35 Burst results for "Anita."

"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You. Anita, is it true that the D.C. chapter of the women's club the wing has a phone booth dedicated to you in their space? Well, I mean, if you say so. I'm flattered. I have to get a wing. Yeah, absolutely. I saw photos of it and people are talking about it and clamoring to get into the booth to make I'm hoping now that you will be able to find that. Yes, I'd like to go down and check it out myself. I need to you were born on a farm in Oklahoma. And are the youngest of 13 children. But from Arkansas and only went west because your grandfather was threatened with a lynching. He left his farm, took his family and headed to what is now, we woke up Oklahoma. How was he able to remake his when he settled there? Yes, that was my maternal grandfather, the story of their leaving with a large number of children of their own. My alcohol tells a story of that laughed Arkansas and says it was the first time that he'd ever seen his father cry. Because that had been a place where he was born, a place where his mother raised him, his mother was he was born actually in 1865. So on the cost of slavery. And they had lived in own property there. My grandparents and completely uprooted in part because of the threat of violence, but also at later learn, because of a lot of debt that they had accumulated that probably because of their race. And so they started all over as people do when they run out of options or feel that they've run out of options. My uncle George also says that grandfather just said that he didn't want to raise his children. In that place where he had seen so much hardship financial hardship as well as racism. And so they moved to Oklahoma. Parents who are also farmers and you've written that your childhood was one of a lot of hard work and not much money, but one of solid family affection. Your family farm was a subsistence farm. What does that mean exactly? Well, we were never going to get rich. That we would be lucky from year to year to be able to cover expenses to feed ourselves and to maybe bring to farm again the next year. But interestingly, even with the large number of children in the household, and not all 13 of us live together, it was. Some of my siblings said already growing up, and I was born. But, you know, with ongoing that we had to feed at least in house and clothes, at least 7 or 8 children in a household. And interestingly, enough, even we were not making a lot of money. My mother decided that she wanted her children to go to college. And so starting with my oldest sister,

women's club Oklahoma Arkansas Anita D.C. George
"anita." Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

03:00 min | Last month

"anita." Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Keep <Speech_Male> keep crushing it. Keep <Speech_Music_Male> doing everything you're doing. <Speech_Male> You're a friend of the <Speech_Male> show. You're always <Speech_Male> welcome on. I'm <Speech_Male> so glad we <SpeakerChange> got to do this in <Speech_Male> person. Yeah, me <Speech_Male> too. Last <Speech_Male> thing I just <Speech_Female> came to my mind <Speech_Female> again, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> my next goal <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Music_Female> others from <Speech_Female> Zambia <Speech_Female> is to start podcasts. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Actually, the <Speech_Male> chichi. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Are you trying to get <Speech_Male> me more competition? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Yes. <Speech_Male> It's not really <Speech_Male> competition. It's <Speech_Male> competition in their <Speech_Female> local language. <Speech_Female> So the <Speech_Female> goal is to do <Speech_Female> decentralized <Speech_Male> Bitcoin podcasts. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> to let <Speech_Female> people translate <Speech_Female> Bitcoin <Speech_Female> podcasts into <Speech_Female> the local language or <Speech_Female> just do <Speech_Female> a podcast in <Speech_Female> a local language. <Speech_Female> Because I think <Speech_Female> also <Speech_Female> speaking of privacy <Speech_Female> and all the <Speech_Female> things that happen <Speech_Female> in the digital space, <Speech_Female> podcasting, <Speech_Male> it's so <Speech_Female> important because <Speech_Female> the RSS <Speech_Female> feed can <Speech_Female> not be influenced by <Speech_Female> anyone. <Speech_Female> They can't censor <Speech_Female> your CSV <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> they can with their newsletter <Speech_Female> or your <Speech_Female> website or whatever. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> so <SpeakerChange> I think <Speech_Female> that's <Speech_Music_Male> it's <Speech_Female> cheap. <SpeakerChange> It's <Speech_Female> relatively easy <Speech_Female> to do today. You don't <Speech_Female> need, I mean, you <Speech_Female> are pro, yeah. <Speech_Female> But you can do it on <Speech_Female> your smartphone too. <Speech_Female> And so <Speech_Female> it's easy accessible. <Speech_Female> And I'm looking forward <Speech_Female> to do <Speech_Female> that project and <Speech_Male> to help the people on the <Speech_Male> ground. This is <Speech_Male> why your head's going to <Speech_Male> explode because <Speech_Male> you've even got things <Speech_Male> you forgot about that <Speech_Male> you're doing. Exactly. <Speech_Male> Anita, <Speech_Male> look, keep being amazing, <Speech_Male> keep doing what you're doing. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm so <Speech_Music_Male> glad that <Speech_Music_Male> I know you, and I'm so <Speech_Music_Male> proud of the work you do. I think <Speech_Music_Male> it's incredible. I think <Speech_Male> it's stands <Speech_Male> out as somebody who's really <Speech_Male> dedicated to growing <Speech_Male> Bitcoin for <Speech_Male> the right reasons. So <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> are we are indebted <Speech_Male> to you and you are <Speech_Male> friend and anything we can do <Speech_Male> for you, you <SpeakerChange> always let us <Speech_Male> know. Thank you very <Speech_Female> much, Peter. You are <Speech_Female> the one of the first <Speech_Female> Bitcoin podcasts. <Speech_Female> I was listening to <Speech_Music_Female> in 2017. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Stop there. <Speech_Music_Male> All right, I <Speech_Male> think we're going to go and have some food, <Speech_Male> and thank you for coming <Speech_Music_Male> to bed, by the <SpeakerChange> way. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Okay, thank you <Speech_Male> for listening to what Bitcoin <Speech_Male> did podcasts. I <Speech_Male> hope you enjoyed this interview <Speech_Male> with Anita. <Speech_Male> And as I said in the <Speech_Male> intro, the work she's <Speech_Male> doing is incredible, <Speech_Male> but it's expensive. <Speech_Male> It's not cheap to fly <Speech_Male> out to Africa and do this <Speech_Male> work. So hopefully <Speech_Male> you can support <Speech_Male> her. There's some links in the <Speech_Male> show notes. We're <Speech_Male> supporting, we supported <Speech_Male> a couple of times now. <Speech_Male> Hopefully some of you <Speech_Male> can fire some sats <Speech_Male> her way. <Speech_Male> Also, if you've been checking <Speech_Male> out my football team, <Speech_Male> we just won <Speech_Male> four on about <Speech_Male> four wins in a row, <Speech_Male> four wins out of four <Speech_Male> and 12 points. <Speech_Male> We're still top of the league. It's <Speech_Male> very exciting. If you want to <Speech_Male> check that out, please <Speech_Male> head over to rail Bedford <Speech_Male> dot com. We do stream <Speech_Male> all the games live. <Speech_Male> Anyway, if you've got any questions <Speech_Male> about this, <Speech_Male> Anita, the show, <Speech_Male> anything else feel <Speech_Male> free to drop me an email. <Speech_Music_Male> It's hello a what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bitcoin did dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> All right, have a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> great rest of your week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and I will see you all <Music> soon.

Zambia Peter Anita Africa football
"anita." Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

04:03 min | Last month

"anita." Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"In Zimbabwe for instance, which that high inflation, if you tell them, you can't inflate that money. You can't make more out of these Bitcoin. You can't censor it. Your government can take it away from you. Everybody in the sense immediately. Hello there, how are you all welcome to the what Bitcoin did podcast, which is brought to you by Gemini. The only place I'm using for buying Bitcoin, I'm your host Peter McCormack and today I've got my good friend Anita posh back on the show. Now I've known in each of the points in time now and the work she has been doing for Bitcoin is incredible. She's been traveling over to Africa and helping spread Bitcoin education and awareness and do you know what? She deserves a lot of recognition for this work. So while we were in Bedford, I also needed to come on over and come on the show and run through everything she's been doing for the last few months and give us some insight into how Bitcoin is being used in Africa. Now, most of her work, it requires a cost. It's quite expensive to get out to Africa and do this. I've made a donation towards it. We're going to include the links available in the show notes. Hopefully some of you out there will be able to send her some sats as well. If you've got any questions about this show or anything else, then feel free to reach out to me. My email address is hello and what Bitcoin did dot com. Hello. Hello. So we've got a great addition since we last spoke. Well, we've never got to do this in person. No, never. Which is point of sadness for me, but a point happiness today because you know how much I love you. You're one of my favorite people in the whole world. And since we've gone on the road, we've given young Danny over there a microphone, he's now got a camera. Yep. He's also got his own fans. Oh, really? Well, you got that one. What does he say? I'll find his name. I can't remember. Yeah, he's a talks about Danny coming from shout out to that one fan. He comes from like a magical universe. Time traveler. So yeah, and we have a screen if you want to use it, Peter shifts with us. Yeah, it's close to me, yeah. Yeah. And who's that? That's it. You don't know who that is? No. That's Chucky. Oh, from a film movie or something. Do you want to know the weirdest thing about this? Let me tell you about this. This is so fucking weird. Do you not know the film? No.

Bitcoin Peter McCormack Anita posh Africa Zimbabwe Gemini Bedford Danny Chucky Peter
US coach makes dramatic rescue of artistic swimmer at worlds

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

US coach makes dramatic rescue of artistic swimmer at worlds

"A quick thinking coach prevented tragedy at the swimming world championships in a dramatic rescue Artistic swimmer and two time Olympian Anita Alvarez lost consciousness and slipped to the bottom of the pool after completing her solo free final at the world aquatics championships in Budapest on Wednesday Her coach Olympic medalist Andrea Fuentes dove in fully clothed to pull the 25 year old swimmer to safety Fuentes told a Spanish radio outlet that when she noticed something was wrong she shouted at the lifeguards but they didn't seem to understand and the few seconds that passed before she jumped in felt like an hour Alvarez was not breathing when she was rescued but Fuentes says the swimmer is doing well after getting some water in her lungs The coach compared swimming to other endurance sports saying we push through limits and sometimes we find them U.S. artistic swimming tells the AP the swimmer has been evaluated by medical staff and will continue to be monitored I am Jennifer King

Swimming World Championships Anita Alvarez Andrea Fuentes Fuentes Budapest Alvarez Swimming AP U.S. Jennifer King
"anita." Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:28 min | 9 months ago

"anita." Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Side effect. Can you tell our listeners, how does that work? We're just curious, do you cook together? Do you take turns, what does it look like at your house? I think that's a TJ question. That's a TJ question. Okay, TJ. Take it away. Sure. Well, in my past, I had done several years of professional bartending. So I'm not a stranger to doing dishes and cleaning and around the bar. So I switched that to the kitchen and but now what we do is sometimes we'll the whole the crux is planning. That's the big thing is planning, planning, planning our nutritional weight and wellness meals and days and sometimes Anita will be the sous chef and I'll be the chef and most of the time. She's the chef and I'm the sous chef. So it's traded off that way. And we have fun. We have fun doing it. Do you like mostly the same things? Like, are you able to eat the same dinners or? Yeah, don't hate this. We do. We don't have a problem. I know some people do that. I'm amazed at the recipes from nutrition Wayne wellness. I've not had one that I didn't like. Oh my gosh. That's so nice. It's amazing. Wow, that's great. Thank you. You're looking at the creator of I would say most of those recipes to your darling. It was interesting when I was creating recipes. Sometimes I would create them in my head. And then I would cook them, but I never followed directions. So then I'd have to have someone else do it and write the exact things down. So yeah, that's a process. So I think that Anita, you have some great advice, I think, for people that are kind of, you know, we have a lot of clients that have had a history of.

Wayne wellness Anita
"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:56 min | 10 months ago

"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You know, I think <Speech_Music_Male> the laws <Speech_Music_Male> need to be <Speech_Male> challenged <Silence> and revamped <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in the protections <Speech_Male> need to be <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> put in <Speech_Female> place. <Speech_Female> I also <Speech_Female> think though that <Speech_Female> as a culture, <Speech_Female> I think the way <Speech_Male> we respond <Speech_Male> is individuals <Silence> <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> who have been victimized <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> skepticism <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> defies <Speech_Female> a reality <Speech_Music_Male> of what we <Speech_Male> know to be <Speech_Male> happening in the world. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The 19 million <Speech_Music_Female> tweets me <Speech_Female> too meant <Speech_Male> something. They were <Speech_Male> telling us something <Speech_Female> was going on. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> if we <Speech_Male> talk to any of your <Speech_Music_Male> friends, you <Speech_Male> know that they <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> they've experienced <Speech_Male> much of <Speech_Music_Male> what was coming <Speech_Male> out <Speech_Male> in social media. <Speech_Male> So I <Speech_Male> think we <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> a culture need to <Speech_Male> question ourselves <Speech_Male> and as individuals <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in terms of <Speech_Female> how we personally <Speech_Male> react and <Speech_Male> what we tolerate <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> in our schools. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And then I think <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> leadership <Speech_Male> leadership <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> at this <Speech_Female> point, if they <Speech_Male> are not taking <Speech_Male> robust measures, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> are <Speech_Male> part of the problem. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> we know <Speech_Male> from these <Speech_Male> very, <Speech_Male> very well publicized <Speech_Male> instances, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> like Larry Nassar, <Speech_Male> which not <Speech_Male> only involve <Speech_Male> leadership <Speech_Male> in terms <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Music_Female> university, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> but also <Speech_Female> the FBI. <Speech_Female> Yes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yes. In failing <Speech_Music_Male> to follow up <Speech_Male> on complaints <Speech_Male> that were given <Speech_Male> to them, which <Speech_Male> enable <Speech_Male> scores more <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> to be <Speech_Female> violated. <Speech_Female> Just as an <Speech_Female> aside, <Speech_Female> I read that <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> FBI disclosed <Speech_Female> that it had received <Speech_Female> more than <Speech_Female> 4500 <Speech_Female> tips about <Speech_Female> Brett Kavanaugh <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> he was being <Speech_Female> considered, <Speech_Female> but only <Speech_Female> in interviewed <Speech_Female> ten people <Speech_Female> after the allegations <Speech_Female> against him <Speech_Female> emerged. And <Speech_Female> I think this is <Speech_Female> another piece <Speech_Female> of proof that these systems <Speech_Female> are not working. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So Anita <Speech_Female> my last question <Speech_Female> for you is <Speech_Female> one that I'm <Speech_Female> hoping <Speech_Female> will help a lot of <Speech_Female> women that might <Speech_Female> be listening. <Speech_Female> Actually, <Speech_Female> let me rephrase <Speech_Female> that, helping all <Speech_Female> people that might be listening. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Knowing <Speech_Female> what you <Speech_Music_Female> know now. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> How are ways <Speech_Female> to show people <Speech_Female> who have experienced <Speech_Female> sexual violence <Speech_Female> that you <Silence> believe <SpeakerChange> them? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> first of all, I think we <Speech_Music_Male> do believe <Speech_Music_Male> many of people. We're <Speech_Male> just not willing to <Speech_Male> do something about it. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> But <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> one of the <Speech_Male> things that <Speech_Female> I think we need to <Speech_Male> do is first we need <Speech_Male> to listen. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And we often ask <Speech_Music_Male> people how they feel. <Speech_Music_Male> And I think that's important <Speech_Music_Male> to know how people <Speech_Male> feel <SpeakerChange> when they've <Speech_Male> been violated. <Speech_Male> But we <Speech_Music_Male> also <SpeakerChange> need <Silence> to engage <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> who are survivors <Speech_Male> who are victims <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> solutions. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's the way we <Speech_Male> show that we really <Speech_Female> value <SpeakerChange> them. <Speech_Female> That we <Speech_Music_Male> don't just take <Speech_Male> their state months and then <Speech_Male> go on and make <Speech_Male> choices <Speech_Male> based on what <Speech_Male> we think should happen. <Speech_Music_Male> We <Speech_Music_Male> engage them <Speech_Male> and find them <Speech_Male> the solutions <Speech_Male> to their <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> problems. And <Speech_Male> not just <Speech_Music_Male> putting all <Speech_Male> of the burden <Silence> of the solutions <Speech_Male> to them. <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Male> I think a real <Speech_Male> engagement <Silence> and <Speech_Male> respect <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> victims and survivors <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> what we <Speech_Male> need to do to <Speech_Male> show people, <Silence> not only that we <Speech_Male> believe, <Speech_Male> but that we're willing <Speech_Male> to stand up and <Speech_Male> try to make things right <Silence> <SpeakerChange> for them. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Anita <Speech_Music_Female> hill, <Speech_Music_Female> thank you for making <Speech_Music_Female> the world a <Speech_Music_Female> better place, a <Speech_Music_Male> more just place <Speech_Music_Female> with your work, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and thank you for joining <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> me today on <Music> design matters. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> Thank you. <Speech_Music_Female> Anita <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hill is of the <Speech_Music_Female> university Professor <Speech_Music_Female>

Larry Nassar Brett Kavanaugh FBI
"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:22 min | 10 months ago

"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You. Anita is it true that the D.C. chapter of the women's club the wing has a phone booth dedicated to you in their space? Well, I don't know that it's true, but I mean, if you say so. I'm flattered. I did get a wing. Yeah, absolutely. I saw photos of it and people are talking about it and clamoring to get into the booth to make their phone calls. I'm hoping now that you will be able to find that. Yes, I'd like to go down and check it out myself. I need it. You were born on a farm in Oklahoma. And are the youngest of 13 children. But your family was originally from Arkansas and only went west because your grandfather was threatened with a lynching. He left his farm, took his family and headed to what is now. We woke up Oklahoma. How was he able to remake his entire life when he settled there? Yes, that was my maternal grandfather, the story of their leaving with a large number of children of their own. My uncle tells the story of that day when they left Arkansas and says it was the first time that he'd ever seen his father cry. Because that had been a place where he was born, the place where his mother raised him, his mother was a freed slave. He was born actually 1865. So really on the cost of slavery. And they had lived in own property there. My grandparents. And so they were being completely uprooted out in part because of the threat of violence, but also at later learned because of a lot of debt that theta had accumulated that probably occurred because of their race. And so they started all over as people do when they run out of options or feel that they run out of options. My uncle George also says that my grandfather just said that he did want to raise his children in that place where he had seen so much hardship financial hardship as well as racism. And so they moved to Oklahoma. Your parents were also farmers and you've written that your childhood was one of a lot of hard work and not much money. But one of solid family affection, your family farm was a subsistence farm. What does that mean exactly? Well, that means that we were never going to get rich. That we would be lucky from year to year to be able to cover expenses to feed ourselves and to maybe bring in enough money to farm again the next year. But interestingly, even with the large number of children in the household, and not all 13 of us live together, it was. Some of my siblings had already grown up and left home and I was born. But, you know, with ongoing that we had to feed at least and house and clothe at least 7 or 8 children in a household and interestingly enough, even though we were not making a lot of money, my mother decided that she wanted her children to go to college. And so starting with my oldest sister, who is now 94 years old, she managed to save enough money for a tuition. And university, which was a historically or is the historically black university in the state of Oklahoma. And so she was able to send my sister off to college with the money that we were making doing farm work on our own farm, and then at other times, farming, on the other forums. You've written about how it was a rarity where you were growing up for any female to go to college. And that your mother was really a visionary in her insistence that you all do that. How else did she influence you? I know that she was very, very important in terms of helping you become who you are. Absolutely. And in ways I don't think that I knew at the time that she was shaping. I mean, one of the things that my mother always said was she insisted that we think about everything that we were doing to think about the consequences of what we were doing. She was she hadn't had only been able to go to school through the 6th grade. But she was always curious and she was reading whatever she had available, whether it was her Bible or local mogul daily times or reader's digest or whatever she could get her hands on. She was curious about what was going on in the world and really wanted us to have that same curiosity, but not only the curiosity, but the ability to fulfill that. But she was a thinking person and I sometimes think what she could have done had she grown up in a different time. And actually not had 13 children even growing up in the time that she did. But I think she was quite remarkable. And she became a model for me for discipline. For being thoughtful and also for being generous. She had raised ten children who graduated from segregated schools. So they had she experienced segregation. She also had the youngest three who graduated from integrated schools. And I think at every phase for my oldest sibling to me as a younger, she had a vision that the world was changing would continue to change. And that she wanted us to be prepared for it. You had quite a range as you were growing up in terms of interests. You had a principle who was white and a family friend, even before you knew him at school. And decided that your school should have a black cheerleader, so he chose you to be a backup for the cheerleaders who'd been selected by popular vote. But you also were shouted for being queer for doing that by a white kid in your class. Were you bullied a lot as you were growing up? I wasn't bullied a lot. I think, you know, in addition to being a cheerleader, I was vice president of my senior class. I graduated first in my class. And I think in some ways that effort in my ability to just really engage in just about every activity that was available, protected me to a large extent. The good grades protected me from some bullying. I had developed some kind of shield. To shield me away from it. But that one incident of being called queer, I think was probably because I was still a threat. And I had to be othered in ways that might not have been obvious like my race or my gender. There had to be something else to be attached to my identity that would have made the person who is making the comment more comfortable with himself. As you mentioned, you graduated first from your high school. Number one. And you went on to Oklahoma state university where you got a degree in psychology. Do you want to become a professional psychologist at that point?.

Oklahoma women's club Arkansas Anita D.C. George Oklahoma state university
"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:31 min | 10 months ago

"anita." Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I think now we are at this point where we've never been before in terms of awareness of the behaviors that are literally killing folks. Because of their identity. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative people about what they do, how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. On this episode, Anita hill talks about what it will take to finally address sexual violence in our society. Leadership at this point, if they are not making robust measures, are part of the problem. 30 years ago Anita hill became a household name and a hero for many women when she told the world about how Supreme Court Justice clarence Thomas sexually harassed her at work. In the years since she has had a fruitful career as a law professor and as an author. Her latest book is resonating with a lot of people just as her testimony in front of the Senate did in 1991. The book is titled believing our 30 year journey to end gender violence, and we are going to talk about that and her extraordinary life here today. Professor Anita hill welcome to design matters. Oh, it's.

Debbie millman Anita hill Justice clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Professor Anita hill
Derby winner Medina Spirit dies after workout

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

Derby winner Medina Spirit dies after workout

"The the three three year year old old colt colt collapsed collapsed and and died died after after a a workout workout at at Santa Santa Anita Anita and and California California in in a a statement statement trainer trainer Bob Bob Baffert Baffert said said the the horse horse had had a a heart heart attack attack an an official official cause cause of of death death has has not not been been determined determined Baffert's Baffert's horse horse won won the the derby derby in in may may and and after after the the race race in in the the spirit spirit are are derby derby horse horse had had been been tested tested positive positive for for twenty twenty one one Pico Pico grams grams of of betamethasone betamethasone that that is is a a legal legal medication medication that that is is not not allowed allowed on on race race day day Baffert Baffert was was suspended suspended by by Churchill Churchill Downs Downs and and barred barred from from entering entering horses horses in in the the next next two two derbies derbies and and banned banned from from racing racing in in New New York York the the Kentucky Kentucky horse horse racing racing commission commission has has been been investigating investigating the the case case Medina Medina spirit spirit had had five five wins wins in in ten ten career career starts starts I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue the the three three year year old old colt colt collapsed collapsed and and died died after after a a workout workout at at Santa Santa Anita Anita and and California California in in a a statement statement trainer trainer Bob Bob Baffert Baffert said said the the horse horse had had a a heart heart attack attack an an official official cause cause of of death death has has not not been been determined determined Baffert's Baffert's horse horse won won the the derby derby in in may may and and after after the the race race the the the the spirit spirit or or derby derby horse horse had had been been tested tested positive positive for for twenty twenty

Baffert Bob Bob Baffert Baffert Heart Heart Attack Attack Santa Santa Anita Anita California Baffert Baffert Churchill Churchill Downs Down New New York York Kentucky Kentucky Horse Horse Medina Medina Donahue Donahue Santa Santa Anita Anita
Why Investigating 2020 Voter Fraud Is About Saving Our Country

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:02 min | 10 months ago

Why Investigating 2020 Voter Fraud Is About Saving Our Country

"And Mike, again, help my audience understand. You have led the charge in trying to bring a case to the Supreme Court. That would be signed by attorneys general from states around the country, what is the crux of this case that you're bringing? In other words, what is the crux of the case that you're hoping that the Supreme Court will look at? Okay, I would rather I'm not a lawyer. I would rather that everybody go to Frank speech dot com. You can view the whole case there. But it's stiff. There's a couple of things. If to explain it, there's 5 states that are getting that are definitely defendants. And that's your Wisconsin, Pennsylvania. Michigan, Arizona, and Georgia. And now all the states have standing. The evidence that's there now is not the evidence that was brought before them back last year. And last year when they said they didn't have standing, now they have standards, not one but two ways. They absolutely help with how to accept it on standing because every state's got standing. The attorneys generals know Anita I need everyone to know this. We brought the case other lawyers who grew up this case that we brought into these different attorneys general. We met with them. We showed them show them that the election fraud happened in their state, Eric. I bought their voter rolls. An Alabama had to pay 30 some $1000 out of my pocket to buy the voter rolls who bought who voted and then the voter rolls after. So then we went in. We canvass. We showed him it happened in their state. I'll give you an example, Alabama. We show it happen there. And I said, you guys need to look at this complaint. And get on board with us. We need to protect our country. This is about who are a Democrat or Republican thing. This is about saving our

Supreme Court Mike Frank Wisconsin Pennsylvania Arizona Michigan Georgia Anita Alabama Eric
"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Who who should we know about to look to To support in this moment you know that is such a tricky question because there are so many organizations you know. I'm on the board of the national women's law center so of course that some one that i think i'll automatically yo. There are different kinds of organizations. Equal rights advocates. Who are based in san francisco out. Whose work i know. These are legal rose but there are also all of these groups like girls girls for gender accurate in a black women's blueprint and These organizations that are. I believe every day speaking truth to power who are out there carrying a message of our value and of our work in the need for change. I am of the mind that there's so much of a burden on our group's they're typically undefended they're over even in terms of atlanta women's groups do not get nearly trying to support that our issues command but they're still is old people society making away out no way and in windy to support them so i think that there are groups that are doing work nationally. But they're also groups that are doing work locally and one message that i have is for those of us who can. We should support them. We need to support them with our money at end with our support our using whatever platforms have we have to support them with our voice and with our energy in town so the the work is going on out there but we really need allies among leaders and every organization you know within every work organization there are there are movements. You sing that now. More than ever in corporate organizations there are employees movements in places like google limb uber where the movement are coming from inside of those organizations to change those organizations and that is encouraging but again the pressure on the leaders of those organizations have to come not just from their employees. They have to come from government to in our courts. You mentioned the court systems. You know we still have decisions made by judges that tolerate basically a certain level of abuse women in the workplace. And so there's no one actor. There's no one simple fix. But there are solutions and there is movement and i call the book believing because i do believe that change is possible and i think i am absolutely certain that we have more tools to today than we ever had before and that we need to utilize so for the people who look up to you as a leader and who who might ask. What should i do. Where should i start. Who should i support his. Is there advice you have for them. I tell them. I don't you know it's funny. You said i endorsed joe biden. I told people that. I was voting for joe biden. I don't even know what a political endorsement is. Because i do them but i think we need to put pressure on all of our islanders any location we have whether it is an organization that we belong to because that was his membership organizations are often riddled with the same kind of problems..

national women's law center san francisco atlanta google joe biden
"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"The minority in that respect. I know that once they happened in go public that in a most emphasis especially that i know of that support is not there Lacking some place or another either. You don't have a family support or you don't have a colleague supporter you don't have your clients support or you don't have your supervisor supporter or you don't feel like you have the support of the society in large. And so i consider my self very privileged. Even though people probably saying well how can you think about yourself. In that way. I do because i know what all of those things met today to my survival and then to my ability to take that experience and see me on myself to z. Through those letters in those letters were apart of micro th to. I had so much going for me and part of that healing. That took place. Was i understanding that. I was not alone others down there and secondly that i had training that will allow me to make sense not only a experience but of the experiences of others as well and i decided that i was gonna use that training that i was gonna use the fact that i had a lot agree in that my job was to analyze things and analyze problems and come up with ways to think about them differently in top them differently to unpack and then rebuild for what i believe would be a better world for everyone when you think about designing a better world and using the law and and using that tool kit that you had that strikes me as feeling so hopeful and and i i will admit that is usually wear despite my sacred rage when i witness injustice or how frustrated i feel with broken systems believe in us and and i think that's what makes at times. It feels so painful. When you see us being failed. And i can't imagine what it was like to testify and then see clarence. Thomas be appointed as a justice to the supreme court anyway and then to watch the cavanaugh hearings in two thousand eighteen for all of us. We just kept saying it's history repeating itself. It's it's anita hill all over again. And i'm very curious. How in seeing it happen again decades apart you can point to you. You know the math the law and see a way forward first of all. I really can reach a conclusion that you know. I did not fail. In nineteen months that the years had taught me. And i seen enough action in change fact that the number of people complaining about sexual harassment doubled in the years following the hearing the fact that we had record numbers of women running for office in part because they believe that they needed better representation that they were not getting from male politicians. The fact that we did began this new conversation in a way of thinking and that really literally thousands of of students have gone through classes and studied under professors who have been teaching us differently about sexual harassment and assault the fact that we have this emerging concept called intersection analogy where takes into account race and gender together multiple oppressions that people experience to understand the enormity of problems of gender violence. I believe we were building and platform and while the out com my single failure to many people the fact that even a minority of people heard us and her that testimony and and they have gone on to respond to at through their own. Work was enough for me to know that the world has changed since nineteen ninety-one and.

anita hill clarence supreme court Thomas
"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Thank you so much for joining me on the show today. i'm. I'm so thrilled to have you here. And i just i have a million questions But i'm i'm trying to call my you know activists social change worker fan girl heart Looking at yuan's zoom. Right now and remember that i have. I have a formula. And there's a way i ask questions of people's well we will have a great conversation. I'm sure i'm really happy to be here in engaging with us so thank you hope that puts you a little bit. It does it does I mean there's so much going on in your life currently and obviously these sort of famous moments in in our national history that you have advocated through But i wanna go back even farther. If i may because so many of us know anita hill this incredible attorney this change worker this activist and i wonder i wonder who you were when you were a little girl. You know what what your life was like. When you're say. I don't know eight or ten years old. What were you always the sort of outspoken defender or you in a completely different kind of head. Space is a as a young child. Oh as a child. I really was pretty bookish out and i was a really want to be a scientist when i was growing up and thinking about what i wanted to do. run through all the different things that that young girls and at that time thought about oh a secretary or i could be a social worker and then i discovered science and math and i loved them both in the quick story about my decision to not go into science but to go into law came about my freshman year in college when i told my first visor that i wanted to be to major biology and my adviser said well you know scientists pretty hard as and i think you really should try something a little bit easier and not knowing that i could actually reject him entirely i did You know i sort of deferred because at Mariah i thought advisers knew what they were doing and when i think back on it i think first of all i did do something in wasn't easier going to law school and and i certainly had tried to have an impact on situations like mine but i would. I would hope that today some advisor would say you know science hard but you've got good scores. Got good grades. Let's make sure we know exactly what you need to be successful..

anita hill Mariah
"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"anita." Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Today's incredible guests is a familiar name to anyone who follows politics or law. I'm thrilled to get to talk with. Anita hill activist professor and author. Anita is probably most well known for her incredibly brave testimony during the nineteen ninety one supreme court confirmation hearings of justice clarence thomas who she accused of sexual harassment but her presence in the fight against gender violence and sexual harassment has only strengthened since she is a leader of the movement and a fierce ally to women everywhere anita has written two books on the issue of gender violence and discrimination speaking truth to power and reimagining equality her third book believing are thirty year journey to end gender. Violence is coming out this year. I am so looking forward to speaking to anita about writing the book her thirty years of learning which is offering to us through the lens of her expertise and about where her fight has taken her for the past three decades. But most of all. I'm looking forward to learning more about anita hill the person behind the icon so without further. Ado let's get to it the brilliant anita hill. You all know how much i am. Obsessed one of the great loves of my life. My sweet dog maggie. And i love to advocate for the adopt. Don't shop lifestyle so it's probably no surprise to any of you. That maggie is a rescue dog with the.

anita hill anita clarence thomas Anita supreme court maggie
Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

Breaking Green Ceilings

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

"Thank you susan. Leonida for being on the breaking green ceilings podcast. Today we want to talk about the implications of free trade agreements. On african women specially from food sovereignty perspective. But i will start with our standard introductory question here on the podcast. Which is what role has nature played in your life and i can start with the anita or interest wondering for that first. The iba the videos descends to nature because he document shower penalties or by the social food at of a economic committee's report i'm raised from finding community and finding for so we actually directed me when we're producing Another thing i'd like to talk for example when you're relaxing use nature of that alexa eastern To league or whatever he thought we offer meaningless. Nfl but so you're connecting with a natural acid and of course that aspects appreciation mitch Your ruin susan lesser very interesting question but just to say that we alive because later is alive and if we look after it looks to us just the same and i think in the last two years we have seen exactly what nature can do when they tell you that you need one hundred million to get about for sitting as a boxy jam when mitch as playing to you realize the narrative changes as what we are we are leaving it and it's accommodating us. I don't know if we're being kind too for that's another story but

Leonida Susan Mitch Your NFL Mitch
How Playing an Instrument Benefits Your Brain

TED Talks Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How Playing an Instrument Benefits Your Brain

"Did you know that every time musicians pick up their instruments. There are fireworks going off all over their brain on the outside. They may look calm and focused reading the music and making the precise and practice movement's required but inside their brains. There's a party going on. How do we know this well in the last few decades neuro scientists have made enormous breakthroughs in understanding how our brains work by monitoring them in real time with instruments like fm r. I n. p. e. t. skinner's when people are hooked up to these machines tasks such as reading or doing math problems each have corresponding areas of the brain where activity can be observed but when researchers got the participants to listen to music they saw fireworks multiple areas of their brains for lighting up at once as they process. The sound took it apart to understand elements like melody and rhythm and then put it all back together into unified musical experience and our brains. Do all this work in the split-second between when we i hear the music and when our foot starts to tap along but when scientists turned from observing the brains of music listeners to those of musicians the little backyard fireworks became jubilee. It turns out that while listening to music engages the brain in some pretty interesting activities. Playing music is the brain's equivalent of a full body workout. The neuroscientists on multiple areas of the brain light up simultaneously processing different information in intricate interrelated. An astonishingly fast sequences. But what is it about. Making music that sets the brain alight. The research is still fairly new but neuroscientists have a pretty good idea. Playing a musical instrument engages practically every area of the brain at once especially the visual auditory and motor courtesies and as with any other workout disciplined structured. Practice in playing music strengthens those brain functions allowing us to apply that strength to other

Skinner
Anita Michalski of Hindenburg Systems on Why Recording Quality Audio Matters

Podcast Movement 2021

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Anita Michalski of Hindenburg Systems on Why Recording Quality Audio Matters

"Getting good order from the get gir- before you even get into editing is going to be really important because if you get poor order and you need to rerecord that is a massive thing that will take a lot of time so just something to keep in mind the better quality of what goes into your podcast. The better quality. That's gonna come out so make sure you know your microphone. You know you might technique you're listening to yourself and you're wearing headphones. All of that is going to help you massively in the long run to get good quality stuff

Anita Michalski Tells Us About Hindenburg, a DAW Tool Made for Broadcast Radio and Podcasts

Podcast Movement 2021

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Anita Michalski Tells Us About Hindenburg, a DAW Tool Made for Broadcast Radio and Podcasts

"Is a little bit different to some of the doors that you may already be familiar with One thing that really separates it is that it's not a dole made for music production. It's actually made specifically for cost and radio makers sir. It focused on spoken word. What that means is that it looks a little bit different. Doesn't have the typical tools that you may be familiar

Dole
Chrissy Teigen Talks Depression and Cancel Club

Daily Pop

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Chrissy Teigen Talks Depression and Cancel Club

"Teigen is getting real about being a member of the cancel club. Founding member probably not wrote. I feel lost in need to find my place again. Anita snap out of this. I desperately want to communicate with you guys instead of pretending everything is okay. Cancel club is a fascinating thing. And i have learned a whole lot. There is no winning. I'm just tired of being sick with myself all day. Snooze in lami snooze in a okay you start buying what do you want to hear from the rich lady. I know you're gonna take. This is what i think. First of all. I'm going to take with me. we are both. We've set at a million times on the show. We are against cancel culture. I genuinely believe people make mistakes when they are different. People i think people go through seasons. They shed different qualities about themselves. I think she made a really bad mistake. I think she feels terrible about it. I don't think she gives herself any slack when she says i have crushing weight on me every day. I believe that's genuine. She's like damn chrissy. Like why did. I tweet something so stupid for this to come haunt me however many years later I will say though as well that she apologized. And some people forgiven her. Some people not forgiving her for her to come out and say this. I mean i read the whole article and i was a little stress. Because i'm like. I still don't have my full form opinion. i think in the old school pr scheme in hollywood. You make a mistake you gotta go away for a little bit. it's just unfortunately the ticket you're given. It's not pleasant. I'm sure it's very traumatizing. I'm sure she's not integrate mental state. And i think the normal chrissy pre tweets would be able to communicate that everyone would rally. I think unfortunately right now. The smartest thing for her to do is just take her medicine a little bit and just let us forget for four months and come

Teigen Cancel Club Anita Chrissy Hollywood
How to Make a Blueberry Grenita

The Maria Liberati Show

01:51 min | 1 year ago

How to Make a Blueberry Grenita

"My first recipe is a blueberry gr- anita and it's really refreshing. This time of year is mentioned. You know with all the fresh blueberries. Four cups of fresh blueberries one teaspoon of freshly grated organic lemon peel a teaspoon freshly grated organic orange. Peel two teaspoons of fresh lemon juice and one cup of sugar or sweeteners. taste in a medium size saucepan. Combine the blueberries. Lemon peel orange peel and one cup of water. And then on high he bring this to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer onto the blueberries are soft set. A fine stringer over the bowl. Strain the mixture pressing with a back of a large spoon. Stir the lemon juice into the puree. Show this pure. I in a saucepan. Combine the sugar and one cup of water over high heat bring to a boil reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar dissolves. So you're making a sugar syrup for about two to three minutes or going to continue then transfer this to a bowl and chill this also star this sugar syrup into the blueberry puree and poor this into a shallow pan freeze the blueberry mixture until ice crystals form around the edges of the pan about forty five to sixty minutes with a fork scrape the ice crystals from the edges and. Stir into the mixture. Freeze the mixture until it's fully frozen about one and a half hours starring several times to serve place this into tall glasses. Garnish with chris. Cookies fresh blueberries than fresh orange slices. It yields about one court

Chris
Cruel and Unusual Punishment: Pee Wee Gaskins Sues South Carolina

Pee Wee Gaskins Was Not My Friend

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Cruel and Unusual Punishment: Pee Wee Gaskins Sues South Carolina

"That week. We go to columbia two of our younger children and anita go to the hearing. There's no one in the room except a judge and two state attorneys and peewee with the guards who have him. Handcuffed and pee wee presents his case and is suing the state of south carolina for one million dollars for neglecting. His hemorrhoids was worried and in pain and he was seeking relief. We were there in the courtroom. I expected five feet to one inch tall really pale. Skin really black. He walked in his arms were chained to his wife's he had on ankle chains. It sounded like that scene from the ebony screwed story the ghost of christmas past rallying his change coming in the courtroom and there were two marshals one on either side of him and they looked big and burly and he didn't even come up to their shoulders but they were so nervous with him and he was smiling. I know i'm the man. And you don't know what i'm gonna do next kind of thing. It was just really fascinating. And i was shot at. How smalley was in frail looking day was so obviously nervous. Hearing only lasted a few minutes. Peewee complained that the prison officials had failed to address this repeated complaints about hemorrhoids and their inattention to his medical condition amounted to cruel and unusual punishment. He requested the judge rule in his favor and award him. One million dollars as compensation for pain and

Anita Columbia South Carolina Smalley Peewee
Pack Your Patience: 47 Million Expected to Travel Over Holiday

The Guy Benson Show

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Pack Your Patience: 47 Million Expected to Travel Over Holiday

"Lot of people will be traveling by air over the Fourth of July weekend Travel is already at 85% of pre covid capacity. More than 3.5 million people are expected to travel by planes in the coming days. That is the most of course since the pandemic started classes Anita Vogel Tripoli says 47 million Americans are expected to travel this weekend and as people travel will be paying more for gas. The national average is 3 12 a gallon Nearly a dollar higher than a year ago, with the lowest prices in Louisiana, the highest in

Anita Vogel Tripoli Travel Louisiana
Anita Diamant Talks Menstrual Justice

Can We Talk?

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Anita Diamant Talks Menstrual Justice

"Tough to be stranded without period products but the stigma around periods can be even tougher and neither diamond wants to help. You should put please everybody put in your bathroom. The one that you that guests use a container with pads and tampons even if nobody needs them it is a sign. It signals the fact that is an amenity. It's not a luxury that needs to be out just like toilet papers so and towels in your bathroom. Anita diamond is the author of many books. Her most recent out this may is called period end of sentence. A new chapter in the fight for menstrual justice the book shares its title with documentary film about a women's collective in rural india that makes and sells pads. The film won an oscar in two thousand nineteen when they announced that this movie had one. I jumped off the couch. Fist bump in the air they as the director said. I can't believe a movie about periods. Just want to ask. That's when anita got involved. The film's producers reached out to her. Because she's well known for her period positive attitude her nine hundred ninety seven bestselling novel. The red tent was named for the imagined retreat. The biblical matriarchs went to during their periods. We discussed the red tent in a live taping. Can we talk several years ago. Anita's fictionalized vision of ancient menstruation. Practices struck a chord with readers around the world now with period end of sentence. Anita is exploring contemporary menstrual justice activism globally and here in the united states.

Anita Diamond Oscar Anita India United States
A Feminist Guide to 'Carrie'

Feminist Frequency Radio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

A Feminist Guide to 'Carrie'

"Is hard to imagine a time when the name steven king wasn't synonymous with horror. The book that i put him on the map was nineteen seventy. four's carry which would also become his first novel to be adapted into a film. Cinematic adaptations of kings works are hit or miss to put it mildly but few have had the cultural significance and staying power of carey directed by brian depalma. One of the most significant american directors of the late twentieth century and also kind of sexist. The comedy stay tuned. Anita y'all i just read this shit. I didn't write it. It's fine all right The combination of carries narrative with diplomas directing style results in a film a fascinating contradictions. I'll veritas airland. You're so good. We can absolutely see the male gaze and things like diplomas love of leering at female bodies and slow motion and yet there are also a strong argument to be made for feminist readings of the film the anger that animates protagonist carry weight as her telekinesis powers wreak havoc on the people who oppressed her and ridiculed her and ostracized her for her entire life as felt righteous invalidating to so many girls and women who have helped cement carry status as a classic in the decade since its release the theme of the poll from which are patriots selected. Carry as a discussion topic was bad. Mothers and in the film her mother margaret as religious zealot who keeps carry living in ignorance of the most basic aspects of her own body and tries to make her feel deeply ashamed. Her desire to go to the prom have healthy relationships with other people her age meanwhile her classmates relentlessly ridicule her for her social awkwardness and inability to fit in. No wonder she wants to burn it. All down

Anita Y Steven King Brian Depalma Carey Patriots Margaret
Pepsi's Number Fever

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Pepsi's Number Fever

"Victoria. And where nato angelo. Where a couple living in manila in the philippines. They had a pretty hot life. When i worked as a rickshaw driver and the whole family lived in a tin roof shack but they had a dream. Tim hoffa talks about this in his cautionary tales. Podcast and that dream is that they'll win a very unusual lottery. The lottery is called number fever in the lottery. Numbers are printed on the inside of bottle tops on bottles of pepsi. They sat down every night to wash numbers drawn on tv. If the number from your bottle top was drawn in one grand prize you could win a million pesos. That's equivalent to about forty thousand american dollars. That is a lot of money in the philippines in one thousand nine hundred to a life changing amount of money for victoria and anita if they were ever to win it but of course. It's just that one grand prize. What are the chances they would ever win. What was the number. The number was three four nine one evening. They are watching the television and the lottery. Juries held on the number comes up and it's three four nine. They can't believe it. Got forty thousand dollars a million pesos. They the children can go to college. Anita doesn't have to work as a rickshaw driver any more it would be like winning a million dollars in the us. Today but pepsi messed up and eight hundred thousand bottletops printed with the winning number three four nine so for victoria and horta the way i imagine. This is the run out onto the streets to celebrate and everybody else is on the streets and they're celebrating too because they all have the number three four nine on their bottle tops. So they're all going to be millionaires. Yeah well you'd think pepsi was on the hook for at least fifteen billion dollars

Tim Hoffa Victoria Philippines Pepsi Nato Manila Anita United States
Biden announces orders to 'curb the epidemic of gun violence'

Tony Katz and the Morning News

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Biden announces orders to 'curb the epidemic of gun violence'

"Center Executive actions on gun control issued by President Biden Thursday, president called Gun violence and epidemic at a public health crisis and said the second Amendment doesn't grant an absolute right to own a gun. The idea Is just bizarre to suggest that some of the things we're recommending are contrary to the Constitution, Biden introduced a Syriza's six gun control executive actions. They include tightening restrictions on ghost guns that can be put together at home with untraceable parts and no serial number. Another calls for categorizing pistols with arm brace modifications as rifles. He's also calling for red flag laws allowing family members or law enforcement to seek a court order barring certain people from purchasing God's Fox's Anita Vogel guy Well for two second human rights attorney and Indian host of the Gun Guy show on WNBC, says President Bynes executive orders are constitutional as of now if he tried to ban so called assault weapons. Through an executive order that would clearly be legislative. That's something only Congress can do. The president can't do that. But he predicts that might be the next

President Biden Syriza Anita Vogel Biden Wnbc President Bynes FOX Congress
How Do Antimicrobial Products Get Approval from the EPA?

A Slob Comes Clean

02:08 min | 1 year ago

How Do Antimicrobial Products Get Approval from the EPA?

"Welcome anita peace. Thank you so much for coming on and giving us your experts perspective on this. I think the perspective that you have is unique. And i'm excited to have people here that so tell me a little bit about yourself in the short version of how you ended up in this particular role with the. Yeah well first of all. Thank you for having me So i am the director of the anti-microbials division in as opposite pesticide programs I started apa in two thousand four as a biologist in the fate affects division. Had a number of different Leadership management roles epa and. I started as the acting director antimicrobials division in twenty eighteen at had been there ever since. So i've been with the agency since two thousand four. It's been a great experience. That's great so you mentioned the word pesticides. And i actually this question before i said. No anti-microbials pesticide. Are we talking. When i think pesticide i think bug spray. You know that kind of thing so can you kind of explain how that's part of the the same division. Absolutely so pesticide program. We operate under a statue called the federal insecticide find decided democrat actor. Deborah and basically a fun guy and viruses are all considered as pests so normally most people associate pesticides with things that kill weeds in their garden or kill insects. But actually bacteria and viruses are also considered as s statute. So you anti-microbials. Division does regulate the registration in the scientific review of all. Upa registered antimicrobial parks. These include things like disinfectant sanitizer allies things us hospitals in addition to wood preservatives. Anti-fouling paints things that are found in a lotta household products. Use every single day. Like the paint on your walls the harpen on your feet the clothes. You're wearing all have antimicrobial. Products in them So they're found really a wide range of different

Anita EPA Deborah UPA
Kurt Becker's Stroll Through Racing History: Grindstone

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Kurt Becker's Stroll Through Racing History: Grindstone

"Only made six career starts but one of them resulted in a victory in the kentucky derby and burst onto the racing. Cd twenty five years ago this month with a win in the louisiana derby. His name was grindstone. A foal from the first crop of nineteen ninety kentucky derby winner dreidel rhinestones was owned and bred by lexington kentucky. Native william tian in the name of his overbrook farm center d wayne lukas grindstone raced twice as juvenile before undergoing surgery for a bone chip in a knee. But after a seven month layoff. He returned to the races with a runner-up relation allowance company at santa anita in february of nineteen ninety-six to start his three-year-old campaign. Despite having made just three career starts grindstone went to new orleans on march seventeen for the great three louisiana derby at a mile and a sixteen despite having nothing more than a maiden special weight victory to his name. Rhinestone was dispatched the two to one second choice behind local favorites arbs magic and it was arbs. Maverick stood and rhinestones way in the final furlong. Tony bentley had. The call takes me puts up. Magic hangs on the inside but it will be grindstone with the lead and sar magic. Grindstone when bill. Louisiana derby by war with terry daily with these victory that day grindstone was now part of discussions for the upcoming kentucky derby but he was lightly raced and no winner of the louisiana derby had won the kentucky. Derby splash gold. In nineteen twenty four grindstone stone would have one more prep race before heading to churchill downs. It would be the arkansas derby on april thirteen. It would be step up to a great two and a stretch out to a mile. An eight rhinestone would enter the starting gate as the eight to five favorite at once again. He would have to deal with the magic in the stretch. Terry wallace brings them home. Describe magic magic comes back. Takes at the magic of turn upset. Rhinestone was only eaten the neck that day but he would be heading to the kentucky derby with a lot of questions surrounding for one thing. Rhinestone had only made five career starts. No horse had won the kentucky. Derby on five starts or less since brokers tip in nineteen thirty-three for another. He wasn't even necessarily the best in these trainers d wayne. Lukas would be sending record. Five horses to the derby and lucas himself was reluctant to rank one above another. As for the rest of the lineup there was unbridled som- who would be the post time favorite. There was avenir from the west coast being trapped by a young trainer. By the name of bob baffert. There were skip away. Who had just set a stakes record in the bluegrass at keeneland. On the first saturday in may nineteen ninety-six. Rhinestone would have to overcome history. He would have to overcome highly talented and more experienced bows and he would have to make a furious. Run in the final furlong. But jockey jerry. Bailey had him in high gear. Dave johnson of abc sports with the goal of cracked late cabinet on the side of town. And here's optima to guide wasn't cabin on the inside was it baby. Mcquaid noted in the top urban grindstone and hit the wire together and it took five minutes for the placing judges to confirm the result of that photo. Finish but the winner of the one hundred twenty second run for the roses was grindstone. As one sports writer. Put it the kentucky. Derby distance is seventy nine thousand inches and by getting his nose in front of the wire grindstone had led only the final four but it was all that he needed five days later. Lucas announced that grindstone had been retired from racing. Following the discovery of another bone chip in the colts need may grindstone the first horse and seventy years to be retired immediately following win in the kentucky derby but he also has become the first horse in seventy two years to win both the louisiana derby and the kentucky derby he had won the first million dollar kentucky derby in history he had given lucas consecutive win and a triple crown race and he had made. Wt young kentucky derby winning owner and brief. I was never proud to stand next to mr young said lucas. Adding this is absolutely the happiest. I've ever been in my life. As a stallion grindstone would become the sire of belmont winter bird stone and the grand sire of classic winners mine that bird and summer bird following his stallion career in kentucky he would relocate to oregon and twenty ten where he would sire more stakes winners in the pacific northwest but the legacy of brian stone began twenty five years ago. This month with a win in the louisiana derby.

Kentucky Grindstone Louisiana William Tian Overbrook Farm Center Wayne Lukas Grindstone Tony Bentley Terry Daily Rhinestone Terry Wallace Santa Anita Lexington New Orleans Lucas Bob Baffert Lukas Arkansas Derby
Open Water Swimming with Simon Murie

ActionPacked

06:32 min | 1 year ago

Open Water Swimming with Simon Murie

"Salmon. Really good to have you on the podcast list of all. Tell us how open water swimming began for you. Yes a my mouth. Was i High beau daiva sermon. Her as i was a kid used to cheese tightly diving my father was. He was a surf lifeguard from sydney and the night by came over here to the uk so he had a love of open water swimming and then my mammals. I love swimming in the thames. Eat so although the diving didn't work on may cheese. She posted with take me down the thames muslim holidays in our members sitting on the banks of the thames she'd have a radio times manip- picnic blanket and the radio radio full blasting all day. Sit next still with a couple of comex and would sort of sit there and go swimming in in the thames. Every sort of our next to the fishermen and this was in the nineteen seventies early nineteen eighty s when open water. Swimming was definitely not the sole the trendy thing it is now anyway. Something obviously sold of rubbed off there. So let's say it's down to both my mom and my dad that a soda had they sold of facination and interesting in open water swimming and i think the first significant swim that got my interest was the heliport in turkey which was made famous by lord byron swimming across it who actually swam it in honor of leandra who in greek mythology would swim across the halas bonds with laba hero hero on the european side at a cost of sesto us and she would hold out a torch which would then leander who was on the asian side in a causal obidos with swim across she would hold out the torch they would do their thing and then he later. That would swim back and then one night storm blew and heroes. Torch was extinguished and leander lost. His way and was drowned is body washed up underneath. Assess council and hero seeing his body through us. Help off the call cell and died alongside lander and that was the tragic love story of heroes leander and byron's recreated that swim and with a lieutenant colonel and head was the first person to swim the allison and i remember reading a poem. The byron did and also mining engineer at the time in northern nigeria on the border with nigeria and was remember reading a schoolboy but then i remember being up in this And a long way from any water and thinking was my passion in life really enjoy doing and our member. I loved swimming. And i always enjoy finding most bizarre places to swim and i remember reading that poem from byron and thinking you know what when i turned thirty. That's what i'm gonna do. And so when i did tend to that. That's what i did a win over to northwestern turkey and went to the town of genetically and managed to find pilots and get various permissions anita day military commission because the halas is also known as the dardanelles famous military campaign in world war. One and it's straight across from gallipoli. I needed military permission from the army but also the navy and also permission from the coast guard and the town council. It took me a week to get the permission and find the piler and about just over now to swim it so that token balance of time with hassle and everything and made me think there must be other people out there who want to do these fantastic swims around the world. But don't wanna deal the admin. Don't wanna deal the organization and safety support not was all so that was my love of of motor swimming blossom then but also the idea behind what i do today which swimming track which is taking allowing these fantastic swim. So that's where the idea came from far across a telephone digit. How how many well the nearest point. It's it's just kilometer across from europe to asia but if you're headed out from those castles kill it. The here is one of the council's as which was i- falsify during the dolphin those campaign in world war one. You started out from there. You would quickly be washed out into the mediterranean. So you've got to start off a lot higher up to start off at the town of bat and get pushed down as you swim across. You've moved down with a current toward the mediterranean but also towards the ancient city of troy. And you end up naeway. Troy is and you get washed down so you in effect. You're probably swimming three and a half kilometers but the journey you've got one is about five kilometers per year. Probably doing an effective swim of three and a half kilometers across you to judge a lot of boats and things like that on the way. Well funnily enough the day. I did it back in two thousand a managed to find his pilots and get the commissions and stuff but the pilot doors did site me. You might have the permissions but we still going to be going off at four o'clock in the morning when the coast guard. Don't start. They shifted six so we started very early in the morning and literally i remember waiting off the coast and the pilot just waiting there as quickly looked up and down the hellas. Ponto about anals to see if there's a break in the traffic and when there was a break in the traffic he gave me the signal as all standing on the shoal and basically told me to swim swim. It's a very busy botero. This is the same traffic that goes towards crimea and into the black sea and he stumble says all those boats. They're going through this very narrow waterway. So yes we had to get a move on when we saw break in the traffic having having done this you then. There are other people out there who would like to do this without the hospital organization. So that's really how swim track begun it. Yes i think so. And i i was passionate about going to play season. Sorta discovering them by swimming. I think what i loved also was this idea of arriving at a landmass under your own steam and looking back and seeing wave arrived from so to speak. I think arriving somewhere. And you've powered yourself. There makes you appreciate somewhere in a way. The somebody say who's arrived by ferry or by bokang possibly do it similar to say hiking up snowdon. Those who've hiked up snowden and those who arrived on the train i think appreciate the summit into totally different ways and i think the same is when you swim from ireland's weiland immersed yourself in the medium of getting there. I think you appreciate way. You've arrived so much more than if you'd sort of got there by plane all binds terry and that's where i get my pleasure out soul and i think people who join us also get not sorta pleasure

Swimming Byron Leander Lord Byron Swimming Laba Anita Day Military Commission Nigeria Turkey Leandra Salmon Lander Halas Sydney Gallipoli Mediterranean Allison Town Council
"anita." Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"anita." Discussed on What'sHerName

"At the age of twenty eight she died is on retreat from Rome and they had to bury her just outside of Norby. Now some unfortunate things have been. She gets dug up by dogs and they ended up. They had to cremate her and they put her to rest and it's not a great anding no for her and do Sepe Garibaldi again. Talking about having to leave her in this grave in the shallow grave while they're retreating. Who talked about it? As leaving behind the treasurer of his life the Queen of his soul and he is just shattered this but that is not the end for care. Ball these ashes this or her legacy because she is still recognized as the mother of Italy then she and she is happy created. Italy they together. Yeah they unified a bunch of small kingdoms and papal states and stuck together a country that is a very handy legacy for future people to have used Ha and so in the nineteen thirties. When Mussalini is also waging culture ward and a literal war against the pope? This is a very convenient sewri to take up. Oh as justification and historical predecessor That he can claim just considered in many ways to be like the mother of Italy and they already have his remains. He's buried in Sardinia off the coast of Italy and so they had everything they could of him. In here there was this hero revered mother figure and she was buried in France. You know this is a way for him to bring home this hero. Connect himself to the Unification Story. This point there is already a magnificent statue on Genetic Elam Hill. To Giuseppe Garibaldi. And the pope asked Mussalini to take it down. Oh that shouldn't be there He unseated the pope. He's not a hero. And please take the statue down and Mussalini says actually in fact I am going to put another statue of Anita Garibaldi on the same hill because they were grades. And you don't boss me around so he not only builds this incredible statue of Anita Garibaldi. He sends for her ashes. Well which are now in niece they need to be in. Italy goes and gets her ashes from niece and her ashes are now inside the statue of her. It is also her grave and now instead of justice. Atchoo of Giuseppe Garibaldi. There is this incredible statue of Anita Garibaldi. On her horse gun in hand back just I mean it. Looks like the most fantastic fantasy cowboy art you've ever seen and it's unbelievable. I've never seen a woman depicted like this old woman in a statue and it's amazing. Wow a gorgeous piece of art but it's also so complicated because its most who built it. Yeah coopting this legacy has nothing to do with what he's doing to justify his fascist regime and he really tried to style himself after the all these Garibaldi Army. Where the red shirts he calls his army the blackshirts he is invoking. This legacy of this heroic coppell Over and over again to solidify his position yeah classic when he probably would have hated Anita Garibaldi because his fascist regime is immensely misogynous. Yeah and yet. Even in invoking her such an odd statue for him to choose because in the way he talked about Anita Garibaldi. It was always about her as mother. Mother of her mother of the Nation Pass in traditional mothering. Figure which is the opposite of everything that she was. They emphasize the mother aspect. For like when you see her. The foot of Giuseppi Statue. They really emphasized the mother of her. I don't think she would have been too fond of him. That's interesting so like if they were presenting her as mother. You'd expect a statue would be motherly. Yeah but don't cheese instead. She's this airtight time Roic. Yeah it's so fascinating and I just the psychology of choices so interesting you know. It does the first time I saw my gut response before I knew anything about her was. Yeah just yes. She is awesome. I don't even care who she is. And so I'm sure it worked on that level fearlessly confronting the enemy but but what a complicated legacy now for her to have this dual legacy of what she really did and the way she was used and literally the way her body was used after her death To to signify nationalistic goals. That didn't align at all with her nationalistic goals and and for a nation that she is not from. The mother of Italy is Brazilian. That's that's amazing. Yeah a Brazilian Gaucho. And did she have any nationalistic goals rushing in all kinds of countries everywhere? If she just a fighter yeah he's if he's Han Solo and and of course she gets marginalized and left out of the story in in all of the men writing about her now. Finally with people like Dianne over not so when people trying to bring her story back we have the true story. But if he's Han Solo. Who is she she yeah? She's not Princess Leia. We don't have a female Han Solo. We don't have an icon. We don't have an Avatar for that. Maybe that's why it's so complicated. Mussalini to take her story. Because how do you tell this story? What even isn't story. I guess he created the Avatar a fierce horse with a gun which you we don't have an Avatar for that but right they have one in Greece. Yeah Yeah they've got sees the Avatar. She is in Greece. Your boob Alina in Brazil in Uruguay and in Italy. You're at any DIG Air Ball. So what are the sources we have on her to know her real story right because she she couldn't read or write off so she didn't write her life down in this case we must all be incredibly grateful for gossip and for unethical. Priests she had this conversation with a woman named Feliciana and Feliciana. You gotTa love that Little Dos from the nineteen th century. Because thanks to her. We have the record of her. In her own words she talked to Anita go home and scribbled down her whole conversation. That was such a treasure for me especially in writing this book. She just started talking to this neighbor and they would meet for coffee and just discuss their lives and Donna was so staggered by the stories. Coming out of this woman that every time they would meet she would run home and write them down right down. Anita gear have all these words in her journal? And say you won't believe what. Anita told me today and now we have this incredible first-person archive of an how Anita her own life. Oh cool and that's the source material that Dan was able to use to uncover some of these things that have never been told or that have been told wrong or that has been downplayed or race cool and then in a moderately unethical turn. We also have her confession to the priests that we mentioned earlier. T. should not happen sharing with laundering. How do we know that? But he did. And this confession actually came about because in her conversations with Feliciana. It came up that she wasn't actually married teaches at the and Feliciano had a panic attack about that. 'cause she's a good. Catholic woman and so she got this priest involved and a scheme to get Giuseppe and Anita married and when she went in to talk to the priest about everything the priest asked her to confess their sins and out of that comes the last story. I wanted to talk about which I think is fascinating and heartbreaking and incredibly illuminating at also incredibly unsettling a whatever this priest expected to hear. I don't think it was this. She said I WANNA impress in Vanity. And he was kinda thrown off by this because she was not as bait long and that's when she tells a story about what happened in the battlefield from her perspective. It wasn't about just finding her husband's body additive. Ocean it was what if he is dead and if he was fed she could have a life of her own apart from him she could be just as famous as him and those were the thoughts that were going through her mind when she was eight months pregnant on the battlefield. People to know my name. Wow now bearing in mind everything that we know about this marriage that this was a devoted passionate absolutely loving marriage. This story.

Anita Garibaldi Giuseppe Garibaldi Italy Sepe Garibaldi Garibaldi Army Mussalini Giuseppi Statue Feliciana Rome treasurer Ha Sardinia Norby France Genetic Elam Hill Greece Feliciano
"anita." Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"anita." Discussed on What'sHerName

"During a major battle. Anita is right. In the thick of it is on horseback. She's writing around the battlefield directing lines in the middle of this battle. Things go badly. She decides she has to get off the field and so she barrels directly at the opposing army their cannons there gunfire all of their soldiers and just runs right through the middle of their line. Why because destiny? Why run away when you know you're going to win. She knew she had a glorious destiny to fulfill she's untouchable. And if need to get off the field why not go out the most glorious way possible take out as many people from their line as you can on the way out gun in hand shooting her way through the lines. Wow and in the course of this wild attacks. She is captured and waiting in the tent. The opposing army officials come in. They know exactly who she is. They come in to announce to her do sappy. Garibaldi has been killed and she needs to give up and put her safety in their hands and then they produce his Poncho and it is covered in blood and she's terrified maybe he died. This is impossible. How could this have happened? And she says fine. I'll tell you what you need to know but you gotta show me my husband's body. This is not enough for me for a moment. There's a panic and then they're like okay. You can go search the battlefield. We don't have it. You have to go search for it thinking that she's going to give up on this and she calls her bluff and she's out there searching the battlefields for his body looking at every dead body trying to find her husband hundreds of and she doesn't find him instead and once realizes he's not dead they don't have him she escapes. Yeah they have soup. Ridley allowed her to leave. The tents go search for her husband's body. She takes off. Yeah she feels a horse and gallops away soldiers are chasing her. There are under orders to bring her back dead or alive. Her horse gets shot out from under her. No and she fall from her horse. The horse rolls on top of her. She somehow escapes on foot from the oncoming soldiers and runs directly into the river soldiers. No there's no way she's gonNA survive this river. It's way too fast. It's way too deep. So they leave..

Anita army Garibaldi Ridley
"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

08:46 min | 3 years ago

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

"To say. Hey I mean do we have a date pitch for this as soon as I'm done with this mess. Yes yeah a mere inconvenience it really is. It really is that is marvelous as marvelous that you have such a zest for life and activity acidity and being involved in the moment the vet not even the biggest trauma means some people you just go into tears at just the word cancer. Yeah and the only thing that brings tears to my eyes is when I think that I can't be there for my kids to help them with something or see them. Grow older I've lived I've lived a lot really done a lot of fun. Adventurous stuff You know I I'm not GonNa go to my grave and or my the death but and say oh. My Gosh. I didn't do this do that. No there there's more I want to do but I've done plenty. I mean bungee jumping and you know find out of an airplane. I've done stuff so I can't say that I haven't lived you know So that's not my ear at eighty two when you look back on this little phase of your life. Who Do you think you're going to think of it or say I'm GonNa Laugh at it? I beat you and I'll still be wearing red high heel shoes convincing really yes. I'll part Hispanic yes. We don't stop dancing shoots. Yes you know. That's just the thing is I want to take down that buzz. Yeah chase down. Yeah I want to still be doing the things that I do now and really and truly you count because you tell yourself you're too old for it people. Tell me all all the time. Stop Remember Your Age. I took my grandson to one of those trampoline places and we jump around and you know we all that kind of fun stuff Yeah and people said that to you. I like remember your age. I was like I know I know my age and I still do it if I can. Why not if my body can still let let allow me to do that? One of the things that you're active in and they tell you remember your age well for example that going to some to to a A rock climbing or bungee jumping. Or you know just things like that. I take my dogs out to the woods all the time and I go running with them. You know. I play racquetball. which is you know? It's not extreme but I do oh my gosh. I'm losing my thought here. Not Skiing snowboarding. I go with my kids. We went in December. I couldn't snow board and I was angry because I planned that trip. There were twenty two of us and I planned that trip to Pennsylvania and I couldn't do it because I just had my metaphor put in two days before and I struggled with the doctor. I followed the doctor. Let me let me wait till I got back. And he said your cancer is so aggressive we need to get you on this now. In fact he shouldn't go on that trip and get started and I said No. My family is coming from all over the country. I am not gonNA miss that trip the most I will do for you for you doc. I will go ahead and get this started and I won't go snowboarding but I'm going on that route so the day after we got back. I was having my first chemo. So people that say Chemo is exhausting and not the treatment isn't worth it. Did they would skip it. Verses versus going through the side effects I would have skipped it had I known then that he wasn't going to work for me because at six months of my life there was wasted in those rooms. Okay I would have skipped it for that reason I don't think it was horrible. I don't think it was painful. The side effects were random. An occasional any depending depends on the medicine that you're taking either nauseated. Diarrhea A little bit of pain a little bit of cramping I had all of that but a little bit of everything buffet style not every day not for for long periods of time at anytime during the six months to doctor ever say to you. I don't understand this. It isn't reacting to the medicine. No they didn't know when reacting they did not want to test me during they wanted to wait till the treatment was complete and because of how they saw me I was his feeling good. I was active. They thought like me that it was working to PT. In fact I planned and I went out the last day of Chemo with a girlfriend to some nice event. You know some wine tasting thing. It was all women and I was going to celebrate. I'm done I'm done time and then I find that. No you're not done. You know we're done at work. So is Kinda sad to learn that mostly because it was a waste of my time but the actual actual Discomfort wasn't horrible. Really wasn't talk to the person that feels as if this is some sort of cosmic punishment Smith for them. Well that was to really. Yeah Yeah because I'm I'm not picking up the event at all well because You know I I do try to lead a good life. I work pay my taxes. Take care of my kids. My you know rescue dogs. My Mom's with me. I'm friendly to whomever and I hope whomever often them before me kind of thing so when that happened I thought why me see why me. I'm helpful to animals to France to family. Why me and I'm not even feeling sick? How is this even possible possible so I did get to that point of been something? I did really wrong some time and I'm getting punished. Now and part of that could be Catholic. We live in Shelby Lewis. Yeah Yeah we do and so And I even thought I go to church every Sunday morning. The box away me So you do get there. I got there. How did you get out of there? you know I just had to remind myself who I am. I know they they were just look at your life. What have you done wrong that you deserve this and then I thought well maybe in another life? Maybe I was really awful in another life. You do wonder especially when you're not feeling sick. I mean I was active extremely active and traveling up until the day off. So it was a shocker. And that's why I had to find out if it's not meal I never got ill. I never went to the doctor. I never took any medicine. Then it's gotta be something bizarre and that's why I thought well maybe it was just something wrong somewhere along the way so I got to thinking about that and I even got to the point You know one of those silly nights where you're by yourself and your boohooing because you know I did have a few nights doing and I thought well maybe you know the what is it. The twelve step program when Alcohol League where you have you had to make amends with people bowl and I just really thought about blasting on facebook if any of you. I've heard damage done something wrong. Please let me know so I can fix it because I'm going through this and I am trying to find out. Why do and again as an engineer? My job is to solve solve. The puzzle solved a mystery. And I know that's just it's my job but I do that in life as well so I really wanted to know who that I heard. What did I do wrong so I can then understand this but you know when you hear about so many people who get cancer two euros nine year old man women good bad then you really know? It's random and in I asked the doctor you know. How did I get this cancer? He said if I knew that I'd be on the cover of magazine I don't know because we don't know and he said it's nothing that you did wrong. Nothing that you did wrong if you'd had wireless glass of wine if one of health if you had eaten as it wouldn't have helped it's nothing you did RONCA. Don't blame yourself. Don't think that way. So okay never blame yourself and never think that way life is is random what happens to you is.

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

12:45 min | 3 years ago

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

"The chemo and the doctors and listen that was my biggest problem so but the actual the so if you WanNa look at it like you know yeah you what's really happening okay so I have pain here okay Sam nauseated there okay so I've because personal experience to friends that were diagnosed with cancer yeah why yeah feared that's my the mid diagnosis they would just one toe didn't tell the truth don't do all of that so let's figure out how to make me comfortable through these last to see them and I rescued dogs so I have four and my mother's eighty five with the medical doctors of course you know talked about Chemo and this not which is a norm but shaded it but there were so many opinions in so many you know achievements and everyone's chiming in with what they know because her friend or coworker cetera needed to do something quickly and that's why I went with the Chemo get your paperwork in order get your stuff together because you cry and hold onto life you should try in chooser treatment oh CD and I've got my stuff my files and everything archive like okay I need to finish the Sparta books just in case because I cannot leave anything hanging so then whatever affairs you have got him in order for a one K. retirement behind your your life what else can you do really what else can you do. I did not expect this because we search and they've already made that decision for their own reasons so of course great so get it all straight and clean up and don't leave that burden to someone else dislike in general oh my gosh will travel for one and I love us yeah and then 'cause I work from home I can go anywhere take my little laptop for a while having to take care of this but as soon as it's done my daughters and I have mountain there are these capsules that are hanging on the side of the mountain and that's your hotel do we have a date pitch for this as soon as I'm done with this mess yes you have such a zest for life and activity you just go into tears at just the word with something or see them grow older I've lived deathbed and say oh my Gosh I didn't do this do that now there are there's more I want to do here at eighty two when you look back on this little phase of your life when dancing really yes that's just the thing is I want to chase down that buzz all the time stop remember your age I just took my grandson to now I know my age and I still do it if I can why not if my body can still a rock climbing or bungee jumping Oh my Gosh I'm losing my thought here not skiing I planned that trip to Pennsylvania and I couldn't do it because I just had my metaphors put in there is so aggressive we need to get you on this now in fact you shouldn't go on that trip and get started doc I will go ahead and get this started and I won't go snowboarding but I'm going on that throughout costing and not the treatment isn't worth it did they would skip it verses months of my life there was wasted in those rooms okay I would have skipped wing depends on the medicine that you're taking either an associated or long periods of time at anytime during the six months to doctor ever say to you I was complete and because of how they saw me I was with a girlfriend to some nice event you know so so is Kinda sad to learn that mostly because it was a waste of my time but the actual Smith for them well that was to really yeah you know rescue dogs my mom's with me I'm friendly to whomever and I hope see why me I'm helpful to animals to France to family young some time and I'm getting punished now and part of that could be on so you do get there I got there how did you.

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

12:17 min | 3 years ago

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

"Yes Taken us here in the studio by store with national up put her in a chair I just moved here yes to what okay where I got a new life not the one I plan but a new life not so what did you feel physically Might well I have breast cancer view is that a washing the women who do not get mammograms regular basis what I see year because cancer can escalate really fast and before you know it it's yes because I'm actually like I just go so I was moved in but I and I found that out and I just had to spend the rest you know the rest of the year really are we get the news and I had just come back from vacation and I was in asked me of my doctor had called in the technician had called his son so I had called and I said no visayas had right now and then I took a deep breath and I said Okay give it to me and dogs I didn't pick up the phone and cried anybody I didn't want the pity party then I just wrote a tax and I know that seems very impersonal but I wanted to lighten I will keep you updated with what I know but this is what happened and your day we'll talk later about it and what was the response thank the number one reason he and my grandson why moved here and within the hour the rest of the day and he hugged me and he cried and so of course I cry too but a bomb on me while we were talking off camera and I do on Wednesday you have search I do I do and didn't work so yeah so that the idea for surgery bill and so from there will come up with a new plan but for now all what is the hardest part of this experience the time that it takes to be a outdoors riding my bicycle it's taking my dogs ability that's what makes me seriously or the hiking trails are but I do know other clinics all the hospitals and all the technicians ah the support and the love and I way was so overwhelming I didn't know what to do with it it was such hours and the fruit baskets and the cars amid shawls and everything they came about it not about how Saad I was or how scared I was because you're not and I wanted to tell him thank you later so health big technician read doctor every nurse I've taken a photo with them because they're part words and you know the the big stuffed animals than we watched our favorite TV show together signed to me like really sweet and kind and their job is having someone else who doesn't know me have to smell me and my staff to use the bathroom and finally I think the fifth day I was feeling better and I know that too but the first thing all of your tongue it's all of the great things just spend time with my family which I've been doing I've loved every minute of it but so people come up to means homey like Leila's beautiful while you have a great experiences ways I was at historic con okay and I was shopping at a and so she asked me this isn't a winner mind you so I was wearing a beanie and I said you know I'm a little older than you might think and you probably want did modeling session with a few of her outfits am that was fun too so now you I'm here and I after this you know so how do in teacher to others I mean I can't say because I even if I wanted to I probably couldn't be boohooing about it uh-huh I've heard how strong I am I literally said I am going to tattoo strong so I think that's just I'm just being me when they give you those name you know and and it just like wow okay then I've got to live up to that hasn't been all that bad the time that it takes to do.

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

11:47 min | 3 years ago

"anita." Discussed on The Emotional Happiness Podcast with That Anita Live

"Level your life he teaches people how to become more intentional deliberate and conscious with their thoughts because your thoughts determined you'll behavior and your behavior determines your life welcome Darius a wise mastermind to the show thank you thank you need them glad to be here dairies when I ask people about success so why they're not going after their dreams of I need to say well I was born into the wrong family or I made this one mistake when I was younger not a baby earlier or didn't get a college degree why is that we get stuck in blaming other things are the people bet is a common action actually for us to blame others usually what it comes down to when you break it all down is that they don't believe in themselves and you don't believe that you have what it takes to reach that level of success that you say that you want it commonly looks like Blaine and you start to say it's because of this because of that because the real issue is not outside of yourself it's actually inside of yourself and that takes courage to actually dig too and with that reason is so most people will gladly go outside of themselves and say it's because of this because of that and play the blame game and and pity parties when they instead of saying let me dig and see what it is I can do to help me get to that level or do the things that I say that I want to do and accomplish this so hard to dig in it's painful the truth hurts sometimes we're not taught to do that right we're program to say if it doesn't work for you it's typically somebody else or because this happened so when you grow up in a situation it doesn't matter your environment but when you grow up in your situation and what you see and what you become familiar with is people saying this happened so that's why I'm here and that happened and that's why I'm here you automatically instinctively start to say okay if something happens with me that I don't really AAC has to be because of something else so we're programmed that way TV programs that's the Internet program is unproven and that takes becoming conscious that takes you now starting to really take a look inside and understanding how our mind actually works for me a self away yes and you have to understand that a lot of what we do the majority of what we do ninety five to ninety eight percent of what we do every single day is unconscious really yes so there are so many things we do unconsciously let me show you most of the time when you're driving somewhere that you've been multiple times don't think about where you're turning you just driving you go have you ever been in a situation where you driving somewhere and you say how did I even get here unconscious you weren't deep right exactly unconsciously drive I'm doing so many times now we can mentally be someplace else yes because the movements that we're making we don't need to be present of mine to make those decisions exactly I call it being co-pilot in most people live their life on autopilot dangerous it's very dangerous it's very data but because we're not aware of the fact that we're living that way when we're not achieving the things that we want because we're not consciously doing and going after those things it's easy to say it was because of this it was of that so it's easier to blame when we're not conscious that really are the ones that are in control living life on autopilot if that's a very unhappy police why do people make their comfort zone the comfort zone for me I didn't let let's talk about that for a second comfort zone is an oxymoron because you're not comfortable in that place so I don't even know why they call it a comfort zone most people who are in that situation where things are not going the way they want they're not comfortable but again we've been taught that our regular normal everyday activities that things that we do what we're used to we're comfortable there and so it's not really that you're in your comfort zone it's that you're in a place that you're familiar with so we are in a space where we're familiar with where we are because it's happened multiple times in our life now what is it that it takes for you say this is not where I want to be in my life typically it some drastic life event it's you become I mean nowhere it's something that happens major that makes you take a look inside most people were not just if they're in that space their comfort zone right the in that as most people are not going to look outside of how can I get out of here out of this position and get to the next level one of the events in life they can be that wakeup call you combine needs to change you can lose your job you can have the death of a loved one you can be in a car accident it can be anything it can be a number of things for me what initially made me change my direction was I graduated from college my son was born two months after I graduated I knew that the woman that I had that I had the my son with wasn't someone I saw myself with long-term okay so that was a wakeup call for me like okay you know what you have to do something because now you're not just responsible for you you're responsible for another human being so that was a mind one of the initial wakeup calls for me so tell me why do people settled in their comfort zones if they're so unhappy I the comfort zone is not comfortable okay it's familiarity it's not that happy they're they're the comfort zone means I'm familiar with where I am and fear is what holds people in that position for me the the the Matt the thing that's so amazing and how I look at fear and when I see people that function based off it's that it's not something that has already happened we are afraid of what may happen and what based on how we're programmed based on how we've been taught we will say if we've been taught and we've only seen negative and people who are not supportive and they're not encouraging and that's all we have when that fear comes the fear is negative that fear pushes us back to what we've been taught and what we're familiar with so instead of stepping out to sea if something different going to happen most people say I'll just stay right here because I'm I'm I'm familiar I know this so it's not countable but it's Melia is familiar and that's what makes it seem like it's the best option yes and it's the best of what they think their choices are and what I mean by that is do I go out to venture out and take the chance of maybe failing of maybe looking ridiculous of being ridiculed or do I just stay right here where I am were already know all the things that are going to happen and all the things that I've been through all right here in this space so I'll stay here who lamed in a comfort zone I dunno you settled with that that you're not going to so it's so wide name it right you know why this is what I think I think that they called it the comfort zone because that will if people feel good about where they are the mind master yes okay why is this so hard for people to develop positive self talk about themselves because they don't believe it they don't believe if they say I am great I am nominal they don't unconsciously believe it so if I am saying something and unconsciously believe something different I'm always internal conflict so I'm saying consciously saying I am going to write a book but unconsciously I believe that I can write a book what will happen is that unconscious part of mine is going to prove that we can't write a book simply because that's what it knows and we haven't worked enough or set it enough to actually now change the thought process of our unconscious mind so that's what they're procrastination income's yes and we'll just procrastinate and make excuses instead of writing the book instead of writing a Book I did for Twenty right that's that's what we do because unconscious mind believes that we're not an author you not at all that you can't write a book you can't start a business and we may have that one on a two times we say you know what I want to write a book but I'm not saying convincingly and I'm not saying and enough to actually now reprogram my unconscious my so now say at once my unconscious mind has been programming this way for years okay me saying I want to write a book once is not going to put me in a position where now I believe I can write a book how exactly does one capture that they can change it it's what you start to tell yourself and what you consistently over time yourself and finding a space even if it's someone else that can actually help pour into you as well so I say for twenty maybe even thirty here's who I heard all those negative things you're never going to be anything in life you're not smart enough you don't look the part you're not pretty enough you're not tall enough Your skin tone is too darn you're too overweight twenty years thirty years what is a I guess pet and or paradigm what is a something that people can use on a daily basis to start to change that negative self-talk there are a couple of things that you can do but here's what I think is the most important thing that anyone can do and what we have done Dan is that we have to tell ourselves that we are what we want to be the most important conversation you're ever going to have is the one you have it yourself you've you've heard of affirmations most people have heard of affirmation yes and they say you know you need to say these positive things to yourself daily basis on a daily basis it's the consistency because what you have to do you have to get rid of and change the twenty thirty years dirty putrid water take one drop and drop it into that gallon of water what do you now have a gallon of dirty water now to get back to having clean water you have to do one of two things you that the poor that ow rinse out whatever you have it in in poor fresh water in it or you have to take water and pour it in it until it overflows log enough to now get all of.

Darius ninety eight percent twenty thirty years thirty years two months