18 Burst results for "Anita Roddick"

"anita roddick" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on How I Built This

"I'm guy is on the show today how Martin Constantine and his partners emerged from a failed business to launch a little cosmetic store that turned into a global beauty BRAC. Lush. Back. In nineteen ninety-five I was studying in London my sister. Karen. Came to visit me that year. She'd been to London before. So on her visit, she was the guide we traveled through the market stalls Candan lock we picked up some indie records at rough trade and made a special trip to covent garden to visit a newly open shop. Called Lush I hadn't heard of it but my sister had instructions from all friends back in L. A.. Get me stuff from. Lush. Now at the time, it was one of two lush locations in the world, and this is before e commerce. So unless you went to the store, you couldn't get the products. Remember the overpowering smell of roses and lavender and honey and lemon I remember these long loaves of colorful soap laid out on tables where you could slice off a Chonkin pay for it. By weight there were bath bombs and shampoos and lotions. It looked like the produce department at a fancy grocery store. You didn't see a whole lot of plastic packaging and in front of each product, you'd find a bright colorful chalkboard with a description. It was unlike any beauty product store I had ever seen. And it probably explains why then There was a line to get in. Lush was part of a new wave of beauty companies that came onto the scene around that time. Many of them influenced by the body shock and it's iconic founder Anita Roddick who as you will hear features prominently in this story is well. The main founder of Lush Mark Constantine had already seen incredible success and then catastrophic failure by the time he launched his venture. In fact, right before mark. Open Lush. He's lost most of his money on a mail order business that went bust. But. Lush turned his fortunes. And and today it's a brand with more than nine hundred stores around the world. Now, in recent months, the pandemic has hit the company hard. For time all of its stores in the UK, the US and Australia were closed. But. Lush has also seen a massive surge in online orders and later on, we'll get an update on how mark and the company have navigated the pandemic and the global economic fallout. But first a little bit about mark's background. He grew up in weymouth seaside town in the south of England. When he was only two years old his dad's split from the family and went off to Africa and mark never saw him again while he was growing up. And his mother. She took mark and moved in with her mother marks Grandma. It was me my mom, my grandmother who really brought me up a my aunt. So. I was really bored three. Yeah. What did your mom do? She was a journalist in the local newspaper on I knew my mom had to work in order for us to to be okay. It was very, very comfortable life full of love and hugs and security. My mom was always there and I love my nine I looked up to my nine and so it was comfortable. Very nice. Obey. Feminine Life I've felt. Spoilt To be honest, obviously, my nine drilled into me the proper values as well. with proverbs and all sorts of other things you know I I had to rights repeatedly better best never them rest till. My good is better. My better best things like that. But then I guess. Around the time you were twelve. So you like you stopped living with your grandmother like Yulia mom moved out. what happened was they there was larger a my mother married the lawyer we moved to my grandmother died. I didn't realize probably until much later in my life high much that'd affected me I felt responsible. I think from my grandmother's death for most of my life because obviously I was important to her and I wasn't there anymore and I couldn't after her and she died on then my my stepfather was. Very, cold I would say and violent. But that's very typical upbringing fifties because they'd come is war gentlemen. There was a lost friends some of them had seen that friends killed or relatives and So it was you know not surprising that those people were bringing up my generation went all the best balanced people in the world. What kind of I mean what kind of kid were you? What do you remember about how you responded to those circumstances? Did you I don't know retreat into yourself or did you act out? Did you fight with your mom? What do you remember or didn't fire my mom but I force a lot with my Stepdad physical fights and they would argue we would all argue. It was just I want to say unsatisfactory which doesn't side like this is like a strange word to use it but. Certainly when I came to build my own home I, for example, never locked the front door. You know I I make an effort on those smaller things that tell people that they wanted to. Careful. Kid were you at school? Are you could student? School was still difficult for. Really. Was it was just heart for you. I. Mean there were a lot of gangs. Gangs were normal in the fifties for for everyone there were lots of gang. So I went to the grammar school, which was the best school in. The top ten percents shoots went to the grammar school. Everyone's surprise when I got in. And then I wasted it while I. was there except that I did make friends and we were in particular gang where we could make. Bombs and things. Can. Make bombs. What we were the news like. PIPEBOMBS. They were we killing sugar bombs with batons permanganate. Glycerin Fuses also savings on we went making them for the IRA season, the Perron purposes to intimidate other gang. Was that William. Golding. Lord of the flies Yup that period of time. So if you can imagine that style of of living when that's how it was about for me on those to physical. Yeah. So I'm not going to fight anyone if I can possibly avoid fighter. No, I talked my way. I'd. Martini, think around the age where you kind of you know these many things are happening. Do you remember being sad when you were a kid or or yes you do every when I seen people sins that was one girl who I went to school have called Al's Cox and I saw some twenty years later and she said so glad you're life work tight well was such a sad child out you know I mean I, missed my father even though I'd never known him. I, think I was melancholy. Use Traditional. Old fashioned word. Yeah. I mean, my mother missed my father I missed my father I suspect I caught it from her. JEREMY AS A. Medium as it were. Up until I was ten twelve or whatever it was, it was fine from then on there were five or six year period.

Lush Mark Constantine London founder Martin Constantine Candan Karen Anita Roddick Africa Chonkin weymouth seaside Martini Yulia UK Cox JEREMY Golding England William
Interview with Mark Constantine of Lush Cosmetics

How I Built This

06:25 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Mark Constantine of Lush Cosmetics

"Back. In nineteen ninety-five I was studying in London my sister. Karen. Came to visit me that year. She'd been to London before. So on her visit, she was the guide we traveled through the market stalls Candan lock we picked up some indie records at rough trade and made a special trip to covent garden to visit a newly open shop. Called Lush I hadn't heard of it but my sister had instructions from all friends back in L. A.. Get me stuff from. Lush. Now at the time, it was one of two lush locations in the world, and this is before e commerce. So unless you went to the store, you couldn't get the products. Remember the overpowering smell of roses and lavender and honey and lemon I remember these long loaves of colorful soap laid out on tables where you could slice off a Chonkin pay for it. By weight there were bath bombs and shampoos and lotions. It looked like the produce department at a fancy grocery store. You didn't see a whole lot of plastic packaging and in front of each product, you'd find a bright colorful chalkboard with a description. It was unlike any beauty product store I had ever seen. And it probably explains why then There was a line to get in. Lush was part of a new wave of beauty companies that came onto the scene around that time. Many of them influenced by the body shock and it's iconic founder Anita Roddick who as you will hear features prominently in this story is well. The main founder of Lush Mark Constantine had already seen incredible success and then catastrophic failure by the time he launched his venture. In fact, right before mark. Open Lush. He's lost most of his money on a mail order business that went bust. But. Lush turned his fortunes. And and today it's a brand with more than nine hundred stores around the world. Now, in recent months, the pandemic has hit the company hard. For time all of its stores in the UK, the US and Australia were closed. But. Lush has also seen a massive surge in online orders and later on, we'll get an update on how mark and the company have navigated the pandemic and the global economic fallout. But first a little bit about mark's background. He grew up in weymouth seaside town in the south of England. When he was only two years old his dad's split from the family and went off to Africa and mark never saw him again while he was growing up. And his mother. She took mark and moved in with her mother marks Grandma. It was me my mom, my grandmother who really brought me up a my aunt. So. I was really bored three. Yeah. What did your mom do? She was a journalist in the local newspaper on I knew my mom had to work in order for us to to be okay. It was very, very comfortable life full of love and hugs and security. My mom was always there and I love my nine I looked up to my nine and so it was comfortable. Very nice. Obey. Feminine Life I've felt. Spoilt To be honest, obviously, my nine drilled into me the proper values as well. with proverbs and all sorts of other things you know I I had to rights repeatedly better best never them rest till. My good is better. My better best things like that. But then I guess. Around the time you were twelve. So you like you stopped living with your grandmother like Yulia mom moved out. what happened was they there was larger a my mother married the lawyer we moved to my grandmother died. I didn't realize probably until much later in my life high much that'd affected me I felt responsible. I think from my grandmother's death for most of my life because obviously I was important to her and I wasn't there anymore and I couldn't after her and she died on then my my stepfather was. Very, cold I would say and violent. But that's very typical upbringing fifties because they'd come is war gentlemen. There was a lost friends some of them had seen that friends killed or relatives and So it was you know not surprising that those people were bringing up my generation went all the best balanced people in the world. What kind of I mean what kind of kid were you? What do you remember about how you responded to those circumstances? Did you I don't know retreat into yourself or did you act out? Did you fight with your mom? What do you remember or didn't fire my mom but I force a lot with my Stepdad physical fights and they would argue we would all argue. It was just I want to say unsatisfactory which doesn't side like this is like a strange word to use it but. Certainly when I came to build my own home I, for example, never locked the front door. You know I I make an effort on those smaller things that tell people that they wanted to. Careful. Kid were you at school? Are you could student? School was still difficult for. Really. Was it was just heart for you. I. Mean there were a lot of gangs. Gangs were normal in the fifties for for everyone there were lots of gang. So I went to the grammar school, which was the best school in. The top ten percents shoots went to the grammar school. Everyone's surprise when I got in. And then I wasted it while I. was there except that I did make friends and we were in particular gang where we could make. Bombs and things. Can. Make bombs. What we were the news like. PIPEBOMBS. They were we killing sugar bombs with batons permanganate. Glycerin Fuses also savings on we went making them for the IRA season, the Perron purposes to intimidate other gang.

Lush Mark Constantine London Founder Candan Karen Anita Roddick Africa Chonkin Weymouth Seaside Yulia UK England United States Australia
"anita roddick" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

Unofficial Partner Podcast

11:41 min | 9 months ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

"The income is largely gang by the person hosting it so I obviously toe into Chubby earlier. And one of the questions asking was about the the the emergence of the Premier Gulf League which I find interesting because these ideas come and go but this this was something it felt significant am not just because of the timing but also the response both of the PD the PGA Tour. They were very aggressively to pushing pushing back in. Gripe threats to that player membership of you know if you you can be with us all against too so it was quite seemed to be very significant moment. Do you think the so for those people listening who are sort of a up to speed on the on the prego fleet ideas. A sort of team was franchise based model which allows at just a different type of of sort of product to to appear on the in the in the Gulf landscape. You this but my question to you is whether or not the tools and as a as a as a whole are always going to be vulnerable to a sort of outsider. A model that comes from outside which seems to tap into the desire from the Fan's perspective that they are get the best players playing against each other more regularly because the tourists themselves always going to struggle to do on the yes. I mean you pretty accurate that the reason the from Gulf league I think It's been around for long telling me when I was at Balkis running sponsorship. They're you know they came to us. It's all day is being rumbling. Around for six years the reason it's cat rumbling is fundamentally if you step back and say what does the audience in the consumer. Won't they tell you they want to see the best gophers in the world playing consistently against each other. And if you certainly take the broader go fan base not just the CO founders. That will tweaking wake out but the the fans actually pretty lot met. You used to watch the masters the open and the Ryder Cup and then drift back out. I'd say I'd love to watch something that brings it in some of the things right interesting we have two different formats the quicker the team the team the nation be nation. So I I think if as long as the Kashima isn't getting a shoot him reciting won't that always made on June. It's April you know in any business in any category similar to bring a product that meets that need and and change the game in the status quo finally dramatically a few faith in the last few weeks Ling site in end of the day. Money money follows eyeballs probably the TV web saying it. But it's true whether or the media whether you're the sponsors upon this you won't largest consistent audience and that you can monetize the cooler idea from a golf league bringing which is you know. Eighteen events in fantastic places around the world with a full Matt does take a lot. I think for the ride More in a team full Simpler scoring with the best flyers is it is fairly compelling the the challenge is held to realize that as you said the the existing oganization to go for the guidance is very similar to loss votes is fragmented. And you know it's it's lots of parts are owned by lots of different players and Surprisingly they put their own interests Whether isn't I A powerful central body? You try and callous things together in a you all dependent on the coming together to try and do things that are in the best interest of of Gulf and. I think you've seen a little bit of that. The last few weeks weather obviously had to get together to try and find an answer to the schedule the last six months of the year if they can to keep the majors get to try. Elaine back in to try and get key tournaments back it. Anything case Palley from the European tourists After the Gulf we know that some of these things are gonNA come into a time of year. When European traditionally mega has a very strong period Gulf. The masses happening is key thing you know. What's obscene Keith? I'm Jay of exactly the kinds of people that would would love to sit down. Probably change a few things about the way. Gophers structured and the calendar looks around the world. But I can't do that on the run you know. They need the support of all their the site. Code is in the game and decide together is is extremely challenging. Little Anita Roddick will leave go for any other sport open to someone coming in literally changing the game by by offering something that is built Found one and it finds the audience come. The media will follow equipment sponsors who follow quickly and the tools themselves I mean. It's when you pair it back. They wake up in the morning and there I sort of saw is the playing membership. Isn't it they are. They are membership based organization. And that's that at at its core is the problem isn't it because if you're not waking up and thinking what the audience wants you'll thinking supply side then you have a challenge or you'll always always be vulnerable thing is if you put it back. So he's grown up in businesses and business a put it back in a business context it essentially is the classic case of you provide in the shelter. What you'll current consumer welts which effectively JOE member. Who SAYS I won't the product like this because that Serbs may and you will miss the mid to long-term strategic direction. You need to go to move with the world is GonNa get and I think that is the floor in the member. Lead structure of the Gulf tolls. Which is the members will always entitled understandably hopeful. I want as many tournaments with prize money next year when I'm playing and if it's not literally means we might not exist in six seven time they'll still say while on enough I'll be plying them in their own money for for them for that families for the career is it is understandable. Why they will say that if you let them make the decision I think. Case of the events open mic night huge strides educating the membership and why? We didn't need to invest some of the money into a new full maps new products The infrastructure a tolerance digital content. Any great you're explaining. Why would benefit apply as bugs in the in the show but also it was essential for the mid long term? When thing you know? A good example of that which Chubby said. He doesn't feel as what you go. Success Full Matla game. It was much implant nation-by-nation only took an ou- clearly takes a lot of the boxes. Funds Italian you about the reason had any gates achieve cannon probably will achieve is the best players in the world playing in the best manner the best women in the world playing in it. I think it'd be a totally different proposition. Because of the FRAGMENTED NITRA GO F-. You know the toll weren't able to bring that into the mix and that was the critical part of the the mix you need to to make something explode and pups I is that constraint even when you get people and as I say I think Keith you couldn't get to better leaders of the tools that really matter in the world who would probably love to change some things that quite significant Even with all of the efforts that making a strike by the cycles I have with that bill of the of the peace people other parts of the game. So two QUESTIONS PAPA. One is about players and how many players sell tickets? You know you've been across the board with you. Becca P. and G. Gillette and then Barclays and then the tall you get a sense of value. How many how many players around the world sell tickets all wheel? Would people pay to when we're talking about the flight to quality or whatever whatever term we years the moment Chevy side about when you asked him about the primary goal fleet Waco bracket I mean Gulf Woods is. He's the generational will mess multigenerational class. He's so far everybody else. It's hard to define roller. Is while ahead of everybody else behind it? I guess. Thirty to forty plus probably actually bringing something again. Always go back to that. Mix would have fun to see them in any way whether it's aligned. Digitally live and event on TV with the media wants to talk about them. Toll to the consider putting them into other parts of the Knicks and I would know see value in them to engage with customers consume as potentially titans of that programs thing that extends honestly faubion fifty players at a maximum that. That's my opinion engulf another. Actually tennis is a an interesting case. Where one governing body did come together outside the migrants to run the whole global toll. And if you look at tennis they moved model in a about a hundred twenty players can really make a sustainable living On the toll and I think if you're in about the seventy probably that making what you go good money a three thousand euros or pounds dollars a mole. Obviously that much you get up to the higher ends it becomes the multimillions but I think that so. The tennis is probably provided an unsettling. It's very similar to go. Individuals full realistically should probably won't be supporting Huntington Twenty. Maybe under fifty top plaza global.

Gulf tennis Premier Gulf League Keith Gulf league Anita Roddick Balkis Knicks Gulf Woods Gophers Huntington Twenty Matt Elaine Chubby Chevy Palley JOE Mix ou Barclays
"anita roddick" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Jim geeky Jim is partner at one better ventures which nurtures and develops consumer brands that have a positive impact on the world prior Jim spent spent eighteen years at Unilever before joining birt's bees where he led the retail strategy brand marketing business development and international prior to serving as its general manager. The business overall he also then at one point in the many years you lead crees entry into the consumer lighting market and then led the Commercial Strategy Adajian Startup skin-care device maker La Lumiere that is a mouthful so welcome. Thank you for having me. Thank you all for coming to listen. I want to get started because one better ventures set out to do something different in the investment space. You're in kind of the venture capital Private Equity Space and I WANNA ask you. You kind of provocative question because it's a question on the podcast in many episodes of comeback too with different guests more recently a guy that I have valued very much. Iran's his harvey. It's the longest episode I think I've done is email like an hour and a half. But he runs he started what is now Adam and Eve so selling adult products. Say for those that need them. My mind is spinning. Sure where we're going to. Ah Come back. I'll come back. I promise but the interesting thing about Phil is that most people don't know is that he is also probably single handedly started well. Oh you has almost single-handedly with partners started three other NGOs around the globe. The they distribute I think it is now eighty million condoms around world prevent and drive down HIV AIDS as well as give people their own freedom and planning when they WANNA have kids which has a dramatic impact in places like sub Saharan Africa. When there's there's not enough food to feed your family but the funny thing is I thought we would get into this conversation with him talking about how he wants to see the world a better place and it was like a left turn out are nowhere where he told me? He's a Milton. Friedman acolyte for those that don't know who melted frequent as I may get this little off. But he's a famous economist. Most notably probably known for saying companies have a single solitary purpose to provide money to shareholders shareholder primacy. Yes so therein lies is my question. How long way around? But what would you say to other Milton. Friedman purists that. Say That's the only reason a company exists so so the Nice thing about this day and age is those two things aren't as as at odds as they might have been twenty five or thirty years ago and I'll explain why so the easiest part right now is you can point point to a lot of examples including Unilever where I sort of started out. The Chairman of Unilever said last year that his brands that are focused on making a positive. Social Impact are actually growing three times faster than the rest of the portfolio. Another example. Avon where everybody knows in the United States Avon was just sold to a Brazilian company called them. The Torah a mentor is a two billion dollar. Latin American wonderful brand that is a core and they also own the body shop which is Anita Roddick's British company so they've created this portfolio of mission driven beauty care brands. They do eleven billion dollars a year in revenue so they're actually the largest B. Corp Certified Company on the planet so instead head of prophets getting in the way of social responsibility or social responsibility getting in the way of prophets. What's actually happened now is does enough examples where people understand that its profit because of purpose and so these things are much more compatible and complimentary than they are at odds anymore and God bless the people that were doing this thirty years ago? Where you know Milton the Friedman his whole idea was actually a decent idea which was simply the leadership team or the? CEO's job is to serve the board of directors of the shareholders. I get that it turned into this. Like profit at the expense of anything else which actually turned into this whole greed is good mindset that we lived with here in the eighties and nineties and Gordon Gecko Enron and all that that stuff so the nice thing about doing this as long as I have done. It is in thirty years. You get to see the entire arc of this from the pit of what business really can be as money. grubbing profit only enterprises this is to actually successful businesses. That you'd be happy to put your money into that also by the way actually happened to do some good around the world. It's just one last thing I know I'm sort of going on about the one point is if he's really start out. At the biggest point we can all agree that this world's got a lot of problems. I environmental problems natural resources going away equity problems problems gender equity lifestyle equity whatever. You WANNA call it. The world is full of problems and there is nothing more powerful on the planet than business and so a lot of people including I and my firm belief that with power comes responsibility and you have an obligation in order to sort of do leave the world a better place than what you found it and make a profit along the way we are. We make these investments estimates with our own personal money because we get good returns and so the idea that you can actually do good and do well is actually a pretty motivating idea if you can do it right. I think loss US applause. Thank you thank you but yeah. I'm thankful that there are people like you in the world. Frankly because I think to your point you didn't go there but I'll go there air. which is the feedback loop as companies get larger and larger and larger? Won't name them I might want their. CMO to come on my podcast. And they won't come if I name them out loud but if you think of big companies maybe big retailers rate over time as they got bigger and bigger they went from small local communities too big behemoths the feedback loop of when they did something something that people didn't like wasn't working quite well and I think they took that profit maximization lever and pushed it to the T- edge. I think eventually self corrects itself but it takes a long long long time to do that so I'm glad that there's good money so to speak putting practice and purpose together. Yeah it's interesting. You say that because I actually I feel fortunate because I get to do this. In this day and age not on the people that were really paving the path back in the eighties and the nineties and early two thousands because they were the ones that were the salmon swimming upstream now. We're actually swimming downstream which does make it easier and so like the standing on the shoulders of giants does kind of apply here but yeah like this idea of trade offs you can actually get the big without selling out like that. Was the big thing they've sold out whether you're a band that started in Austin or Athens Georgia and then got big and you sold out. Well this idea of selling so you can go big without selling out now and what's happening is you. Don't get the pressure from your corporate parents anymore. Because what they're trying to do is harvest the equity. That's been built. They're actually trying to build on it. And incorporate incorporate that into their other brands and so when we sold birds bees to clorox. That's exactly what happened. And that's exactly why this big company their only business. That's not an Oakland California is over here in Durham. Because they wanted it to be a learning function for them to sort of incorporate that into the other parts of their business and they actually through great expense and disruption option to people's family. They move a lot of people here from California so that they can work in it for eighteen months or three years and sort of learned enough about it to bring it back and incorporate so it's actually a sort of self reinforcing enforcing thing. Where does not this pressure to harvest or compromise or trade? You know sort of lie about that underpins. This consumers. These days have got a really really high bullshit detector like they really can smell bs a mile away. And if you think you're smart enough to be asked to consumers you're probably GONNA get found out at some point and so it does catch up to you. It might be short term beneficial but it's long term value destroying so honestly this fight between the marketers and the finance people just doesn't exist because the finance people know that this is really the the longterm means to their end. Let's talk a little about one. Better enter so if I understand You guys focus primarily on growth stage versus say early stage or seed stage companies earnings and just curious. What's the rationale behind that? And then there's that prevent causing any challenges along the way sure so just a quick one on one better ventures for those of you who don't know don't do advising and investing work with early stage but with growth stage companies and We have five criteria we. It's all consumer products. So I am an inch wide and a Mile L. Deep I've spent thirty years only in consumer so I can't talk about any other category other than that. We only worked with the corpse or companies that could be certified because if they bothered to go through the process so we're looking for people that are walking the talk on on mission we have a real preference for this region surprisingly that this is a tech and life sciences town or region but there's a ton of consumer products talent that we're educated here or from here in one actually work here and so a Lotta people in the room here are actually part of a group. That's really trying to stand up consumer products industry three in this town and there's a lot of really great early stage stuff going on here so I think the future is bright and we look for teams that we have good chemistry and because by design we're putting minority stakes into these these companies because we want the founding team to hang around but when you're putting minority money and you WanNa make sure that you're like minded enough that you're not gonna we want the advice to be taken alongside the money so this is a people business at the end of the day. No machines aren't gonNA take over my job because it really is about working with people in the right way. So that's kind of what we're about and the reason we focus on growth stage your companies with ten million or more in revenue because the work in an I invoke that entrepreneurial startup is just vastly different from the work in a growth stage business. And I'm just humble enough to know that I can't do the start. That's for another group of people who are wired to do that where what ends up happening is like the sheer force of will and worth that ethic ethic usually from the founder or a small founding team does everything and makes every decision but what we generally find business usually reaches a sort of an inflection point where the complexity of the business just outstrips the ability of one good smart hardworking person to just flat out do everything and that's really where we step in because we try gotta give our advice and work hand in hand with startup founders. They don't really want that what they really want the money because they're trying to cash checks for people on product they. They don't really want the advice because they're so clear in their mind about what needs to get done and how to do it. So that is very different. Gross stage business where people are like. Oh my God I got it this far but I have no idea what to do now. So that's where we bring in. You know we bring in good basic processes that were learned in places like Unilever Birds Clorox and we stripped him down to their bare bones. Owns and apply them in small businesses. And so it's that idea where. CEO Can't do everything they NITA CMO and they had a supply chain and they need specialist functions and they need to figure grab how to work together and sort of divide up the work. So I think quite good at that. We're self aware enough to know that we're not made for entrepreneurial stuff and so we focus on what we're good at. I'm I'm sorry. I one less thing. Our our problem is that we're so seduced by the amazing start work. That's going on that we're like. Oh well they're on a run rate to ten million dollars and we have this crazy crazy internal justification about how they're really farther along than they actually are but the truth is when we do make those exceptions. We regret it because they're not further along they're just more interesting wistful. It's a crazy little dynamic. That's interesting you have to really be disciplined about yourself to you not get to romanced in the small little thing maybe interesting. We also were born and raised in these larger fifty billion dollar global multinationals and we know how they think and so it makes it easier for us is to transition a business to those people because we know what they're going through how they think what their processes are like and we can position things. We've walked in their shoes so we decision things in a way that make more sense nice to them so we just play this nice balance of avoiding work that we're not good at working stage that we've got some skill that and then being able to hand off appropriately that's awesome. So what do you look for in a companies. He's say brand before making an investment meaning. Because you you coming from a consumer background. I'm assuming that there is a need to have something there are you. If you're at a ten million or or higher growth rate we could try one hundred things but we know five things matter. We've actually gotten good at being serious about the five things that matter. And so what is on brand. One is on product when his team was on one financial metric and one.

Unilever Jim Friedman partner California CEO La Lumiere Adam HIV Iran clorox Unilever Birds Clorox United States Eve Anita Roddick Avon Milton birt
"anita roddick" Discussed on Sunday School

Sunday School

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Sunday School

"You know and that's why actually came up with this that phrase conscious luxury because we realized wow there's actually a connotation here and let's just remind mind people you know there should not be compromise ever in the aesthetics or the qualitative positioning of a product if it is environmentally sound and so in case of Russky you know we have worked with <hes> fair trade gold so working with the tiny little gold in Peru and actually <hes> the miners are predominantly Apopka farmers that just happened to find gold on their last hearsay so they're mining it and all the prophets profits they get from the mining goes into their farming and the entire community the benefits from it you know and it was so sweet we had a little video conference with them and they all dressed up nicely near sued for the video conference decided that wasn't feed and the you know Andy's but it was so nice was so nice that they knew that there somehow contributing to some luxury good product and here they are so far away and try to dress up what we appreciate it so much but we're so and it's Ross we just have to added with my Gosh. We have to source materials anyways so we might as well to source from a sound location and the same thing is also applying to our gemstones. The older gemstones our minds sustainably we have been certified by the Responsible Jewelry Council which does a very thorough audit is to work at the body shop L.. What a great experience? I was a great experience and Anita Anita Roddick was working with some Pharma's in Nicaragua and she was guessing sesame seed from them to make sesame scrub but she had taught the farmers how to follow gallantly not herself. She doesn't know how to form <hes> but she also while she was in the Karakia. She met some some kids who were on a dump who used to municipal dump and they would go and collect bottles on that and she didn't know what to do about it so she set up a schooler for the children and we went to visit the school and it was the most amazing experience of my life because she was so they was so proud of her and she was so revered and these kids were guessing appropriate education they have proper school uniforms and it was like the Queen had arrived when we went to visit it was the most incredible experience and shows how businesses can go above and beyond behaving responsibly they can actually change lives and I thought that was a really good example of that's that's one full story and it just gives me chills you know and so often for us. It's so easy to make that contribution but it's incredible see how huge the positive impact yeah you know again Dan that's a matter of will she had the will to want to have a positive impact in one to make a change in how wonderful and I'm sure that it has a very positive <hes> trickle effect and inspired other people and I really am such it's a shame when when she died obviously shame also and she stopped doing the shop because I think that that passion kind of went with how exactly anyway okay so now I have a question for you own real diamonds versus manufactured diamonds up you really interested to know as Dan and so the same thing then applies in as we're talking about fair trade gold it also applies to the gym industry so as I mentioned all our stones are <hes> responsibly sourced and then one other new category besides being sourced from the earth is of course the lab-grown diamonds and yes it is a fact that lap grown diamonds do use less energy to be grown and certainly people in planet it or not negatively impacted that is just a fact and this is the fact that we're embracing and we're actually stepping into credit diamonds as the next chapter of russkies initiatives within within the world of sustainability but having said all of that we are also and we have <hes> expressed ourselves to the diamond industry that we are very excited to also use diamonds as long as they're sustainably sourced so we are in conversation with the G._I.. which was the Geologic Institute of America to look for those minds and they certainly exist <hes> in Botswana? You know where there are very regulated processes. <hes> diamonds are traceable. <hes> the G._I.. has created an APP. When you buy a diamond jewelry store you can get this APP and you can actually trace your diamond their photographs of the diamond coming out of the mind and chose entire process of what happens to that diamond until it ends up in your ring and that is fantastic and you know it's Russkies these efforts within the credit diamond world has the impact of encouraging minors <hes> or the mining industry to mind sustainably and that's fantastic and we will be their customer you know home and how when when you say about manufacture diamonds how how does manufacturer so they're actually three different processes to are the most popular that's vapor deposition? <hes> in the other one is high heat high pressure her which is the one that's high energy which is really exactly that's totally replicating the natural process by heat high pressure <hes> and then I think de Beers with their plant are really also growing the colored diamonds which I think is really really exciting <hes> right now predominantly it's more clear or slightly brown or yellow that we're seeing coming out of China and India <hes> but I have to say totally appreciate the technology. That's behind it. You know try right. If you're GONNA grow diamond that's hard try to figure out how to make a crystal that is hard. I mean we have these melting pots. That are the size of this building right and we chuck in Certain Chemicals from Potter Sodium Courts and so on quartz sand. That's that's all melted and outcomes would looks like honey but that's crystal and then it goes into the different malls and then we cut it you know that such a tedious intricate process I appreciate the crystal because of its manufacturing and I can only say the same thing about created diamonds. You know I really appreciate the technology in the human intelligence. That's behind it. You know do you think though that that the real diamond industry said when I say real isn't even the right phrase but the mind diamonds <hes>. Do you think that the jury industry is going to be trying to tell us that they have more value because they're older. Maybe in there certainly something about that you know but I also think in particularly young generation or the younger generation they will all have seen those documentaries they will have seen the blood diamond movie you know and I have to say <hes> my mother probably would not by crater diamond but my daughter's only and it's really a matter of the values and the values that are associated associated with the younger generation you know they don't care for its old. They don't they don't care or they don't care if it's old but they care it was extracted and bad conditions and I have to say it was interesting. I was just at the Las Vegas Jewelry Fair last week and had to give her presentation at G._I.. <hes> about this topic and there are a lot of people from Africa that had minds and there were saying well. What about all these artisanal minds you know then the livelihood of so many people are dependent on listen? I said yes absolutely right and you know if we can assign a process of cleaning that up and making sure people totally taking care of intrigue at the Right Way and you know the technologies out there to extract these wonderful <hes> stones from the Earth if we can just apply the more environmentally safe practices. It's everyone wins the you know and certainly I have to say by embracing the created diamond industry does not mean that one dismisses certainly the artistic element you know that's wonderful but <hes> and I just felt in general last week from Las Vegas at the whole injured industries ready to embrace a better process you know and because people are at stake and people's voices are being heard and the photography is documenting. Everything and everyone wants the best so I think it'll it will take up few years but I think I totally believe in the sustainability of extracting these wonderful mill minerals from the earth so you you're celebrating one hundred twenty five years and what can we expect to see is part of your celebration my Gosh and selling we're realizing what one hundred twenty five years out about happen you know in a certain sense. I have to say you have the source retail stores but every time I have asked speak somewhere of course I speak about Swarovski's history and I'm usually mobbed after I speak by people saying I had no idea about what's Russky. Did we didn't know that it was crystals on Dorothy slippers and the wizard of Oz or Audrey Hepburn Tiara at breakfast at tiffany's or unmanned Marilyn Monroe's dress when she sang happy with Mr President different so I think in terms of sauce history we have so much communication to do. We have to communicate about that heritage slow. I think that's what will focus on <hes> next year and you know I think what we really wouldn't position as the fact that we're master cutters we cut crystal. We cut gemstones. We can cut real diamonds. We can cut <hes> created diamonds so really emphasizing Swarovski's craftsmanship its heritage. It's strong long value for quality and then of course what we really want to celebrate are those various different collaborations. We're talking about from the past to the present and <hes> again you know our product truly is so multifaceted. No Pun intended ended so our customers also you know and that is why those different collaborations are so important to continue to show how the crystal can be implemented so many different ways you know in so many different areas with its clothing or fashion jewelry <music> architecture also up cycling. I yes exactly tell me about that. So we're working with <hes> young fashion designers wells working with various different universities like several Saint Martin's the world Cultivar Parsons F._I._T.. And we're certainly <hes> working with the students on the sustainable use of crystal and that means reusing crystal up cycling crystals and we're working with <hes> young designers to do that as well such as Kevin. And get Monier Kevin Yemen yeah has been amazing at <hes> reusing the crystal and still as we mentioned earlier showing an incredibly luxuries product so I think that is really a new unexciting chapter <hes> <hes> it's interesting you know because it's Russky as I mentioned we had such a we have such a strong quality consideration which means the quality control is very strict so not won crystal leaves the factory with a bubble in it or scratch on it and my question is are we to strict with our quality control so if you upcycle crystal it might have that scratch on it and might have that bubble in which you of course can see until you take a loop and look at it so you know for the sake of the planet environment. Oh come on lead me to loosen up a bit but it's simple and penelope Cruz telling me that well we dressed her at the film festival in Venice three or two and a half years ago and <hes> we gave her first our first collection collection of credit diamonds along with our sustainability report and apparently she took really three hours to read that report and we got a call the next day from her agent asking if she could work with us wow and that was such an honor for us you know <hes> to be asked by her..

Russky Anita Anita Roddick Kevin Yemen Responsible Jewelry Council Dan Nicaragua Las Vegas Jewelry Fair Apopka penelope Cruz de Beers Karakia Peru Andy Ross Potter Sodium Courts Africa Botswana Saint Martin Las Vegas
"anita roddick" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"Don't overcook it get stuck in and do even if it's going to be an imperfect result to begin with you doing it. You're on the journey you cracking on, and you learning as you go off low people would absolutely sugar at LA and would want to planet to the degree bi-strategic be more grown up. Be polished plan ahead all that kind of stuff. And I think that, that represents the two extremes on the spectrum probably and everything in between a nothing 'cause long as you recognize the I think, Joe your inspiration from where it feels right safe. For me. It would be people like Anita Roddick. It even be keys Flynn. You know, he very softly pass less way know where he hides passions like his metal cross that he then turned into a commercially viable project. I just think that's so inspiring, you know, and then and then him openly talking about his love of the team and his passion to drive into do that stuff. That, that's the type of person. I didn't buy with but, you know, who's causes is true, obviously action beats intention that so many people who, who intend, they talk about doing it. But the flipside is it's. It's hard isn't the failure rate is high. But we do learn as we go. Hi. Hi, I'm guilty of also often do in the action, you know, and, and they're not having fully planned to our and then and then trying to work out and then got naturally. It was a bit of a shit audio. I probably should have listened more to the team. But but it's probably good. Fun, isn't it? It's probably good fun, starting stuff. And then try to work out. I mean like most of the stuff that we've come up with. I've come up with after failed, you know, but the pardon the pun, but the Bredon buzzer, the kind of beating heart of the business is, it's glamorous selling pallets of lovely lovely cake. But that is that is it, you know, all of these other ingenious ideas, that we've had over the is, you know, I cry like savory cakes and a little glum ping of shoe and all these crazy creative things have not. She made us any money. And you know if you're looking at it, conventionally have been failures if you like, but have they really they've been? You've learned loads on the back of that. Van you crack Denny I always say it's not what you earn. It's what you learn. And you know, falls learn fast, I love learning. I love learning. I do prefer learning without the really expensive kinda mess up a proper swear. Then that's. Yeah, I I'm we've now probably simplified and contracted the business. And if I look back, I probably think, yeah, maybe I shouldn't have done that it was a bit impulsive, but he doesn't know unless you try to you, but now I am simplifying stuff again so good. What? What? Lovely to meet you welcome people. Find out more about what you do. Can you remember your website address, otherwise, otherwise, I won't put it in the notes. Go on trying to get it right. Definitely definitely of Lido, Honey, buns dot. K. E K. Larry easily is pretty easy, and the on social media and stuff like that as well. Yeah, you're on Twitter Facebook leisures, and we've written a couple of cookbook. Yeah. Given away you try secrets there or what was what was the motivation for that? Yes. Some we, we figure the you've you've said it will really laser people can make amazing cakes. I'm I'm pretty relaxed about LA and the recipes and whatnot. If we can share as millions fire people, that's brilliant. But the so much more to building the business down that so on pre chilled about sharing the recipes good. While I'm gonna I'm gonna put my daughter who is ten in a couple of weeks time she is obsessed by kick. She breaks three or four times a week. I self taught because I'm not a vacant or an a little bit too busy at the moment, because we're in the process of building a restaurant for ridiculous reasons. But she, she gets out the YouTube video. She plays that she absolutely loves it. You talk about this kind of nature nurture thing. And I look at I mean the trade, but it's not really coming from me apart from the fact that I've got bakers, and he knows we do. She just absolutely loves it. So I wonder whether she'll end up following the trajectory but I'm gonna get the book and, and show it to an an inspiration. But thank you so much for taking the time. Good luck with what you do. I'm I'm, I'm fading calm and relaxed. I'm sure you're not Joyce harder from your side of the table, but this is a.

Flynn LA Anita Roddick K. E K. Larry Joe Twitter YouTube Denny Joyce
"anita roddick" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

09:15 min | 2 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

"Incredibly inspired by Coco Chanel, who may have a probably she was a tyrant, but she was she fully terrain par. And she was the first to do so many things. And she was a woman in business when it wasn't the done thing toll. Yeah. Ship, lots of lovers and, you know, she I'm sure made lots of enemies, but I am a huge Myra of, of how she just decided what she was going to do and followed that path made she created herself. So she's always been a hero of mine. Anita Roddick of couse, Nutley Mussina, who founded supporter here is another one. Yeah. No news, gone on to do various other businesses and things. You know, it's all people rolled up, this leaves a love negree. I love to finish off by asking your few quick, Christians that I know our listeners would love to hear from you. Do you have any particular morning, routine to set you up for a productive day? I have such a morning routine love it. So my alarm goes off at tempo, six. I put my Kathleen, and I have my two cups of speedy breakfast. T- from the rats, he company, which is run by my friend Henrietta. Another women in business who created the special breakfast blend for me, except now it's best selling t shirt with the world. Read in bed for while. But when I go to my desk, which is probably about eight thirty sometimes nine so I have much time in bed thinking, and reading into into my lovely husband looking out of the window. My garden, I do ten minutes of com dot com. Meditation before I start. Yeah. If ever I skip that my day is completely different. It's just much more. Scattered a Arctic, and I've discovered I absolute need to determine meditation before I start my day. Yeah. Then I my off to that the routine could be anything. Yeah. I mean it just goes, whatever direction the day, takes the very last thing. I do is before leave my desk in the evening. I write my own my kick Cape pad my list for the next day. When I've done my combination, the following morning, I look at that list knots, my day already. Set out. Yeah. But I find it much easier to spend ten minutes, the end of the previous day thinking about what I've got to do next day. And that's my blueprint. I might add to it. Yeah. I also my phone have something could Wunderlist. Yup. W. U. N D. L S D, which, again, is this is an app, you can show with people. So all my team have the same app. So I can put things on a to do list for them. And I see when they've ticked it off. My husband has wanted list. Sometimes he looks at in. I can take a horse to water make yes. So the morning routine is, is crucial. Yeah. And then at the end of the day, I have if I haven't had a walk yet, that's when I go, my long war. Yeah. Yeah. The end of my, we have a pair, where I live. And so I walked to the end of the pier and back and that's that's about eight thousand steps. So I have to get another couple of thousand years somewhere. Yeah. Beautiful. Thanks for sharing a love hearing morning retains and it's hopefully inspire. Lots of listeners out there to, to create their own. If they haven't got one, I feel like it's the foundation stone for the day. Yeah. I do too. And I love the early morning because you are less likely to be interrupted, especially for, for younger mums, who have young kids because often they are up. And then did your day is detaining people. You never quite have the world to yourself in the way the do in the morning. Yeah. And I feel like every day is clean. She to paper. Yeah. It's a clean sheet paper on that to do agree. So I think you already answered this, but just in case there is another one. Do you have a favorite KiKi K product? It's to do pads giving new today. But I will say that I walked into your show, the for the first time, I don't know, maybe three years ago, something on, I just like wow. Can I buy shows in this business? This is amazing. Great. But I just fell but you had a just as you had done for yourself. You'd feel the need in me to surround myself with nice things, which part of the motivation, the pleasure of motivating myself today. Yes, you regularly feature in the Christmas. Stockings Marius people in my thank you so much very much appreciated. Thank trying to turn them into Oganization human beings. That's good to good things happening because so much. So what's your favorite book, and why is probably Little Women actually, which I was named after Joe in Little Women by my mother, I she. She tagged zoo Fien on the end. But I should really always been Joe and I particularly love Joe March as a character. She's feisty and doesn't wanna play by the rules else's rules. And I love that book, and I have a really nice vintage copy with a lovely kind of gold in. 'lustration on the couple. Oh, I reread it every now and then I'll get for thanks linked to that in the show notes. So one very last question for you. If you could go back to younger self so say, maybe when you're late teens, what advice, would you give yourself knowing what you know, now? And, you know, so much. I think I just wanted to reassure her, that it was all going to be okay because when I was at school, I was really put down my teachers, they couldn't deal with the fact that they knew I was smart. But I, I didn't wanna do lessons. I it's I would argue with my teacher. I will learn logarithms if you tell me why I might ever need to use a logo rhythm in my life. We have almost fisticuffs in the classroom, 'cause she couldn't tell me took an astrologer friend late to say that she used logarithms all the time in a strategy and it's like, wow, if you told me that when I was fifteen I'm actually paid attention. So I kind of fought with my teachers and there were dealing with me was to say, you'll never be anything literally, I had to teach. When I said, I wanted to be a secretary who said, if you haven't make so much as go Friday, eat my hat. And I just heard this kind of rocket ignite under my Chad with the determination to improve wrong. So I had to put up the loss of being, you know, put down in dissed my teaches. That's why probably you are like you are today, ups it probably is. But, you know, I still think it was unforgivable if I'd been a different sort of girl, I might have kind of bought in -solutely instead of rebelled again, but I would probably have just liked little bit of reassurance at that age that it was going to be okay. And actually, I was right. You know what I felt in my hall about that? The traditional academic path not being the one for me. Even though it's what every other girl in my school was doing. Yeah, it would have been nice to hear that instead of just being told I was I was rolling. I was never going to amount that is such a good way of ending out amazing conversation because I think there are so many people who would have had similar. Situation from teachers parents peers friends, whatever. So think saying what you have done and created is just incredibly inspiring, and I'm sippy grateful for the amazing shock, let you have. Keep them. Now. It's available everywhere but me when I discovered it, I, I couldn't find it everywhere. So I used to give us an do and I love it. So thank you for all that you do to the world and continue inspiration to especially women out there who are wanting to be just like you. So I think you bring so much beautiful things to the world. And I cannot wait to continue so you are nixed journey, and what that will be we'll funk for having me. I think it's been really fun. We could've done this three hours guys but. That hasn't been your back. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thank you. Wow. What an incredible woman, Joe as I could have spoken to her for hours. I loved hearing her ideas and thoughts on business, the importance of taking the steps to fully dreams at being true to yourself, a hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. I found it truly inspiring how even though she left school adjusted stain. She was able to create a success of his self through passion, determination and hard work, and become one of the world's most renowned businesswomen, Joey Sutton amazing example of had no matter what your circumstances, if you're willing to learn a work hard, you can achieve anything you, set your mind to a really believe this,.

Joe March Coco Chanel Anita Roddick Arctic Henrietta Nutley Mussina Kathleen KiKi zoo Fien Wunderlist Joey Sutton W. U. N secretary -solutely ten minutes thousand years three hours three years two cups
"anita roddick" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Mixergy

"And it grew at has been very quickly over the last six years. So that would help take you off. You were doing well before, but not not nearly like this. So let's go back and understand than how you got started speaking of your son. I heard one of the reasons why you decided that you were gonna start a business was you were working so much in feeling like you weren't getting to spend time with your son right? Yes, yes, I that you are doing give a day in the life that you think back on and say, this is an example of what I didn't want to continue. I do. I was on my last in clothing business will this work for spree in. I had the honour working with stuck Tomkins, and that was really compelling because his idea was just getting to the environment on sustainability issues surrounding apparel manufacturing. I had sent already twenty years in our desert desire. So through that, you know, it was a very natural segue to understand what he is. He is the the man behind the north face. Right? He he will ask, yes, yes. Okay. Just to give us a sense of it was environmentalism. So you got to see him in, you said what I said? But he's doing is such important work and what I learned as exceleron in very interesting until through him, I met. You know, you're going to narrate Anita Roddick in all, David growl in also of environmental environmentalists socially impact businesses in it. It would refrain how I thought about is nece and meaning that it's very possible that business can be a source for good that a winning find your calling that it's bigger than the bottom line and how how we create a company that we would want to work for. And so when I was working at a screen for that year production in a piece of the company to his former partners, Susie, she came back in the very difficult situation with other investors to make what for conventional decisions. And while I was on a buying trip per spree in London, I found is amazing. Apothecary, I walked in it smell like. Vinyl alive and was so beautiful at herbs and teachers, homeopathic remedies, missiles, denying wine, and I smelled a lavender essential oil and I was taken transported. It was like, you know, that was my hub of went of, I wanna understand what the is lights. Now's play. Why feels this way year? And is it because at that point you said, look, I found my possible business. I know that I can't work myself ragged with a with a young kid. I see these entrepreneurs building something that's meaningful. This smell is the path towards creating that new lemonade stand for the adult, Susan. Yeah, it was. So it was a combination of the love of the scent and the opportunity that spoke to you to to the girl lemonade stand owner. It just somehow it just arises at the same time. It's it's hard to trace it back to that, but I always say about pay attention when circumstances world where you are you are heloc, feels sort of all arise at the same time and. Slow down enough to sort of feel at feel side so that you can take with you than that become sort of a threat to the next thing, but it's much easier to see in hindsight, you know, if I would have had that same experience, I would've mmediately thought this is a mature market there. Tons of people making these things I'm going to have to go and compete against. All these big is is too hard versus when when I think about the entrepreneurs y interview here, it's not at all unusual for them to say this product needed to exist. Nobody made it. We needed to have a way to q quality assurance test software. No one had a way to do that fast. I created a company and boom. It was called rainforests QA dot com..

Susie north face Anita Roddick Tomkins London David growl Susan twenty years six years
"anita roddick" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Unusual emergency today when a construction worker on downtown high rise project was impaled on a metal rod the worker was on the thirtieth floor of a building under construction. At four zero one east Wacker when he fell according to fire department. Spokesman Larry Langford and. Was impaled on rebar that went through his thigh and crews. Got on the scene they had already brought the man down apparently they cut. The rebar and brought him and the rebar down to ground level are in ruins crews started treating a man and Made a cautious, transport over to northwestern hospital and the fire department crew is said. To the ER to help fire department squad one went in. With their heavy equipment and actually cut the rebar in. The emergency, room a little unusual, but what you have to Langford said don't, be surprised to see this one. On an, episode of the show Chicago fire Mike Krause her NewsRadio on. What oh five point nine FM three Chicago police officers ended anonymous civilian are being, credited with saving a man who was trying to kill himself this week on the northwest side at Nagel and the Kennedy expressway Monday morning Lieutenant Tonio Bao's stopped to talk to a man he thought had been in an accident snarling traffic the. Gentleman told me he goes this isn't. Going to end well this is going to be a suicide by capital Lieutenant says the crisis intervention training, he received came in handy Then the, man bolted and began to climb the fence over the expressway through officers who are made officers in the sixteenth district were writing heading the court came, out of nowhere to help me. Lieutenant bail grabbed the fifty five year old man's. Waste while officer Robert Roth scaled the, fence and. Grabbed the man's arm officer Anita, Roddick in a civilian also helped, in the man was taken to the hospital for. Treatment Bernie, to foia NewsRadio one. Of five point nine FM News time two oh eight traffic and weather together on the eighth, sponsored by the hot tub and swim spa blowout expo here's Laura von outbound Edens nineteen..

Larry Langford northwestern hospital Kennedy expressway Lieutenant Tonio Bao Wacker Chicago officer fire department foia Mike Krause Bernie Robert Roth Nagel Anita Roddick fifty five year
"anita roddick" Discussed on Sportstalk 790

Sportstalk 790

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on Sportstalk 790

"That's how hungry they are and then if depending on how the teams the collector teams we're talking about do then we'll see if there's a drop off in in in fan ship or if it becomes a phantom or becomes goes to the other team i don't think it'll ever end up like some of the places like arizona where you go and see a cowboys game you see more cowboy jerseys in the stands that i don't think that'll happen anytime soon but i think they'll support it and hold onto it for at least for the immediate future i gotta give some credit i gotta give some credit to the vegas fans because i did not i mean obviously them being such a success and just the vegas is anita roddick kevin's been saying is up to or they five hundred a one to reach the five hundred to one to win the stanley cup man that's unbelievable but it's just like watching them an even during regular season games not even just in the playoffs like from seeing highlights that fan that place is rocking every night for that team it's it's unbelievable like the energy that's in t mobile t mobile raina and it shows you what winning franchise in a new city like that can do and it's like i i really think that hey i it could be a really good thing for vegas if this team keeps winning but the nhl is always tricky guys like you just don't know there's so much parody in it like the blackhawks were a perennial stanley cup contender they're not in the playoffs this year so it's just it's a weird thing in hockey where where where where it's really tricky to go from year to year and see how they do but this is one of the great i seasons in any sport and for this to happen in vegas after all the conversations of oak could it be a really good sports city and for this team to really sort of like i guess galvanize city and just starting to get people to root for sunday because it's like they have shots of fans outside the building in addition to having eighteen to twenty thousand strong in the building going absolutely nuts from this team it's unbelievable it is all right here's.

arizona nhl blackhawks hockey vegas anita roddick
"anita roddick" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Goodell anita roddick shirt i need a center i need a guy you know what i'm gonna i'm gonna take the smart pick here i'm taking james daniels iowa you can play center he can play guard let's keep matthew stafford up right alexandra who stay love those iowa offense align ball fair guard centers to guard rhonda all the guys that have come out of there over the years yeah even the biggest bus from the iowa offensive line turned out to be a pretty good guard robert gallery cincinnati bengals are upright that's me cincinnati bengals are twenty one by virtue of etrade down with the buffalo bills obviously that involved cordy glenn mel what are you thinking here cincinnati's not looking as loaded as they have in years past now and you've talked about the the offensive line as a big issue on this football team and we know about the cordy glenn situation there but there was both left and right tackle it hasn't worked out for a boy he and fisher the way we had hoped yeah i offense llamas a worse than the nfl last year early on it was horrible i couldn't say you can't if you can't block them you can't beat them so i'm gonna go here again picture all of this with mel shaving cream on talking now i'm debate to me sitting in the caf you want to hear what might the betas colton miller or mike mcglinchey columbia loves them play left tackle does not and and i don't care because that's what he's not making the pick so i'm gonna go mcglinchey or miller and mcglinchey is plug and play right tackle and he played left tackle when struggle quickness he's at right tackle got gland or do i go left tackle a move glen i think it's a very similar situation there i'm looking at my grades miller headache similar enough i'm going to go here or pain here i'm gonna i'm gonna go here with the better athlete colton miller now i was going to be better athlete mcglinchey tested out stronger and i thought i'm one colton miller since he gets colton miller and they also have cordy glenn i mean that's a decent offseason for tackles as much as todd's down quote miller todd you're picking for buffalo with twenty two.

colton miller mike mcglinchey fisher cordy glenn iowa anita roddick buffalo todd james daniels mel nfl etrade bengals cincinnati rhonda alexandra matthew stafford
"anita roddick" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Hateful racist policies that he's doing today it is that'd be what how california's lead in that resistant another some there were to continue till 2020 during i i would like to make a distinction between resistance and opposition i think opposition is what always happens every two years with um with the midterms and so one and that's fair and legitimate and through the body politic resistance i get emails from move on from various other leftwing organizations that have pledged resistance to everything he does this isn't about they don't even know what he's done and i would even ask you what what racist policy has heat you know you just said all these racist things what what's one what's one thing but this when he's called mexicans rapist and murderer he called some who come here rapists and murderers and at low some of them have very set it up he he targeted issam there darpa people and then he moved on to his aid identity in oslo to them yeah so that's wasn't a racist statement has nothing to do with race scott literally nothing to do with radio has warned ajino that he not a policy that wasn't a policy how could address the misogynist statement said he makes do if you on that he not yes he was a groper he was isn't this horrendous and we still decided yes and he still elevated more women to positions of power so his actions and his words heaven aligned and i would that you mentioned policies he's put it implemented policies that are race sustained and misogynistic and that's completely not true but i think we also need to remember there's a difference between opposition and resistance and to resist just by virtue of he said it easy on isis it was almost a year ago almost a year ago where you had the major major at a parade but major major resistance in los angeles in downtown los angeles los angeles were rarely do you get people out walk in another great but that was a model of democracy it was all of apps anita roddick democracy ifc with all if it was astonishing and i've never thought to the very peaceful or wearing ramadan he lied her little locked acquisition 1950s of of objectify women took it to.

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"anita roddick" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"When jewelers laden's standard your date translator a major whistle blower so much we know about nine eleven this thanks to you in total credibility here my my issue in closing is this think about how fifteen sixteen years ago you're exposing government can connects his alqaeda that back then that was unknown now it's everywhere it's confirmed i'll give talked about in congress john mccain's deeply involved got in trouble and the patriots that blew the whistle we're the ones being persecuted but the good here's the information is now out well i hope i hope again i'm hoping i'm really hoping hoping debt white house attorneys general liz attorneys are watching this general flynn is not only protected by the facts the real choice for the need for nancy's lower we won't use it was eddie before that if you'd like to get a magic to him they're not watching live they'll hear about us to give your advice it is not only he's protected by the fact that he has by also as a whistle blower he is covered by whistle blower even though is not very strong the whistle blower laws the socalled laws be have easy covered by that okay and uh absolutely mind boggling how the attorneys will of and in this case that general flynn's one trouble anita roddick you know how be have traditional warfare style as great wall cher nontraditional same think apply legalese a little bit of this they are not playing they are not playing by the rule this this this special council the conflict of interests okay biggest kukoc the tasting tire russia gate ours trump allies gone why did the traditional way that's why they have been losing thought bar they have to just decipher the gloves the com agreed that so you beat these political persecution all right back of the.

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"anita roddick" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on WTMA

"Believe that all immigrants by terrorists and criminals lino gracie fields garmin do they know their creation turn on yeah antifarmer films present a hammer and sickle production dawn of the disruptor haiti pelosi chuck's humor maxine waters bernie sanders and rob reiner as need had now i see what your idea of a free country is not cuisine anything you want but what if anyone disagrees with you in italy that thrown into jail while anita roddick in dawn of the disrupt third rated pg or progressive guilt thanks jim that was pretty damn good very very nice gift for me this morning has anyone seen or heard from the afc pelosi since she was attacked by the dreamers that she fostered and created i haven't seen her since jim she given a speech my guess is this woman's going to have a nervous break down from what just happen she is so use the dumping on everyone she is so used to running the white men around like their little boys you are afraid of a woman with a uh a meat or meat cleaver in her hand she thought she could do it to anyone little did she know that the very dreamers that she thought were eating out of her hand feeding her in feeding our friends with billions of dollars you have no idea what i'm talking about unless you studied these things do you have any idea how much money this immigrant thing produces for the corrupt political parties and by the way some both sides of the aisle if you think it's only her you're wrong the coproduce allegedly quote conservatives are very big into housing for the illegal aliens and set at center and they're totally in favour of granting amnesty to dreamers and all their families because it's a big money just like it is for the vatican so it's a totally corrupt system we elected donald trump to take on the system or the swamp which is what it was called.

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"anita roddick" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Zero forty to sixty one patrick who's up next pat she has a question about her tangerine tree okay hey pat good morning good mind paul that net giving k o nectarine okay ad uh several years ago i plan to kill neck during key and they're here i got pumped beautiful block them and i started to get work that a lot of foul off and though it remained on a tree if they grew they got big grab a clear liquid hang from equine anita roddick right on the firing of i on the tree and i never find get and i'm wondering whether that is customary nectarines to do i go spry i fade them every cool week when the bone night i could buy yeah i had with my peak case all right neck right neck to undermine i hope again catching what do you think well deck to read peaches there are pretty pretty close to being cousins in this situation now when when did you put the first application of your bone i fruit trees spray on all the tree r k i started after the petrol tall perfect okay now what i want you to do is this for next year i want you to buy a plastic or some type of an artificial peach or even apple and something that has this damn and you're gonna take a piece of string that's about afoot eighteen inches long tie one an to the apple all the peach other the pair whatever it doesn't matter and then you're going to tie two two year tree one of the right side one i'm a left side at idle level and you're going to do this during the end of march beginning of april when you see that winter is starting to elect go of us in spring is starting to move in and you're going to rob on the fruit the vassily and that is something that when i went to university of massachusetts one of my teachers who taught about fruit trees with the test that we did as the class and what happens is windy insects awry they will laid their eggs bond rotten fruit well you've got a trap set for them and when you see the dnc six get stuck from the fruit that's when you.

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"anita roddick" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"And they were significant number two for wherever stole my guys well tell you we ended up to buy her out net for any investment capital is ninety million dollar company at that time a 45 million dollar loan which would never can how to buy her out and it was in gerry began to articulate his reason for doing that which was this vision of using the power of a company to do better in the world and noone one supper anita roddick at the body shop and ben and jerry's we're talking about ozgur yeah and sustainability never heard that word or ganic was associated only with produce and here it always think about my life is coming full circle like god if he's of right we could change the world through business in a very positive way oh my god this is what i've always wanted to do and i had the honour be name ceo in two thousand and four and address the cruiser partner walks away he gets alone the other proserv macbook the guy the bag put serbians of part was devon right apart the go the guy's outta us the guy that the bank put in your letter he was good on the debt like internally ends up leaving to work for he is such a wonderful goods through his sole person and so it was a it in putting first the whole company knew we were up for sale in it with with real articles like everyone's the human there's an accident oh yeah we're i thought we were all ten whoa what's the commute yeah what's the communication and how do you get people excited about.

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"anita roddick" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on WSB-AM

"And repairs national tire and battery that's all you need this report brought to you by ntb on wsb president trump is already making news in poland there were two seven hours ahead of us i believe something like that at any rate he's already spoken at a joint news conference with the president of poland this morning addressing the north korean missile threat i don't like to talk about what i have planned but i some free severe things that we're thinking about that doesn't mean we're going to deal on a drawer red lines that same warsaw press coverage president trump said russia was involved that election tampering in last year's election but it also could been eleven other people in other countries as well them then president trump criticize former president obama for gnawing about the hacking and not doing anything about it he was sold it was russia by the cia as i understand it it was well reported and he did nothing about it they say he joked well i don't think he joked i think what happened is he thought hillary clinton was going to win the election and he said let's not the when he thing about it had he thought the other way he would have done so the thing about it and that speaking later of what is known as these three sees summit now explain what that is in just a moment of president trump gathering up those twelve nations under a us better this morning saying that look we can help you when your nations us wrong all the free nations of europe are strong and the west became stronger as well together our nation and yours can bring greater peace prosperity and safety to all of our people this summit ushers and the next great energy frontier this is largely about energy because we are that great exporter we've just become uh it's what's going on in our country is incredible the three seized initiative is an effort to improve trade infrastructure and energy links among the twelve nation between the baltic black anita roddick season for non geography majors no none of those touch the usa all but one of the three countries is formerly communist and their economies and infrastructure still develop king and there is a pitch to purchase us energy wsb news time is five fortyfive saudi five five am 750 wsb and atlanta's morning news breaking news first and accurate plus the top three things you need.

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"anita roddick" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"anita roddick" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"To do young people have seen it at what say larry paging gugel as bad as he by being held prisoner role has even myself they've seen the difference said people can lay that was richard branson jim ratcliffe of annual susan thirdplace now the league table he's definitely less wellknown than sir richard branson but here is speaking to bbc hardtalk programme last year i started life and council house in manchester on how to get where i am today and i don't feel particularly her shows about the fact that are being quote successful nieto's pose it's texas we've of work pretty hard for us fifty years to get an opportunity is open to everybody in the planet america embraces that culture much more warmly them we tend to do in the uk we go we got a greeneyed about somebody has been successful in the uk and that was jim ratcliffe the chemicals tycoon hamish that they both make a similar point sunday in that entrepreneurship used to be a dirty word do do you remember that surgery would is a set of foster tornadoes god still in the street corner an ost people to name some entrepreneurs and they could only nine to people and was anita roddick from the body shop and am and richard branson and today i think you a know lot will people would name a lot more entrepreneurs and that's something along people aspire to bin what change because i do me in that very first fast track list it was cold it was one of the slogans houston it was a thanked his children was down two margaret thatcher was something else going on i think it was a combination of of of of things certainly fetch suit was was the starts and then these of a selfperpetuating they started to see the entrepreneurs doing it and it's nc become more acceptable and a lot more fun and the strangers them because we rebel to hold two ideas now hit outweigh big businesses bad theresa may doesn't spindly tom quoting big business anymore blood conservative politicians use to do but entrepreneurship is great we love sir richard branson but we don't like the bankers it's it's funny is that how we how we can have these two.

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