17 Burst results for "Ann Druyan"

"ann druyan" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

04:34 min | 6 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Science Salon

"Different. It is to. Let's go. We liked it not to be able to hold my loved ones in my arms but but apart from that I mean is this the beginning of something the how you know obviously a great economic cost but we are living without things that we thought we couldn't live without right right yes. I have a feeling this is going to be a major game changer. For our generation for to come it could be a lot. More stuff is done remotely education media interviews like this people are kind of figuring out how to set up their their house and the camera. And where does the light go and you know really thought about any of that and it's fine. I'm fine watching the news and these talk shows with the guests not being there in the studio. Who Cares were there. Well I want to be mindful of your time. We've been going in an hour and a half and and But I want to get your thoughts on. What your next big project. How do you? How do you top three Cosmos does most for Disney? My voice? Yeah I I have a fourth cosmos in mind and we'll see what happens but I do have a Each Cosmos has kind of the Matic Even though the episode very different from each other. There's a some kind of theme running through all of them and Sam Sagan and I have a have I come up with an idea and Sam made a debt much better and so I'm hoping I've been saving stories encountering books journals in everywhere and we'll see what happens. I hope to be able to do another one. I think I have another one in me and some other ideas and other projects. I'm excited about. I hope you do a much. Does it cost to produce a thirteen part series like cosmos? I mean I have no idea. It's very expensive and I think not supposed to divulge it's I don't know but What I what I'd rather say is that Fox in National Geographic in both season two and season three have been the most generous partners in. You're giving me the money that I thought was necessary. In order to have the production values. The visual effects are so magnificent. All the time and be nine hundred eighty seven people. We counted the while on this show in about a dozen countries so so rather even divulge how much it cost. I don't know if they care about this but but the hell Just to say that it was a struggle for years before season to to find a network that would give me created control in the wherewithal to make this show and It wasn't presented Farley. It never would have happened. And so Deeply thankful to my dear friend. Yeah he's a great guy he's a. He's a become a friend of sorts. He was a fan of the book. The moral arc and we want to produce a you know a series like that not quite like cosmos but but something different but sometimes it takes to someone like him who has the connections and the and the power with with the media to do something and And to their credit I think although they wouldn't have done it a second time had it not been a market success that is people watched and they have to have that because it's a business so that's encouraging that millions of people want this content. Yes yes and the more people see it the more want it and so at. It's tremendously encouraging and exciting. Yeah well good luck with that. I can't wait to see that. I guess it's about three or four years to to bring this online. Yeah it's it's quite a project. It takes me three years to research write and produce a book so at a TV series too. That it's probably it's probably five years. No but Michael. What am joy? It's been to reconnect. I've really enjoyed our conversation wonderful..

Sam Sagan Disney Farley Fox Michael
"ann druyan" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

09:02 min | 6 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Science Salon

"The likelihood that this tiny world was the focus of the creator of the universe is attention and he went on and on these great demotions that sciences handed the Carl was speaking about. Why do we have left? How do we find meaning and Carl without hesitating looked at this man and said do something meaningful and those words echoed in my heart? Ever since that inspiration. Yes we are. We live like Maith lies. We live for one hundred years on the luckiest side of things. But we're here now. You know I'm really struck by something in my daughter. Spot in Sasha's say book in which she speaks about the whole history of the universe and the whole potential future of the universe and here we are in this moment if we could feel that instead of always looking forward to that vacation or that something here now and grants to love each other now and if we do it right then we can come to accept. The natural course of things tend to think of it. Like whether there's an afterlife or not is irrelevant because we lived in there. We live here now and I think people mistake the idea of finding purpose. Like it's a thing you find instead of a process that you just go through right you don't you don't get there. There's no there to get there. It's just right now. This is it. You're doing it. That's right that's right Something you said really sparked an idea which is immediately fled. But I agree with you yes. It's a process but it's also the small things that we begin to do that. Become you know I feel like are are are just remember what I wanted to say. Yes the most pernicious aspect of the idea of an afterlife is that it renders this life to be disposable and that's the most wicked thing about it to me. Is that here? We all those generations of people living their one and only lives in constant fear of the punishment that was coming for them. Like the child whose waiting for the angry started to come home and beat them up so tragic robbing all of the beauty of life on its natural joy. I call this Alevis. Lv SANGER was woody Allen's character in Annie Hall where is Flash Back to his childhood? We REFUSES TO DO HIS HOMEWORK. Because the universe is expanding. And when it's all going to blow up and and his mother upgrades and says you know what the universe got to do. Is We live in Brooklyn and Brooklyn's not expanding so you have to you know that that's it theologian that says well if there's No God and there's no ultimate outside source that says this is right and that's wrong then. Then what difference does it make that? Hitler gassed the Jews. Or or that. I beat my neighbor. Whatever what differences and make it makes a difference to those people then and there and why do you need a billion years from now for it to matter? You know. That's what I am wondering on in life too? Yeah right I wanna hit a bunch of the of the great topics. Because you're such an interesting thinker. So this is what triggered the hard problem of consciousness. You've got this image in the book of your heart rate and dreams. Br Brainwave sorry and how art sounds recorded. June nineteen seventy seven right. After he fell in love with called June. First Nineteen seventy seven right. I was the gay that we had that wonderful phone call. But at this recording I think was made onto third just two days later. So instant Magin you know sh you know my heart is still. I mean for you know still that way. So can you could imagine. It's like the first. Three seconds of the origin of the universe ended still expanding. But you know how intense that people said. They don't believe in love at first sight. That's not true. Sometimes that happens right away because we had worked together for years. Okay right right there were lambing I do. I think some people do fall in love instantly but I think what happens when people say that they're talking about that. Instantaneous magical attraction you have for a person but then all these other processes have to take place in order for it to to really be love. I mean it's you know it's attraction it. I love it for site if both people are up to you right here might the extraterrestrials in another part of the Milky Way galaxy some five billion years from now be able to interpret joy contained therein. Well I can see that as a possibility in as much as we're already able to interpret certain brainwaves as representing this pattern or that image or or whatever but the hard problem of consciousness is not that it is the experience that you had. It doesn't matter what it looks like on a brainwave. The actual internal subjective feeling. That's the hard problem of consciousness. I just want to get your thoughts on that. What is the explanation? Maybe there is no explanation. Maybe it's just It's sort of a fundamental principle of the universe that we have these subjective feelings and I can never get inside your head to know what you feel when you feel eleven and by and vice versa. I can't know what it's like to be a bat and so forth But but it's when your thoughts on the hard problem. I don't think it's harder problem because I think it all has the material basis and therefore it's noble at we. Don't we're not able to know these things right now? But remember when I asked Karl in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven if I were to meditate for an hour and have my heart brain everything. All of those signals are recorded. Would it be conceivable that the extraterrestrials could understand what what message I was sending and he said well you know billion years a long time any go do it but the fact is is that in the time since Carl's Dad? Only in the last forty years we have begun to be able to make it possible for people who are paralyzed to actually send messages with their brains with their eyes to a computer and that computer can correctly interpret. What they what their will is to me once you can do that. You're you've come a long way towards decrypt ing and maybe you know. Look if my joy. What is my joy on that day? It's just a collection of molecules atoms but arranged in a specific way and maybe there are possible ultimately to quantify or to to apprehend what the nature of that joy is. Maybe when we are deeply truly madly in love me our brains you know make kind of music. That is able to be interpreted. I don't rule that out. Maybe an emergent property atoms molecules unless you're paying psych EST atoms and molecules don't feel anything feel anything but we do and we're made of that so the we as we often say in Cosmos we are away for the universe to know itself where away for those atoms and molecules to know themselves. That's you know we. What was the famous scientists? Said you know A physicist isn't atoms way. Making you know someone you can understand atoms. And that's that's really that's what's going on here. You also deal with free. Will I love how you guys hit all the big questions? So but in that chapter in that episode of Cosmos. You tell the story after going through all of the deterministic causal factors that basically make bees. Do what they do and cockroaches all the way up to primates in US and then you end with telling the story of Asako Who is this Crazy mean psychopathic. Autocratic dictator genocidal murder. Who then becomes kind of a spiritual leader and has his total.

Carl Maith Sasha Brooklyn woody Allen US physicist murder Annie Hall Hitler Karl
"ann druyan" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

07:52 min | 6 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Science Salon

"Six seven in the morning and so I was A location in Santa Fe for months at a time Because we were shooting on those big sound stages the air and so it had a kind of You know I just couldn't even actually believe that I would get it doug I it just like such a tremendous challenge and yet I do feel like it's my way of like when someone dies then you love them with all your heart. How can you can you do after that when you're no longer able to perceive anything that you do and when you're most principal joy for twenty years before that has been to see them happy and so? I guess both Cosmos and All the work I've done since in a way is my way of demonstrating at least how much I truly just revere. An Adour Carl's memory and that really believe that because I knew him so well and I knew that it wasn't the appearance or the facade but it was really who he was completely threw himself that I feel I guess I just I want not only one a bear witness but also because the values that we shared were still completely harmonious and I you know. Part of the greatest heart of Lutheran. Kara is that we need a car right now. They're need a car right now. So badly and With enormous respect or so many wonderful committed communicators of science. I feel the Carl really occupied. What remains an unintended ecological The closest thing I can say to to him leaving people is Jane Goodall because she not only took the science of primatology and completely brought it to a much higher level than ever been before but also felt that that that calling of citizenship to to keep at flame burning and to touch as many lives as possible. Yeah I think of Carl's ecumenical nature of of being able to deal with people of religious nature. Even though he was an atheist or he was a Democrat I assume but he worked with Republican administrations and scientists and so forth. I think it would be more of a challenge today maybe to do that across that. Divide for so much more divided. It feels like now than than say yes. We are more divided and for good reason because you know in order to be undivided. There has to be some kind of the polarity. Can't be so extreme. That one side falls off the edge you know. And that's that's you know that tension at balance was more possible when and when the other side was outrageous or you know complete less less willing to take all the norms and standards and completely trashed them at so. It's like bed whole idea. You know and also in terms of climate change you know the old the old journalistic approach of. Let's hear from both sides. You know these things became less tenable right before we get off the the the whole grief thing. I wanted to pull back a little bit with the rise of the nuns. A quarter of all Americans have no religious affiliation. A third of millennials. No RELIGIOUS AFFILIATIONS. Probably forty percent of. Gen xers Gen Z. I. Jenner's And spirituality is on the rise and other areas but not religion and you know humanism is increasing and saw. What do we say to somebody who has lost somebody? Who is that? They were in love with or they. They themselves are dying. You don't believe in God you don't believe in an afterlife you know there's always kind of perennial question of what what we nonbelievers say or think or how to how to sort of convey our sensibilities about this without seeming colder or mean spirited. Short of saying you know. Hey there's no heaven that's it so too bad. Obviously we're not gonNA say anything like that. Give us your thoughts about you. Know how to deal with loss. Death Grief and so on in a materialist atheist worldview or humanist worldview nonreligious worldview. What are we WANNA call it? Well all I can say is even though I completely plead guilty to have having been truly suicidal in the aftermath Karlstad. The thing that has comforted me and inspired me to do. My work inspired me. I hope to be the best possible mother and daughter that I could've been was the fact that I felt that when I was with Carl. I gave it everything I had I had. No you know no memories to regret. I had no feel egging we. You were a delirious about being together and I had no resentments. I know you know they all they had. Was this feeling that if I could only have data retrieval access to every moment that we spent together think of how great that would be. I could spend the next twenty years. Just reliving that and that was my only regret was that I knew that is great as I remembered it they were so many Tuesday nights you know that I had forgot and so for me. The idea is this is that look. We're all GONNA die. That's just the way it is and that's nature in fact when I think of people who are trying to live forever. I feel sorry for them because I think they're missing the basic point of life in nature so as Emily Dickenson said that it cannot come again is what makes life so sweet so you know if I can get back into nineteen sixties youth and say. Be here now be here now. Finding the beauty in this day find a beauty and this enforced `isolation of the corona virus find spine. Something to do. I was just thinking last night of what I consider to be. One of Karl's greatest speeches which was on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday at Cornell University in Bailey off and the speech was a tour de force a just breathtaking. People were on the edge of their seats. Pin Drop silence and then the question is came up and one of the questionnaires said now that you've taken everything from us. Our centrality.

Adour Carl Jane Goodall principal Santa Fe Kara Gen Z. I. Jenner Emily Dickenson Cornell University Karl Bailey
"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

11:32 min | 7 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"To explain an idea to someone else and he did it to communicate. Connect never have to intimidate. And that's why he was such a great teacher and I also feel no lie. Grandparents were very religious. Really I mean they were Orthodox Jews and you know if Gerry Ford touched a meat fork. They'd have to bury it in the backyard. They were like they never ever know. My even when my grandfather was dying of cancer he ride on the Sabbath They were devout to the extreme and yet they were two of the most enlightened people that I've ever known Sir particularly my grandmother who had a kind of wisdom and goodness That was transcended. She never you know I've told this story before But the great legacy that my grandparents gave me. Is that my father as I said earlier. Most he was teacher of Love Creek person but he didn't believe in God whereas parents were devout and yet there was no conflict between that you know I never saw. My father gives my grandparents a dirty look even though my father was highly educated and his parents were not he had almost no totally loving respect for them so I feel how did you navigate this hour. Is it possible that you have to this conflict free relationship and yet grandma and GRANDPA leaves so fervently and you don't believe at all when he said it was? After my first year of college I came home on the subways to GRANDPA's house. Grandma's house and I found my father deep in prayer. He was wrapped in tolerant. He was wearing black trees and he was running. He was praying with his eyes closed. Moving backward and forward do you even know I was there. I get stood there shaking. He when he opened his eyes when he was finished he saw me and he looked at me as if I were the answer to his prayers. And he's doing out to impress me that I should know and from my father telling stories I said no pop. No I've got something to say. We said okay. You said my father did not gonNA keep kosher anymore. I'M GONNA ride on shopping on the Sabbath Not GonNa go to shore to temple anymore not GonNa do any of those things because it's all bs and I don't believe it. I said why did crap I say and my father told me. He looked at me and he said well the only sin would beat and pretend that is you know that's what my grandparents gave me. Was you know no desire to inflict their beliefs on anyone else? Respect for everyone respect for their sons ovation his right to find his way in the cosmos. That is such a beautiful thing and it's something that it stayed with me ever since my daughter has written about putatively in her new book For small creatures such as we fascists Sagan. But that's the that's like the family crest. You only say would be to pretend when I met Carter and I discovered how important in West to hand it mattered. What was true. That was kind of echo when I had loved him. My grandparents and I just feel that there are many ways to be human and many ways she make your way life and the world did I. Dream is a place where we're all free to do so without intimidation or fear honestly and you leave me speechless when when we speak. I'm just so overwhelmed with the kind of profundity of your words and I just hope that everybody who's listening really takes a minute to breathe and to internalize that story because it really is. I think fundamental to all of it you know I. It's it's foundational to everything we've been talking about. I hate that. Were were basically out of time. And you've been so generous and giving me. I know in giving me the time that you had. I'm wondering if I can ask you. You know when I when I closed my episodes each week. I always ask my guests the same two questions and Oh yes because I think more than anybody. I'm interested in your responses to these. So you know. I'm wondering when you think about the future which you do all the time in your writing and in your research Number One. What is the thing that truly does keep you up at night? If you had to pick one thing what are you you know. Walk worried out pessimistic about. It's really not looking good. And then on the flip side of that if you had to pick another what. Are you truly fundamentally and and just deeply optimistic about what? Are you looking forward to okay? Well the thing that keeps me up awake at night as the tragedy the criminality of our leadership and the idea that my granddaughter may have to live in a world that is not healthy and beautiful. And you know in good as as if what they should have that keeps me up at night. The idea that we will you know. Continue this flight from reality and continue to value money over Water Air. Our climate the things that we need to live as an organism. This is the entry level requirement for any life form. The Matt is adaptation and the need the need to change In order when the environment changes and we're failing that miserably and I just feel that the last three years have been great heap backwards into I don't even think of the nineteenth century. I think it's like more like the sixteenth century. If we continue this this flight from reality and this failure abject failure to to do what we have to do to protect the planet And you know and our civilization then I really. I really worry about that. I think we feel very guilty. Makes me feel like we are failing You know as humans and I don't want that to happen The thing that I look forward to what you know the thing I notice really corny but the thing that I look forward to the most if you know see being with my family. It's really my kids. Their kids their partners That's to me the greatest joy of life and At this point in my life. That's the thing I most look forward to So you know it's a simple thing but it's true in terms of science in high technology near what I look forward to is learning learning more learning more about nature and many more about the merger cosmos. That's something that makes it. You know really excites me. I'm optimistic because as I said I'm seventy and I come from world that in many respects with even than the one we live in now and you know that was a time when it wasn't no extremists and people who everyone recognized as being Foolish said horrible things about women in anyone with different from them. And I've lived to see this time which I'm very I you know I have a metric yardstick of my life and while I know we're not where we need to be. We certainly haven't gotten all the way to where we should be a change in the great middle in view of the great middle which is really important because that can you fantasy change in the culture in the view of the people who are not arranged to those those those ugly verity of my youth or no longer the problem and so as I say we still have a long way to go. But I'm optimistic because I've seen those changes. They're very real to me. And if we can change on that level then there's nothing we can do as I said. We're any gaps species and no in some fence in this technological adolescence of ours and with terrible adolescent like 'cause my parents and worry It was wild and crazy and and yet I matured into productive human being and I. That's how I see. Our civilization were in that technological adolescence. Everyone looks hope hopeless and adolescence. But we're not hopeless and we're not power you know we have to do is awakened and and I just WanNa thank you so much for so many things not just taking time out of your schedule to share with us today but for the incredible work that you do honestly for being who you are and being unafraid to share that with the world because I am a testament to and cannot deny that there must be so many more people especially young women out there like me who are fundamentally changed because because of who you are and what you've done so I just want to thank you so much from the bottom of my heart..

Gerry Ford GRANDPA Grandma Love Creek Carter
"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

14:42 min | 7 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"R. dot com and use the Promo Code nerdy guy. Let's get to the show. Is that really the motivation behind all of it? I mean you know when when you had the opportunity to do yet a third cosmo series you know what in your mind told you not. Just Oh that could be fun even though. I imagined it took years. But what in your mind told you? This is necessary now. I need to do this. Why why does the series matter not just to the People? Watch it but to you personally why does it matter while the inspiration for me in conceding the series for this season was how dystopia and I'll of popular culture and I don't fault the artists who create popular culture because already reflection of of reality and we all feel the darkness and the encroaching this shadow over future? It's real climate the ruining of environments the loss of Biodiversity. The-there all wheel challenges. But you know somehow yelling. We're all GONNA die doesn't seem like a great motivator and It's not because we all know it. You know even those of us who are in denial some part of us knows and so I thought well you know the problem is not. It's not so much telling everyone how urgent the need for solutions to these problems really. Is that at this at this? Low Point in human self esteem. What's needed is a great dream of future. Not You know pie in the sky an empty promise but I really do believe that Train Service. Not Without a great dream of the future. It's really hard to persuade a kid. You think the hard work required to know something deeply to become a scientist or engineer or mathematician or teacher. These you know you have to believe there is a future and what you have to have a dream but it might be Lake He. Should you know Karl? Five years old when he was taken to the nineteen thirty nine New York world's Fair Mary core family struggling paycheck to paycheck and pass that fair. He discovered that there was such a thing called the future and the only way to get there with science and that was he was on his lifelong trajectory at that moment. And so one of the great fun.

Karl Lake He New York Train Service scientist engineer
"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

15:36 min | 7 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"And in some sense. I was the bridge Another Bridge to to the rest of who might have felt intimidated or excluded from science. And the Oh you know I mean the thing about love. If that it's seamless you know so often I would say God that mind in a book that we had written together or in cosmos contact or anywhere he would say any. That was your line and I said No. I'm sure it was. It was it was just seamless. I mean we thought if we went bruening tuned the waters like see mammals like a pair of sea mammals. You know that we once observed In the South Pacific. They've been sort of riding the wave Off The bow to in parallel great at a pretty good clip and we relying on the deck looking over the edge and looking at them and marveling at how perfectly they were in tune and then all of a sudden the two of them peeled off made a you know a restaurant as this. They had been perfect communication without you know without any any communication that we were aware and collected them and he said that's us any and that was the feeling chest you know. We're flying through this view from live together in harmony and you know communicating. No sometimes we'd be looking at each other on an evening and then I would be looking him and I thought I knew what he was thinking and I would ask him to write it down on a slip of paper and then I would say what I thought or more often than not I was right and You know it was just that that Ben Total communication and love makes possible and when I say I don't necessarily only mean romantic loss. Pay Mean lobbying in the sense of just completely opening yourself up to something and giving it everything you've got it really is I think in some ways obviously it so special in some ways I worry that that idea or even that connection feels very four into a lot of people you know a lot of people might put it on a pedestal and say what they had nobody else seems to have or or it's something different than what we understand. Yeah I don't mean first of all ever suggests that because I really believe that love is left but I don't. You know wouldn't suggest for minute that we were the only two people whoever had it because I've known a lot of people who I suspected understood and had experienced that. But you know the reason. I think that both of us were able to achieve this together once because our parents were virtually identical even though they were very unusual people. They weren't too in the sense that they were you know they were For the most part that three of the four of them were born in abject poverty and bootstrap themselves up and their families lifted them out of poverty but his parents his father and my father were two new minute figures of such kind of you know we thought that Ms Bodey sat for us. has You know they were two guys worked in the garbage is correct and approximately the same age Harry and San and yet you wherever they wet light up a room. They were kind they were. They were thoughtful. He He loved love. We're very special. And both of our Bothers Pearl. Racial were victims of circumstance of their time of the fact that they were both brilliant and yet could not find a means of expression for their brilliant. They felt rejected unhurt. Hurt angry and they were very angry and they. They channel their genius. Because they didn't have a you know a constructive means of expression of their genius those into Into making Carl and meet the people became in curiosity and our interest in literature. And why in the world you know the world. I mean they were very inquisitive and naturally curious. I'd also either time Carlin. I met each other. We already spoke the same idiom because of the way we have been loved by our parents and so it was really a portable mini thing to bring together and she realized how Simone they were in their extraordinariness nece and And also you know eat meat. Our lives together that much closer and both my parents. My parents lived across the road during So most you know. Most of the twenty years we were together and then And if parents lived with us for the last year that their lives so we went through all of us were very close and I think that had a lot to do with you know with how successful our relationship and also with how much you know you could hear yourself through his words Edmund really vice versa. Because it's not just cosmos which will will come back to but also you guys co wrote several books together as well yes and that was really fun because you know. I'm sitting in the same place in the same house where we wrote those books and I looked down to this place. Where among the trees where Carl would sit ten months out of the year even though was in upstate New York you know where the winters are pretty tough but he left to work outside and I would sit in my office in our house and be watching him deep in thought I would be sitting and writing. We divvy up in chapters of our books. Of course I couldn't do the highly technical scientific parts that was all him but I certainly could do History and once I just stood the science and the stories of the scientists. I could tell them and the end of the day I would bring him my work he would give me is work and it was so exciting funny with a mother offering and it was just a thrilling to him when I was really excited about what he Britain and vice versa. It was just you know that was part of the joy you know. I think that that one of the reasons that I personally have such a strong emotional reaction when I hear you speak and when I read your words is is really this kind of fun to fundamental psychology. That it's almost inevitable when it comes to role model and I think a lot of the reason that people resonate so much for certain people is a because they have broad appeal but b because we see something of ourselves or our potential In these individuals and the truth of the matter is there are a lot of parallels that? I notice when I think about some of my early careers and I want to kind of. Come back to the skepticism parallel. In a minute but I'm mentioning it so I remember 'cause if I don't I'll forget but the other two are that you know I I've been working with National Geographic for many years as as a science communicator. Among on one of their more recent television shows back in the day I worked for years on. Kcet show which is a PBS affiliate in La and that's of course original Cosmos and right and it's funny because this this reminds me of I think a fundamentally important question which it which has to do with the American landscape of scientific programming. So you know. My background is science. I've worked in SICOM FOR NOW. Maybe about twelve years writing podcasting but doing a lot of TV and one of the things that I so struggle with and that frustrates me so much. Is that often? When you speak to television producers and executives there seems to be little to no appetite for depth for context for a slow and steady and beautiful and poetic journey into you know really difficult scientific concepts in history and people are much more interested in in this modern time in something. That's quick like these digestible tidbits. At News you can use but what you have been able to do through your whole career. Is that beautiful thing that you've shown time and time again. People have a hunger for yet. You seem to be one of the only people who who is doing it. Is that true? I I mean it's funny. I compare like Canadian and maybe programming in the UK especially and you do see more of like you've got the admiral's than the Brian Cox's but here in the US like what's going on and a like. How is Cosmos able still thrive it? Now you're on the Third Iteration Cosmos Possible Worlds. Of course the last one also cosmos the space time out of see both with Neil degrasse Tyson through national geographic and Fox but But you compare that to the backdrop of Mo- science programming right now. It's so different. And it's so exactly what the what the TV executives say they don't want and then yet it's like hugely successful and incredibly impactful. You Know I. I wouldn't have been a second cosmos a second season of Cosmos without Seth Macfarlane really that was the watershed that was the lynchpin was whatever. That's what made it possible. And it was meeting thefts and finding out from him that he thought you know. This was an amazing thing that apart from his parents no two people had been a greater influence on him. Then carling me which I found really having watched family guy for years before before I met him I was really the lightest. You hear it so to me. Took me to Fox to Peter. Rice and He he literally said I will pay for the pilot out of my own pocket. Please pass on Fox and Peter. Rice hadn't seen me original series to just stop just missed it by his age group and so he he agreed to watch it and he made his kids watch it than they initially thought. He was torturing them but They eat started getting calls at the office. Same Daddy. Can WE WATCH COSMOS TONIGHT. Which was really astonishing. Because as as you very you know the original cosmos especially moves had a different pace. It's a whole different metabolism then then. Tv is now and it was then after watching the whole series with his kids. He's probably into his office and he said I'm ordering thirteen out and I said don't you? WanNa don't you WANNA PILOT? And he was like that's your pilot. And he pointed to the original cosmos a personal voyage. Dvd and bath and he talks and then National Geographic in partnership with Fox. They gave me complete freedom. I never had to change a line but this entirely scripted series. I never never. They didn't there. Were you know their factors would raise questions? And in some cases I was glad really glad they give made mistakes. And when I say I for the series I have my my writing. Partner has been Fred and Braga defeats in and was Stephen Soda or original partner for the second season but we never had to change the line and there was no pressure from them of any kind and so it was a tremendous experience and it was very successful all around the world. Our new series possible worlds. It's going to be premiering. In a hundred and seventy two countries around the world. And that's just an amazing fact even though it's a really tiny planet that's a lot of country and It's just it gives me a you know such a a real to think of it we've You know it's it's really exciting. I've been very ridiculously lucky. My life over the whole life is being amazingly less than fortunate and so now this is part of that bad that great walk that I've had that I got to do these seasons of Cosmos. The way I want to do them and I was working with nine hundred. Eighty six other people and I ne- not number for vice -ly because we counted them up and every one of them brought to it a kind of devotion willingness to really stretch and do things the above and beyond because they told me that it was so exciting to be doing something that could be meaningful. That really could have a positive effect on a very troubled planet. So I mean I can't tell you. How lucky ARA GUYS? Don't want to take a quick break to thank the sponsors of this week's episode starting with Key Week. Oh I've talked about them before I'm talking about them again because I love Kiko so much. This is a company that creates super cool hands on projects and toys that are designed to expose kids to concepts in science technology engineering.

Fox Carl Another Bridge Rice South Pacific Seth Macfarlane Neil degrasse Tyson Ben Total Ms Bodey Carlin San Simone New York Edmund UK Britain US La
"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

14:08 min | 7 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Very special guest this week and I just WanNa Start and by saying that. I'm so grateful that you are taking some time out of your day to talk with me. two main reasons number one is that you've been like an absolute inspiration for me throughout my career as a scientist but also as a science communicator and number two because this is a special day because this is my three hundred episode on. Talk Nerdy and I can't think of a better way to celebrate that than to have one of my heroes as a guest on the show. Well cast thank you. And congratulations three hundred. That's a real achievement. Well done thank you so you know. I don't even know where I really WanNa start but I was. I was thinking about this the other day and I was struggling a little bit. Personally with how to broach certain questions with you and I thought well I think the best way to handle this is to just ask you outright and that really is sorry if I'm not as eloquent as you typically are when I try to ask this question because maybe it's a little bit awkward. Maybe it's not but you know you hear a lot of people know you for your work but a lot of people also know you because of your relationship to your late husband Carl Sagan and you know as a as a kind of a very progressive feminist thinker. One of the things that so important to me is that when we have these conversations we have these conversations about the amazing things that you do and how you came to do them but I almost feel like the story might be incomplete without references and mentions to Carl and so it's a complicated conversation to be had as we go through this This episode together. Because I never quite know what your relationship is or your comfort level is. Obviously you talk about your late husband in such beautiful loving terms and you know when. I read what you've written and when I listened to the interviews that you've done it's so apparent to everybody how deep your love and admiration and respect was and how incredible your relationship was but you of course at the same time or your own woman and are such an accomplished Scientific thinker and writer and storyteller at that so. I'm not really sure what my question is except like. Is this something that you ever grapple with your original assertion that in some way the story begins with a car is absolutely correct and in fact you know I'm seventy two. I came of age and time of utter contempt for women. You know I when I was a girl. I remember watching television every night and the main topic of humor with derision of women that was that was the line that would always get a laugh. How beautiful women are. And that was very painful to me. and You know I stopped unheard disrespected. And it really wasn't. Until until Carl changed my life that I from loud to finish the sentence and that was a surreal. Because he was a man who was you know even though he was born in? Nineteen thirty four console. Many men of at that vintage were so blind to the sexism and homophobia and racism of that time somehow emerged free of those poisons. He really loves everyone. Oh human and he made none of those none of those penny bias if he had none of them. I Carl as the person who is a newly minted post. Docs from Harvard. And what does he do? He goes to teach in all black colleges in the south of course on the search for intelligent life on earth. Wow can you imagine how resonant that was in nineteen sixty one that perspective He didn't need. I didn't need anyone really. Oh to show him the way in that regard and I know many scientists who are women who told me that Carl was the. The first scientist had a meeting and a professional meeting to to to actually complement them. Encourage them Take seriously their science in what they were saying he was he was a person markedly free of those of those toxins and That's one of the reasons why I look upon my time with him. As being you know the gates of the wonder world opening up to love someone who who really was interested in exploring the possibilities of love without limits someone burr whom it really mattered. What was true. Not just in the science that he get in the way that he lived his life You know I I know I sound like I'm painting a picture of his saint and I don't mean to. He was completely human. But I just think that quality of being so awake to a promise of what Real Equality Real Los You know that just that openness at an and that desire to be happy more You know then then other things that was so he was clear in in the way he wasn't a hus- Pinch and as a father and the son now he wasn't born that way it took a lot of growth and learning but he was willing to learn and so You know I say that. If people could have known him as our family did they would be even more in all of him because he wasn't just a courageous scientist in Pathfinder and science and in that and it's one of the great teachers but he was also a human being so not and And how so compelling so yes. I'm proud of my work. I'm so proud of the Work Carlin. I did together for twenty years and because it was indivisible from our luxury each other it was in fact another way of making love was thinking together and writing together but but I also am very proud of what I've been able to accomplish census Jack and And very proud of of of our family and children and the people who gave the calm and are becoming so Yeah I have no problem. Referencing Carl I know you know that I would have been a brighter anyway. But Colonel Colonel Gave me love I'm searching for truth not absolute truth but searching for and being honest because it matters what's true and she taught me and I really didn't know that before I knew him interesting so I mean. Obviously it's very hard to to know things in hindsight but you know that you would have been a writer. Do you think that you would have been focused on science? The way that you happen throughout your career probably not probably not. I had become interested in the history of science before I met. Carl and I became completely and I'm just crazy about the pre socratic philosophers. Because I I came at that. Not Interested in science but to an interest in philosophy and politics and You'd be first. Materialists ancient Greece spattered on the island of Ionia. They wouldn't have I people who were looking for and natural cause for All phenomenon that we witnessed and they wouldn't allow themselves To get off the hook. I saying it's the will of the gods the lead feature with knowable that is such a revolution and to me so valuable not only scientifically but also politically and philosophically. Because if you strip away all that mythology when you and you begin to see humans as being part of a Greek global family and you stop thinking in terms of the whims of kings. You know anything can happen. And then the and the power and genius women can be can be liberated. That's only possible. If you demystify the you know the the mythology that we've had since the agricultural invention of agriculture so Yeah I love those guys. I don't I was lousy. Science student was distracted. I couldn't do the math teacher. Chew tell me. I was inevitable but Truly adversely tears. But you know that that was all that was all in in my in my youth in my childhood and And then I had the great good fortune to meet Carl into and to begin to learn leave him and I was always so proud of the fact that he was very quick to correct people. When we would we would. Carl taught me He would wanna tell them what I taught him. And so that was a that was just. It was just amazing to be with someone who was craze for poetic scientific so learning and so patient so yeah I know I just I just thinking about Carl's still makes me feel one happy good grateful. Gosh. That's so beautiful. You know I think about people who are sort of in my age bracket my generation younger. So I'm thirty six years old. Which means that when the first when the cosmos a personal voyage aired. I was not born yet. I was born in one thousand nine hundred three so this aired in the first time in one thousand nine hundred eighty. Yeah and so. You know a lot of people my age. Who Know Carl? No Carl through rewatching cosmos. But they may not have seen many interviews with him at the time because they weren't contemporary with him. You know I have a tattoo on my ribs that says we are away for the cosmos. So I you know. This is taken away from Cosmos and I listened to you talk in in a contemporary way and I hear him in cosmos a personal voyage through your words. There's a poetry and a careful beautiful thoughtfulness to your word choice and your turn of phrase that is very I think you know symbolic of both the original Cosmos and the way that Carl spoke but also to some extent still in the more recent ones. Although there's this mix with how Neil speaks as well and I guess I am wondering how much of that scripting and that that beautiful science meets poetry. That's so that's so specifically cosmos. How much of that is you. How much of that is. Did you both speak this way? Always or did you influence each others the way that you you talk. Well that's a great question. I don't know if I'm the best person to answer it. Because of course my bias ego and all those things but but you know I I really think that if you look back at Carl's earlier books I mean. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for the dragons of Eden. And while I you know I knew Carl Van I certainly. We were not together and it wasn't kind of relationship so he was already well on his way to you. Know to Being one of the foremost if not be exponents of and public outreach but I do think that the voice of Cosmos is something that we developed together with Steven Soda and And you originally theories when we were writing together which was so one of the great experiences because You know I was alone. Non Scientists.

Carl Carl Sagan scientist Carl Van I writer Pulitzer Prize Greece Colonel Colonel Harvard Ionia Steven Soda Neil
"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:06 min | 7 months ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Everyone and welcome to talk nerdy. Today is Monday march. Twenty Third Twenty. Twenty and I'm the host of the show Cara Santa Maria now. It's a strange time. Obviously everybody's really aware of that and it's a pretty bitter sweet time because Today were celebrating the three hundredth episode of Talk Nerdy. Which is a big achievement. That immodestly really proud of that means that I've been doing the show because I take two weeks off every Holiday break in the winter. So I've been doing this show now for fifty episodes a year six years six years three hundred episodes on the show on my last kind of landmark episode. One hundred than the two hundred. I didn't Ama but I decided for this week. I had done such a special interview A few weeks back that I was holding onto that. I'm just I don't know meant a lot to me so I figured I would share that with you to commemorate the three hundredth episode this really special day and I want to thank Jose for your very very kind email that you sent me all the way from Spain congratulating me on this achievement and also just talking about what life is like out there during During as what we know now is the covert nineteen pandemic. You'll probably notice that I haven't talked much about it on this show partially because my last few episodes were recorded actually end. The next few coming up were recorded before everything got to be really intense even in this episode. I'm thinking we may have mentioned The Corona virus scare. But we didn't go into much detail because it was still in the early days when we recorded now of course life is upside down for most everybody on the planet. People are losing the people that they love. People are afraid. They're experiencing a lot of acute anxiety. A lot of people are in lockdown or they are mandatory isolation and they're starting to feel the psychological difficulties that are associated with that. And so I just WANNA say that my heart goes out to everybody you know. It's tough here in. La It was one of the first cities in the US started. Implementing pretty strict on social distancing rules But it's incredibly tough and places like Italy in Iran of course in China and South Korea. Where hopefully there see you know seeing themselves now on the other side of the curve. Things may get much worse before they get better and I really do urge everybody to follow the.

Cara Santa Maria Jose US Spain South Korea Italy Iran China
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Coop didn't forced into being polite and nice but really wanted to stand up i mean he was really you know honest about his use of marijuana at a time in marijuana smokers were horribly persecuted unreasonably chris putin of course they still are he was real and he kept it real and so i mean not the greatness of ham if we had a car seikine could be as jim hansen has been so steadily and so magnificently but with the kind of outreach that carl had beating not drum that about global warming conceding attention must be paid i think we would live in a different world i think carl would have taken on the religious fundamentalists at the height of their influence in this country and really big quite a stamp because when he darkened it was like yes theory individuals who were trying to speak out do speak out occasionally but they weren't going beyond the tonight show week after week on those other major media outlets which could easily influenced the people who hadn't made up there this has been at its view full of joy when one another rarely whether at the other dad night but all you optimistic for the future that i'm india forget you think that you up i'm not often right but i am i am always optimistic it i am more optimistic at this time in my life having seen the great changes i mean i was born at a time of putting netted forty nine and where make it with a postwar phenomena duck respect for women in their intelligence with at an all time.

Coop marijuana jim hansen carl media outlets chris putin global warming
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"For a very long time about climate change and i think what happened with the nuclear arms race was the kind of exciting existence they're demonstrating what the best that were capable and so cosmos was always going to have fair is strong social content which would be about you know the founders of sun via means these were my guys this is always my passion they were not like plato was swimming around didn't just thinking in having contempt for people who did the work they were middle class and there are merchants and they actually dick work and the new stuff based on the worth they did any get expand the method straight out of that you wouldn't get that from me wrist credit do not been were never got their hands dirty so cosmos is not only about how the origins of science came from a kind of fledgling sense of democracy of kind of meritocracy in the sense that you could come from anywhere but if un what you've had to see was sent in represented some kind of step forward and will be on how we understood nature then you get the floor and so yes it was always that the values of science and democracy the idea that we done a planet and still do where a fifth of us living on something like two dollars a day may maybe another fifth of us are living on an astonishing scale far beyond anyone's conceivable requirements.

climate change two dollars
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Of customers and i think it's through it's organically woven into every moment i was i think without exception i was standing leads to the camera every single time carl talking into the camera every word with scripted which is something that i think people find very surprising it wasn't i novi the cars delivery was so natural but he felt like something except for any that he was to say but now with these big cue cards and we argued and struggled in really thought end pulled together the three of us of every single word and if you look at various duration of the scripts of which they're probably 25 adoration of every script you will see is gonna constant changing word for word until he got to the point where the three of us were happy and we had a a kind of role which lasted with carl for the rest of his life in which steven i also employ which is in the best argument wins the day but everyone's entitled to one or two peremptory challenges with are just you know i'm sorry i this is really important to me i wanted to be this way and finally okay okay but that's how it got written in dan it's it's just and that's how we're doing this one and to fight in this house asleep pinned we started last june so if we finish episode thirteen by the end of this month which i think we in a very good shot but we will have written thirteen hours in one year which is more or less yeah and without car and we've seen in i've said to each other countless time this is harking only carl we're hearing only really it's like trying to do all kinds of things missing a big part of herself.

carl novi steven i one year
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"And it's weeks months went back and we'd been disappointed so many times before that we were prepared to be disappointed again but you know the whole idea what does not to give up and he called us back to la which was very encouraging you probably wouldn't have done other food one of the state now and he said not at the by his kids all the time because he said well the beginning i said to my kids can watch this 30yearold show uh they're like an he said after the uneasy check laying the turtlenecks than the hair in the factor in some whatever it was every time it came up worked wondering which conflicts went on to customers and so that's really how we got to all of our wishes team truth so that we can do cosmos on fox what you earlier described as that cosmos feeling as you described it as mrs astray ministy thing was that concept should always there from the beginning without always built in two weeks so that looking back on the move retrospect and see what has become well being a part of that was carl's own personality on his own approach which is evident actually if you look at what he was writing in his earliest notebooks it's such an amalgam of those elements that you could say i'm sure that there would have been a cosmos it's not a car had the chance to do it there would have been a cosmos it would have been different knitting would have been wonderful but then what happened gloves the three of us started working together and there were things that each of us brought there was a wonderful tension affection and its chair all after that i can still echoes reverberate through my head all the time and just kind of a choice discovery because we were all alerting by do it we had never done anything like this before it was like really jumping into the middle of the pacific ocean and saying okay let's mickey thirteen part television series we had the guidance and the great talent of adrian cologne who was the executive producer and i think his role in this was very but.

carl adrian cologne executive producer la two weeks
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Uh this new cosmos that we're producing with separate filing is being done in a much more disciplined way in fact steven i today are putting the finishing touches on the threat for episode 12 and in this beautiful another june which is so beautiful in this part of the world we are getting ready to right what is we hope will be the symphonic 13th episode as we try to do in the original series we coic climbing mount cosmos what feel one because you know the opportunity to be on fox which is a network in the united states that you can get without having cable without having to pay that extra money for cable so it's truly uh the kind of outreach fit we heal most passionately about permit carl was a total pathfinder in his ethos was that all of this belongs to everyone and it's committed to complicate for absolutely everyone from a small child to someone like my dad his 95 and very sharp if you make it too hard for anybody either those or anyone in between to understand and it's your failure and so what we're trying to do is to present that marriage of history science trauma we want to make it as we hope cosmos the original series lives can do feast for the brain for the heart heavy i for the ear if it doesn't work on all those forlove's it's not cosmo did and in working in the last several years with steve sooner sath and mitchell kenold in meal tyson will be our host it's you know i find myself frequently say that's us.

united states mitchell kenold tyson carl steve
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"And we will bring these pieces of music and these pieces of ourselves onto this arc this cultural arc which really had a shot survive me are worst madness and whenever we did here to this planet nuclear war climate change the messed up things if he did the voyage but still be moving indeed still have that lie meet once me you sort of took the political climate in which is we're taking plans and this is a very creditably idealistic i dare is not something really been done on old relate obviously voyager is going where he's going but how did the order even get off the ground how do they even come about built and voted carl sagan in frank drake and linda saltzman second who bruce carl's previous white created a plaque for the pioneer spacecraft to other very well travelled spacecraft although not as far away from us as the voyage star eden uh that had been launched years earlier and so the for the idea this going anyway caro and frank always have that kind of big picture of air to man with crank we're lucky to still have with us to man with just a youth not that wall between science and culture the two men who always lived in both worlds and who were thinking always uh scientifically but also with the kind of all embracing understanding of the importance that we are related science is culture and that there shouldn't be deficient between the two end and that's why in everything colonel touched was like he never saw he was tearing down those laws and just as he didn't want walls around science that prevented the rest of us from being lifted by the revelations in discoveries of science he thought that if we were putting our best foot forward we had to make a cultural statement as well and it was i i don't at this moment i can't say it was carl or frank or john kozani a nasa new tumbled to the idea of putting something on the spacecraft may have been.

climate change carl sagan caro frank drake linda saltzman bruce carl john kozani
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"And part of that of course was gets crater mad men joy of this spring of a love that was constant spree and so on this was all put on the which wrecker it's one of the final simpson the sound essay by drafted in india's sams feats can rasping but dared sounds very much like the recording of what was them the most distant object ever recorded by movements which was in the difference between my praise love loved thoughts of the pulsar new and up to kaurov later i said to him speakers any chance that extraterrestrials will be able to reconstruct decipher reconstitute these thoughts that i had in new in meaning what i was feeling in thinking as i remember him looking down at me on this beautiful june dane saying hey billion years long longtime management is it's possible so if that's the case the voyager record holds not only chuck berry doing johnny b garden louis armstrong end mozarteum bar hint beethoven and japanese shackle hutchison use it can japanese gamil on improving pan pipes and tell us senegalese percussion and an indian focal rawda which will make their hair back of your next stand up as well as the bulgarian shepherdess who has the greatest pipes this side of the rica franklin besides all left on the voyager record theorists and mothers irri first words to her newborn baby i kiss and the heart sounds in brain cells of a woman fallen insanely and truly.

india brain cells kaurov chuck berry billion years
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"At and he mounted in human history precisely because these two voyagers would leave the earth as they did in august and september nineteen seventy seven and a fix to each of them were these golden records containing eighteen pieces of world music images hundred eighteen pictures of images of what it's like to be alive through what life on earth looks live or recorded sound sa of the geologic tall and biological and technological sounds of earth using the recorder as a kind of camera for the ear to record the history of the whole planet and besides that greediness in some fifty nine human languages and one whale language to the beings of other times and other worlds the voyagers travel roughly as the great ed stone may have mentioned something like forty thousand miles an hour and they've been traveling for thirty five years and they have a projected future life of perhaps a thousand million years billion years with a b into the future traveling through the galaxy and of course carl sagan was one of the minds behind this whole impulse to fix not just the kind of license plate on the voyager saying where were you are and who we were but actually something much more ambitious a golden record with the essex oh the part about us that you can't convey through the machines and imagine you distant extraterrestrials flagged down this derelict crafts and immediately bingo they fail that's a class f civilization at such a degree of development.

carl sagan essex thousand million years thirty five years billion years
"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ann druyan" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is less lots of a radio show about ideas and coccia with me nail danny undermine our our our our our welcome to another little items for tonight show i am cross posting last in the series of the little items right podcasts this is an interview recorded in ithaca in upstate new york home of andrea who was coauthor with carl sagan of a demon haunted world is basically responsible for me getting into signs and skepticism in the first place which led to the formation of atlanta games at eventually that road trip andreanne is an author and television and film rights are in producer whose work is largely concerned with the effects of science technology on on civilization she was carter writer with carl sagan steven citre if the emi mp body awardwinning television series cosmos and as the founder and ceo of cosmo studios she is currently working on a reboot of that series andrea on served as creative director of the nasser voyager interstellar record projects she is the author or co author of several books including comments which was on the new york times bestseller list for two months shutters the forgotten ancestors with them with qosay sagan was another new york times bestseller she is also accredited contributor to the bestselling books contacts terribly dolts the demon holds the world and billions of billions by sagan she was the coproducer incurred cocreator of contacts a warner brothers motion picture based on the stories you wrote with go sagan directed by robert zemeckis and starring jodie foster.

new york times jodie foster nasser voyager steven citre carter atlanta new york danny robert zemeckis ithaca qosay sagan director cosmo studios founder and ceo producer andreanne andrea two months