighty five essentially. The overall fatality rate is. Point two percent, right. Correct. Do you do you break down by age group at all? I do I don't have the chart in front of, but with paper, we are shortly after that paper branded like the basis. which was a chart raking it down certain age groups, infection fatality, rate which obviously most of those deaths, the highest infection valuate is those over indirectly sixty five years of age whereas in the lower age groups, it's incredibly small to flew flew in. Nutrient and. By the way not as bad not nearly as bad in younger people as h one n Webs if you if you were right in fewer deaths even for the the. Normal Ninety. Live right on in in kids. Under. So Flu Influenza A H One n one way worse for a younger person that way worse worse for younger person H One n one definitely way whereas I had h one n one almost died it was hor horrific and I was my great friends his fiancee actually had it. She was a healthy athletic twenty year old H. One and one actually had to go an echo. was so bad. She's unfortunately. For the listeners like you know machine and replace Kerr lungs failed her lungs completely failed even a ventilator. And and here's the deal. This is what I keep saying. So that was two thousand nine we had that pandemic and you don't even know what happened. No one knows it happened. How do we go from an epidemic the pandemic that was killing twenty, two, four year olds pretty chilly not as bad but but pretty routinely to true this is the different pandemic it's different it's more infectious. It's more dangerous roller people got a high fatality rate probably that I h one n one but how do we go from not knowing it's happening..

University of Minnesota England Journal of Medicine Doctor Ouchi Pataudi Kobe Lipid Syndrome Cova Kerr Kovic
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on The Four Top

The Four Top

11:25 min | 10 months ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on The Four Top

"Did you have to overcome misconceptions among the public? How did you educate your customers? Yeah I mean after this conversation. I think I might change my yelp standard of okay. Restaurant is to actually just be a health food restaurant. This is great out here. We come. You know I've always as I hit on a little bit early played the delicious card and I've always played on whole foods and me she's forward of Menus and very whole foods with delicious produce and delicious food. That's all I've ever done. I've never actually had tried to convince anybody. I was right at the era when Olympia provision in two thousand nine where the cheese. The American Cheese Society a lot of the leg work for me to tell you the difference between process cheese and synthetic Jesus to homestead on pasture is high fat cheese and real molds and all the great work that they did that had people taste it and actually just enjoy what they were consuming and then. I followed naturally with my Salamis. High Fat content for mental live active mold all of that and just watching people enjoy them. I've never really had to explain myself too much. That sounds very fortunate on a health level. I've just had people try it. And if they have loved it. I've been that's because it's full of beautiful fat and enjoy and I make very genuine and very awesome very arrogant very genuine team awesome food and I think people just recognize that it was the right time. People have changed their diet. They don't want over sweet food. We're very strongly based on US TO MAKE DELICIOUS FOODS. You need to have the most delicious product and that has to do it. A lot with eating seasonally. Obviously you're going to craze crave more tomatoes in the summer and nettles right now in the spring and we've always stuck with it and it seemed to work people love coming into our places and eating our foods because that's what we do definitely never focused on but a lot of people do come in there to consume healthy foods. Now which is lovely. What about cured the fact that the meat secured? I know. There's concern about the health? Yeah the nitrate in nitrate dilemma has been something battle all the time and maybe miles and you know your next book. It'd be under masking. That would be great for me. Please do me a lot of work. And so there is a huge pushback against the nitrate and nitrite although we do find the same nitrate and try and spinach and charts and Kale's and a lot of the leafy Greens and what it stems from is also in the industry referred to it. As bad data that happened in the seventies with a big bacon? Boom or we'd load tons of sugar tons of salt on an unbelievable at night trade and Bacon and FRY IT and burn. It would turn carcinogenic than the spun out of Control that it was bad for you and so everybody started making loopholes labeling. Like we've heard of the saying you take away the fat. How can we get nitrate into our products without putting it as nitrate? That's US chart powders. Spinach on down contains the same nitrate and do not put nitrate on the label. So it's nitrate free. You can feel good about it. It's ironic because I called my friends at our sausage makers in Switzerland and I called him I think. What are you guys doing about this? Nitrate how are you guys getting win? How are you guys? Marketing your product. And they're like well. What's wrong with nitrate? When our children have stomach problem we give them nitrates to settle their bellies. We make lots of spinach and cured meats in the nitrate is what we like to balance the bellies. Ed To us. It's a health thing. There must be something. People must misunderstanding. The value of nitrates in foods. So I I do. I went clean labeled for that idea. Synthetic nitrates just because it's the easier battle that took me eight years now to be able to make the product tastes absolutely the same of the highest quality with using synthetic nitrates. But I do use CHARD and spinach product to get cured meats and so that makes me able to sell in every grocery store in America. The whole foods on down. So that chard spinach actually actors preservatives. Yeah you're pulling out of the spinach. A lot of it. They say comes from the fertilizer. They're putting in the ground and leaves pick it up and they have a high nitrate content in it. But I'm using the exact nitrate from spinach that I would have had used mind mineral nitrate. Wow It's actually interesting because in the sports world in particular than the nitric acid pathways in your in your body which are heavily related to cardiovascular health and are generated by olive oil chocolate and dietary nitrates and so for example football clubs giving their their athletes beet powder and the reason for giving them beat powder is because it's really high source of Nitrate Celery and Cherries in my practice. I actually use those hydrogen nitrate foods to treat people's high blood pressure without using drugs. And so there you get this this dichotomy some conflicts between good here nitrates bad there. I think it was been shown since the seventies that it wasn't the nitrate. That's the problem and so when you go back and look at the sugar hypothesis for generating disease and highly processed oils for January disease. It starts being a much more coherent story and I know this this. Four recent papers in the annals internal medicine looking at processed meat and meat unprocessed meat consumption and showing no discernible effects adverse effects despite the fact that a lot of people eat excess. Red Meat actually make really poor choices elsewhere and yet even with that. You didn't still didn't see a problem. And I've used these these papers and numerous lectures in medical audiences. And it's kind of funny because people don't accept the data but don't read the data don't have an answer for the data but they still stick to their story. The red meats bad frio. Well because we've been told that story for so long. I spoke to one of the world experts on that topic. And he said we have been thoroughly debunked debunked but we just cannot get this into the medical literature. We cannot get it accepted because according to him there is such a bias against red meat and particularly processed meat and he had just been to the meeting that they had by a group named I R- Which is the one that decides what Causes Cancer? And I are had just made this decision about that processed meats and red meat cause cancer based on these very very weak associations And so there's a lot of science that says that there's a lot of science showing that there's association not causation. Which is a really kind of science one. Oh one point it's association. Something might be says he was something else like my computer. Used in fact is associated with breast cancer. They Find People's computer uses associated with breast cancer. But does that mean that? Using Computers Causes Breast Cancer No you have to clinics of what's called a clinical trial to get that kind of cause and effect information. It turns out that there has been almost. No clinical trials unprocessed meat So they really don't know anything about it causing cancer whether it does or whether it doesn't it hasn't been properly studied that way so they've just used this kind of weak association data to to condemn these two to condemn both red and processed meat using this very week science and I think that's just a shame because that kind of idea that red meat is bad. Based on this ray week science has been widely accepted. So what miles was saying that when these four rigorous studies came along last fall which were really historic studies. They look at all the data. All the associational data and all the cause and effect data and they ended up concluding we cannot find any strong evidence that red or processed meats like like great salamis or or any allies foods. We cannot find any evidence that those foods cause cancer or diabetes or heart disease or any other kind of metabolic disease many yet people could not accept those conclusions. I mean it's it's been a kind of firestorm every action to those papers because they contradict everything we've been told before and people's people are so have for so long believed that means bad for health that they can't really adjust to what they rigorous data actually says and when it comes to the process meat section in my lectures to medical audiences. I make a distinction between what I call the semi synthetic mainstream processed meats and traditionally produced meat such as versus Bologna. Within things. Like that exactly and so. Am I correct in identifying that? There's a clear difference in production methods between the the the mainstream. I don't WanNA mention any brands. But mainstream lunch meat and and hot dog and and processed meats brands and companies like yours produce absolutely and the a side by side tasting the thing. It'll jump out as what we've been hitting on his current cord syrups and sugars and the amount of attitude that you have to do in there to make the meat look like it's real you know if you're going. The route of making traditional media takes time takes out for lower sodium to make products in a real ingredients so they wanNA speed it up and make it as fast as fake as humanly possible. Since in the real culturing can use just sort of identify. How your culturing process differs from mainstream production? Yeah in Salami production exactly So I I had very very little dextrose and I use nitro. Or excuse me natural microorganisms. That are in meat and I do a very slow from in. Tation and high humidity lowers the PH naturally in mass produced. Faster turn out Salami productions what they'll do is they'll throw any other citric acid or already for meats fermented at a high temperature lowering it down so nothing actually happens in there and they'll put sugar in there to stay after the fermentation is there. So you get that sour sweet super fake tangy flavor. That people do crave associated with the American Salami and then drying in mind. I use live act of molds. I was initially one of the only companies in America to ship. Salamis around the nation with real molds on the outside and you're getting Salami and most of your grocery stores and they're white on the outside that's just milk powder rice lower so it looks like mold and I don't know how much Data is actually out there but in the Swiss cultures and the Talian Greeks. We've always felt that that was a really huge aid. Those probiotics and everything on the outside of those Salamis. Those mold actually aid in digestion and really helps your stomach digests higher fat meats and I of course love him for the flavor and it just shows the nuance of different Salami producer. So so we're going with this. These are actually probiotic foods. You can't for it to Oscar Mayer products and so so there is a you know when we look at the effect of products on the microbiome. And how that influences every disease process including immunity then it suggests that there's a real reason for the consumer to look for naturally produce process meets as against commercially produced a standard partially produced. The doctor to do a good I like Salami.

Cancer US America American Cheese Society Olympia Oscar Mayer Switzerland metabolic disease Bologna Bacon Kale CHARD producer Ed miles
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

13:49 min | 10 months ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Over ninety new bacteria and I discovered large size viruses. Obviously the guy knows what he's talking about Chris. Cuomo doesn't WanNa believe he's alive but here's what he had to say actually from all respiratory infections this Kobe. Nineteen is probably the easiest to treat so. There's really no reason to get excited anymore. There is really no reason to get excited and rush to produce a vaccine. Guess what? He's not alone next next up Dr Frank or rick. Montgomery President of the German Medical Association President of the World Doctors Federation argues. That locked down measures as in. Italy are unreasonable and counterproductive and should be reversed he says. Italy has imposed lockdown and has the opposite effect. They quickly reached their capacity limits but did not slow down the virus spread within the lockdown a lockdown as a measure of political despair because coercive measures mean that you can go further than the generation of reason next professor. Ph Zero Ver Naza. Md chief physician of infectious disease. Sankt Gallen cantonal. Hospital found that around eighty five percent. This is the guy. Eighty to ninety percent of all infections occurred without anyone noticing the infection. He's the one that's saying. We have a huge symptomatic carrying body. He says based on the new insight we also have to understand that many of the measures that we have implemented so massively today may even be counterproductive next Dr Schumacher. It Bach D. N. D. I'm sure I am really beating up these names. But that's not the point microbiologists former Professor Johan Student Berg University in Mainz former head of the Institute for Medical Microbiology and hygiene one of the most cited research scientists in German history. We were afraid. He says that one million infections with a new virus will lead to thirty deaths per day over the next one hundred days but we do not realize that twenty thirty forty or one hundred patients positive. For Numeral Corona viruses are already dying every day. The government's anti copay nineteen measures are grotesque absurd and very dangerous. The life expectancy of millions is being shortened. The horrifying impact on the world economy threatens the existence of countless people. The consequence on medical care are profound already services to patients in need are reduced operations canceled practices. Empty Hospital personnel dwindling. All this will impact profoundly on our whole society. All these measures are leading to self destruction and collective suicide based on nothing but a Spook next Dr Ward Gang Ward Argh. Md German pulmonologist. This guy's gigantic former chairman of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. In two thousand nine he called for an inquiry into alleged conflicts of interest surrounding the EU response to the swine flu pandemic. He says politicians are being courted by scientists scientists who want to be important to get money for their institutions scientists who just swim along and the mainstream in want their part of it and what is missing right now is a rational way of looking at things. We should be asking questions like. How did you find out this virus was dangerous? How was it before? Didn't we have the same thing last year? Isn't it even something? Is it even something new? That's missing next. Dr Joel Kettner. Md professor of Community Health Sciences and surgery at Manitoba University former CO chief public health officer Manitoba Province Medical Director of the International Center for Infectious Diseases. I have never seen anything like this anything anywhere near like this. I'm not talking about the pandemic because I've seen thirty of them one every year it is called influenza and other respiratory illnesses viruses. We don't always know what they are. But I've never seen this reaction and I'm trying to understand why next Dr John. Unidas member of the National Academy of Medicine Professor of Medicine of Health Research and policy of Biomedical Data Science at Stanford University School of Medicine Professor of Statistics who Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences Director of the Stanford Prevention Research Center and Co Director of the Meta Research Innovation Center at Stanford Editor in chief the European Journal of Clinical Investigation former chairman at the Department of Hygiene Epidemiology. The University of Nina School of Medicine. He says patients who have been tested for SARS koby to are disproportionately does was to beer. Symptoms and bad outcomes as most health systems have limited. Testing Capacity Selection. Bias may even worse than in the near future. The one situation where an entire close population was tested was the diamond. Princess cruise ship in quarantine passengers. The case Batali rate. There was one point zero percent but this was largely elderly population in which the death rate from cove in nineteen is much higher if we do not know about a new virus out there and had not checked individuals with PCR test the number of total deaths due to influenza likeness would not seem unusual this year at most we might have casually noted. That flu season seems to be a bit worse than average. Hardly terrifying testimony. Dr David Katz. Md bounding director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. I am deeply concerned that the social economic and public health consequences of this near total meltdown of normal light. Schools and businesses closed gathering ban will be long lasting and climates possibly graver than direct toll of the virus itself. The stock market will bounce back in time but many businesses never will the unemployment impoverishment and despair likely to result will be public health scourges of the first order next Dr Dan Yemin PhD Infectious Disease. Modular FORM OF FACULTY MEMBERS CENTER OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE. Modeling Analysis Yale University. Are you getting the picture yet? I'm going to keep going. But are you getting the picture? The actual number of people who are sick with the virus in South Korea is at least double. What's being reported so the chance of dying at least twice as low staying at about zero point four five percent very far from the world health organizations global mortality figure of three point four percent. And that's already a reason for cautious optimism. We're getting there folks. I want you know I just want to talk about. Remember Chris. Cuomo just told you. On Prime Time News. Nobody supports removing or ending a quarantine or locked down yet. Every one of these scientists is telling you this is an incredible overreach. We should not be doing this. I've got a few more. Let's look at this not yet. I WANNA see the study. Bring up the study you were on hold on. We got a lot of slides and I have a team very small team attempting to make this all makes sense. Here we go. This is really important because here's multiple science tests now all involved in a paper written at Science Direct. This is what they went on to conclude and say. Ddr relieved by being one of them in OECD countries. The mortality rate for SARS covy to one point three percent is not significantly different from that for Common Corona viruses identified at the study hospital in France. The problem of SARS Kobe to is probably over estimated as two point six million people die of respiratory infections each year compared with less than four thousand deaths for SARS KOBE. To at the time we wrote this and what they're saying is look we have always had people dying of Corona viruses. We're the experts of the world. We've been monitoring it. We've been watching it. We know it's there. It's always been within some sort of safe acceptable region. In fact. Look at this study. That came out in two thousand six. This is and outbreak of human corona virus. Oc forty-three infraction and serological cross reactivity with SARS coronavirus. This is what this went on. To say we have characterized an outbreak of respiratory illness. Due to this remember this is a totally different corona virus the Aid Co V. O. T. forty-three the observed attack rate of sixty seven percent and case fatality rate of eight percent underscore the pathogenic potential of eight of Corona viruses in frail populations. This adds to other observations underscoring that Kobe's other than stars could be may be responsible for a broader spectrum of disease then Karadzic alone these findings underscore the Berlin of Human Kobe's elderly populations and confirmed that cross reactivity to antibody against new CLEO caps. It proteins from these viruses must be considered when interpreting serologic test for stars Kobe. Now this study is saying all the way back in two thousand six. We have a high death rate amongst the elderly with just a common corona virus right. Then you see this has always been happening and what we're doing is we're overly focused on an event we just never spent time looking at it. We're overly focused on it and making a dramatic bank is what it looks like these scientists say certainly what they're saying the study and the list I've given you. Let's look professor. Your former health ministry cheap of Israel former Associate Dean Tel Aviv University Medical School. He says that the new corona virus is less dangerous than the flu and lockdown measures will kill more people than the virus. He adds that the numbers do not match. The panic and psychology is prevailing over science. He also notes that Italy is known for its enormous morbidity in respiratory problems more than three times any other European country. He's telling you they're hospitals are terrible and they are not the healthiest people and this. You know one of really Dr Gotcha founder of the Cochran. Collaboration who has been investigating scientific fraud the worldwide for decades. This is a brilliant scientist. He's published more than seventy five papers in the B. J. Lancet annals internal medicine and New England Journal of Medicine. All right this guy will never want to lead anyone WANNA stray. I guarantee you. He has no goal to put people in harm's way look what he has to say. The eighth of March I published in the B. M. J. about this I wrote what are the Chinese not tested their patients for Corona Virus? Or there had not been any test would we have carried on with our lives without restrictions. Not Worrying about some deaths here and there among people which we see every winter I think so he goes on to say I believe we have other quotes that the he breeding almost every almost everyone. I talked to lay people and colleagues. I'm a specialist in internal medicine and worked for two years in an apartment of infectious diseases. All of my colleagues and friends consider the corona virus pandemic a pandemic of panic. More than anything else the. Who estimates that an influence a season kills about five hundred thousand people or about fifty times more than those who have died so far during more than three months of the corona virus epidemic shoot. It turned out that the epidemic Wayne's before long there will be a queue of people wanting to take credit for this and we can be damned sure draconian measures will be applied against net. We'll be applied against again next time but remember the joke about tigers. Why do you blow the horn to keep the tigers away but there are no tigers here there? You see you see Peter. Dutch is giving us a warning saying we were going through draconian measures that are not warranted. We have seen this year after year after year. There are no new numbers here but when nothing happens they will see that. It was the quarantine in the lockdown of the world. That achieved this. You know the the lack of death and disease when we know that it's going to be the case scientifically and if we allow that to be the message and the story from mainstream media funded by farmer working on a hundreds of billion dollar vaccine if we let that be the story not only will we probably be forced vaccinated. Every time we have a virus in the future. Every new flu season we will have to quarantine because the numbers look very much the same. Those are the scientists around the world. They are jumping ship from what we are being told by. Dr Foulkes see and the CDC and the World Health Organization. Usually all of these people are aligned. But clearly somebody somewhere has jumped out so far ahead of this thing that these scientists have said. I'm not a lending. I'm not walking off the cliff with you and I'm certainly not going to risk my reputation by continuing on with what it appears from their language to be a fraud.

influenza professor Kobe Italy Md Cuomo World Health Organization Chris tigers fraud chairman Sankt Gallen cantonal Naza Dr John Dr Frank President University of Nina School of M German Medical Association Dr Ward Gang
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"If they don't come to mind in the first five minutes it dropped down to twenty four percent accuracy. Basically what we have is type one system type one thinking system. One thing ash say at work and we just are reflexive. We don't reflectively reflectively go over anything we don't have time. We don't simulate all the data we can because there's so much and so we have to basically the whole the big hole. Aw is acknowledged that we can do far better and it can all be through human support. We need help. Do you think there's any area where where I think you've made a compelling case that machine plus human should be better than human Eventually woman I mean. I think even in radiology today it should be yeah. Hopefully critical care would be an amazing place where machine plus human should be better than human. Do you think that there are extremes on either way. Do you think there are places cases where humans will always be better than machines plus humans. Yes and that's in being human. which is the bind you know dislike our conversation this deep conversation? It's really illustrates the human connection. We don't have those kind of conversations in seven minutes or ten minutes for the patient can and can't get to know a person's life history that's never going to get really digitize story their story we interrupt patients within eighteen seconds from litany. We don't listen so the point being is that machines. That's what we don't want machines. They don't have context. They're not going to be able to. Truly you understand all the non verbal communication and the real issues of a person that are deep and that's where the humanity we we need to bring it back. I mean the essence of medicine is that and it's been lost. It's become this big business and it's the I don't know if roe it's not really a brain drain but you worry that the war for talent has shifted and back when you went into medicine. It's probably safe to assume you were. We're one of the best students in your high school. The best student in college like it would have been skimming at the very very top of the pyramid of students. Is that still the case today or has has I mean. You've already alluded to number of things that I've seen. Luckily I don't experience them just on the nature of my practice because it's private but I mean these stories you you tell. I know so well the doctor that gets seven minutes to see a patient and in that seven minutes six minutes as typing into an em are the moral distress and the absolute erosion of a belief in what you're doing is a huge cause of burnout amongst physicians. And I don't understand if you're the top student in college and you're interested in life sciences. Why you'd pick medicine today unless you had a profound confidence that you could carve a path distinct from what most are probably going to do? I mean you have to be an optimist. I think is sent to pursue medicine today. Do you worry that it's going to be hard to recruit recruit that most talented kids out of college into medical school. Well I hoping it won't be but I do hear constantly a friend who are doctors. Thor's who tell their kids don't go into medicine. Yes I hear that. That's really bad because here is the ultimate profession and for sense of really helping people and then you have the people who are in it saying it's horrible and as you know Peter. The physician burnout no less. All clinician. Clinician burnout is at peake. And why is that. It's because it become data clerks and low and they're squeezed for the time it can't care for people people when you don't have time so this is of course going back to that main thesis of Gift of time. We can get that but I think we have to restore or medicine the way it was in order to attract the talent that you're referring to and I think doable. It's not going to be easy. It's GonNa require a lot of activism which we haven't had that much of in medicine. Yeah this is something. Doctors are quite ill equipped to do. It seems we're seeing the light on activism the gun control and are a really brought it out when they said stay in your lane is in the Ama said a physician should be asking a patient Asian if they own a gun who is America to physician okay. They published in the annals internal medicine last fall and then they said you know the these doctors snitch should stay in their lane and then you had all. The doctors came out one of them. Judy Melnik saying this is my fucking lane and you know when everywhere it went viral. The idea being if doctors doctors are going to be killed potentially by patients. It's not an unreasonable question. Does that that. In caring for all the gunshot victims you know dimmer and the suicide and the suicide. It's probably the greatest cause of gun. Yeah you've got it both suicides in homicides and mass killings and era fifteen and all the stuff so you know the fact that this was taboo Abu. That doctors didn't weren't allowed to talk to patients and they weren't allowed to do research. I mean there was no research in this area so this was a void that now has brought out a lot of the activists and social media. And it's this new era of young physicians a lot of women and we're seeing gene activism like never before I wrote about in the New Yorker recently about this and no should doctors organize and this what we're seeing it is happening and the hope is is that we're gonNA see an organization. Take hold where all doctors can join as well as alternately patient advocates and and others that we will turn this around because this is the biggest concern I have. Peter said we're going to see a kick in more and more over the years but what will it do if they administrators administrators. Who are the overlord who are overrepresented? As compared to the people taking care of patients if they keep the squeeze Zahn. We're just GONNA see things get worse. So we have to override that and the only way we're going to do that in turn inward and get the humanity back in medicine is to to have doctors organize and the Gravitas of a million doctors in America all being part of one entity it could be enormous. You know and this gets to another problem within medicine that I alluded to earlier. which is the patients aren't footing the bill based on the system directly and therefore demand I anna demand based system? So if it's not a mandate system it doesn't matter like in other words in the NHL. The Canadian system. The patient is not footing the bill but they're also not driving the demand manned demand is budget set but in the US where you have this paradox. It also means the patient's voice doesn't matter and that's the irony of it right so it's the opposite sit of the DC license plate which is taxation without representation. They it's like no taxation and no representation and that's that's why I don't I worry that patients can't be the ones to drive this change which they should be able to like. The patients should demand this change change. But because they're not the ones writing the checks to feed that three point eight trillion dollar machine directly. They're only doing it indirectly in other words they don't get to control it right. They're paying their taxes. And their employers are withholding it but they. It's not the same as saying here's my dollar. Go and do this thing with it. Yeah now that's why if you get the doctors to come together to start this and the sole purpose is the patient doctor relationship. It's not about better reimbursement or all the other trade guild activities but rather it's about we wanna fix this relationship and bring the humanity bat in medicine then we start to see the you know that the ability for that patient interest to be recognized because now all you have is you got a lot of patient advocacy groups. But they're you know they're just like the doctor organizations they're all balkanized. We need one entity to stand strong and and I. I hope we'll get there. Well that's a good point right. It should be made up of physicians and patients. Yeah actually it shouldn't be. They shouldn't be separate. No no I think you know started with the physicians because you know there's just a million of them that We can identify and get them together as many as possible. Then you start eating Arthur really of million physicians in the states. Yeah you know. The fact checking of the New Yorkers amazing when they I. I've never experienced that before. They track down everything and they got to the numbers that I never could get to. Not all of them are practicing. There's about nine hundred almost nine hundred thousand or actually practicing practicing some respect but there are million dachshunds country. Have you done the math about how many doctors we would need under this new regime of breath. empathic intelligent artificial. This symbiotic relationship and others because because there's a bunch of moving pieces right it's radiologists still exists but now they're there to talk more with patients and interpret the diagnosis as opposed to make the diagnosis right. And you're still going to need the internist but now they have more time with the patient and they don't have to worry about the diagnosis as much as they have to worry about the treatment. Directionally the Eric do we need the same number of physicians. Are we going to need more physicians. OR WE'RE GONNA need less physicians in thirty years on a per. Yeah he's you know when when I did the UK review. We got into that. And we had economists and all sorts of brilliant people modeling on that and I think what we'll see is even though everything now which adjust. We need a lot more doctors because of the aging population and Co Morbidity and the complexity. I mean if you look at like for example had he care here for a patient with cancer day. It's gotten very complex. So you would project. We're going to need you. Know a steep growth Kerr but what we're going to see. I think he's a big blunting thing of that because we are going to be. The machine story is not just about doctors relying more on machines getting support. It's also about consumers words patients and so when you get outsourcing and the offloading you start to see a pretty big and then when you get rid of hospital story and just have surveillance centers is remote monitoring you start to see a very less need for expansion. So I don't see what we're GONNA be draw Decli- but just a difference in the Kerr's as as they go forward over the next few decades and they're also be this. I don't know for lack of a better word kind of a growing pain as people transition I mean most most of the radiologists I know today for example have very technical backgrounds I mean any of the MRI folks. I know you usually have a great background in physics and things like that. So all of a sudden there's going to be a different selection criteria for example. You May want to Choose Radiology. Independent of how technical your background is in physics or mathematics addicts and.

Peter America Aw Ama NHL US DC Judy Melnik Thor UK Zahn Decli Kerr Arthur
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"An hour. The barometer is falling along the lakefront thirty two. I'm Kim Gordon in the WGN newsroom. Ready to join the conversation live whenever a story changes Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN thinking big thoughts here we. Don't have to go. Again. Here's John Williams were here. Tritiated being here too. We're in the AllState skyline studio here till three o'clock on Saturday, ten to noon. Social media. Look for me as WGN king. John I'm on Facebook and Twitter WGN King, John if you're on social media. Remember, the mincing rascals podcast is our weekly conversation. We record here. A bunch of us smart, folks. I'm referring to my guests. Steve Bertrand and Justin Kaufman Patti Vasquez, Eric joined Scott, Stanton's from the Chicago Tribune talk about the news each week. We are recording the podcast this week tomorrow Wednesday because of the holiday, so if you're missing rascal fan, and I know many of you are it was judged this year the best podcast in the city will post it tomorrow afternoon. One of the note about that we want you to be part of the mincing rascals podcast. So if there's a comment that you'd like us to hear if there's a topic you'd like us to address or a question you'd like to ask or for that matter a recommendation, we always closed the podcast with something. We're eating or drinking listening to watching a reading that we think other people might enjoy. And that's always at the end. And it's it's it's good. But we'll take your recommendation to read a book. You've watched the show you seen a movie you've heard a song. You've had a cocktail whatever it is that you want to recommend you can leave that with us. If you go to my Facebook page, we've got some videos posted about how we're asking you to do it. But it's real simple. It's just record a voice memo on your phone, and then send it to my producer elephant Garris. And all of that information is on my Facebook page WGN King, John, in fact, you know, what L if now that I've mentioned all of that we should post that at the top of the page on Facebook. So here we go again. In fact, the headline of the Chicago Tribune editorial today is and now a massacre at mercy hospital. I got a call yesterday for my brother in Denver. Just walked in the door last night. He said what the hell is going on out there who's actually driving through Wyoming listening to the radio. Asking me what's going on in Chicago. Days like this. I find myself clicking around to see how various national media are covering the news. So at eleven thirty this morning, I just made a couple of notes Fox News top of their page today. The perils of Pelosi. They have a story about Democrats who don't want her to be the house speaker. That's their top story. Just before noon today could be a huge. I mean, that's a really interesting thing. Yeah. It's absolutely legit. Chuckled. But only because it's so different than CNN or Huffington Post say, right? So you knew that they would legitimately find the most interesting story to be that which is most problematic for democrat. Right. The perils of Pelosi. It wasn't about the emails. No. It was not. They then had a story about charges against Michael Evan Eddie, the porn-star lawyer. That's what they call them. And then they had a story about a bachelor party rafting trip that killed four. And then a story about the little girl in Wisconsin who killed an infant and then six stories down beneath the digital fold after a story about an NBA player who got into an argument with a fan. Is this headline Ivanka's use of private emails baffling, but not on the same level as Clinton. Drudges top stories. Stocks race gains for the year. We're negative now. For twenty eighteen down five thirty five thirty on the Dow minus Huffington Post top story in the left hand column are about the hypocrisies have avanti's private Email. So of course, that would be their first story and the story about the chairman of the Republican party and one Ohio county who says that the fires have California are God's punishment to liberal, California. I knew there would be a story like that. After this started to burn I said to my wife, Brenda. That's her name is Brenda. I said you wait. There will be a story. Some I thought it'd be whack a doodle preacher going. This is this is God's condemning California for the homosexuals. But instead, it's just the liberals in California. This is God's revenge said some ding Dong in Ohio, it's not an important story. He's a ding Dong, Ohio. But Lord knows. Knows Huffington Post wants you to hear about that. Their second story on huff PO is the story about Chicago mercy hospital shooting that story is titled this is our lane. And it features doctors and others criticizing the NRA. It's the same angle that the sometimes took into territory today, which is headlined NRA says doc should stay in their lane on guns. Tell that to mercy hospital. I don't know if you've been following that at all, but maybe you will be now the NRA a couple of weeks ago posted this someone should tell self-important anti-gun doctors to stay in their lane. Half of the articles in the annals internal medicine are pushing for gun control most upsetting. However, the medical community seems to have consulted. No one but themselves the critical of doctors for taking a stand against guns. And a lot of doctors are using the hashtag in our lane today because the medical community is is really upset about this. In fact, if you go back to the Tribune editorial, they they say that. We all had this image of the sanctity and safety of a hospital, and it was so literally and figuratively violated yesterday. Dr Michael Davenport at mercy hospital, and he joins us now on WGN radio. His the chief medical officer there Dr Davenport, thanks for joining us. How are you today, sir? Well, still a little bit in disbelief, but we all here don't the best. We can. Where were you yesterday during the shooting, and how did it unfold about you? So I was actually here in my office with my assistant whose next door. Indicated to me that she thought she heard gunshots and first nation, which may have been the wrong one was to look out in the hallways. And see what was happening, and we didn't we heard over the over here. They're cold silver, which we know is an actor shooter in which case, we we all close the doors and turn off the lights in waited for further instruction, code silver is the code. You all use for when there is an active shooter on the premises. Have. You had a code silver there before never you've practiced for this though. I understand. Yes, we be we've all we are all of our employees have been trained in the actor shoot a drill. Our leaders are all of our leader in management team. I've been trained a little bit more in depth in terms of that response and leading then a two months ago where she had a marked active shooter drills. So that obviously helped us to prepare for the real thing. Do you feel so I wonder I mean, tell me just a little bit about that. I wonder how the staff responded was it. According to plan did that maybe help save lives. What you thought about that? So amazingly enough when it's in terms of that type of stress years, not always sure how you're gonna react. But the actor shooter drilled, and what we're trained is is simple enough that is run hiding in and fight. And all I mean, not probably not to my surprise. But the employees exactly what they did to make sure they protect themselves. Protect our patients. And if you probably heard some of the stories to some of our employees, speaking to the news promptly, then that's all they all of them spoke to the fact that they did run they did highlight. Unfortunately, no one had to fight. So we're we're confident that it definitely made a different window factory won't be activated. The cold silver that people do close and barricade the doors which proved to be fruitless the perpetrator as we understand wasn't trying to get in some of the other officers downstairs, doctor I've been reading. The press accounts. And of course, we all fall it it on the radio and TV yesterday. But can you just walk me through briefly? What happened the shooting took place after an altercation? Did did the first victim gets shot in the parking lot. So my understanding is that the dark. Spends working her shifts in the ED what's going to her car and was apparently funded by the suspect at that time. And and for us, we we know that yes, she was shot in the parking lot. Right. That's tomorrow. Neil the emergency room, doctor thirty years university of Illinois graduate. It's just it's just everything about this is sad. And then does anybody have any guests is to why the shooter then went into the hospital? If his problem was with her why did he continue to shoot people? So it is our understanding from the police department that obviously officer Jimenez in responding to a nine one one call did encounter the suspect which this when he was shot and there, and then apparently the suspect started running and ran through the emerges in ran through our hospital. And that is when he encountered the young lady miss this less pharmacy technician and just by chance to be in the wrong place there on time and shot her Dana less the first year pharmacy. Residents aged twenty five. Yes, sir. What is happening at the hospital today. Today, we are b-actor operations not completely. We have a full house of Ben patients, and obviously all of our employees bless their hearts, and their dedication. Everyone is showed up doctors nurses, techs lab technicians. Everyone is here. And as an are taking care of patients. The only thing that we're not able to do is some of the outpatient clinics that we that we have on the first floor are pharmacy outpatient pharmacy, which is on the I four which is obviously a those people that that's where Dana work with them to closest. So we knew we had to close at and the emergency department also had been closed as well as some of the other services down on the first floor due to cleaning behind so. Some of the engagement of that just the shooting. But also the officers who came to declare to make sure it was all safe. It went through the hospital. So the first floor, but the most part is close, but otherwise Demane hustle, the impatience all being taken care of. But we were able to open up our emergency room at twelve thirty. And we are now once again fully operational down there as well at this point. One last thing. Doctor does this crystallize in any way, your views about guns? Generally, there's this NRA tweet from earlier in the week the sun times a couple of weeks ago the sentence editor realized about it. Other national media talking about this stay in their lane tweet and the movement that it's now become what are you have to say about that whole business of doctors opining on guns? Well, being a position myself and being one step with my colleagues anything with you know, with the begun drugs anything that hurts and harms the human body of plus this position or something that we're we're actually going to be against. Our best to all of you over there. Heidi Stevens said in the Chicago Tribune today that. At times like this our hearts break they've broken before they'll break again. And all we can do now. You know, literally is just other citizens. As patients is family is friends is is reach out show sympathy hug, people show them that we care show them that we care, and I hope you pass that along to your staff as well. Thank you. So I will do just that there's so much Dr Michael Davenport is the mercy chief medical officer that sometimes editorial today's pretty good. The guy who wrote a joins us next. Trending now Elise have.

mercy hospital NRA Facebook Huffington Post Chicago Tribune John Williams California WGN Dr Michael Davenport Chicago Pelosi medical officer Kim Gordon Brenda AllState skyline studio Chicago mercy hospital Tribune
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"With the illness and surprisingly the difference between types of masks use was insignificant to confuse the cheap paper masks and um if you use them appropriately you can reduce your risk another study published in the annals internal medicine reported similar results researchers looked at ford people who had the flu they found the family members reduce their risk getting the flu by seventy percent when they washed their hands and war surgical masks so these facemask massar fairly loosefitting disposable masks they they just giving you get them at the local drugstore hub their keep their disposable and they prevent large droplets of bodily fluids make did viruses from escaping beyond the nose and mouth while there's of a new kind of a scary surprised about this year's flu epidemic they just released information that it's not sneezes or coughs necessarily that transmit the fluid the flu can be transmitted justin year normal breath so you just get up close and personal we saw boehner share airspace with somebody has got the flu say in a crowded bus or subway and it's up there the flu virus particles are escaping with each breath and a punt a problem to is that you know you was easy somebody's lowcarbon his knees until you move to the other side of the subway car obviously recognize that they might be a source of contagion but the problem is the flu is communicable uh several days before you actually come down with the symptom so that is a particularly insidious part of this i guess what it calls fours we shall be weren't you know waturo where those masks and lest u b a you know accosted by homeland security or by the local police department for concealing your big as your maybe they think you're route to knock off the corner bank because you were to face mask but ill here's some guidelines for proper maskwearing we're faced mass when coming within six feet of sick person position the strings to keep them as firmly in place over the nose mouth and chin planet to touch the mask again them till you.

flu ford boehner seventy percent six feet
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on WDRC

"The illness and surprisingly the difference between types of masks use was insignificant so we confuse the csce cheap paper masks and um if you use them appropriately you can reduce your risk another study published in the annals internal medicine reported similar results researchers looked at ford people who had the flu they found the family members reduce their risk getting the flu by seventy percent when they washed their hands and war surgical masks so these face massar fairly loosefitting disposable masks they dig his giving you get of it the local drugstore uh their cheap their disposable uh and they permit large droplets of bodily fluids makdid viruses from escaping bela the nose and mouth while there's of a new kind of a scary surprised about this year's flu epidemic they just released information that it's not sneezes or coughs necessarily that transmit the fluid the flu can be transmitted just tenure normal breath so you just get up close and personal with owner share airspace with someone has got the flu cena a crowded bus or subway and uh it's up there the flu virus particles are escaping with each breath and at pundit problem to is that you know you was that you see somebody's the cobb his knees and so you move the other side of the subway car obviously recognize that they might be source of contagion but the problem is the flu is communicable uh several days before you actually come down with the symptoms so that is a particularly insidious parlous i guess what it calls as we shall be were you know water where those masks and the list you be um you know a caused by homeland security or by the local police department for concealing your biggest your maybe they think you're rutter knock off the corner bank because you were to face mask but tom hear here's some guidelines for proper maskwearing were facemask were coming within six feet of a sick person position the strings to keep the as firmly in place of the nose mouth and chin planet to touch the.

flu ford bela tom seventy percent six feet
"annals internal medicine" Discussed on Latest in Paleo

Latest in Paleo

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"annals internal medicine" Discussed on Latest in Paleo

"But a long in point like we have some studies looks for example well i'm a study published in the two thousand ten issue of annals internal medicine show they found one hundred twenty nine thousand people for twenty years that's a hundred and twenty nine thousand people they followed for twenty years showing the 43 percent increase death over that twenty year period for people waiting more protein more animal products follow the two thousand twelve but he would 43000 women stats 43000 women fall from other 15 years shown to increase sixty percent increases gets cardiovascular death for you know and then we have a 2014 study showed that six thousand people filed for eighteen years showing a fourfold increase in cancer deaths eating higher protein compared to low approaching but the protein was animal protein and it was when the higher protein groups more than 30 percent of calories mammoth protein which is what we'd in america we 32 percent of calories mammoth box and lower protein in these studies were all less than ten percent of so who are closer this like lessons you know so the point is is that we have learnt won't through studies in other words there's no controversy regarding the dangers of these atkins high you know paleo type diets especially the kind that used to be advocated by like coordinating who used to advocate seventy to eighty percent of your diet the animal products those that kind of advice is exceedingly dangerous and respond on civil 'cause these the studies are or how should i say it refutable at this point because they're they're based on large numbers of people the important points and what about your thoughts on such think your approach also differs with some of the people in the the detari and slash vegan community is because you seem to be a little bit more okay with that since recent studies and metaanalyses are showing that sense aren't necessarily the evil macro nutrient they've been made out to be but uh where we get our stats is kind of important you want to talk about that.

animal products america twenty years eighteen years eighty percent sixty percent ten percent twenty year 30 percent 32 percent 43 percent 15 years