17 Burst results for "Anna May Wong"

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

03:08 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Org and just look up the film programs. And it will be all there. All the titles will be there. We've got 15 different programs. We got one of the original Charlie Chan kids. Oh my God. Coming. She doesn't sound Marino. Oh, she's gonna come up with her grandkids. I don't know how old she is. And her parents are in one of the films. I mean, I had to talk about one of the shorts, our gang, you know, again. Yeah. Okay, this is short called baby blues. One of the art gang members is getting a new sibling, his mother is pregnant, and he reads in the almanac, every fourth kid is born Chinese. This is 1941, right? He totally fixed out. So, you know, the whole episode ten minutes is about him freaking out. He's gonna have a Chinese brother or sister. And they go through all this, you know, like, okay, what's wrong with having a Chinese brother or sister? It's about tolerance. In the film, Margie, she's the Charlie Chan kid. Her parents are in the film and her parents play parents of a laundry and they own a laundry and their kid, I think his name is, I forget his name, but he gets beat up by white kids. But the I gain comes to rescue him. So it's about white saviors in two, right? So he gets rescued. They all go to his house to have lunch, and they were expecting, you know, chop suey or something. And then they serve him scrambling eggs or something. You know, so it's pre assumptions of what it means to be Chinese. It's kind of interesting take on teaching tolerance to kids. So that's going to be yeah, and this can be paired up with a Charlie Chan film, you know, where Marjorie is in the film as well. So it's going to be a so we have programs like that. I tried to pick films where, yeah, let's look at the good, but let's also look at what's behind these films and why we need to critique them and put them in this place. Your master of timing, once again, Arthur dong, the quarter comes out with the enemy Wong, you've got your film series right in the midst of all of this. Yeah, Anna may want niece is going to be at the animated program. Yeah, so she's going to introduce the films with me. I can't begin to thank you enough, Arthur for being so responsive. My last minute invitation, as I stumbled into the news about the quarter, my premonition was correct. You were the perfect person to bring on to talk about all of this and more. Thank you so much. I wish you the best with this series. You'll see me in some of my friends, show up some of those nights. Yeah, please do. I'm gonna be traveling early in the series, but, you know, I've already sent your link out to my friends because when I told them about it, he's like, oh yeah, you and me, man. We gotta be going to these things. Yeah, on the big screen now. Oh, wow. Beautiful projections state of the art sound. You know, you might have seen these films before on VHS or even streaming today, but there's nothing like on the huge screen with some everywhere. Okay, folks, this is an opportunity you don't want to miss. Thank you once again, Arthur. I will see one of those maybe more than one of those nights. And

Charlie Chan Marino Arthur dong Margie Marjorie Wong Anna Arthur
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"English and code speak English. And he does that to challenge arrogance, a small town attitude. He's really a good guy. Fighting bigotry, fighting oppression, and he does that when he wants to confront bigotry and people who have big ideas. He uses this crazy Chinese accent. To throw them off. But his real character, he's speaking like a newscaster. On TV. And it's really interesting. So, you know, I kind of embrace that as the silver lining in this film, that he's really calling for diversity and tolerance. And he's using this, you know, I know that me being Chinese American as a kid. I remember because I had brought up in San Francisco Chinatown with all sorts of tourists around me and they would be white tourists that would be really annoying and asked me questions on the street and I would say no speaking English, you know? Just to get them off my back just for me as a personal attack to them they said, you know, I do speak English, but I mean just piss you off by saying those English you know and so it's like I recognize that strategy and I see it in myself as well. I've asked a speaker representative from the visual effects branch to be on stage with me and a speaker from the makeup branch to be there as well. Both Asian American and they hadn't seen the film. And I said, well, before you agreed to be on my panel, I want you to watch it. And they watched it, and they said, you're not going to want me there. Because I hate this film. Awful. You should not show it. I said, that's exactly what I want you to say. Really? I said, no, I'm not here to celebrate everything. I mean, they could celebrate the artistry. Yes, of course you can't deny that. And celebrate the fact that there's a kind of American artist bombing Chang who did participate in this craft. If you're pissed about it, I want you to be pissed, yeah. Because that's part of our realization of what these films mean to us and what they should mean to us in the long range of Hollywood history. And also put in the contest, what was going on at 60s. Yeah, yeah. Where no one said anything. There was no protest, right? Against this film. And there were plenty of Chinese Americans around who were in the audience in me included. That didn't, you know, I didn't say PEEP about the yellow face or the accent. So let's talk about that. Bring it down. Another film I'm showing in Oscar Sunday is sand pebbles. Which stars Marco. You know, and, you know, that's another film about white savior, you know, it's the McQueen. I reached an admirer of these white saviors. It's about missionaries and it's about the Chinese being unscrupulous. You have bila quaal playing a madam, who sails off all the Chinese girls. James Hong is there, same thing. He's part of the brothel clan and it takes rich in Aden borough to save the Chinese prostitute and of course she dies, right? Okay, but this Marco who is one of the earliest Asian American Oscar nominees for acting. Easter is the marvelous performance, and that kicks off his very distinguished career in film television stage and you know, brought him to the point of cofounding what we know now as east west players. Absolutely, right? Yep. So it's again celebrating and critiquing. And it's a pretty good film. It's widescreen, Robert, why is that? It's got 8 nominations for Oscars. You know, right after sound of music, right? Robert wise. When I started and then Sam pebbles. And then finally, our final Sunday, we're showing the last emperor, which I totally celebrate. Everybody celebrates the last emperor, but are not able to unload these. All of them. Okay, but here's the thing. Here's the thing about this, and this is on Oscar Sundays, is that, okay, out of the 94 years of Oscar history, only three Oscar winners for best picture. I talk about when it's not, not nominees, but winners for Oscar, best picture, only three have had all Asian casts, or mostly on Asian cast. Less than perhaps Peter tool, the one white guy, right? So we're talking about parasite. Right, yes. Slumdog millionaire, which had no white people. First I had no white people. Last emperor had won Peter tool. None of them had any recognition for his actors. Nominated for winners. You know? Wow, I didn't realize that. The last emperor, are you kidding? Yeah. No acting nominations? Come on. And they had 9 nominations, and they won all 9 nominations. So I'm going to celebrate totally the last emperor. On Sunday, November 27th, Joan Chen will be there. Wow. I hope other actors from the series to say, while we're going to make up for it, here at the academy museum, we're going to honor the brilliant cast and say, you know, Oscar so white. We needed you back in 1987, but late than ever. So that is my programming for the Oscar Sundays. That's fantastic. I would love for you to tell folks how they can get some tickets and find out which movies are going to be screening. Okay, go to academy, museum dot org. Academy museum dot

Oscar bila quaal Aden borough Marco James Hong Sam pebbles Chang San Francisco McQueen Hollywood Robert wise Oscars Peter Robert Slumdog millionaire Joan Chen academy museum Academy museum
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And I want people to be upset because they should be. Yeah. Partly because we need to know and show. We can talk about it in academic books. We can see pictures of fu Manchu. We can even see a little clips of fu Manchu and Charlie Chan and documentaries that critically analyzed representation of us in Hollywood films, but the seed the entire film, for an hour and a half, really absorbed was being done. I thought that was important. So I wanted to show films like daughter to dragon and show films that king el chattel to see, okay, this is the polar opposites. And we should look at both and study both. So that's our anime one tribute on Saturday, the 5th of November, and that evening we have our James Hong tribute. Our James Hoff focus, he's gonna be there. We're gonna show a big trouble little China. Dennis Dunn, who plays the young kid in will be there, Peter kwon, who plays one of the spirits. I think he plays rain with thunder one of those spirits. He will be there. This can be a great evening to celebration. And each Sunday, the museum has given me their monthly series called Oscar Sundays. And traditionally, at the museum, Oscar Sundays are to honor films that have been recognized by the Academy Awards, either through nominations or by winds. And they say, what do you like to create that for November 2? I said, hell, I would. Yes. So on Sunday, I was showing lots of horizons, which is about Shanghai, you know, and they're based on the James Hilton novel. Was a film that I love as a kid. But the way I'm showing it, the way I'm framing it is yeah, dominate for 7 Oscars. It won't ask us for best art direction, which it deserves, because it's a beautiful film. I ask her for editing, but I say, well, look at this film. Django law as is presented in this film by fan capra, mister capra himself, is a wonderful life, mister fact of kakra, is predicated on a very imperialistic point of view of subjugating an indigenous culture and indigenous people. That is the Chinese people. And the debt and people where this film takes place. In China, in the region of Tibet. And it's all about the missionaries point of view of Christianity coming in and taking over the religion of that area and saying we are the religion you should embrace not yours. It's about the indigenous people being disturbance. Chinese leader that is in the film Chang is played by HB Warner by actors. So I said, yeah, I love this film, but when I saw as a kid in the 70s, I didn't think about any of this. I just loved trying to laugh. And the beautiful art deco sets. But this coming Sunday, I'm going to reframe the film for the audience. Yes, love the craft. But let's look at it with how do we train these lands, which is what I'll be doing for each of this Oscar Sunday programs. The following Sunday shows 7 faces of doctor Lao. Which I also loved as a kid. You know, these crazy makeup, special effects, you know, all not CGI, but hand done special effects in I want audiences to embrace these special effects, particularly because the team that produced them included warming Chang, a Chinese American artist. And a special effects were nominated for an Oscar for a special effects. Now, on the other hand, the academy that year chose to honor the makeup artist, William tuttle, and iconic figure in the world of makeup, used to have the makeup department at MGM studios. After that point, the academy had never given an Oscar for makeup. And they said, you know, they were so impressed by William tuttle, both his career has long decades long career, and the work he did in some faces adopted Lao in making up Tony Randall the actor into 7 different characters, including main character, doctor Lau. In yellowface now, I've been on the board of governors and I've been in academy members in 1997. And today, I shudder to think is someone said, we should give William tuttle or any makeup artist who created yellowface character and honorary Oscar. It's like crazy, man, right? But you know, that was 64. Different time in different place. And as a kid, and I know many fans of San Francisco and I just love that film. So I'm going to show that film with that in mind. This embrace the artistry and the craft and the Oscar recognition, but what affects did it have on the long-term identity of Asian peoples around the world to see this character and I don't know if you've seen the film or have seen it or remember it or seen clips, but Tony rando is pretty accomplished. What I found actually really relevant about this film is I've seen it recently in the last few years from my research. Tony Randall's character doctor Lau, he switches between heavily accented, broken

fu Manchu Oscar James Hoff Dennis Dunn Peter kwon William tuttle Charlie Chan fan capra mister capra James Hong HB Warner James Hilton China Chang Academy Awards Hollywood Oscars Django Shanghai MGM studios
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:00 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Chinese American filmmakers who actually started making films in America since the 1910s, including we've been talking about Jay-Z Leon, who did lotus blossom, lotus blossom is a tinted film about 5 year old full feature film that he produced in the early 20s, he produced that in LA. And it started a natural called lady senbei. And ladies and men were made was actually a vaudeville here of mixed blood. She was white, black and Asian. What white black and Chinese. She was a mix, but they marketed her as Chinese. So she was in his film lotus Boston and was a chapter on that. It's a very little known film. And in my series, I showed two ladies and men films. So let's talk about that a little later. But you know, I really wanted to tell the untold stories. There's also a filmmaker called Joseph San ju who made get this over 20 films in the 40s in San Francisco, Chinatown. Chinese language films for the Chinese speaking audience. But they were American films. They didn't sound Chinatown in a small studio. And it's an incredible story that I just wanted to have on the record. Because as I was beginning in my film career and studying film in the 70s, there were no role models like Joseph San ju, or a James beauty young. And it would have I think inspiring me to know that they were there. And they did it. And they aspired to be part of the film industry. And in their own ways, they were a part of the film industry. Just not the Hollywood one. And you know, this comes to question, does one need to be in Hollywood to be a part of that industry? No, you don't. Yeah. Because like Joseph San ju, he just said, nah. You know, I mentioned the film to bouquet earlier with anime volunteers. Well, small world, Joseph said you worked on that film too. Oh, wow. His father was in the fan 9 Sears in that film. Anyway, so it's just this really wonderful interlacing of different kinds and layers of films as film stories, including the popular film stories of John Chan and this is chapter on win win. This is chapter of Joan Chan. Definitely James hall is a stand to chapter in the book. So I really wanted to tell a long spectrum of stories about being a film artist in America. Well, hopefully the issuing of this enemy one quarter is going to spark a new interest in your book. Things come in waves sometimes. Yeah, and you know, the book, I came on your show, I think in 2019, when it was first published, right before COVID hit. It's been doing well. I'm consistently, so this will just keep the story more relevant and alive. Yeah, you never know how things end up, but we asked Janet Yang to write afterward. One of her credits was she was the executive producer of fort joy luck club. But she and I had been working on this various committees at the academy motion picture arts and sciences. Well, since then, she made history because she was elected to be the president of the academy. The first Asian American and definitely the first Asian American woman to be a present at the academy. So, you know, there is progress. And we're launching this series, can we talk about the series now? Let's do it. For those in Southern California and even for those who are not, hopefully, the series might even travel to different cities, depending on the interests. What days are they Wednesday, right? Three Wednesday, right? In two days, we are launching this series called Hollywood Chinese, the first hundred years is a 27 film series, all month long in November at the academy museum of motion pictures. I've been involved with the museum since 2017 as a member of this inclusion advisory committee. Advising the curators and the director and the designers on inclusion and diversity of representation within the exhibits. And I'm still on the committee. They've asked me to keep serving. So I've been working with the museum for a long time. Talking about how do we tell stories of the other? How do we unearth the stories that are not towed about Hollywood? And then they commissioned me to curate this series. Nice. We've been working on different a long time. But definitely working on it since February. Okay. Putting it together, choosing the titles, making sure the child is we want to show even available because the academy museum prides itself in showing the best possible prints, and that means no, we're not going to show VHS copies. Okay. We're pirated copies that you get nanogram world. They're going to show it the best possible, which meant that some titles just went available. But we've called it to mount this series and it starts this Friday. And it's very exciting. Should we go over some of it? Yes, please. Name some of the Phil, I mean, you can't go over all of them. Yeah, definitely. Okay, well, you know, there are 15 different programs, and they're like babies, right? I can't choose my favorite ones. But this Friday, we're going to launch the whole series with 15th anniversary showing of Hollywood Chinese my documentary. So that's exciting. We're going to show it in a 35 millimeter format. So yeah, so it's going to look great. It's going to sound great. Now Saturday is our anime long tribute. Where we are going to show two films we just talked about daughter the dragon in king of Chinatown. And I specifically wanted to program those two films because they showed the total opposite of the kind of roles she was allowed to play. One, the devious, torturous, revengeful, dragon lady and daughter to dragon. And on the other opposite end, is this upright well respected Chinese American position serving as a Chinatown as she plays in king of Chinatown. And I wanted audiences to see them both. Because for me, curating this series, I could have created all good stuff. I mean, good to us. All positive images are good stories. All happy stories. But I said, no, part of my working with the museum all these years on the inclusion advisory committee was, you know, we have to critique the system too. We have to critique what happened in Hollywood and the history of politics. And I had the same attitude with the series. So I chose no. I'm going to show a lot of the hits that we want to see and be an embrace and be proud of. But I'm going to show some fields that are very uncomfortable. And maybe even disturbing. And maybe even abhorrent to the point where we say, why the hell are you showing that Arthur?

Joseph San ju Hollywood John Chan Joan Chan Janet Yang fort joy luck club academy motion picture arts an Chinatown America academy museum of motion James hall Leon Jay academy museum Sears Boston LA San Francisco Joseph
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:02 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"None of those episodes have survived, so we don't we see pictures where we haven't seen any episodes yet. It was a dramatic series. A TV series. We can't see it because we haven't found any surviving prints. At that time, didn't keep the trends. Unfortunately, this brings us into the 60s and her last film is portrait in black. And her last appearance on screen is as a maid in the Barbara Stanwyck theater show. Her laughs episode aired January 1961 and portrait black the last round 1960 was produced by Ross hunter. And Ross hunter bought the rights to flower jump sound and contracted anime wall to play madam Liang in the film version of flower drum song, which was all set to shoot in March of 61. But she died in February of 61. Which is really upsetting. I mean, to all of us who are fans of flower Johnson. Yeah. You know, flower gemstone is touted as a milestone of Hollywood, and it is a milestone for Hollywood. But we can not say it had an all Asian cast because the role of madam Liang, who was supposed to be played by Anna Mae Wong, was played by juanita hall. That's right. African American Puerto Rican actress who originated a role on Broadway. So she was brought in to replace Anna May Wong. And you know, she's great. She's perfect. Yeah, and she's an interesting actress. So for me, it's wonderful that the quarter has finally been released because otherwise the last superiors we have of anime Wong would have been disbarred Stanford show. And if you remember Amazon Prime Video, you can watch episodes of it at. She's not known episodes, but she's the one that airs January of 61. I don't have the title and top of my head. And now it's kind of, you're not gonna say the word pathetic. You know, she's aged and not the aging is pathetic, but she plays this maid. In the background, you know, kowtowing to Barbara Stanwyck. A barber started a credible and well respected actress too. But it's just that I just didn't want for that to be my last image of anime while on the screen. So here we have this quarter that recognizes the struggle and the accomplishments that this woman had for four decades. I mean, there are not many actresses who survived the silent era into the sound era. Onto stage, performing live into TV, I finally back into film by the end of her career. It's quite an incredible feat in any profession whether I talked about entertainment or other fields, other professional fields. In America, you know, my knees very important, right? Yes. Let me speak. And here she is on the quarter. Whether you value your quarter or not, every American can see her face and whether or not they know her story, that's okay. They'll see her face and say, well, who is this woman? And hopefully they'll want to explore more, find out more about Adam ray Wong and what she went through in her four decades in the industry. And how she survived. Yeah, she was also a fashion icon, right? Oh, totally. I mean, even in her later days, if you see the back of my book, how do we Chinese book? I chose one of her final images of portrait in black as the back cover image. And you know, it's a very oversized black coat. She's wearing, but it looks great on her. She's standing there upright. She's standing there for me. You know, a picture's worth a thousand words. For me, she's upright and righteous and staring right into the camera and say, I survived, and I'm still here, and I don't need to, you know, throughout her whole career, oftentimes about her body, you know? And here it is, you don't really see the shape of her body. You see the shape of this large cone. But her strength comes through. Yes, she was a fashion icon. She was amazing covers and people with design clothes for her. On top of that, she's gorgeous. Yeah. Right. I've never seen a bad picture of her. Even in her older age, she's just has a serenity and a strength that comes through even in the pictures of her in her old age. You can see the lines of wisdom that comes through in those photographs. But I would also say there's a sophistication about her. Yes. Oh, totally. In the best sense of the word she had class. Yes. Yes. You know, I mean, any picture, this is that you knew this woman, she knew what to do. What a camera. Yeah. And she knew how to look at the camera. She knew how to pose for the camera. Arguably, some critics may say, well, she really explored it or ethnic lore with her fingers and their poses. But she knew what she was doing. I believe. No one else had duplicated. There are many copycats of her, but they never had the success that she had in front of the camera. When did the Hollywood Walk of Fame finally recognize her? You know, I don't have a year for that. I thought it was supposed to, but I look in the days that she was still alive. So I have to double check that research. So there was near the time early 60s. Yeah, no the time of her death, right? Yes. So it was 1960s. That way you found? Yes. 61. Okay, 61 she passed away in February. So it may have been after a death. I have to look at the exact date, but it's very close to the end of her life, if not at the end of her life. Before the pandemic, you came out with this incredible book about the Chinese in Hollywood. So if people want to know more about anime Wong and all these other pioneering Chinese Americans in Hollywood, tell us a little bit about the book and then you're hosting this film series that you've curated where those of us here in the Southern California. We can actually see some of these iconic films featuring Chinese so first tell us a little bit about the book and then tell us about the film series that's coming up. The book is over 300 pages. It's got over 500 images that are collected through my life and through my research for my documentary Hollywood Chinese. And it is a chapter on Anna May Wong. And as well as other actors, but thematically, I wanted to go through the first hundred years of the history of the Chinese and Hollywood. Like my documentary and like the film series that we can talk about a little bit. During sections are yellowface sections on women's roles, sections on, and I'm really proud of this are lesser known actors and participants.

Ross hunter madam Liang Anna May Wong Barbara Stanwyck theater Hollywood juanita hall Adam ray Wong Barbara Stanwyck Wong Puerto Rican Stanford barber Johnson Amazon America Southern California
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"On stage productions, it's incredible incredible story. So with this success in Europe, she came back to America. I think it was probably 1930 or so. And Paramount Pictures hired her and to first picture she gets, the first gig she gets is in daughter of the dragon, playing the daughter of fu Manchu. And of course, is back to that old. Wow. Podcasting. He plays this devious. It's fermented his daughter, right? She's totally evil. She took the robot, what's interesting about that film is she plays opposite so see how color. And so see how it comes to Japan born silent film star. Oh yeah. In American style fields, he was one of the biggest, if not for a while, the biggest box office draw Romeo actors in American silent films. That's amazing. So for to see how this I believe I'm pretty sure that this was his first sound film. For anime Wong, it was her first English American sound film. She did English southeast and Britain. But this is the first American sound film. Well, both of them. And what's fascinating is that if you watch it, and we'll talk about how you can watch this little later. Yeah. If you watch this film, they're speaking without overblown, crazy accents. Now, so see how car was Japan born, so he does have a Japanese accent. But their English is on tact. It's not broken English. It's not pigeonholing. The standard. You know, with correct grammar as we know it in America. Which is very different from what we see in afterwards where we know that by and large in the American productions, you hear whenever you see a Chinese or Asian character on screen, they're directed to have heavy accents. And I talked to my actor friends here in town in LA. And he said, yeah, you know, they go to auditions and directors say, well, can you talk like, you know? And they don't want to say it. And the act is not what they want. You want me to talk like a chinaman or what? You know? And because I'm not sure where that trend started in Hollywood, but it grew so strong that we know that oftentimes when we see Asian or Chinese characters on screen, they're going to have this heavy, thick accent. But not daughter to dragon. That's amazing. Which I find very fascinating. Yeah. Okay, now the dialog is on the ball this and we slept on the happy stuff. But the grammar is intact. It's not and it accents aren't there. Let me try to jump through big stages. So from there, I wonder if we're a big hit was Shanghai express. I think one of her more selling roles on screen. She plays a prostitute opposite Marlene Dietrich, but in the end, I'm not going to give it away in case you haven't seen it yet, but it's a wonderful role for Anna May Wong. And in this role change you're bringing back these belong is in their view as well. Now from there, we're talking about the mid 30s. There was a book called the good earth. For less but written by MGM bought the rights to it and it was going to be this big deal. For those who don't know, it's about Chinese peasants. In China and rural China. And anime Wong was the Chinese American actress of her time. And you know, are going to be today. But definitely of her time. And she lobbied to play the lead in that role. As far as I know, and I haven't found records of it, she was never given an audition for that role. I'm not sure if she was even seriously considered for. That's criminal. And that's what she thought. But they did give her an audition for the concubine row notice. Of course, I don't think they even offered to her, but she thought, and this is we see this in her writings to some college friends. And I'm prayer for us and she goes, you know, yeah, I auditioned for it. I'm not sure I'm a very wanted, you know, hell, if I'm gonna, if I'm not gonna get the main character role, hell if I'm gonna take this secondary role who is an evil character, you know? In this story, she's a bad character. She's one of the villains. And she goes, and in the end, she just, I don't think that even offered it to her, but she publicly or made it known that she wasn't even gonna take it. Tell us who they did cast for the protagonist's role. Austria. Austria. If you get my book Hollywood Chinese, I actually have a full page spread because it was so egregious. I have a double spread, one side is ten lilo, and one sized anime Wong. Just so that you can visually see this is who they got instead of anime Wong. You know, it's just a crime. But I think this is part of why this quarter or so important for her is that she's a fighter. You know, she was trying to control her career in she was offered a multi picture deal at paramount, which gave her more control over the kind of roles that she would get. And here we have about three or four films where we start with daughter of Shanghai, where she plays a Chinese American and opposite fill on a Korean American actor who plays a Chinese American, and they're the lead roles. And they have a romance. Wow. And they're good. And they're the good guys. Wow. They saw the mystery. And this led eventually to a film called king of Chinatown, where she plays a Chinese American doctor inspired by the real Chinese American doctor in the 30s, doctor Margaret Chung, who was a very well regarded well respected citizen of America. It is particularly as China where she practiced. And she's plays against again, offset felon, who plays the Chinese American lawyer, and they save the day. And she's an upright citizen Doctor Who's trying to raise money with a war relief in China, the war against Japan. And they have romance in this film. And they get married at the end. So, you know, she took control of her career and got the scoop of films made, and in the 40s, she transferred or she really wanted to push her interest in helping China against the Japanese in the war war two. And made two films bounce off a Burma. What are those? And lady from chungking, where she plays a Chinese gorilla. And lady from chungking, she plays a gorilla. She works with James B long again. As a core gorillas, sabotaging the Japanese attacks in China. The independent films not high budget, but really underscores her commitment. To her politics. And her last film in the 40s was impact, not a great film, a small film, she plays a maid, she's not the main character, plays opposite again, fill on. Feel I'm actually a small role. So it's not playing opposite. But he's in the cast. But in the 50s, he excels in TV. It's crazy. He's one of the first, if not the first woman or Asian American. Definitely be first Asian American to have a TV series on the DuPont network.

Wong Japan fu Manchu Anna May Wong Paramount Pictures America China Romeo Marlene Dietrich Hollywood Shanghai Austria Britain Europe MGM LA Margaret Chung paramount Chinatown chungking
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:59 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And a lot of us are buying stuff online so you don't get changed or when we're in person. We're actually using credit cards, but there is a new quarter with the first Asian American face on it and it's of Anna May Wong. And it was issued by the U.S. mint as part of a set honoring 5 women achievers and trailblazers. Writer and civil rights activist, Maya Angelou, astronaut Sally Wright, Native American activist and former Cherokee nation chief Wilma mankiller, suffragist educator and politician Nina or terror Warren and actress anime Wong. That is maybe news to some of you you maybe are vaguely familiar with who this is. She was a movie star and entertainer and activist and even a fashion icon. And I think it's just fantastic that she is now gracing one of our quarters and I thought who can I get to come on and fill us in on why in the world the U.S. mint picked her, it's gotta be Arthur. Arthur, I was listening to another podcast about the anime one quarter and the host dropped your name several times. So if that wasn't the universe telling me, let's just get Arthur on here. You don't have to get somebody else. Welcome back to the show. Thank you. It's great to be back. Tell us you are a walking encyclopedia of Chinese in Hollywood. For some people, you know, they're thinking, I think I know this name, but why would they pick an actor to be on a coin, you know, when they're maybe clearly lots of other Chinese Americans who've done significant things, how do you feel about the selection of anime Wong? And then I just want you to fill us in. Well, you talking to a film fan. So, you know, I'm a little biased. Every director, every filmmaker should be on a coin. Yes. Okay. But particularly Anna May Wong because he represents not only the arts, but she represents the Chinese American history and ups and downs and the roller coaster experience is that a Chinese American goes through in this country, particularly in the early 1900s, up to mid century until she died in 1960. So really her life represents so much that we go through as Chinese Americans in America struggling to find equality, a representation. Take us back to when she was born where she was born. Because it's kind of an unlikely story, especially when it happened. I was just born in LA's Chinatown. She was born in 1905, bill suggests starting to be made and LA became the center of the filmmaking world soon after that. They were shooting around her, she was around production, she was curious child and she hung out on sets and by golly by the late teens, particularly by 1922, she made her breakthrough role in a toy to see. Silent film kind of based on the madam butterfly story, where she plays a Chinese falling low within American and the whole madam butterfly store. And having a child, and it was one of the first two strip color Technicolor films. And it was her breakthrough film and people loved her. It was a dramatic romantic role. There wasn't, you know, it wasn't like some vampire, some devious ferment you roll. But as a romantic role and a tragic role because she was left, of course, like the man of butterfly story. By the white protagonist, and they took her child, the white protagonist gets married to a white woman, and they take her child, their child. Wow. So it was a heartbreaking role as she was wonderful and people loved her. That was pretty much her beginning, and I'm not sure how much you want to dig into it, but yeah, please. I would love to hear more. I think this is the moment now that she's gracing our quarters. For us to fill in our gaps. Yeah, you know, you have to think about a woman or a young teen at her age and we're talking to us, she's one in 1905, told us he came out in 1922. So she was 17 years old. And she lived in a pretty strict Chinese American family, and when her parents heard of her, wishes to be part of the film industry, of course there weren't supportive, like, or even up to Dave. Yeah, our parents. Hard pressed to find parents that our Chinese American willing to have their child go into the yard. But more difficult back then, but she did it. And I remember once there I read about her, actually playing hooky from school. Just to be on a set, you know, to hang out and see what's going on. Though, and we had to think about the generation of Chinese Americans being brought up at that time. Not a very many of us, but those that were born in the early 1900s were starting to absorb or at least observe the western culture around them. And of course, being born here, you know, there's this pool of, well, which coach it to your father and many of us are still dealing with that. Are we Chinese? Are we American or are we a hybrid? And she went through that as well with her parents. But she chose the arts, and she chose to film as her outlet, and obviously she was the natural. The camera loved her. From then though, with the accolades she got for the total sea, just relegated to playing exotic oriental roles. And he tried to break out of that and her roads led to the thief of Baghdad. A 1924 film, where she played a Mongol slave girl. And she played this devious conniving backstabbing slave girl against the despair. Oh, boy. But she held her own against Douglas Fairbanks. And for the public really embraced her, but they also embraced the type of roles she was playing, and she couldn't break out of that. There was one film that I found interesting that she did participate in is called a silk bouquet. And that film was funded by Chinese American businessmen up in San Francisco. The production was in LA, it was based on the Chinese story in China, and she cost out with James B leong. And I bring up Jay speed Leon because he was actually a Chinese American producer while he came from Shanghai for he immigrated here to America. He wanted to be active in film production. And he did one film called lotus blossom in 19 20. I might get the dates wrong on this, but I think 1921 or so before talk to C I believe I may be corrected, but around there. And he and anime Wong costarred in this film called silk bouquet, independent film. But it didn't get anywhere. Unfortunately, and I'm going to bring up Jay's belief again. Later on, I just want to plant that seed. Although she broke out again with thief a Baghdad, she was even more entrenched in these roles of being a vamp. She was very disillusioned and frustrated. And your card, a German film company caught her and brought her overseas, and there she thrived. As natural, making silent films for the European markets, French German, and even British markets. Okay, so how does she handle the language differences? She learned it. She learned French and German. And for the British. And of course, for the British well, first of all, okay. There's two sides of the story. They were silent films. But she also did sound films talking films early talking towns and French and German. And she learned the language. And part of her learning language was not only did the European auntie embraced her for who she was, and actress, not necessarily an exotic notice flower, but an actress that she also thrived on stages.

Anna May Wong Arthur Sally Wright Wilma mankiller terror Warren anime Wong U.S. Maya Angelou LA Nina Hollywood James B leong bill Baghdad Douglas Fairbanks Dave Jay Leon Shanghai
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:47 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"In Hollywood, 5300 Melrose avenue in LA. Tickets are $10, and you can go to film freeway dot com, backslash LA Asian film awards, backslash tickets, and scroll down to autocorrect. You'll also be able to view autocorrect via an online screening from November 12th through the 15th through the LA Asian film awards website, WWW dot power of film dot XYZ. Thank you so much for tuning in to my podcast, especially if this is your first time. I hope that you'll hop on over to AA podcast dot com to explore some of my previous episodes. There's also a spiffy new search bar to south curate through what's already in my library, or you can use the popular or highly recommended tabs to discover some new ones that might tickle your fancy. A huge shout out to all of you here at around the world who are already fans of this show, and in extra special thanks to those of you who financially support me and all my efforts, either through Patreon dot com or by clicking on the donate tab on my web page. As we're approaching the end of this year, I hope that more of you will join this vital group of my supporters. Two years ago, one of my first cousins, Anita Wong Choi, finally succumbed to pancreatic cancer after battling it courageously for several years. To me, she was the spitting image of my late mother Emily, who also died of pancreatic cancer several years ago. Same nose, same eyes, same boundless energy and exuberance for life. Being with Anita, especially as she battled that cancer always helped me connect with my mom. So when Anita died, part of me felt like I'd lost mom again. Due to COVID restrictions, Anita's husband postponed any kind of memorial gathering until just this past weekend in sausalito, California. He and their son had scattered Anita's ashes in the waters of the San Francisco Bay, so he chose a waterfront restaurant for the event. Anita's younger sister Cindy had asked me to open the proceedings with a prayer of blessing. Before I did, I read this poem that I modified so that everyone gathered not just family members would feel included. We didn't know that fateful day that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly. In death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, but you didn't go alone. For part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us beautiful memories, and your love is still our guide. And though we can't see you now.

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

03:11 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Welcome to Asian American to Ken Fung podcast, where my mission has always been to spotlight Asian American culture makers and shapers by having them share their remarkable journeys and stories with us. As of 2022, I've proudly partnered with UCLA's Asian American study center, which will eventually archive all of my episodes so that future listeners will be able to access them. And of course, as always, I'm your host, Ken fong. Welcome to episode 397. With the recent announcement that the U.S. mint has placed the gorgeous face of legendary and iconic Chinese American actor Anna May Wong on the back of new quarters, I of course reached out to my friend Arthur dawn because, well, he's the absolute best person I know to help us appreciate this historic occurrence for Americans of Asian ancestry. If you're a longtime fan of this show, you've probably already enjoyed Arthur's two previous appearances. In episode 52, back in 2016, where he talked about his storied career, making documentaries about Asian Americans and the hashtag Oscar so white controversy, and in episode two 24 in 2020, where he shared about his groundbreaking book, Hollywood, Chinese, the Chinese and American feature films. In this third appearance with me, Arthur describes the valiant life and career of Anna May Wong, and I'm fairly certain that you'll find yourself agreeing that she was a sublime choice to be the first American of Asian ancestry to be celebrated on one of our American coins. Arthur and I were originally going to record this a week earlier so that I could drop this episode a week before the launch of his monthlong film series, Hollywood Chinese, the first 100 years at the academy museum's theater in Hollywood. Because we had to postpone it a week, this episode is dropping on the morning of the series second day. The two anime Wong films that Arthur selected were shown on the first day, but if you go to academy museum dot org, you'll find many other notable films from Chinese Americans first century of involvement. In listening to Arthur retail enemy Wong's story, one of the things that stood out to me is how this pioneering Asian American actor was determined to exercise agency over her career. Even today, Asian American actors and those from other underrepresented groups struggle mightily to find scripts and roles that don't perpetuate stereotypes, while giving them opportunities to showcase their acting skills. Next week's guest is South Asian American writer and actor, a new bot. Her compelling new short film autocorrect grew out of her own efforts to exert agency in her own career, and we explore the connection that this has to experiencing greater mental health. If you're in LA, there will be an autocorrect screening at the Los Angeles Asian film awards this coming Saturday November 12th at 6 p.m. Pacific time as part of the short film block one in the Charlie Chaplin theater at the Raleigh

Anna May Wong Ken Fung Arthur Asian American study center Ken fong Arthur dawn Hollywood academy museum UCLA Wong Oscar U.S. Los Angeles Asian film awards LA Charlie Chaplin theater Raleigh
"anna may wong" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on KOMO

"Her mark on American currency. ABC's Michelle franzen has details on the latest coin released in the American women's quarters program. Anna May Wong was the first Chinese American star in Hollywood, appearing in dozens of films, including 1930 twos Shanghai express. Now Wong is the first Asian American to be featured on a quarter. It's the 5th coin released by the U.S. mint in the American women's quarters program that highlights trailblazing women, four other coins have been released so far highlighting women, including poet, Maya Angelou, and astronaut Sally Ride, Wong's coin will start shipping out next week. Michelle Franz and ABC News. ABC entertainment news. At one point during the run of the NBC sitcom Friends, Matthew Perry says he was taking 55 Vicodin a day, and the 6 foot actor was down to a 128 pounds. He makes those revelations in a new memoir with People magazine getting a sneak preview. He says when he started the show at age 24, his alcoholism was just starting to poke through, but there were years he was sober, like season 9, during which he scored an Emmy nomination, but things got worse and by 2018, he was hospitalized after his colon burst from opioid abuse. It was in a coma for two weeks, given a 2% chance to live. Matthew Perry's memoir is out November 1st. Actress Anna Faris revealing she was harassed by director Ivan reitman on the set of the 2006 film my super ex-girlfriend. On her podcast pair says the Ghostbusters director terrorized the set yelling at her on her first day, and then later during filming, he slapped her on the butt hard in front of the crew. Reitman died earlier this year at the age of 75, and reitman's

Michelle franzen Anna May Wong Wong Michelle Franz ABC Matthew Perry Sally Ride Maya Angelou Shanghai Hollywood ABC News People magazine NBC U.S. Emmy Anna Faris coma
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:55 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Paramount actually employed her to tutor other actors such as Dorothy Lamour, to use chopsticks. Et cetera she forged on and performed on the radio several times, as well as performing in the cabaret. She went from U.S. to Europe and Australia through the 1930s and 1940s performing a cabaret act that utilized songs in Cantonese, French, German, Danish, Swedish, and a few other languages. In 1938, wanting to help others, she auctioned off her movie costumes and donated that money to Chinese aid and the Chinese benevolent association of California, honored Wong for her work in support of Chinese refugees. She also dedicated the proceeds from a preface she wrote in a 1942 cookbook titled new Chinese recipes, which was one of the first Chinese cookbooks to united China relief. She worked less in movies through 1939 to 1942, instead participating in events and appearances in support of the Chinese struggle against Japan. She actually stayed in Australia for more than three months in 1939 to perform in a vaudeville show because she was sick of being typecast in Hollywood. Then in 1942 she starred in two anti Japanese propaganda movies and donated her salary from both films to united China relief. The lady from Chongqing actually portrayed the Chinese as heroes rather than as victims rescued by Americans. In fact, American characters are captured by the Japanese. But the primary goal of the Chinese heroes was to prevent the Japanese from entering the city of Chongqing. And all the Chinese characters were portrayed by Chinese American actors. And the Japanese villains, which were normally played by Chinese American actors too, were portrayed by European Americans. The plot wasn't well loved by critics, but Wong received positive reviews. Later in life, she invested in real estate, owned a few properties in Hollywood and was an apartment house manager from the late 1940s until 1956. After a 6 year absence in films, she returned to Hollywood in 1949 in a small role, then from August 27th to November 21st in 1951, she starred in the gallery of madam Liu Tong in a TV role specifically written for her. She was a dealer in Chinese art who also did detective work and international intrigue. After the series completed, her health started to deteriorate. In 1953, she suffered an internal hemorrhage which her brother contributed to financial worries, her heavy drinking, and the onset of menopause. But she continued to work afterwards in 1956, she hosted one of the first U.S. documentaries on China, narrated entirely by a Chinese American. The travel series was called bold journey, and it consisted of film footage from her 1936 trip to China. She continued to get guest spots in TV series and in 1960, she received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Also, if you go to the gateway to Hollywood, her sculpture is one of the four supporting pillars. In 1960, she returned to film in the movie portrait in black, but she was still a typecast and stereotyped. She later explained her long absence in a press release using a supposed proverb. Don't be photographed

united China Dorothy Lamour Chinese benevolent association Chongqing Wong Hollywood Australia Paramount madam Liu Tong U.S. Europe Japan China
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:24 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"The role was instead given to Louise rayner, who won the best actress Oscar for her performance. MGM's passing over of Wong is remembered today as one of the most notorious cases of casting discrimination in the 1930s. After the major disappointment, Wong left the U.S. and embarked on a yearlong tour of China to visit her father and his family in taishan, as well as to study Chinese theater. Her travels were recorded in a series of articles in U.S. newspapers. All throughout her famous travel, she was strongly criticized by the nationalist government and the film community. Wong was raised with the taishan dialect rather than Mandarin, so she had trouble communicating. After her travels, she commented that the different dialects sounded quote as strange to me as Gaelic. I thus had the strange experience of talking to my own people through an interpreter. Due to the heavy scrutiny as an international celebrity, as well as the multiple disappointments and her professional life, Wong had bouts of depression and son nanger, and she started to drink and smoke excessively. Throughout her travels, she met with some kindness, but often hostility, and she commented when she returned to Hollywood, quote, I am convinced that I could never play in the Chinese theater. I have no feeling for it. It's a pretty sad situation to be rejected by Chinese because I'm too American. And by American producers, because they prefer other races to act Chinese parts. So with her return to Hollywood in the late 1930s she completed her contract with Paramount Pictures by appearing and starring in a string of B movies. Though they were often dismissed by critics, Wong was able to have more freedom in these movies and played non stereotypical roles. In fact, they were publicized in the Chinese American press for their positive portrayals of Chinese Americans. They were smaller budgeted, but since they weren't higher profile releases, she could be bolder and portray successful and professional Chinese American characters. These roles broke stereotypes and worked against the negative caricatures Chinese American characters were generally seen in. Of these B movies, one of the most famous was daughter of Shanghai released in 1937. Wong played an Asian American lead that was rewritten for her so that her character was the heroine of the story. Instead of the more passive character that was originally written, her character actively set the plot into motion. It was carefully tailored to fit Wong and it was even given the working title anime Wong story. She told Hollywood magazine quote, I like my part in this picture better than any I've had before, because this picture gives Chinese a break. We have sympathetic parts for a change. To me, that means a great deal. Though it was a B movie, it gained generally positive reviews, and it was the first movie starring an Asian female lead and Asian love interest that ended happily. Neither die and they drive off together. Happy. A positive end that many of our characters rarely got. In fact, Wong's characters committed suicide or were killed so often in films that she commented they could write, quote she died a thousand deaths on her gravestone. Sadly, her next few B movies were considered failures and given negative reviews. Although she played very strong roles like in king of Chinatown, where she played a surgeon who sacrifices a high paying promotion to instead help the Chinese fight the invading Japanese.

Wong Louise rayner taishan nanger nationalist government U.S. Chinese American press MGM Hollywood Chinese theater Oscar Paramount Pictures China Hollywood magazine depression Shanghai Chinatown
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:02 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"The notoriety she gained in Europe helped her land the lead role in on the spot. A Broadway play that ran for 167 performances. The director requested she used stereotypical Japanese mannerisms, but she refused and instead used her Chinese background to create the authentic and exotic feel the director wanted. She had a bit more freedom on the stage and in cabarets than in Hollywood movies. So she repeatedly turned to both for a creative outlet. In 1931, she accepted her last stereotypical evil Chinese role in daughter of the dragon, where she appeared in starring role alongside suit hayakawa. Even though she played the main character, she was paid only $6000, whereas hayakawa received $10,000. And Warner oland, who was only in the movie for 23 minutes, was paid $12,000. But she gained more recognition and was now a true Hollywood celebrity, and with that status she started making political statements. For example, in late 1931, she wrote a harsh criticism of the mukden incident and Japanese invasion of manchuria. She also became more vocal in her advocacy for Chinese American causes and for better film roles. She criticized the negative stereotyping in daughter of the dragon and, in a 1933 interview for film weekly, she stated, why is it that the screen Chinese is always the villain and so crude a villain, murderous, treacherous, a snake in the grass. We are not like that, how could we be with a civilization that is so many times older than the west. She then appeared in the movie Shanghai express, alongside close friend Marlene Dietrich, whom she'd met in Germany. She played a self sacrificing courtesan and scenes with Dietrich were full of chemistry, sparking rumors of lesbianism. In some ways, this negatively affected her career. It was after Shanghai express that the Chinese press, who'd given mixed reviews of her career before, wrote their strong dislike of Wong's career choices. Her characters on screen sexuality was believed to spread negative stereotypes of Chinese women and the nationalist government gave some of the most virulent criticisms.

hayakawa Warner oland Hollywood manchuria Europe Shanghai Marlene Dietrich Dietrich Germany Wong
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:35 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Then, at 17, she was cast in her first leading role, a silent film called the toll of the sea, which was a version of a black and white silent movie in madam butterfly. Fun fact, the toll of the sea was the first Technicolor full length narrative feature. Variety magazine praised her extraordinarily fine acting based on her moving and extremely expressive performance. People across America were drawn in by her, but because of her ethnicity, she wasn't seen as leading lady material by U.S. filmmakers. So, in the next few years, she was given supporting roles to add an exotic atmosphere in different films like in the 1923 movie, drifting, where she played a concubine. But it wasn't until she was cast as a Mongol slave in the 1924 picture, the thief of Baghdad, that she really made waves in Hollywood, long played a stereotypical dragon lady type role, but audiences and critics were fascinated by her brief on screen appearance. The thief of bogdan grossed more than $2 million, which is about 30.5 million in today's dollars. Wong was extremely conscious of her perpetual foreigner status, even though she was born and raised in California. So she started cultivate a flapper image and began dating white actors. She was also tired of the roles she was given in Hollywood. So in March of 1924, she established her own production company called anime Wong productions to make films about Chinese myths. Sadly, her business partner was caught using bad business practices and the company closed. The American public loved her, but due to anti miscegenation laws, her career in Hollywood was stilted because the only leading Asian men in Hollywood was sasu hayakawa. She continued to receive praise, but her roles increasingly followed the trend of femme fatale, vamp type tragic female characters, and it disappointed her, so she started to follow different paths to find success. Wong joined a 1925 vaudeville tour that ended up failing, but she kept going. In 1927, she starred in the silk bouquet renamed the dragon horse which was one of the first U.S. films produced with Chinese backing. It featured Asian actors playing Asian roles. Hollywood, though, continued to assign her two stereotypical roles, either the self sacrificing butterfly or China doll, or the sly and deceitful dragon lady, or concubine. Really, these were just caricatures of what white Americans believed Asians were like. There was also an increase in censorship of mixed race on screen couples, so she continued to be sidelined and cast in supporting roles.

Hollywood Variety magazine U.S. Wong bogdan sasu hayakawa Baghdad California China
"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:14 min | 3 months ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school. We're your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to episode 16. Today is international women's day a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. It's always celebrated on March 8th and it's a day to celebrate women's achievements, raise awareness about women's equality, lobby for accelerated gender parity and fundraise for female focused charities. The very first international women's day was celebrated in 1911 in Denmark, and the U.S. followed soon after, but the day actually has origins in the national women's day in the U.S., which began in 1909 and was organized by the Socialist Party of America. And before anyone stops and criticizes the day because it has roots in the Socialist Party of America, just know that a lot of political movements focused on equal rights, began with socialist teaching or the Socialist Party. From women's rights to protection for laborers to basic civil rights, the Socialist Party was about change through revolution. Russia celebrated its first international women's day in 1913, and it was around this time that several nations agreed to celebrate on March 8th according to the Gregorian calendar. It wasn't until decades later, 1975 that the United Nations recognized its first international women's day, then 20 years later, in 1996, the UN began announcing themes for the celebration and began with celebrating the past planning for the future. In subsequent years, they've used the themes women at the peace table, women and human rights and world free of violence against women. After 2001, with the establishing of the international women's day dot com website, the themes began to also get hashtags. So you might be familiar with some of the past hashtags of each for equal, balance for better, press for progress, be bold for change, pledge for parity, make it happen, and the gender agenda.

Socialist Party of America Socialist Party Jen Ted U.S. Denmark United Nations Russia
"anna may wong" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Lieutenant Kevin Bishop talked about tumors. Actions after rescuing the boy's heart wrenching part was the fact that he just walked away afterwards and we're standing off to the side and letting the medics and the police tend to the But the boy and help him out and he was just humbly standing off to the side. You know, out of the way and didn't say anything. Wasn't looking for anything. Didn't try to interject himself. Just just an amazing young boy right here. Both of the boys that were rescued were treated and released from the hospital, some trailblazing women in American history ever in their place on some special U. S currency. More from ABC is Darian Albert, a pioneering native American leader is among the first group the U. S. Mint selected for its American Women Quarters program. Wilma Man Killer, The first female principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, became one of the most visible Native American officials in her 10 years at the helm of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. She joined celebrated poet and author Maya Angelou, astronaut Sally Ride the first American woman in space. Adelina Otero Warren, a leader in New Mexico's suffrage movement, and Anna May Wong. Chinese American Hollywood Film star. The first quarter's go into circulation next year area Aldinger ABC News, An £80 portion of the World Trade Center destroyed in the September 11th terror attacks. Police and fire escort this week as it was taken to fire headquarters in Newburyport, The Newburyport News reports. The portion of steel split into two perpendicular slabs representing the twin towers is going to be at the fire station in perpetuity so that generations will never forget what transpired that day Fire chief Christopher LeClair telling the paper he thinks it's fantastic and says We're honored to have it here. Roughly two years for the piece to make it from New York City to Newburyport. It will become part of a larger memorial at the Newburyport Fire Department that is now being developed. Looking for a job. Well, you may be in luck, it's a job Hunters Paradise, WBC's Jeff Brown tells US companies trying to navigate a comeback road have been putting workers into the driver's seat people beyond the move. A lot of people felt like their careers have kind of beacon and put on hold. Josh drew with staffing firm Robert. Half. Nearly one third of workers in Boston say they're going to look For a new job after the summer a lot more employees are looking for flexibility in their work, life balance..

Adelina Otero Warren Jeff Brown Darian Albert New York City Anna May Wong Newburyport Christopher LeClair Maya Angelou Boston 10 years Josh Kevin Bishop Sally Ride £80 Newburyport Fire Department WBC U. S. Mint next year Chinese ABC
"anna may wong" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"anna may wong" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"805 49 1985. Expected in court today for an arraignment is the California man accused of firing a gun during a road rage incident and killing a six year old boy. Marcus Harris is facing murder charges being held on $2 million bail. The boy 18 layers, was shot as his mother drove him to score. Missouri couple who waved guns that black lives matter. Protesters who are marching near their home last year have pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges Mark and Patricia McCloskey paying fines and agreeing to give up those weapons. Federal safety officials now say that since 2016 they have opened 30 different investigations into Tesla crashes. All of those investigations focused on whether or not Tesla's driver assistance systems were being used. And some of the most important women in American history are being honored with their own quarters, says ABC. Daria Aldinger. Pioneering Native American leader is among the first group the U. S. Mint selected for its American Women Quarters Program. Wilma Man Killer, The first female principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, became one of the most visible Native American officials in her 10 years at the helm of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. She joined celebrated poet and author Maya Angelou, astronaut Sally Ride the first American woman in space. Adelina Otero Warren, a leader in New Mexico's suffrage movement, and Anna May Wong, the first Chinese American Hollywood for Film star. The first quarter's go into circulation next year. This is ABC News. It's all about the knows It's your air filter the first line of defense against bacteria and viruses..

Daria Aldinger Mark Marcus Harris Adelina Otero Warren Patricia McCloskey Anna May Wong $2 million Maya Angelou Sally Ride ABC 10 years Tesla last year 18 layers first California 2016 next year Chinese Cherokee Nation