18 Burst results for "Anna Lena"

"anna lena" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:52 min | Last week

"anna lena" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Would go on anti nuclear protests with her parents, and it'll go back home for King afterwards. That could be a metaphor for the mix of middle class coziness, unprincipled radicalism that is today's German Green Party. So just who is Anna Lena Bear Bach. She's charismatic, disciplined, focused details or entered, perhaps slightly too much. Some people say she's a very strategic thinker, and she has self confidence to go through the roof. He can be really impatient in terms of achieving her gold on she might not have to wait much longer, says Jeremy Cliff, Berlin based international editor of the new Statesman. It's almost certain that the greens will be in the next government in some four on that Angelina Bear book will be either the next chancellor or the next vice chancellor. If you just look at the long term trends, local stepping down difficulties in the governing artist. Pretty easy to imagine a better book chancellorship. It is a humongous question. Why are they doing so well? I don't think that their political ideas and the program and anything is so fabulous that it should convince every voter in Germany But investing is a German political analyst. However, there's a deep feeling that this government has not done very well dealing with covert. The largest bit of the success of the greens, is that people are fed up with the government that we have. Their book is obviously a hugely gifted strategist who has done a miracle to bring the greens under control and stop the incessant Coralie Lieber gave no those splits almost destroyed the German Green Party. It was in government from 1998. But a year later at a party conference Green Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer Was pelted with red paint when he said the party would support NATO bombings in Yugoslavia..

1998 Coralie Lieber Anna Lena Bear Bach Jeremy Cliff Yugoslavia Germany Joschka Fischer Berlin Angelina Bear a year later today King German Green Party Green Foreign Minister German NATO four
"anna lena" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:08 min | 2 weeks ago

"anna lena" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Here in Germany with the Green Party's staking its claim to lead Europe's biggest economy. For the first time ever, the greens have announced a chancellor candidate. Her name is Anna Lena Fair ball, and she aims to succeed Angela Merkel. If the Greens win September's elections, and the numbers are looking good opinion polls placed them second only by a small margin. The Angela Merkel's conservatives. With two party leaders, one needed to step aside and all but topic did so, making Anna Lena Bear book the first Green chancellor candidate ever. In her first speech, she promised a renewal in German politics. And a departure from the status quote. This is a matter of who I'm getting. We must make changes to create a fair country, a country where daycare centers and schools are truly the best places to be a country where care give us generally have the time and above all, the resource is too careful people, a country in which the state functions digitally and serves its citizens. Diverse and cosmopolitan, country values based and strong democracy. 40 year old became politically active within the Green Party in 2008, focusing on foreign and security issues. Only five years later, she entered the bonus Tak, the German parliament at the age of 32. They actually quickly and respect for her thoroughness and knowledge of detail. She has a degree in international law and spent several years abroad in the U. S. London and Brussels. She now lives in Potsdam, with her husband and their two young daughters. Best yet carefully correct Raft announcement came in sharp contrast to the bruising power struggles still going on within Germany's conservative Party. Both contenders. There were quick to react to bad books candidacy. Got a lever on Elena Congratulate Angelina Bear book, and I can promise her that this CTU in Germany is looking forward to a fair election campaign in

Angela Merkel Anna Lena Bear Anna Lena first speech September first time second Europe one two party leaders Greens first Green German greens Fair
Germany's Green Party Selects Candidate for Chancellor

Investors Edge

02:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Germany's Green Party Selects Candidate for Chancellor

"Here in Germany with the Green Party's staking its claim to lead Europe's biggest economy. For the first time ever, the greens have announced a chancellor candidate. Her name is Anna Lena Fair ball, and she aims to succeed Angela Merkel. If the Greens win September's elections, and the numbers are looking good opinion polls placed them second only by a small margin. The Angela Merkel's conservatives. With two party leaders, one needed to step aside and all but topic did so, making Anna Lena Bear book the first Green chancellor candidate ever. In her first speech, she promised a renewal in German politics. And a departure from the status quote. This is a matter of who I'm getting. We must make changes to create a fair country, a country where daycare centers and schools are truly the best places to be a country where care give us generally have the time and above all, the resource is too careful people, a country in which the state functions digitally and serves its citizens. Diverse and cosmopolitan, country values based and strong democracy. 40 year old became politically active within the Green Party in 2008, focusing on foreign and security issues. Only five years later, she entered the bonus Tak, the German parliament at the age of 32. They actually quickly and respect for her thoroughness and knowledge of detail. She has a degree in international law and spent several years abroad in the U. S. London and Brussels. She now lives in Potsdam, with her husband and their two young daughters. Best yet carefully correct Raft announcement came in sharp contrast to the bruising power struggles still going on within Germany's conservative Party. Both contenders. There were quick to react to bad books candidacy. Got a lever on Elena Congratulate Angelina Bear book, and I can promise her that this CTU in Germany is looking forward to a fair election campaign in

Angela Merkel Anna Lena Fair Anna Lena Bear Green Party Germany German Parliament Europe Potsdam U. Brussels London Conservative Party Angelina Bear Elena CTU
"anna lena" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We need joining us them now to make are it possible and a north for senior all reporter workers at box to join covering together gender and across reproductive employers rights and welcome across to the show industries hi thanks and for having across me geographies Anna Lena style gonna not coffee more place in your vice by president workplace and director by the of dozens women's health policy but at the by Kaiser the hundreds family foundation of thousands Alina welcome and millions harasses thank you her it's a two pleasure million to join member you union will only so in endorse a let's start a candidate off who with supports you briefly that goal what is so title Horsley ten NPR funding news and how Washington does that work by the way the the journalists title ten and funding broadcast is engineers federal family of NPR planning funding are represented and by it's two really unions intended to help sag after and underserved the but populations Russian so people president Vladimir without Putin insurance accuses for people who the are United low income States of creating to get services new threats like STI testing for Russia contraception after the trump things administration like that withdrew and from and a landmark what we arms know control about treaty earlier the connection this month between from what the Moscow trump administration and peers loosing is saying can reports Putin is says they're Russia they're not allowing is this still waiting this for organization the US to resume to provide a dialogue abortion about referrals limiting on and the tying two countries' title tend nuclear to that arsenals can you help us speaking clarify to reporters that'll during a right visit so to Finland so president awhile Putin back addressed the and trump administration's the early exit this year from a nineteen other than eighty ministration seven treaty finalized the US our rule has accused I Russia regarding of violating title ten funding human and condition critics what call the is roll the your domestic role in the acheral I'm and what it says is that if you've got title ten funding you cannot also provide abortions or refer for abortions now title ten funding itself actually could never be used for abortions so what they're really saying now is is not just you can't use this money for abortions but if you get this money you can't do abortions all Alina let's bring you in here other than abortion referrals which is kind of what a lot of folks are focusing on here what other services this plant parenthood provide in terms of reproductive care and women's health well that's just a very small part of what they do they provide access to contraceptives services STI testing and treatment HIV treatment and other prevent HIV testing and other preventive services so that's just a fraction of what they do and we know who will this change affect the most what parts of the country will be impacted differently well many parts of the country are going to be impacted and I just want to add that this change just does not only affect Planned Parenthood there's a network of four thousand sites across the country that are participating in the program Planned Parenthood is about ten percent of the sites and forty percent of the patients but there are many other sites and many states have actually said that they are going to withdraw from the program so we know in Maine we know Utah actually all the title ten sites are Planned Parenthood clinic many parts of California Oregon and Washington Vermont so many parts of the country are going to be affected and what do we know about Planned Parenthood funding structure right now I mean how much of this money from title ten was going to the overall Planned Parenthood budget and how much did Planned Parenthood rely on this money right so this wasn't the only federal funding stream the Planned Parenthood get they also receive money through Medicaid and that so far has not been cut off so they will still be getting federal money they won't you know friends and have to completely ceased operations but they have said that certain things will stop they've mentioned that I've actually operate a mobile health unit that drives around Ohio offering I'm family planning services other services and that may have to stop functioning I'm and they mention also that that wait times will go up at clinics around the country and they are concerned that patients might go without care the planned parenthood's entire budget does not come from federal funding there also private donors I understand that are doing this are those private donors going to be able to fill the gap in funding it's unclear to me whether or not Planned Parenthood has a plan to fill the gap right now right so they do get private donations also and and they said that you know certainly they will try to make up some of the shortfall plan hundred is known for a long time that this might be coming so you know I'm sure that they've been talking to folks who could provide donations but they've also said that it's unlikely that private donations would be able to make up this fall shortfall given I mean it is a long standing federal program that Planned Parenthood but part of for a long time a lead that you used to your point earlier about this being a a nationwide problem are there alternatives to Planned Parenthood are smaller clinics are going to have to pick up of it some of the this black here or is this only is planned her into the only option and in large parts of the country well in some parts of the country it is the only option and you know there's been studies actually that sound when Planned Parenthood goes away when it's closed the S. T. I. rates go up in taxes had you know was an example as well where the Texas Medicaid program decided to terminate its participation in planned parenthood and what they found was actually that there were fewer claims for I you dis and other and implants which are long acting and very effective methods and actually showed increases in that rate of Medicaid parts and the state I'm in other cases in Wisconsin there were also similar cut back to planned parenthood three state dollars and they also saw that there were adverse outcomes and women were finding that they were without providers we asked our listeners about their experiences with Planned Parenthood and we had a couple of calls I want to play one from Nikki this is Mickey from Arlington Texas I relied on Planned Parenthood for regular checkups for about with the flu and for regular pap exams when I was young because I could not afford health insurance I specifically went there because they had a fighting skills I could afford and there was no judgment we know is that an experience that a lot of folks who who a lot of women in particular who use prep Planned Parenthood say that they've had and if so what impact is this change going to have on that sliding scale that Nikki referred to yeah yeah actually our own survey so show that upwards of the third of women in the United States say that they have used a Planned Parenthood because Planned Parenthood gets title ten they are able to offer the sliding scale and because the title ten funds offer the replacement of the cost so that Planned Parenthood is reimbursed for the services that they provide to uninsured and low income women so I'm very sure that the experience that your caller had is very much reflected in experiences of other women as well particularly low income women who don't have the resources to go to a private doctor or other site and we also mentioned that the top that Planned Parenthood has had its own internal struggles recently one of them was a leadership shake up at the very top he talked a little bit about that and whether or not that was connected to planned parenthood's response here that's right so our doctor Lena one has left the organization was that was the president and the First medical doctor to be president in a long time you know that I'm with an issue that is characterized differently obviously by her and by on some within Planned Parenthood she really said that the organization wanted her to be political about abortion in a different way than the way that she wanted to approach it you know other sources when Planned Parenthood told me and told buzzfeed that they were management issues involved too whatever the case actually wouldn't say that that's really the planned parenthood's response here they've pretty much always said that they will not comply with this domestic ag role they really feel that there's no way they can offer a full range of comprehensive family planning without referring for abortion on providing abortions part of that and so they've never been really willing to wherever there so in a with that would this be considered a strategic decision or one that Planned Parenthood was forced into so I think that depends a little bit on who you talk to anti abortion groups will say well Planned Parenthood should just stop providing abortions if they want to provide family planning services planned parenthood's response would be while abortion is potentially pamp family planning service even if it isn't funded by title ten they feel that they can't really provide healthcare which is a core part of what they they feel that they do they feel that they can't do that in an ethical way without being able to talk about the full range of options that patients can have we know it is it a common experience where Planned Parenthood is not just use for women's health but also as a primary care center for a lot of women who don't have insurance or don't have other options well you know a lot of women in during their reproductive years really heavily rebel rely on sites like Planned Parenthood and other family planning providers as their primary source there's that in the past especially the uninsured rate was higher among this group they're generally a very healthy population so they don't need other specialty care so Planned Parenthood and other family planning providers are able to provide the majority of services that they need half past funding cuts led to decreases in services Alina what we've seen that as I mentioned earlier the case of taxes where was was a clear example where that they had far fewer visits and your claims for I you dis contraceptive implants injectables which are the most costly and most effective method so those are examples there are other cases as well in Wisconsin where the state legislature approved family planning cuts which were directed to Planned Parenthood which resulted in the closure of five Planned Parenthood clinics and world areas and they found that even though the women were were referred to other clinics which were further away they had waiting lists and those claims didn't provide the full range of methods so we have examples in the past where that that's happened and we're we've seen decreases in access and we know Planned Parenthood is contesting this in court where does it go from here that's right so I believe the next hearing in the case is scheduled for the week of September twenty third in the ninth circuit so at the end of next month we'll find out more and a north senior reporter at box and Lena south gonna cough director of the women's health policy a Kaiser.

director reporter Anna Lena president forty percent ten percent
"anna lena" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KGO 810

"By the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian a way talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are there are these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. Yeah. I think that brings us very effectively to volition Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The the communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways tickets tickets through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the ballista city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness the Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night check service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After this survey, I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was punched into the darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for many couldn't pass it up. Anyway. Two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl.

Anna Lena ballista city council politica Iowa Henry Moore two hundred years twenty second six days
"anna lena" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

11:39 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"And say, the keyword free bottle. Bill James works for the vises the Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting dichotomy of. Working in the sports world in by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The guy was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blest guy called bliscoll living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bullets converters are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you you can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers who was the circuit writing preachers, the ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that we try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death. It became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community the. That happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. He had always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shot. He said he was tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that man hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I I understand. Understanding the sense. It was important to to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I've I've I don't know there's a lot of difference. But he's still didn't have that reaction to it. Go ahead. No, please. No lot of the book. The book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding. A lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred. They one hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was. What how people lived that? They they lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in spot has a hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they felt love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that happened to happen to us happened to them. And I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their deaths. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible death. But also trying to create a picture of how they live, and and and give the reader an understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town years ago. I think he did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders, you know, as opposed to the traditional way that the crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing, especially when you getting into the fabric of of these communities, and it is it. What is it always takes with me that elevates the point you were just making and that has to do with the the taco in the case of soccer fans. One of them. I think it was Sako had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes one of the crimes committed on December twenty fourth of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had with who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a pickle deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was there was there was conflict in testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under Semper twenty-fourth because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice. Rick couple of days before you eat them. The. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little there's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. Yeah. I think that brings us very effectively Visca Iowa and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. That was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims that the woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity of your six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they.

murder America Bill James Boston Red Sox politica soccer Velazquez city council Iowa England Rian Vert Anna Lena Sako Henry Moore Rick one hundred years fifty sixty years two hundred years
"anna lena" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

09:59 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on WTVN

"To buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The. It's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true talion as the way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light eliminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Visca Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine nineteen twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a dispute between the Liska city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is named as Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house it there's a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to know, former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies eight dead bodies in the house and talents in a small, quiet. Midwestern town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The from the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been she had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later. A conman named Jay Walker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted ballista for even though. Wilkinson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You know, you mentioned that piece about the the person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so, you know, a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people's are. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it sorta make you feel it again, the fact that this crime happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of sentiment. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that people the the chamber of commerce types in Velasco wish to ballista was known for something else. Right. The there is a house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around the Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is that we assign thing where the doctor's house has. But that but where the what is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. The I don't know that it you raise an interesting question. I don't. I know that in any of these cases there was a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people Muslim people without. Without one in the family was very well liked. They were and the community thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers or there's an effort to try to. Like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece net explains everything, you know, that that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains. Crimes the double murder in Colorado Springs, a murder two families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened. Now, the people in that area is still remember it. It's still they they could tell. Yeah, that's a house right there. It's still it has not forgotten many.

murder Frank Jones ballista Felicita Iowa Liska city council Hank Horton Anna Lena Jay Walker Sohn Alaska Wilkinson Colorado Springs Henry Moore Valenica Velasco Liska two hundred years twenty second Two years
"anna lena" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

09:58 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"To buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories. Are there are these little there's a flash of light? That eliminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to ballista Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness is this Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal, and he his name, Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that a crazed murderers hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to no former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies eight dead bodies in the house and launched house in a small, quiet. Western town, the at all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. Imagine the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay Walker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided politica and horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became Kepa badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go to they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Alaska for even though. Raucous was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the that piece about the. The person in whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so, you know, a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people people's feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, it that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it sort of make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a any kind of Morial to the family of their been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wished to ballista was known for something else. Right, right. The there is a the house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around the list, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is now that we assign saying where the doctor's house, but that, but what ballistic is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. The I don't know that it you raise an interesting question. I don't know that in any of these cases there was a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without one in the family was very well liked. They and the community. Thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical. Loyal to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. In an effort to try to. So it doesn't mean you have to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything, you know, that that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains crimes. The double murder in Colorado Springs, emerged two families in one night and joining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened. Now, the people that area is still remember it. It's still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's a house right there. It's still it has not forgotten.

murder Frank Jones ballista politica Alaska Velasco city council Iowa Hank Horton Anna Lena Jay Walker Sohn Colorado Springs Velasco Henry Moore Morial Valenica Santa two hundred years twenty second Two years
"anna lena" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"By the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Visca Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve the lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness is this Sunday night. That was a church service. I a Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the voice murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little.

Velazquez city council Anna Lena Iowa Henry Moore Felicita two hundred years twenty second six days
"anna lena" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

17:03 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on 600 WREC

"R, E C and ninety two point one FM. Bill James works for the vises. The Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing them from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves that we don't like to talk about and going on my talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got up like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bullets murders are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became. Five or six years. So I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that indicates of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit writing preachers, the ministers that would come to these towns on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death, and it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons. And then they will get passed around these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring in even though. Which a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in in the deaths of of somebody that one point, you know, we're popular members of the community. Faded happened. Just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. He had always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about that. But it was it was a shot. He said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow. And I don't know why it was important to him. I understand. Understanding the sense. It was important to to know what had happened, but you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. No, please. No of the book. Book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred Baker two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system is like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived. They lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns two hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies in which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happen to you and million people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their deaths. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Hundred years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. I that's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it that always sticks with me that straight the point you were just making and that has to do with the soccer in the cases, SoKo invented daddy? One of them. I think it was. Doc, oh had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes. What are the crimes was committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a Khalil. Heels because tickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflicting testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on an ice couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that talion American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Iowa and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. There was a church service. I a Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After this survey, I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity your six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house, the uh. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is neighbors. Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to no form of protection. Olding matches in front of a friend of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The match the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay in Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He can keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided fullest and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Liska for even though. Wilkerson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the the person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people are feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is you know, the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of sentiment. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years, the Liska authorities, and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wish to ballista was known for something else. Right, right..

murder America Boston Red Sox Bill James Liska Frank Jones soccer England Iowa Rian Vert Heather Velasco city council Felicita Anna Lena Velasco Baker Hank Horton
"anna lena" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

17:07 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Say, the keyword free bottle. Bill James works for the vises the Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world. Lingers is talking before the top of the hour, but the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing them from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're painting out the and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that just saying that you were presenting the sort of a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. I was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. Because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about and dog on my talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got like a fish. I was I was I saw documentary about the murders. Envelopes guy called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary far above them, mama levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are apart of a series. So I started I was just going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week of actually became five. Five or six years. I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. You can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. It was the it was the preachers was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in the community overall would benefit from his or her death. And became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well, heck, I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they will get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. That happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great aunt had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. Here at always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. It was it was a shot. He said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man had actually that madman haven't actually gotten away with this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Who I understand? It was important to to know what had happened, but you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I've I've I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still have that reaction to. Go ahead. Please. No. A lot of the book book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred they could a hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system is like how fantastically primitive. It was. What how people lived that? They they lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago or often take people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, living he's boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and million people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them. And I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths. But also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town years ago. I think he did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism, and you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders as opposed to the traditional way that the crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you were getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it always sticks with me to the point you were just making and that has to do with the the taco in the case asako invent Zeti? One of them. I think it was SoKo. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes one of the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a pickled eels because tickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflict testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under similar twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice wreck. Couple of days before you eat them the. It's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light that illuminates the details of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Iowa and the the crime story, which the as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. That was a church service. I Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims have the woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June ten is stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes it breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he his name was Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than. Than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. He as dark house he's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to know, former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies there are eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert. And he was instead in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later. A conman named Jay in Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became a badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them. This battle lasted Valenica for even though. Welcome STAN was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the the person whipping up sentiment in making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes at that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people's revealing. Yeah. Yeah, that's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The. Well, there was I don't know that there was that kind of sad about I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that people the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wish to ballista was known for something else. Right..

murder Velasco America Bill James Frank Jones Boston Red Sox Alaska Velasco city council England Iowa Rian Vert Valenica politica Anna Lena ballista Hank Horton STAN
"anna lena" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KTRH

"The pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would. Would never never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Valente Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The the communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the ballista city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims of the woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about one hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was punched into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little.

ballista city council Valente Iowa Anna Lena Henry Moore Felicita two hundred years twenty second six days
"anna lena" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KGO 810

"The pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian the way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's what crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. Yeah. I think that brings us very effectively to Valente Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine nineteen twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness the Sunday night. There was a church service. I a Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims that I've ever the woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity of just six days earlier about one hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. They'll little girl is.

Velasco city council Valente Iowa Anna Lena politica Henry Moore two hundred years twenty second six days
"anna lena" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KTOK

"You listened the more, you know, NewsRadio one thousand KT. Okay. Oklahoma's first news. Bill James works for the advisers the Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour, but the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The was saying that crime stories are fascinating to us because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw documentary about the murders. Envelopes guy called bliscoll living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above them, mama levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are apart of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became we can can the week eventually became. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that indicates of true crime. It was the it was the preachers who was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that we try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death. It became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. On an exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. There was an interesting that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. Here at always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shot. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that that man hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Who I am? Understand the sense. It was important to have to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. I'm punished. I I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead, please. No lot of the book book is about is is all all books. All good books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred. They one hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives in which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me million people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their deaths. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it that always sticks? With me that illustrates the point you were just making and that has to do with the chocolate cases SoKo event. One of them. I think it was Sako had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a pickle deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflicting testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. Stories are these little there's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to volition Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The the communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness is this Sunday night. There was a church service Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity of just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with the their friend. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is name, Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to no form of protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies. There are eight dead bodies in the house and longhouse in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. Imagine the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay and Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry..

murder America Bill James Oklahoma Boston Red Sox Hank Horton England Iowa Rian Vert Sako Velazquez city council Jay politica Valenica Anna Lena Henry Moore one hundred years
"anna lena" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Eight fifty AM and ninety four one FM. Bill James works for the advisers the Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaders is talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting sort of a dichotomy of. Working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliss commercials are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became we can the week eventually became prime. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. You can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit riding preachers ministers. That would come to these towns on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death. And it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody is still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. On an exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. There was an interesting thing that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a great great and had been was one of the victims of crime interesting always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he says it reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about it was it was a shot. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow. And I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I understand I understand the sense. It was important to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I I don't know that there's a lot of different. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. Please. No lot of the book. What book is about is is all all books. All good books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred. They Kurt a hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these. He's murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like help fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lies. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible death. But also is trying to create a picture of how they live and give the reader an understanding of what it was like to be an American small town two years ago. I think you did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is that always sticks? With me that the point you were just making that has to do with the the taco in the case asako and vans. Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a pickle deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was. But there was conflict in testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true Italian as a way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. Stories are they're these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. Yeah. I think that brings us very effectively to volition Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The the communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine nineteen twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the ballista city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness the Sunday night. There was a church service. I Sunday night check service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity of just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with the their friend. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June ten wanna stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he his name was Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than. That a crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun no form of protection, holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of and hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The mansion the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after that the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later, a con man named Jay and Welker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry..

murder America Bill James Boston Red Sox Kurt Sako Iowa England Rian Vert Velasco Hank Horton ballista city council Eddie politica Jay Welker Sohn Anna Lena
"anna lena" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

11:24 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on WLAC

"Bill James works for the advisers. The Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports where linguists talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the man from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of. Working in the sports world it by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The guy was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders. Invalid sky called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became five. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wondered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. It was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death. It became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that one point, you know, we're popular members of the community. The. There was an interesting that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shot. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that man hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Who I? I understand the sense. It was important to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. I'm punished is. I I don't know that there's a lot of different. But you still have that reaction to it. Yeah. I think go ahead. Please no book book is about is is all all books. All good books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred. They Kerr two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me in them. And that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was. What how people lived that? They lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths and also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Years ago. You did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is that always sticks with me that the point you were just making and that has to do with the soccer, the case asako and vans? Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think one thousand nine hundred ninety nine hundred eighteen and he had a he had witnesses who said that on that particular day. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a tickle deals because pickled eagles were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was there was. But there was conflict and testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under Semper twenty-fourth because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The. It's a tiny detail that you would. It would never never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that talion American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are there. These little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to ballista Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness the Sunday night. That was a church service a Sunday night, check service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After this service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was punched into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they.

murder America Boston Red Sox Bill James Velasco soccer Iowa Felicita England Rian Vert Anna Lena Kerr Velazquez city council Sako Eddie Henry Moore two hundred years
"anna lena" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

11:37 min | 2 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Bottle. KFI AM six forty. More stimulating talk. Bill James works for the advisers. The Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world linguists talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're painting out the and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of. Working in the sports world it by day and writing crime that night. The saying that crime stories are fascinating too. Because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about and going on my talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got up like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above them, mama levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious bliscoll murderers are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a we can the week eventually became. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. You can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. Yeah. And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that indicates of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit writing preachers, the ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death. And. Became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfils the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. On an exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. Happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a great great and had been one of the victims of the crime interest. Here always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that yearbook that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was you said he was tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that that van haven't actually gotten away with this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I I understand I understand that it was important to have to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I've I've I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. No, no, please. No lot of the book. Book is about is is all all books. Authored books are search for understanding. A lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred Baker two hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was the. What how people lived? They lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in a hundred years ago living these boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they they got married I fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also trying to create a picture of how they live and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be in a small town. Years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that the crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you were getting into the fabric of these communities. What is it always takes with bated illustrates the point you were just making and that has to do with the taco in case asako and dams, Debbie. One of them. I think it was Sako. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on their Semper? Twenty four of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular day. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community, a tickle deals because tickle deals were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was but there was conflict we testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under similar twenty four because you're never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to volition Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Paliska due to a a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was complete darkness the Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up. Anyway, re the two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they.

murder America Boston Red Sox Bill James KFI Sako Iowa England Rian Vert Anna Lena Paliska Debbie Henry Moore Baker Velazquez city council two hundred years fifty sixty years
"anna lena" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"anna lena" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Know article is kind of a because it never happened of never having is governed daily mail so it's gon anna lena tower and be suspended for main or getting asteroid thirty one thousand miles away and the only way to leave is by parachute or drop it i don't quite understand how the we think there's a good happened yeah i mean let's just say forget the building for a second from him what i want to take how it did get over thirty one thousand miles with the twine if we're going to happen however gonna with on this that's a mom story it does seem i get it seems like thank knows yes you know middle build like of of our plan of a flying city but there seems more doable them the world on the it's that's mountain into it is the colts and their craft this summer decision drummond it seemed like a big waste about comment erlin asteroid good you know why don't we first start with column nice thing the asteroid can you set up attempts hammock only asteroid he can we start there the idea that we're going to go to the asteroid and build something that'll be suspended thirty one thousand miles down doesn't make after that and they have illustration so a real architecture firm has come out but this irving urban city it just entrenched in a so someone way should all the time it took to drum a drawings i'm sure it may as well do like to one of the the mood elevator that and it has also been you know cost around a little bit sure this kid megan elevator all the way to memphis the radical designed what's creative mike clough architecture office which also the mastermind behind proposals for a mars house and a cloud city the firms latest designed will overturned they established skyscraper type college iii as a build from the sky down instead of the ground up though the course of history humanity has been able to it through the course of history humanity has been able to affect the environment on increasing scales and now they'll be able to do that it will travel any figure a pattern as we discussed the past they have such did just a how it's going to happen though the things that are going to happen a figure a pattern it'll pass over major cities said just panama.

anna lena tower colts drummond memphis panama irving mike clough