17 Burst results for "Angelo Ponzi"

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:20 min | 5 months ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Is love each other in carefree job. Amen amen. Thank you so much. This has been a motivational inspirational conversation. And and i hope it reaches a lot in people. I know i. I'm i have downloads and listeners. All over the us but i also have reached out into other parts of the world. So i think this is a broader message that that carries pretty far. So paul tell the tell the listeners how they can learn more about about your programs your website your holiday contact you and all that good stuff. I'm unlinked and of course paul mitchell publishing in article on this subject lament lincoln page every month so feel free to go there and see see. The articles have Posted last few months. I also in setting up. A website added a l w life in black and white l. i. b. www dot w. dot com. And so that will be probably the next week or two so you'll be able to look their download things like case studies or resources that you can go to educate yourself. There's also a lincoln if you wanna cope somebody or be inter- Two young man. I'm connected through my fraternity to a lot of black universities in so the goal is to try to incorporate them into the system so that they can meet with companies that are that are friendly to that. So of course you know on. My website has my phone number Lincoln pages my phone number but lamilla just feel free to reach out. I've talked to people individually. I've talked to groups and an open in welcome to doing all of that because the more we get the word out more wearing community with each other the better off. We're going to be that's fantastic and hopefully when we we publish this podcast. When we go live with it you'll have the opportunity to actually share this on your website as well. Hopefully you'll do that over and we'll certainly be promoting. Wait there for podcast. This will will thank you for that and and again. Thank you so much for for joining me here today. It's been a great conversation. I hope you listeners out. There will after you've listened to this will share. It will reach out with with paul and and think about. I'm gonna leave you with that. One word is love. Think about how you can be compassionate empathetic towards others in remember. We're all striving to do better in life into propel ourselves and the people around us to do better to do good and to be happy and live a full life. Some why by leave with one quote my angel fed. Do your best until you know better in when you know better do better. So that's all we ask people to do tastic. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you jill take care. Thank you for listening to today's discussion at the business. Growth cafe with your host angelo ponzi. Take a moment to subscribe to this podcast and visit our website at www dot business growth cafe dot com read angelo ponzis blogs at www dot the ponzi group dot com..

paul mitchell angelo ponzi lincoln us
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Be an important part of our life I hope a few these ideas presented here today we'll give you pause when you're sitting back and crafting your next marketing Tation your sales forecasts your hr need your brand strategy documents for your organization to start telling your team I remember back in now what happened that day many years ago when I was standing in front of that group of the Action Sports Industry you ask twelve years later with more than fifty conference presentations hundreds of articles multiple consulting gigs the company evolved to be the leading provider of research and the action sports industry prior stepping away from the company day and thank you for joining me at the cafe you can find out more about me read my blogs view my show videos and sign up to receive more information about the com or connect with me on Lincoln and if Your Business is ready for growth in you need a cmo but not quite ready for a full time person yet connect with me I welcome the opportunity to Thank you for listening to today's discussion at the Business Growth Cafe with your host Angelo Ponzi take a moment to subscribe to this podcast and E._S. these statements have not been evaluated by the F._D._a. this product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease.

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"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Us at the cafe. Today you can find out more about me. Read my blog view my show videos especially this one that will go up fairly soon or sign up to receive more information at the pond group dot com or certainly connect with me on Lincoln and if your business is ready for growth and you need to see a mall but you're not quite ready for a full-time person yet connect with me. I'd love the opportunity to explore the benefits of working with a fractional channel. CMO and lastly please subscribe to this show and if you're already a subscriber I encourage you to introduce the show to others and you can find us at any place you can find. podcasts join me next week for lunch at the business growth cafe. Thank you for listening to today's discussion at the Business Growth Cafe with your host. Angelo Ponzi. Take a moment to subscribe to this podcast and visit our website at. WWW dot business growth cafe dot com read Angelo pansies blog at www dot the ponzi group dot com. It's cutting into your exercise time. It's stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's it's pain and it's getting in between you in life. You want to live CD medic. Targets your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added added benefits of THC FREE HEMP oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind wind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and a life. You want to live CD medic. Targets your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients audience plus the added benefits of T._H._C. Free Hemp Oil. Get back to your life with C._B._D. Matic available online at C._B._S. These statements have not been evaluated by the F._D._A. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease..

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"angelo ponzi" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

11:38 min | 1 year ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"It's really having that champion to empower power that this is something that needs to be done and then just like an external marketing program we have to look at the channels of communication that can reach out now. I love starting off these programs with an internal employee survey to understand what they know about the organization any issues that they might have <hes> the positive aspects so really really comes from a base so they automatically see input into the plan that they might have put into the survey so right away. There's ownership and to me that becomes very very important. Versus something that's being dictated versus having that ownership and then structuring what are those pieces so example one of the clients that i worked on a program for for a few years ago every month. We had a thirty second to a minute message from the c._e._o. He literally used his <hes> computer camera and just taped a a little message gave the highlights of what was going on and then the real details came from different managers within the departments and so this thing filter down to make sure that the department's everybody in the departments were sharing the same information wasn't like marketing was getting wanting accounting was getting one and and you know shipping was getting into different message. They're all getting the same but they structured it so that information could filter down so it wasn't the c._e._o. That was responsible so angela. Let's say i'm a small company. Let's <hes> i'm twenty thirty people right. We're just getting started. We've gotten a series around. I mean this is. I think when it's most critical take advantage of this sort of initiative right and if it's being driven by say c._e._o. C._e._o. when they need to be aware of in order for them to be able to really make sure that they're getting access to the best people understanding what you're you know so far from talent acquisition was ition standpoint and moody you truly looking for and we've talked about this before i mean everything from the job descriptions to laying out the details making it more of a a workable or a marketing marketing document as opposed to just a list of bullet points that that you're trying to fulfil because ultimately that doesn't truly get into that individual is right and i think i'm probably preaching to the choir and you're nodding your head up and down if you're not if you're if you're if you're listening to radio he's nodding and saying give me sometimes up. Sometimes we show ervin show so it becomes really important that those factors are really weighed in there and i think when the organization is small that is absolutely the time where everybody's busy working in their business talk about a lot of that on my show but you've got to step back and look about working on and part of that working on is making sure that your employees have an understanding of your organization. The message is you're trying to put out there and everybody else is doing right because we're not working in silos. I worked in the advertising business for a long time and there were a lot of silos and so how many times you know the people in the marketing group and client services we had no idea what the other groups were doing because we didn't talk to each other until became time to pass off the information until the next level of work and i always found that very disruptive and what was going on and i think that's part of it. If we don't have that strong platform for communications internally making sure we're all on the same name you know base of information it become very disruptive to the organization at that small of a company to there. There's some alignment between h._r. And marketing time time to ever cross whoever's been the marketing needs to hire somebody exactly the other thing that i find is really interesting. Is that a lot of the content that goes out for job descriptions and that's all written by by h._r. And recruiting don't you wanna marketing message plugged in. I think in is the topic that you brought up because so many times when the job descriptions are being developed. They are coming out of h._r. They're not being developed by the parts themselves yeah. I i think i told you a story wants about a talent acquisition group that as chief strategy officer i was actually overseeing and i remembered robert interviewing the the various people in the group and i was talking to the person who is in charge of recruiting for marketing who had no marketing background whatsoever in my mind. I'm thinking to myself. How how can you interview marketing people. When you don't know what the interview and i'm basically overseeing marketing you haven't asked me once about input to develop job descriptions so you know from that day a forward. I always made sure that when i'm involved in the description defining what we're looking for and how the interviews are held are being held in in developed by the people within the department because they're the ones that that obviously have to work with them. What about cultivating for referral initiative ever having some sort of internal marketing program that helps you pull people am sure sure well. There's a lot of tools internally that you can implement the like an internal facebook account kind of thing where employees can feel empowered to communicate with each other and things like that but again if people know what the company is truly about it elevates their ability to look into talk about other talent that they may know and also be able to communicate is a brand ambassador if you will to get those people interested in wanting to apply for the position brand messages reached five hundred and sixty one percent further when they're shared by employees as opposed to your normal branch and then the other thing that i found was that content shared by employees receives eight times more engagement the content shared by brown channels. Why wouldn't you take advantage of this with your company especially in hiring in getting everybody to be your clear recruiter again i think on a normal day-today it's not top of mind your heads in the business heads in the business used thinking about. I've got to get my lead gen going. I've gotta get my content out there so i can get people into the the funnel and and try to sell my product or my widget and you're not thinking about all that other stuff is happening behind the scenes until the products and services are starting to be sold and and then all of a sudden you know the people that are doing the job don't understand all the repercussions and so that's why i'm saying if it could be a base of a platform that all organizations start a bigger small and champing somebody to really take charge of that and think it through because there's a lot of simple ways. I mean we use email. We got internal chat. We get internal tax. There's a way to communicate internally. I really think businesses will be far better off and you just read some wonderful statistics that talk about how much farther they'll be better. Oh god it's it's crazy to me. I i couldn't believe it. Was that much more effective. How do we do that. How do we cultivate that kind of relationship. You talked about setting up a monthly meeting or internal chat platform. Let's actually talk about how to deploy some sort of engagement or get some sort of framework well. I think if i was doing this for my organization today i i would do internal survey and i would want to understand the different aspects of what's going on in the firm what they believe about the firm how well they know the products and services how well trained they thought they are work with companies that you know the guy gets hired on monday. They give a little pat on the two she on wednesday and get out and sell and i've also been suspended a show show where the bathroom yeah and and i've been another is that you know they're in training in for three to four weeks and then all of a sudden cut loose and they still don't know anything more about the departments that they're being released into so extremes so really understanding how the employees think i think is one of the key areas and then from there. You can just like you would do with an external marketing program. You have different personas within your organization right. Counting people are gonna think very differently than the marketing versus the <hes> <hes> h._r. Versus <music> sales versus operations so you've really got those kind of customer personas in a sense of what's important to them so you understand what's important to their job than how do you craft your messages and then really build that infrastructure from a strategic standpoint and those tools are those tactical executions that are simple is if you overcomplicated complicated. I'm telling you right now. It'll never happen you might do at once. You might do it twice. It gets too difficult. It'll fall apart very quickly so they have to be simple forms of communication that that become very consistent and standardize month the month so your marketing team actually put together this content and then feed it out to the different departments absolutely and making making sure that you might say you know across the company. Here's what's going on. Here's what's happening. We landed these new accounts so and so got promoted blah blah blah and then you could actually even customize it if you wanted to buy department do something very specific when there but importantly is the key everybody in the company knows and has an awareness of what's going on but how do you get the people people in product development engineering or accounting the people that don't have typically share a lot of content online. How do you get them to buy end to be able to do got well. I think from consistency standpoint. I think it's important that they see that. It's just not a one and done so when i have had tech people that i've had to deal with you know one of the things that they bring any. I'll call them bad habits if you will from another company right as i yeah we've seen this before you know in two weeks or two months. This one even exists the why should i bother or and that's why like to start off with an anonymous employee survey because then all of a sudden you can get a lot of feedback that you might not get if i can tak their names aims to it and so once they see that their concerns are issues and things are starting to be addressed then that's how i see people starting to buy into it and not over complicating it because everybody's busy and the last thing you want a new is ten emails a day from the company so you can also may be encouraged promotion through like gamification so game a fly that process s. making beneficial to them in some sort of way yeah and i think too. That's <hes> those back to those monthly meetings company. I worked with a couple of years ago. We have ended up implementing implementing monthly meetings and they could win prizes and they were given challenges and so everybody loves prize yeah. They became a more interactive situation where there were just coming and you're listening to the c._e._o. Talk i mean there was intere- interactive and they did skits. They did all sorts of stuff to build morale and income rotary and no one wants to talk. It's the people who are listening right now. Thank you by the way but the fact is more we talked to now but the more we listen to them and help them champion happy into 'cause then the more they're going to engage in cause marketing is another good one getting the organization to buy into a specific cause that they can give to house talking to somebody <hes> recently and what what they do is employee rewards because they're do a lot of cause marketing. They actually give ca donation card that the employees win a prize. Let's say of one hundred dollars for the employees can actually actually use that if they want to donate to charity so not only can they win a prize and you get the thrill of winning but now sudden you can think about a charity that you would like to donate to who says money that you didn't have any way right and and so that was one of the ways i thought was really cool that they got their employees involved in that kind of the whole atmosphere of giving about from the organization. I'm getting the wrap up thing from our engineer pumpkin finger finger three quick takeaways that you want the audience walk away with today. Well i think it's important to incorporate incorporate information about the company and the markets and the brands that that you really after and and utilizing <hes> when you onboard a potential prospect right start right right from the beginning to immerse them not just in the kind of the higher level stuff or the departments that they're going to work in but really about the organization update the employees i say at least once a quarter about what's going on if not monthly stand i would love month bet it minimum quarter but monthly is much better and they don't have to be long belonged rang out meetings and then make sure the employees are are marketed to i the other mistake market you put it out in the marketplace and they see it or they hear it after the fact or other friend calls for hey i saw you guys have a job there can you. I didn't know anything about campaign. Yeah exactly so making sure the employees know about whether it's the marketing campaign or it's about a new new opportunity your new job posting make sure they know about it first before it hits the streets angela. We're just about.

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"angelo ponzi" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"Thank you very much. It's always a pleasure being here. Obviously we're were so shared with each other and every tuesday we we do a flip flop as you're leaving. I'm coming in so it's always exciting and sometimes i'm sitting down in the parking lot waiting to go listening to your show so i'm really gonna be on got it. That makes me happy yeah. Absolutely we usually just high five walking out and you're usually but i do sit down there early. Sometimes i sit and listen get me in the mood. Get me fired fired up and ready to go and that's what i'm trying to do today all right today. We're going to cover employment marketing internal marketing for employment branding. We're gonna talk about what it is and why it's important and then we're gonna teach you how to structure a solid marketing campaign that deploys internal marketing. I sound fund at murdy to play all right. Let's do a baby all right so what is employment or internal marketing. Let's talk a little bit about that. Yeah you know so many times with the companies that i deal with. We always focus as a marketing guy where i was looking at. How do we reach customers. How do we sell more products and services but so many times we forget and i use the category abroad we if you will we forget about the people inside the organization a fact i have literally walked down the halls and started talking to employees and said hey how do you like the new campaign vein this going on and they say we have no idea what you're talking about and so they're really focused on their jobs and who they are and that particular function but they don't really disconnected from the rest of the organization. I was working with a client last year and as we were talking about sales and marketing programs in the room where operations and shipping and h._r. A. and accounting and try to explain to everybody that we are so integrated if we're successful and we were successful we impact shipping right now. There's more products the the ship we gotta do inventory. We need more proximity. Tori accounting's got more work h._r. Hire more people so there's a symbiotic relationship internally but but companies missed the mark to educate their employees about what's going on about the brand themselves. Yeah i encourage you listeners. Ask your employees what they really know. Go about your business and one of the survey that i did last year. I ask ceos of companies to your client. Would they recommend you. The answer was yes. Do they understand your products. Yes do they understand all of the products that you you sell or just the ones that they buy and their answer was. We'll just the ones they buy so they had no idea so. Few clients have no idea about all the stuff about your brand. You can't expect your employees to to and that's where it really becomes important to focus to make sure you've you've got all your employees as you mentioned brand ambassador that everybody's firing on the same <hes> cylinders are on the same plate as far as what the communications says messages to their audiences going to companies as well and i talked to them about hiring and what's interesting is that nine times out of ten mostly employees don't know what the company's he's hiring for. They don't have those internal discussions as much as they should. That's really important because those are your best source of people <hes> so why is important. I mean i i look at it. Is it improves employee engagement. Oh absolutely i mean if i know as as an employee a about all the different departments about the brand and i can speak really strong to it then then i also know the types of people that would fit not just my friend. That's looking for a job right. I know right off the bat that person's not going to be the right for that company because i understand the culture and so i think that's where where that education comes into making sure that everybody understands it also really boost morale because there's an understanding of what's going on they feel more part of the organization initiation and that's essential right because you want people working on your business as much as in the business to making sure that we're all moving in the same direction absolutely so what are the big challenges that you see when companies are in particular with hiring <hes> internal marketing seems to me like sometimes they just focus in completely external runner marketing comes from right. It's the employees aren't necessarily that plays are generating the money right because you can't have a business with employees churn. I don't care you could have the greatest product the the greatest service in the world but if you have employees to make that all happen then you don't have a business turns out so from that standpoint they are really important in in we could probably get into tons of statistics and talk about employee retention and all those different factors that are really important but i think the biggest challenge when it comes to setting up internal marketing program is it has has to start at the top much like doing customer persona or customers centrisly you know customer. First strategy starts at the top same thing with an employee programmer more internal internal marketing program. It has to start from the top. There has to be a champion so many times i've seen when we actually do internal programs they. They handed to one of the marketing guys one of the h._r. People in the really not geared up to fulfil that because that's not their daily job i was at the job of this cease way past the startup there it has to make sure that that information is being filtered down and he's empowering. Somebody and i don't care what the level is is to making sure that it gets implemented implemented. They don't have to physically do it. They have to take command and control to make sure that we just like anything else that we're meeting deadlines and milestones in accomplishing this objective so they need to be the champion of it. Somebody needs to be the champion. I prefer it's in the c. suite because i think it's important is you got five people in your organization. It's easy to talk talk here. You've got fifty a hundred two hundred three hundred then. It gets a little out of hand. I tell a story about a agency owner from years ago. In every month he got all all the employees together and he called it the state of the state and i always use that kind of my benchmark and he would talk about new wins losses how we were doing profitability ability the agency yeah when you walk into those out of that meeting you you had a sense of where the agency stood in the marketplace about all the great things we were doing and you felt proud route to be there and empowered to be there versus somebody just walking down the hallway that has.

brand ambassador Tori accounting programmer
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:08 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"V._R.. Host Angelo Ponzi. I am Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining us today at the cafe. I'm excited to welcome back. Don Re C._E._O.. Of the wooden floor and Marcelo Rios C._E._O.. Human options to discuss the business of building and running a nonprofit welcome thank you now. You're both back here. In mid February. I believe in looking down at my notes so we had an incredible conversation so first of all if you're tuning in we want you to go back to the February. Show listen to that this. If we're going to count that as part one this'll be part two and we're going to do a part three so this is going to be very exciting and get lots of information and learn how to have a successful nonprofit. I making that promise. We're going to deliver today. That's right so before we get started. Though let's for those newcomers. Let's put it in perspective and let's give me a little overview of who you are and what's your nonprofit is about Don. I'll go with you. I Okay Great. Thank you Angelo <hes> so the wooden floor is Crabbie's development organization right now. We're headquartered in Santa Ana. We have two locations and we are four hundred seventy five children year round from two locations. Now our goal is to use dance education combined with academic tutoring conquer readiness and social services in order to support children over a tenure journey from third grade all the way through high school and really at the end our end goal is to to transform more young people people in low income communities through the power of dance and that access to higher education and we know that it works because this year is our fifteenth year in a row that one hundred percent of our students have graduated high school in mealy enrolled in higher education and so now there are taking this model also also nationally. We have our first license partner in Washington D._C.. And we're hoping that we'll have future partners in the in the near future but today it's all about growth in Orange County and since we last minute we've now identified our third location also in Santa Ashley and hoping that we'd be able to bring on more children at least one hundred more children by twenty twenty one sick until about myself is I started in the four profit sector in management consulting in the high technology eighty sector working with software companies in helping them develop strategy each our services finance services and business development and I was very fortunate that my first boss inventor really encouraged me to give back into the community so I also worked in some boards when I was only my twenties in Arts Education and Human Services Boards and so fast forward today I'm at the wooden floor and I'm an arts education and Human Services and our goal today is related move young people forward. I was just GonNa add that. I'm also now also on the Board of one O._C.. And I'm also the chair of the nonprofit Advisory Council and also in the board of Orange County music and dance and then I've just joined the Senate chamber as well you sleep when I was busy. It's it's all in part of you know <hes> it kind of scientists. Some questions are in talk about later about how we really build the brand of the wooden floor and the community and the number one way we do it is through our own leadership footprint Marhsall Cher human options ignites social change by educating Orange County Tony to recognize relationship violence as something that threatens everybody <hes> we advocate for those that are affected by abuse and extended safe place for victims while empowering survivors <hes> on their path of healing and so we actually ran a sort of full comprehensive array of services we prevent violence and relationship violence through education in the schools by making sure that there is someone as a first responder to recognize relationship violence early on and to intervene and get that person on a path to healing and we also do much more protection which is more in our residential settings where we are doing emergency shelter transitional housing and really invested in ending homelessness victims of domestic violence we also empower and a lot of that is done through educational components making sure that <hes> women and children and men that are being affected by a relationship violence no <hes> the rights no the axis of <hes> how they can access the legal system to get protections that they might need how to <hes> <hes> access different types of services and then really empower them to go out and the their full potential in the community <hes> we have been in Orange County for over thirty eight years which is extremely exciting and are currently launching and hoping to impact networks in addition addition to communities and that is done through partnerships <hes> we've been educating healthcare practitioners over the years to recognize relationship violence. We've been educating beauticians as well on beauticians extremely helpful reaching out into the community yourself in helping raise awareness for people to pay attention to what's going absolutely and it's it's really something where we've noted that <hes> somebody has told their story multiple times and never really gotten <hes> the response or the assistance that they've needed and what that does that essentially feeds into somebody's <music> but they've been hearing from their abusers for years right. Nobody's GonNa care nobody's ever going to help you and so what we do is trying to break that by helping making sure that when somebody sharing their story that they know that they're being listened to that it's not okay and they get connected to assistance okay. I think you use the phrase before prevention. Intervention is kind of two two lanes take so but you didn't mention about yourself. Let's talk about that. That's about your rice emerging hallway. <hes> sure I am I <hes> for last years I've been the human options and prior to that. I was the C O human options and I've been there for ten years and I worked alongside our founding executive director for that time and really helped get us on a path to expanding our footprint in Orange County County <hes> on that journey was <hes> on the board of directors for the California partnership to end domestic violence and eventually became their board president right. I really got a big feel for what was happening on the on the statewide landscaped and the national landscape in our field I am currently on the Family Violence Appellate Project Board of directors as well as the continuum of care governing board and then I sit on Task Force at one O. C. which is on for diversity. We also very busy yeah. I appreciate that it's <hes> I I had to say it was Friday afternoon. There were drinks water and coffee so I'm going to start off with humorous and in you guys have very successful in some long Jedi thirty eight years. Don You said thirty six years I mean that's that's longer than a lot of businesses manage to survive and. You guys have been part of that and growing that and really brought a lot of sophistication to we're going to talk about a lot of that but let's take it up thirty thousand feet and think about nonprofits in general we'll we can pick on Orange County but in general what are the biggest challenges that most nonprofits face is. They're really trying to grow and frankly survive I when I was thinking about that question I was thinking there's two things one is as a nonprofit sector. Our work is really intended to change the community to change the landscape in Orange County and you don't do that alone and so as a nonprofit you're expected to and you should work with other nonprofits and so we've actually Kinda pointed as cooperation right so it's really hard to both cooperate with another nonprofit and still be like I am Brag about yourself at the same time they almost. There's some tension between bragging about yourself as a great brand. We've got a solid program. We've got solid outcomes and still feeling like you can partner with others who are doing like work <hes> and so as I think that is one of the things is really learning how to uniquely sell yourself uniquely position yourself and talk about the great work that you do in service of others while being cooperative and knowing that we share space base in the intersection between a lot of our work and that really you can't negate the work of another organization in order to lift yourself up so that that that's one thing that came to mind for me as something that keeps people from growing and driving because you're not pushing your brand out enough. If you feel like why can't really brag about myself because that's not really what nonprofits do so. I think you have to comfortable with bragging about the good work because you're doing it. In Service of someone and the other thing that came to mind for me is that in the nonprofit sector is we are reacting eighteen two things were responding to need and so that really sometimes takes away from the idea of really innovating and creating space decree to innovate and innovate could be you know you're maybe I think in some ways <hes> caught up by certain funding streams we can only do this or they expect us to do it. This way and there has to be really room to think about bigger ideas and think about how would we do this differently. How do we adapt to the changing times? How do we listen to the people that were serving because everything is changing around Indus and we can't do things the same way that we have in the past and without really spending time reflection reflecting and creating that <hes> cultural learning within the organization so ex knowing that people coming in Mesa two different way actually asking asking unexpecting? Tell me how else we could be doing this and then accepting that feedback and integrating we get stuck in the way that we've always done which which essentially then you're not growing. If you're not learning from others we talk a lot of times about working on your business versus in your business. I think that's very reflective of what you said that we get so wrapped up in that day to day in the nuances and chasing you know those crises and activities that keep popping up. We don't spend time to really work on IT <HES> I did some Emma survey work here in Orange County with some C._e._o.'s and one of the questions we ask us you know. How much time do you spend working on your business every month and it really broke down to about an average one hour a day for me? I don't know that doesn't seem like a whole lot of time to really it'd be effective. Especially when the other statistic that I quote as ninety percent of executives say that it's not the planning. It's the implementation that their strategic plans fail so really. It's what you said is really important that these nonprofit spend the time and not caught up in the nuances every day but really step back and look I somebody told me one time as you know we talked about you know getting outside the box. He's as you needed to get outside the box. Walk around the box and take it the way I wish I was in the box like she's always for a little while. I wish I could the nonprofits. That's what it is. We're always you know driving. If your uh-huh driver hero sure let's talk about thirty thousand feet for you think I'm listening. I agree everything. Marcella said think her myself is that I like it nonprofits in different spectrums so I think there's the emerging nonprofit there's the the more established nonprofit medium size are small to medium size and then there's those have had long term longevity and even longer to longevity doesn't mean they're always thriving and survive so you know there are those modes and I think the the main kind of through line through that is that you have to have a strategic long-term vision for your work and what your impact of your works going to do and even if you're a small nonprofit and you're just this kind of getting your feet on the ground. You still have to have a bold vision for what you want to accomplish. Whatever that is for yourself I have was just talking about a good friend that runs a nonprofit that is emerging and but she has a bold vision she's already on the national level and but her budgets fairly nominal and but she's making it happen and then there's other that are sometimes larger and lumbering you know that they're not learners and act innovators and so when I look at this it's like some nonprofit sometimes we'll kind of act small with the scarcity mindset and I no matter where you are in that spectrum you have to have a big bold vision for what you want to accomplish because I believe that will then set other people around you to be super excited so if the wooden floor was doing what it did thirty six years ago it was fantastic and now we're doing all these great things today and if we weren't continuing innovating and reviewing and making sure that we're staying relevant to the community need we would it also find that same kind of life cycle that businesses go through sure if you think about talking about the vision and having that vision were were smaller nonprofits really struggle and fail? I mean that is that they just they have an idea. They have a mission they started but they're not real leaders or not business people they you know they just think that that build it and they will come so to speak right so west that mentality that get somebody going and then just never really takes off because they just don't have that skills. It's interesting because I agree with what you're saying in terms of the vision and and I think that that if you really pause and think about vision that that's generally <hes> if you stop if focus too much on mission and tactics and you you lose sight of vision right and so but if you're really holding that vision it moves a little bit quicker what I think have been in smaller nonprofit <hes> and medium-sized nonprofits quite often as well is that when you get so tied down to like what's happening right in front of you in that moment and the and the day-to-day <hes> challenges and and and Smarter nonprofits you've got one person doing four people's jobs right and so when you're doing that I mean you know we joked about whether don sleeps or not and I'm sure she does maybe five minutes I think <hes> but when you're so focused on <hes> the day to day MINUTIAE..

Orange County Angelo Ponzi partner Marcelo Rios Don Re Orange County County Don You Santa Ana Washington don Marcella Crabbie Senate Advisory Council Human Services Boards Mesa Santa Ashley
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"I am Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining us today at the cafe. I'm excited to welcome back DON RE C._E._O.. Of the wooden floor and Marcelo Rios CEO Human Options is to discuss the business of building and running a nonprofit. Welcome thank you now. You're both back here. In mid February. I believe from looking down at my notes so we had an incredible conversation so first of all. If you're tuning in we want go back to the February. Show listen to that this. If we're going to count that as part one this'll be part two and we're going to do apart three so this is going to be very exciting. Get Lots of information and learn how to have successful nonprofit. I making that promise. We're going to deliver today. Okay we go all right so before we get started. Though let's for those newcomers. Let's put it in perspective and let's give me a little overview of who you are and what your nonprofit is about Don. I'll go with you first. Okay Great. Thank you Angelo <hes> so the wooden floor is crazy S- development organization right now we're headquartered in Santa Ana. We have two locations and we serve four hundred seventy five children year round from two locations. Now our goal is to use dance education combined with economic tutoring conquer readiness and social services in order to support children over a ten year journey from third grade all the way through high school and really at the end our end goal is to to transform more young the people in low income communities the power of dance and that access to higher education and we know that it works because this year is our fifteenth year in a row that one hundred percent of our students have graduated high school in mealy enrolled in higher education and so now there were taking this model also nationally. We have our first licensed partner in Washington D._C.. And we're hoping that we'll have future partners in the in the near future but today it's all about growth in Orange County and since we last met we've now identified our third location also in Santa International and hoping that we'd be able to bring on more children at least one hundred more children by twenty twenty one sick until about myself is I started in the for profit sector in management consulting in the technology aged sector working with software companies in helping them develop strategy each our services finance.

Angelo Ponzi Marcelo Rios CEO Human Options DON RE Orange County Santa Ana Santa International partner Washington twenty twenty one hundred percent ten year
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"I._M.. Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining us today at the cafe. I'm excited to have Chris Schultz President and publisher of Orange Coast magazine to discuss the importance of print print and magazine advertising today's Digital World Chris Welcome. Thank you Angelo. It's a pleasure to be here. I'm very excited to have you here and before we get started want you take a moment. Tell the audience about yourself and about the publication sure happy to do so I have been here in southern California for twenty two years. I'm originally from the New York area. <hes> I early on in my career I worked for a long time in the travel publishing field <hes> which allowed me to travel the world live wildly above my means it was fantastic <hes> my wife and family and I came out here twenty two years ago and I have been involved in city and regional magazine publishing ever since okay all right fantastic well I I I was doing it in my little research. I congratulations <hes> orange coast was established in nineteen seventy four in is the oldest continuously published lifestyle magazine in the region. That's unbelievable. That's fantastic. I have been here <hes> little a little longer than twenty two years and certainly seen a lot of changes in this community and certainly seen a lot of publications come and go so this is a a great <hes> <hes> feet if you will to have this kind of continuous publications so let's start off as looking looking at today and then looking at that evolution how is the publication changed and more importantly. How's the advertisers change and how you reach advertisers well? Orange coast is really a unique product it. The moniker for the magazine is is that it is the magazine of Orange County and the fact is in forty five years Orange County has grown as a community and as a market and Orange Coast reflects that change in that growth and and so we have grown up just as our community has <hes> in this entire time ultimately our mission has has not changed fundamentally our mission is to engage entertain and inform our audience about Orange County and at the same time offer businesses of very effective way to reach a targeted and affluent audience okay so we talked about lifestyle and the fluency I mean so who is that audience segment here in Orange County I mean I know that we are in a fluent certainly community but it's not everybody so how do you segment and really get into targeting your publication to the audiences here in Orange County. Well Orange County is when when I moved out here I barely knew where Orange County was and I knew it was somewhere stock between San Diego and Los Angeles but it was sort of an amorphous place and the reality is this is a very powerful market in itself Wolf. You know the three million people that live here. It's the same size as Phoenix Scottsdale Minneapolis Saint Paul where the sixth most populous county in in the country and certainly this is the most affluent county in southern California so it is a force to be reckoned with <hes> so our readers <hes> orange coast is available. You can buy it on newsstands in two hundred and fifty places so we have visibility in in virtually all of the <hes> all parts of Orange County most of our readers. Tend to be on the more affluent side so of course most of our circulation. You're going to see in the more affluent coastal communities but also pockets of wealth that are inland it could be the Yorba Linda's of the world it could be villa park. It could be coated. A Causa is a <hes> so on and so forth so again we're here to serve everyone but we have a tendency to skew a little bit on the higher end okay well. Certainly you talked about the influence of Orange County and and the orange curtain is a phrase that we've all heard <hes> when I first moved here from New York another New Yorker I moved to Santa Monica and then about six months actually got a job in my and the at an agency was at MacArthur in Red Hill and boy has it changed over over the years but that premise of the orange curtain really still exists <hes> because I mean you can almost see it sometimes when you're driving into Orange County all the roads change and things like that so anyway it's a it's a really wonderful community and <hes> and it changes so if we think about kind of magazine advertising in today's World Right we become digital I mean we came kicking and screaming at first now we embrace it so really if you think about the combination services that that a publication such as yourself print alone doesn't necessarily provide all the kind of the strategies for advertising agencies so what are those combinations of programs that you offer as a publisher besides is the print vehicle well. The reality is in this day and age in a rapidly changing media environment. <hes> you have to be more than just a single product. You have to be able to reach people wherever they are however they want to be reached and we learned that with magazines I mean there's an old joke that if the only tool that you have is a hammer everything looks like a nail and for a long time orange coast was a stand alone single monthly publication and and and went along long very happily with that that's not the way the world is anymore and so we learned that you have to be able to diversify so the core of our product line is that we have a <hes> a monthly magazine we now have a whole portfolio of specific specific printed publications that go along with it. We have an arts magazine. We have a design and decor magazine. We've got food magazines custom publishing but we also have digital assets that go along with all of those in the beginning those were just very simple apple websites but now we have <hes> we we engage with our audience who sign up to be part of our insiders <hes> we have very strong online relationships with a very <hes> great group of an audience here in Orange County as well so oh it is absolutely a combination of reaching people sometimes imprint sometimes digital sometimes on their computer mobile wherever they may be guys so basically serving up the publication and the content no matter matter what <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> channel they're using so you're starting you mentioned several publications that are kind of sister publications or kind of combination. Can you go into a little bit more about that because obviously that's a a strategy in the sense of broadening out. Get get beyond just one property if you will so how do these publications fit in in your strategy and in the audience change or is it the same audience well. That's a wonderful question Angelo <hes> orange coast as a lifestyle magazine. Ah has a little bit of everything every single issue. It's going to have arts. It's going to have entertainment information. It's going to have great restaurant content. It's going to <hes> have profiles of interesting people etc home designed to core real allstate etc but we also realize that there are certain people that want to go deeper into a category and that's why we've really created more pure play publications couple years ago I happen to be very very fond of the arts and come from a a family that has a lot of artists in it and as a result we decided to create premiera see the only publication for Orange County wholly focused on the performing and visual arts. We decided to create a design into core publication wholly focused on Orange County. <hes> we <hes> have taken a lot of the great food content that we have throughout the year in Orange Coast and we've repackaged and re purposed it into a magazine called <hes> <hes> O._C.. Eats <hes> we have a lot of great medical and <hes> of of coverage and <hes> health and beauty we now have a publication called <hes> <hes> O._C.. Health later this year. We're going to go into a whole new market. We're going to create a new publication called baby on beyond and create an event and experiential part of Ah that goes along with that so again we're looking to serve <hes> the market and a couple of different ways have <hes> have new things that we can give to our existing audience but at the Sta- same time look to expand the audience sure well. I and this is actually news to me so thank you for sharing that. verticalisation and segmentation is as a marketer in a market researcher. That's always <hes> top of mind for me is how to you take one audience and really divided up and not use a silver bullet. If you're well or a single bullet to try to to try to get the all of the audience you started talking about experiential and that's that is so important these days when we start thinking about events and I know you do events and I've been to some of your events and it really gives an opportunity for that kind of face to face with your your advertisers in the brands if you will so let's talk about advance as a strategy and how important that is in the overall communications mix well. It is extraordinarily important because it brings brings the product and it brings the relationship to life for many years. We've had very loyal subscribers and readers who get orange coast every single month but it is sort of a one way communication when you do that you serve them the magazine you hope they read it or the our feedback is that they do. They like the publication but it's a it's a whole nother animal when you can get to sort of look somebody in the eye face to face and interact with them so we do a handful of events that are curated and really okay well done. We have a fantastic team marketing team to execute these. We do a handful of events each year that are highly focused. We do a restaurant event. That's coming up as a matter of fact and it's a perfect example of what we do. Well we have great content of related to dining cuisine in the magazine and once a year every April we do a best restaurants issue well <hes> shortly afterwards on the eleventh of April we will do a best restaurants event and <hes> and ten one of the folks that we've tapped as the best new restaurants best new chefs in Orange County <hes> who we are highlighting in the April issue will all come and cook for our guests at <hes> at this event that we're doing on the eleventh of <hes> April so it's a fantastic opportunity for our <hes> our audience to be able to sample something to meet people in the flesh. It's also a wonderful opportunity for all the restaurant tours and our sponsors to be able to meet our audience reince face to face are the are the <hes> events kind of separate as far. I'm looking for you but strategically if you think about building out a communication plan obviously we're talking to consumers. This was not really a B. to B.. Play are when you put up a by together so you know but the audience may not know or I probably told them a hundred times. I grew up in the advertising industry so you know when we look at putting together a media buy for our clients and looking at the extensions extensions of products we can bring beyond a print or broadcast by things like that so when you're talking to advertisers how important when they're putting together their plans do the digital in the print and the advance and kind of all all that integration. I'm beginning a great believer in integrated marketing. How do they all play and how do you <hes> proposal that will Angelo? That's it's a wonderful question and the fact is that really boils down to the communication and the relationship ship that you have with your clients and the most important thing to be able to ask a client of yours is what are you trying to achieve in the old days we would go in and try to sell them advertising in the magazine but the the fact is you have to look at this in a little bit of a holistic. Holistic way because we all consume information differently across a lot of different platforms <hes> we also want our our clients our marketing partners slash advertisers we want them to be able to reach our audience or audiences <hes> across a variety of ways so we love to have a dialogue with our customers to be able to say. How can we best serve you? Maybe it's.

Orange County Orange Coast Orange Coast magazine Orange County. California Angelo New York Angelo Ponzi regional magazine Chris Schultz monthly magazine publisher villa park Phoenix allstate Yorba Linda President
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:03 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"With with your host Angelo Ponzi I._M.. Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining us today at the cafe. I'm excited have Jason Dunkin chief storyteller at Miller fire media to discuss how how to take your storytelling to another more strategic level to ensure your communications are truly communicating and we're also going to discuss. Maybe a new paradigm when it comes to the sales funnel to help drive business growth Jason Welcome. Thanks for having me Angela Fish. Why don't we do get things started? We let the audience know a little bit about you and your business and all that good stuff yeah I help businesses generate sales for their products and services using video <hes> we know that people prefer for to watch a video as deep as opposed to reading something we know that next face to face communication videos the most powerful tool that we have so we take that and supercharge by adding a sales process to it to make sure that our customers get results from those videos not just pretty videos okay that's great and we're gonNA spend some time talking about video along with a lot of other different things <hes> I asked this question of all my guests before we get started so when it comes to growing your business what keeps you up at night. I think what's kept me up at night. For the last few years is all disruption that we faced <hes> there are lots of new players to the market when it comes to marketing and in the has never been more we it's ever cheaper to create a video a so. It's making sure that we are doing what we need to do to get results for our clients so that we don't have to be part of that disruption. That's going on in the marketplace right in there. Certainly we think about video from the quality standpoint right everybody who's holding an iphone walking around with a video camera and they think they're video aquifer but that that doesn't necessarily mean we're getting the quality in and the more importantly it's not communicating. You're just taking a video of yourself or or shooting some video but as far as the kind of skill set that you bring to it as making sure we're GonNa talk about storytelling but the story is being told in more importantly that the message is being communicated so I think that's something that that you know throw caution to the wind I saw that happened in the advertising industry when everybody with a MAC became a creative director and so it really kind of changed the dynamics wchs but before we get into some of those details really the idea of video and working into an integrated marketing program it's really about how do we communicate with our customers in their journey in they're buying journey and that leads me to a sales funnel if you will oh and I found this interesting stat and in eighteen ninety eight e c e Saint elmo Lewis created the sales funnel as a way to help visualize the customer journey from the moment they became aware of the product until actual purchase. That's that's a hundred years that this sales funnel quote unquote has being used at predates the model t yet we still use a sales funnel to sell cars today. So what's your perspective on kind of the current strategy when it comes to customer journeys sales funnels those kinds of things and also we're GonNa talk about this and the next question. Is there a paradigm shift coming in the way we need to really think about our customers journey yeah I when when we start talking about journey we still keep it simple because I don't think that most brands are ready to hear the real truth about complicated. The journey is so we talk about <hes> usually a three step funnel so we it's called lots of different things in my favourite for a three step funnel is warm cold warm hot leads right <hes> some people talking about a top of funnel mid funnel Boffon which doesn't begin to tell story for me. That doesn't work. I love <hes> what Jon Jansen duct tape marketing says about but <hes> his seven funnel which is no like trust try by repeat refer he calls it the <hes> the marketing hourglass where you get the people to the bottom you flip it back over and they go through the process again. Okay so there is a journey. We need to know how to create content. Freed stage of that journey and <hes> we need to warm up you know companies the idea that it's much more complicated than just three stops along the path yeah and I think that's important. There was a stat that I had talked about another previous. Show about how many touch points it takes to get a customer from that kind of I touch all the way through a purchase now as a in my sales process I used to say if I can't communicate with somebody in for within four touches if you will. I'm pretty much done with them. When I saw this model I realized I was just like eighty nine percent of the other people bailing out at four touches where it's potentially actually get to that sal was gonNA take somewhere between sell seven and twelve so the same kind of thing along this customer journey and recognizing you know where are they at? How do you communicate with them and truly what is that and we just can't make it up? We really have to talk to our customers to try to try to understand that so we think about then utilizing different integrations of communications some way off. I'm way off topic here but this is this interesting conversation to me where when we think about the integration of how we communicate do you see video from from point one building building awareness all the way through or do you use. What other tools do you see from a communication standpoint to really help broaden out that communication? I think videos the foundation but I really think an Omni channel approach is is the most important these days not everything has I I think videos to touch every part of the journey but you need supplement that say linked in with other things <hes> Lincoln's the best example I can think of right so linked in. Let's say we've got a video that is is about awareness but the next day shouldn't be another video next tape probably should be something else. That's simpler for them to digest and then admit in creating other types of content within that space to to continue to make those videos even more valuable okay when when you post a video on Lincoln for example. I you WanNa talk about videos on different channels. I I'll do myself so I post a video. I see people view it. I don't actually know how much they engaged with it. I don't know if they're actually clicking and going somewhere. So how do we really drive more engagement supposed to maybe with video views but but you know with linked impose way see views and that's great. I really appreciate it. All you up there in in in my <hes> radio land I really appreciate that. But how do we get them to engage more. How do I get him to actually for example subscribe to the show those kinds of things well th that's a great question so <hes> I you need to make sure that your your communication is clear right? You need to have a proper format of your video to guide them to that next thing you make sure you're always asking for that next. Step <hes> when it comes to measurement it depends on the platform so linked in is terrible right now. When it comes to giving you metrics you know that some somebody watching for three seconds but beyond that you don't know so unless you can get them to get off the platform in track them that way <hes> you really don't know what's happening on linked in other platforms have figured out how to to track engagement which is very valuable but at the end of the day you need to get an off whatever platform they're on into your system ideal your email system so that you can then make them part? Are you a regular rotation in case one of those platforms goes away or suddenly decides that they don't like you anymore. So we need to capture their contact information if you will or at least where they are in their journey and their interest level now there's always a call to action but have you found that when you utilizing Elisa video and they click on it to serve them up something else as far as that call to action or deliver them some other value or as the video itself should be the value the video should be the value but should lead them to eat or more more value or a specific action so typically what we say is at least a couple of videos to warm them up before they're going to do take that and take that action in twenty nineteen anyway it used to be that you could make a video or send them to a landing page. They would sign up right it away. People are starting to become leery of that because there's so much poor content out there so you provide value so they begin to trust us then they'll sign up and that you can continue to push them down the path from there. We reached the saturation point of content. There's I- somewhere my notes here I read that you know the average consumer add average person consumes about ten hours of content today or information day we remember in in my ad as we talk about they get bombarded with five thousand messages a day so there's so much information coming at him from so many different ways and you mentioned the word disruption. So how do we breakthrough that clutter if you will and rise above the fray and in disrupt disruption eruption. I'm GONNA coined that phrase E._M._t.. 'em disrupt-disruption and how do we get <hes>. How do we get to that next level so we do have too much time and there's what there's more content uploaded in one day to Youtube in Hollywood's made in the last one hundred years so there's the chance of your content standing out is is slim to none so that means we need we need now to create content? That's of absolute value to our target audience that either inspires entertainment educates and if you don't do one of those three or have all those three in in your content than no one's GonNa find it. It's also supplemented with ads so you've got to create the content for your target audience and then get in front of them because there's it's rare. They're going to find it on their own. So you said inspire. Educate Okay and entertain were the kind of three three items that you need to have within your video or all three or at least one of the other okay interesting. <hes> I started off talking a little bit about the buyer journey and and and I mentioned the Word Paradigm Shift. Do you see a kind of a paradigm shift in the way they're going on. I I read this article about <hes> a new buyers journey call the cyclonic buyer journey and basically the idea that there's.

Angelo Ponzi Lincoln Jason Dunkin Angela Fish Jon Jansen Miller fire elmo Lewis sal Youtube director Hollywood eighty nine percent one hundred years hundred years three seconds ten hours one day
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"With your host Angelo Ponzi I._M.. Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining US each week we select from a menu of topics that can impact business growth to discuss with experts from a wide variety of disciplines and today the Kathy. I'm excited have Don Reese C._E._O.. Of the wooden floor a Marcelo Rios Faust C._E._O.. Of Human options to discuss how strategy financial stability and leadership of nonprofits are are essential to ensure the long term success I in growth dawn Mazzola. Welcome thank you for having before we start. I'll go with Don. I want to talk a little bit about yourself and about your nonprofit create. Thank you Angela again for the opportunity a little bit about myself I started the first part of my career career and the management consulting field with <hes> work in the high tech sector. I had this incredible opportunity work. With a visionary management grew with time his name was randall multi his past but he really believed in giving back to the community. So when I was was my early twenties I served on the board of directors for a Symphony Board and also health and Human Services for Cam and then also I started a nonprofit with him in the night in the nineteen ninety s and so with that really gave me of kind of I believe it's my passion and purpose for the work. I do now the wooden floor because I'm able to bring arts education human service to help low income youth move forward so the wooden floor is at Creative Development Organization annually provides today four hundred seventy five young people with a rigorous dance education program that we combine with Academics College Readiness in Social Services and I'm happy to say that this is our fifteenth year in a row in two thousand eighteen that we are on track to have one hundred percent of our students graduate high school in immediately role in higher education circles and gratuities. Thank you to do that over fifteen years and in consecutive as we feel it's really honor and privilege with our children then go to become great adults so we also have students now in college in universities all over the country. They've attended everything from Wellesley to N._Y._U.. To Cornell to our local community college which we believe is a really great pathway for many children and so the two locations in Santa Ana today when mile apart so we call it a connected campus and then we're also growing locally locally and nationally at the same time we have our first national partner in Washington D._C.. Called City dance and they're now implementing our model here under licence structure which we'll talk about in a little bit from caustic doesn't wonderful remixed have next so I feel like I grew up in the nonprofit industry. I started my nonprofit career. When I was in my early twenties I was working at toys R us and going to school and decided? I didn't have enough to do that. The time end I took on an internship and I was began. I began working at a nonprofit that was working with at risk kids and I knew at that point that that was definitely something I wanted to do with my career long term the business element always spoke to marry was really passionate about the work of his joining US MS in a management role. There fit knew that I wanted to combine both my ability to be a business leader and my heart and do something that was really meaningful so over the last twenty years I've really been able to look and find my path to what I'm currently doing today. I have the great honor of being the C._E._O.. C._E._O.. Of Human Options which is a nonprofit here ninety county that's been around for nearly forty years it was founded really with the vision that no woman our child should ever be afraid in their own home and be continued that vision moving forward and what we've really looked at as an organization station is really igniting social change in this county and getting this county in particular to really recognize relationship violence as an issue that impacts everybody and making sure that we're educating and advocating for those affected by both victims and survivors and empowering the survivors to make a change in to heal on the path such a great honor to be here. Thank you from biting. Absolutely I think this is a great topic for discussion as I think I mentioned prior to coming in we've obviously been promoting this event and we have gotten a lot of likes and views and re purposes on Lincoln so this is obviously a lot of folks are waiting to hear this conversation one of the things I've heard from both of you. It's really about that passion and commitment. I think that that kind of is at the heart I would have to believe of Fennelly as leadership of a nonprofit but those that that are you know under your pure view and working for you as well as people like myself that are might be helping out or donors so people come to you with that passion and that fire like you have or the come with curiosity and in then they evolve into really wanting to be part of this who has to take this Lenny Marcella. It's a great question at human options we have the benefit and a really having people come to us with passion and a connection to what we're doing and it's interesting because that connection continues to grow and gone yes there's a little bit of curiosity I think in the beginning but that curiosity really stems from like a heart connection and really valuing individuals and knowing that they wanna make a difference and so we're fortunate at the organization where everybody from our finance person to our direct service person has a connection to the mission and really knows that this is somewhere they want I._B._M.. Says somewhere they want to create change Don I would just add also the way that we also today agree everything with Mercilus but also the way we do today. especially with our growth right now is that we wanted also to make sure that we had our culture transcend and so we've actually identified a profile of those employees potentials that come through the wooden floor. We look at mission driven business minded people. We look for people that have a passion for a I'm making a change in young people's lives like Marcella said that is really where it starts mission and passion for if you don't have that energy. It's not a good fit for the organization. We we know that we're driving social change. We're making a difference then in young people's lives and we need people that are all in it to win it so that's really our philosophy so if you're not there's lots of organizations find your passion and purpose in you know not all nonprofits for everybody. Not every mission is for everybody. Let's help you if if it's not a good fit let's help you find that right fit for yourself of great advice that really is because in dealing with anything and you know even dealing with a client for example. If it's not the right fit it gets beyond just a paycheck. If you will right it's it has to have a relationship you want to have that passion of doing well for someone and <hes> so that becomes very crucial and as a as a business to to add to that is just we then also operate in a way to take care of people make sure that <hes> great benefits. Another nonprofits are could have known for you know. Maybe maybe being a little slide on this things. Our Board of directors especially in the recession didn't make any cuts to salaries on because they know where the critical link those we serve from our children and our families and so we start to struggle a very high stewardship level we don't have debt or anything like that but it's we just tune away to take care of our people to okay so I asked this question of all my guests and usually start off with it so this is about a business business strategies. She's we're talking about the business of nonprofit so ultimately it's about growth and and surviving and thriving so what keeps you up at night when you're thinking about that aspect of go back to you with the wooden floor so before I mean I'm very fortunate to work at the in Florida say that all the time the waiver ran from a structural level and we have something called forward funding that we fund raise funds eight minutes in advance of a new fiscal year start and so we calendar for fiscal year here that runs September one to August thirty when I say that because most nonprofits to struggle just that financial unknown and for the organization if we continue to raise funds at at or above the same level we're gonna be okay because we always have a reserve nar funds so when you kind of take within raising the typical answer we were talking about <hes> Maryland. I talked it really gets down to. I interviewed C._E._O.'s in the number one thing that they were concerned with with growing and that's really where I am today. It's how do you maintain culture over over the organization at both locations or across the nation with your partners. How do you maintain that in for us? We've identified that our culture aspect is all about high quality and making sure that we're learning as an organization and making sure that I'm continuing continuing communicating that the big vision the why we're doing what we're doing and so making sure everybody is on board with that. They're transcending the other locations. They're monitoring the way we do of course correcting doing things because once your culture slips lips the normally say it eats strategy so it's I tell you the same thing I think for me it's really at the same in terms of culture you have to really drive your values and really make sure that you're living out the values in the way that was set forth in the vision and one of the things that we've really been spending time intentionally on his talking about with the values look like in our organization not just values across from peer to peer but values with our customer base which is our stakeholders both donor and our and our clients really. How are we living those values and asking asking questions about the values that may be don't really fit or feel a little uncomfortable? Some of them are new to the big ones that we've been really implementing or curiosity an ingenuity right as an expert. I mean we've been in the field of domestic relationship balance for almost forty years which makes us an expert in what we do and yet we have to enter into this with curiosity. It's a really understanding that our marketplace whether it be our clients and our donors need information and if we just have the expert hat on there we're not really learning from them and ingenuity is now there are many more barriers to accessing services. There's barriers to getting out of abusive relationships in it could be housing it could be employment to be a myriad of things and so we really have to think about creative ways in enrich the approach this issue and so for for us. It's when you think about that that takes a very special talent pool which is critical. It's finding the right person not just in terms of your culture but are the values but also that has the skill set and the ability to continue to fall and that they're open to that. I think that's that's one of the things I think about all the time like when we have key staff. How do we keep them engaged? How do we keep them motivated and then? How do we pay them? What they're worth while employees I mean that's that's the challenge all over the place now especially with low unemployment rate? It we have the same as in keeping people engaged in statistics will show that I think it's eighty five percent of the American workforce is either unhappier disengage so finding that balance and finding that passion that word we used earlier within those the people that really wanna come every day and be committed to driving forward and we just can really quick is rat also when I was on the critical mass program with Rick Ramsey he asked at the end of it what was my guiding principle and I've taken that now throughout the whole organization position we now have codified that and I think having your values your principles really codified so you really lead the organization than what happens as you scale growth. Everybody just gets on board because they understand what you're which are all about well this guy in that unlike any business right and providing leadership in making sure that you've got by not only from the top of you two are the C._e._O.'s in the leaders but making sure that the rank and file if you will for lack of better term are on board understand what you're doing doing and are committed to US versus they walk down the hallway and they read something they don't understand it right so it really getting that buy in and that I think rick passionate commitment so we think about or at least I think about.

Don Reese US Angelo Ponzi Lenny Marcella Rick Ramsey Marcelo Rios Faust Creative Development Organizat Wellesley Angela randall Symphony Board Santa Ana toys R Washington Mercilus Lincoln
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Angelo Ponzi I._M.. Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining US each week we select from a menu of topics that can impact business growth to discuss with experts but wide variety of disciplines in today at the cafe. I'm excited to have David Misaki director of strategy at the Rhythm Agency to discuss digital strategies to grow Your Business David Welcome. Thank you for having me Angela appreciate it yeah. I'm excited I I was just mentioning a few minutes ago. I originally saw you a few months wants back on a panel for the American Marketing Association so I put my name. Your name on my list took us about five months to get here so I'm really excited about today's show before we get started. Want you talk a little bit about yourself about the rhythm agency until the audience can and have a perspective of who you are sure absolutely so I've been in digital marketing for just over ten years. It's weird kind of happened by accident which is odd but ended up coming from a background of S._E._O.. So start off with S._E._O.. Very Small S._E._O.. Agency the ended up <hes> moving so move to another one kind of kept growing and then got interested a little bit more digital strategy so that's the kind of one function of it but starting to calm wanting to know a little bit more about brands and all that stuff and just kept growing ultimately found myself <hes> home at rhythm so rhythm agencies agency's full service digital agency. We pretty much offer everything I lead the digital strategy team there <hes> professionals involve or include paid S._E._O.. Analytics et Cetera et Cetera so <hes> yeah we kind of pride ourselves in using a little bit of data <hes> a little bit of theory creating these ideas and moving forward with them and hopefully we find those partners out there <hes> to work with us as well yeah fantastic. I know <hes> rhythms of Great Agency. I was just telling you in the hallway as we met <hes> had the privilege of doing some strategy work for them <hes> a a few years ago on a on a new business pitch and I have a whole talk about new business because I believe that is the lifeblood of any agency <hes> my background actually is agency and clients. I had the <hes> those fortunate enough to grow in agency and sell well it but I I came from bozell originally and so was involved on <hes> multiple agencies and then I've been clydeside everything from ad manager up to chief strategy officer so I get to wear both sides of the fence I get to make the decisions and of course pitch myself I self on <hes>. Why should try to do those so before we get started a question? I always ask my guests. When it comes to thinking about growing your business? Now we'll talk about rhythms business involvement as a senior member of their team. What keeps you up at night sure so obviously with an agency basically whatever the clients problems are become our problems right so that is really what keeps me up at night and it could be a myriad of different things? Sometimes you know sit there and think about Gosh. You know what something different that we can do something the unique that takes this client to the next level <hes> but really that's just the gist of it is whatever their problems become our problems and that keeps me up at night. I can see that and I and I empathize <hes> like I said I was in the agency business and I can relate to that so when I think about digital strategy and I've talked to clients about that and we'll get into some of this as we go along the goal the goal obviously is what do you want the strategy to do and typically for me. It's always generate leads and of course that means if I generate leads as a return on my investment so when I think about strategy it really kind of depends on the type of company <hes> either B. B. Two C. retail service all those kinds of things so there isn't a cookie cutter solution but when you think about lead generation from a digital standpoint in what what's your perspective on that and what advice can you give our the listeners who are thinking about developing a program sure so that you prefaced with you know it. It totally depends right. It's it's a hard question and to answer but some things that kind of thought about really. Is You know what I find at least in my experience a lot of times when we work with these individuals on the other side. Is that a lot of times they get into the thought of what do I need. I need more leads. I need this. I need that. <hes> and that kind of influences their strategy so we try to get them to take a step away and think okay great those are your business goals and the key is that you want to go after but let's start to think about what the customer needs or what this potential lead needs and what are all the things that we can do to address that and so we start to think on kind of a macro and a micro level and some notes that I had here really on the macro level things that we kind of know identify who your users are personas were all sort of familiar with that and then one of the things that we kind of like to live by at rhythm is Google's micro-moments and it's kind of they have varied ones but I need to know I need to go. I need to buy their kind of these micro moments that as we now have these cell phones mobile phones were interacting with brands on small scales consistently so how does that go and then also kind of customer journey and then how the different variants of that sometimes people just go okay this is the ideal customer journey will not every situations an ideal situation. We also try to think about what happens when things go wrong and then on the micro level we try to go where those users are whether it be through programmatic other things like that which we talk about a little bit more yeah please <hes> and then lastly <hes> one thing that I wanted to add is just don't forget to continue testing. That's something that it seems like more and more people are getting involved with A._B.. Testing <hes> but just because you set that strategy doesn't mean that it's going to remain that way always you constantly to test and refine yeah absolutely I call the keeping the pulse <hes> your finger on the pulse of the market because it is constantly changing and if you put you said it and let it go and you're not looking at what's going on chances are it got off course when I think about strategy energy then in in trying to get buy in if you will from from management <hes> you know they always WanNa know they they go right to well. I want to be on facebook and Youtube or whatever and they don't sorry out there management folks in listener land but a lot of times they just don't understand the different aspects of how the strategy comes together so selling it from a marketing standpoint on up to senior management but some advice. Could you give some of the marketing folks that are listening today sure so again. Every situation is different <hes> sometimes I've encountered where maybe there's some senior level management. That is <hes>. How do I says politely maybe he's not up on the up and up as far as the importance of digital <hes> but that said almost everybody now has a mobile phone right a smartphone so one of the things that I've used and although it's not necessarily surly recent study but in two thousand fifteen there was a study that in the morning were by a factor of three more likely to reach for our mobile phone than we are far significant other in the in the bed right so that's how personal that device has become and that device really encapsulates everything that's digital whether you're doing search facebook whatever it may be right so I kind of say look at the importance of this in everybody's life if you're not advertising on digital whatever area is you're missing that and then of course one of the things that I would also recommend if they want to get more granular is really start to think about when it comes to lead or sale or service what's the actual value of that and then see if you can work that back through some of your analytics so that way you could do a little bit of a small test campaign right say okay? Maybe you're not ready to jump full in. That's okay but can we start with something small. It's a little bit of a media budget. We've got our eye and then you work on it and if you show a positive R._O._I.. Then you can say let's scale this okay that makes a lot of sense you know there. There's so many in you know better than I different channels and and new programs coming out on a daily basis acis I mean if we just sat and did nothing but read every day. That could be a fulltime job for us so when we look at some of the Standards Right facebook linked twitter instagram youtube in display and retargeting and P._p._C. An S._E._o.. I mean that's kind of the the core if you will 'cause I've missed one of those so when designing the strategy what are some of the effective- -ness of of some of these different tools if you all just call them tools and again that might vary based on B._B._B.. To see based on strategy and all those things so I'm giving you up the big broad and trying to get you to narrow it down to some specifics sure I'll try my best so <hes> again yeah it totally depends but that said <hes> when it comes to facebook what we like about facebook at least at rhythm is that it does provide a great testing environment for some test campaigns paints. The advertising tends to be a little bit more cost effective than maybe going with <hes> p._p._C. Right out the gate so a lot of times when we have this idea we've created the strategy of who we think we want to go after will start to test it there with some demographic data and then we'll see okay this is it. I think we've Kinda hone this in for a small price now. Let's start to scale this up. Well let me interrupt so let's talk about facebook for a second how effective is be to be on facebook. <hes> B._B.. Can Be Effective <hes> but we generally wouldn't go there a lot of times. As we may go to linked in instead it's still worth being on most platforms but again it depends but yeah typically we do a little bit better with consumer products or potentially lead generation. Maybe it's an attorney service and somebody searching for something on there but it's still worth exploring but definitely spent a little bit more time looking into it..

facebook Rhythm Agency director of strategy Angelo Ponzi chief strategy officer American Marketing Association Great Agency David Misaki Angela US Google bozell twitter attorney Youtube five months
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Personas unfortunately a lot of small and medium size organizations don't spend the time to really build those buyer personas personas but it's really important and I'll say one thing imagine you're a software company and you're selling software to an organization. There's someone who looks at you and says I want to initiate that. We need this new software. Then there's somebody who may be evaluating that software and they may not be the same people and that ultimately there's someone who's going to write the check. They may be three different people in the same organization but if you're only messaging to one and only delivering the same message you might be missing the boat so buyer personas an understanding ending who those people are that you're trying to reach account based marketing is really coming on strong and and understanding ups and downs if you will from the vertical standpoint and horizontally within organizations and really concentrating on how you really understand and you can get the biggest bang for your buck and targeting those organizations teach your customers how to effectively by and that gets back to that relationship that you have with them if they understand who you are in the value that you bring the next step is to make sure sure that they see you as the best way to by the way you have that relationship with them. Don't be turned into a vendor. It's very important because then you start down that road of being a commodity one of the things that we think about business growth another aspect is employees without employees without sales. We have nothing without employees to get those sales. We have nothing right now. About Eighty five percent of the workforce in the U._S. is disengaged or unhappy in the jobs that are in that translates to about four hundred fifty.

Eighty five percent
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"It's not necessarily the planning part. It's the implementation in fact fifty three percent of those same executives. I think the execution challenges unnecessarily hemp hamper their ability to compete now. This is really important because again. It's a by innocent. A Corporation can't set to lofty goals that you can't meet and not have buy in from your staff whether it's marketing or sales or frankly H._r.. In all the different things that can impact your road to growth because all these different things that are out there and I talk about market dynamics can have an impact on the growth of your business so if we think about that road to growth right. There's is a lot of offshoots things that can happen styles marketing employees finance operations all those things have an impact on what you're doing however you have to pay attention to the external factors if you will the market dynamics in which were competing the competition technology changes economy changes in the economy politics. We have a lot of stuff going on right now in our in our the U._S. here that are having a dramatic impact on small businesses and how they can borrow money how they can keep operations opens and things like that so it's really important that you look at the total picture and not just internally not just talking to the sales people but really understanding that broader picture of those things that can impact what you're doing now one of the things I'd like to challenge you on is how would you rate yourself. How do you feel you're doing as a business or how you did last year for example? Do all of your employees understand the unique value propositions and can they clearly articulate them. Do you delegate those non essentials as a business as leader or do you tend to want to kind of do it. All yourself are marketing sales messaging on track in making sure that everybody is articulating that their particular value proposition do you conduct regular employees <hes> a meeting so they can understand the K._p._I.'s A._p._i.'s and again getting that buying time after time. What about the annual plan? Do you plan once a year do you do you monitor it semi annually you look at it quarterly. How're you doing that to make sure everybody is buying an Andy as this conversation nation is going to you have a three year strategic road map now the one that I want to really stress right now is the voice of the customer <hes> My background? I have a market research background and and I always say when I talk about this I see my clients they have big dollar signs in their eyes and their the idea is this is going to be really expensive but it doesn't have to be expensive but it is so crucial that you understand the needs wants motivations behaviors of your target customers whether their current customers or whether they're protect perspective customers right you can't work in this back vacuum if you're just sitting around the conference table and and you and your management staff or just talking ideas back and forth and have all this great information the way you want to grow your business and you have no idea how that's going resonate into the marketplace. You're doing yourself a disservice so if you think about how you would rate yourself today and making those changes as we go forward here business growth cafe one of the questions we always ask our guest is what keeps you up at night. One of the consistent answers has been pipeline so that's sales keeping making sure that there's constant sales in the pipeline because you don't win everything you go after that also generates cash and cash flow for your business as well so so when you think about pipeline and you have you know big pipeline goal when you get yourselves folks out there and you know at the the goal is prospect prospect prospect so then you have to evaluate again that back to that historical aspect of what you have in your organization Asian says how many of these prospects or go to turn into customers what am I <noise> clients has been working on these ratios and they know in certain cases that thirty percent of all the <unk> proposals that they put out they will land has been very consistent over the last several years. So we're able to actually forecast how much <hes> proposals how much dollar revenue dollars after putting their proposals and order to turn that into two revenue and then also how long does it take all right if we go out and we sell a widget today and you they go on the Internet and they buy it and they get seven days well that didn't take very long but if you have a long lead cycle right you start today but the sale of the product and the revenue doesn't come in for six eight months from now you also have to factor that in because again getting back to things like cash flow and how do you keep your business afloat as you're going through the all become very important and the other thing is company culture that I wanNA talk about a little bit. It's really important that you step back and think about the culture of your organization is it is it a nurturing one is one that inspires and motivates or is it one that deflates in degrades in that sound silly but it does happen so it's really important that you really put a check and you can do some of that by talking to your customers immerse. I mean not your customers but talking to your employees your customers to but remember you as a business owner. It starts with you. It starts at the top and worked its way down. You have to have that driven from the top in order to have a strong culture and the importance of that culture so today we're talking a little bit about business growth which in turn goes back to sales and I'm a big believer that new businesses the lifeblood of any business right new businesses the lifeblood. It's really important that cassatt looking for those new prospects right because you want the renewables and you can certainly sustain yourself with the renewables but your growth is going to be much lower than if you're adding new blood if you will into the organization so when you think about that you could break get down into your developing strategies occurring customers and new customers now one of the things I talked about and actually have a blog on my website about it is is a strategy for selling more self or more or to sell to more so if you think about that sell more those it'd be kind of retention strategies increasing volume with existing customers generating new users of of existing products in in in stimulating current users to buy more one of the things I've noticed in a lot of the interviews that I've done with target customers myself and people that I've been interviewing a lot of them will admit that their current customers have no idea about the products and services that they sell they know what they buy but when you really start to sit down and talk to them about the breadth of those services and products that you sell they have no idea so just selling more from that strategy if they knew you had more products and services to sell and you could to sell them a little a little bit more. You're going to increase revenue without very much difficulty right. It's easier to retain existing customers than it is to generate new ones sell for more is always an interesting aspect because now we're talking about pricing and pricing could be an uphill battle but if you think about why they selected your company in the first place it was based on value not really on price now certainly a bunch of commodities that my pricing might have been a big factor but the end of the day there's value and what you offer and and you have to constantly remind your customers about that value you don't WanNa let the competition get in because you're not continuing reinforcing that and what you don't want to do is start to be committed competing on price so value propositions positions and understanding what that is and what you why they hired you in the first place and why they should continue to use U.. Becomes very important and then sell tomorrow right. That's that acquisition strategy users that maybe are using adding similar products and services yours but just not you. They become a likely target because maybe the competition is doing everything. I'm telling you to not to do and they're doing those things so they're leaving themselves wide open for opportunities for you to slide in. And take competition from them so looking at those ways to.

business owner Andy fifty three percent six eight months thirty percent seven days three year
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining US each week we select from a menu of topics that can impact business growth to discuss with experts on a wide variety of disciplines Lynne's and today at the cafe. I'm actually going to be talking to you about the importance of planning for business growth now. This is a topic that's near and dear to me as of ads of this morning before I came in there are three hundred and fifty days left in this year. Hopefully hopefully you've already started your planning process and this'll be just kind of some insights them help you Polish up what you've been working on but if you haven't started your planning for this year you're a little behind and hopefully this <hes> show that you're going to listen to. We'll help you out now. Planning is really interesting because I when I talked to clients with the planning part is easy right. Planning for growth is easy. We can sit around and we can talk about it but making it happen now. That's really the challenge because unfortunately implementation is the biggest part of all of this. We can talk we can plan. We can do all sorts of things but unless we actually implement and manage that implementation it's all for not right. I had some guests on some last week. We talked about her strategic effort they do and she gets weekly reports and quarterly updates to make sure they are staying on plant so it's really important so let's talk a little bit about this. If you think about planning for Growth I I always recommend a three year plan right one years the little to enclose looking at five years at four and five you're just kind of guessing at stuff but it three years you can really sit down and put some real effort into making this happen and looking at what you currently doing or what you did last year for example Colin using your projections off of that you have a ton of data in your organization. We tend to forget about utilizing that data but that date is really important because you can go back into history and look at how your growth happened to go. You can look at things that took you off track if you will and so those are really important in setting your goals for next year and the other important thing is getting buy in from your staff. You can't do it on your own if you're the marketing guy or the C._e._o.. Of the company you have to have the other people apple involve your sales teams talking to the customers. There's other ones out gathering information so having buy in having participation really helps ensure that when you do implement your plan you have full cooperation from everybody on your staff. But what is you know as a business owner. The road is not always straight a lot of bumps and curves and twist and turns at so. It's never a smooth ride and that's why it's important to have some kind of monitoring in place so you can keep your finger on the pulse Holtz of what's going.

Lynne US business owner Holtz Colin three years fifty days five years three year one years
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining US each week we select from a menu of topics that can impact business growth to discuss with experts on a wide variety of disciplines and and today at the cafe. I'm actually going to be talking to you about the importance of planning for business growth now. This is a topic that's near and dear to me as of ads of this morning before I came in there are three hundred and fifty days left in this year. Hopefully hopefully you've already started your planning process and this'll be just kind of some insights them help you Polish up what you've been working on but if you haven't started your planning for this year you're a little behind and hopefully this show that you're going to listen to. We'll help you out now. Planning Planning is really interesting because I when I talked to clients with the planning part is easy right. Planning for growth is easy. We can sit around. We can talk about it but making it happen now. That's really the challenge because unfortunately implementation is the biggest part of all of this. We can talk we can plan we can do all sorts of things but unless we actually implement and manage that implementation it's all for not right. I had some guests on some last week. We talked about her strategic efforts that they do and she gets weekly reports and quarterly updates to make sure they are staying on plan so it's really important so let's talk a little bit about this. If you think about planning for Growth I I always recommend a three year plan right one years a little too in close looking looking at five years at four and five. You're just kind of guessing at stuff but it three years you can really sit down and put some real effort into making this happen and looking at what you currently doing or what you did last year for example on using your projections off of that you have a ton of data in your organization we tend to forget about utilizing that data but that date is really important because you can go back into history and look at how your growth happened to go. You can look at things that took you off track if you will and so those are really important in setting your goals for next year and the other important thing is getting buy in from your staff. You can't do it on your own if you're the marketing guy or the C._e._o.. Of the company you have to have the other people all involve your sales teams out talking to the customers. There's other ones out gathering information so having buy in having participation really helps ensure that when you do implement your plan you have full cooperation from everybody on your staff but is you know as a business owner. The road is not always straight lot of bumps and curves and twist and turns it so it's never smooth ride and that's why it's important to have some kind of monitoring in place so you can keep your finger on the.

US business owner three years fifty days five years three year one years
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"A focused discussion with an industry expert to provide insights that can impact Your Business's growth with your are host Angelo Ponzi I._M.. Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining us he tweet we select from a menu of topics that could impact business growth to discuss with experts wide variety of disciplines and today at the cafe and we're going to do something a little bit different. I I want to thank all of you that have been listening to the show is really greatly appreciated and I'm excited about the lineup. We have for the coming year however well many of you have been listening to the show since just the beginning we have newcomers to the show that only been listening to last two or three episodes so for this year.

Angelo Ponzi
"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:13 min | 2 years ago

"angelo ponzi" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"With your host host Angelo Ponzi I._M.. Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining US each week we select from a menu of topics that can impact business growth to discuss with experts on a wide variety of disciplines and today at the Cathay. I'm excited have Mike Carroll Managing Partner Corp Jen Council on her show to discuss the anatomy a selling or buying a business as well as the importance of corporate governance or lack thereof that can impact your business. Mike Welcome thank you agile. It's great to be here. I'm happy to have you here. I think is going to be a great discussion before we get started. Watch take a few minutes and and tell the audience a little about yourself and your company sure absolutely so my name might the Practices Corp Jen Council. It's sort of a a <hes> hybrid organization. It's it's organized like law firm so we practice corporate securities law mergers and acquisitions and a fair amount of private equity and fund work for high net worth individuals private companies <hes> of ranging from smaller sizes to mid sized to large size privately owned <hes> family owned companies as well as smaller publicly traded companies generally traded on the small <hes> over the counter on Nasdaq and what we do is we provide general counsel services for these businesses where companies that don't have a general counsel in houses and employees what we do is we sort of work there either an onsite or offsite capacity providing these legal services <hes> on an outsource basis okay. Well sounds a little bit like what I do. It was fractional chief marketing officer and so you're kind of like a fractional <hes> chief counsel fractional general counsel but we're still like you very much you know we are the general counter where the attorney just like. You're the marketing officer and we take that stuff very seriously Ashley so they need thing about it is while we are not an employee of the companies and the clients that we work for we're truly embedded within the organization well and I think you have to be especially in the roles that we take on. I mean it it isn't about just popping in and you know doing something real quick and leaving and we get 'em immersed in their business and really so we can offer the council that they really need yeah you really have to and it's funny members of my team that that work in the organization we literally limit ourselves to a few clients because after that point you really can't embed yourself you really can't a truly be their general counsel and know the INS and outs of their businesses the people's the ups the downs the wants desires and the places that you want to get your clients too right well. We're we're we're subject to time right. We have time to sell L. and if you'd like to carve off a little niche for yourself we had a show not too long ago about <hes> employees <hes> health and wealth and balanced life life balance and so we all try to achieve that so we're subject to time so let's get started one of the questions. It's a real simple one but I wanna make sure that the audience is not confused because I think it ties a little bit into some of the new corporate laws that are coming down in the tax laws so I'm going to start a corporation. My choices are C.. S. l._L._C.. Let's see so why would I pick one over the other and in one of those kind of benefits as you see it down the road sure well you know in the United States of America <hes> recently in the last thirty thirty or so thirty five years. We've added the advent of new corporate form in in the sense of it's not really that new anymore but the advent of this limited liability company the the L._l._C. as it's known <hes> that has been an addition to the the typical corporation that you know that we've had back to the days of American telephone and Telegraph and National Cash Register Easter and the standard oil company these were all original early corporations and the last few decades this other entity is derived called a limited liability company and I would have to say for the people particularly listeners of your show probably would generally. Early more times than not defer to setting up that method of organization to stepping back real quick the corporation of when we talk about s or C that's not necessarily the legal form of the corporation. It's still typically a corporation Asian and the corporation like the L._l._C. is formed in the state in which you reside or in the state which with you want to do business a lot of times you hear about Delaware Limited liability company doesn't necessarily have to be that it's just the most flexible state to organize one S or see that refers to the taxation <hes> that the I._R._S. imposes upon the corporation and generally speaking. You're either a C. Corporation or you're an s what they call subchapter C or subchapter S Corporation a small business or business starting out for reasons of flow through taxation less tax burdens is that you would be s subchapter s corporation where you're generally taxed not at the corporate level but all the money that you make in the business flows through to your ten forty you report reported as a <hes> essentially as income on your ten forty tax return the L._L._C. is fascinating and it's really my favorite of the three organizations because you can have it any way you want it. <hes> it's not like McDonalds is sort of like Burger King. You can have it with all manner of things and it's very flexible an l._l._C. could be taxed as really one of the three you know the S. C.. Corporation we could have two levels of taxation and there's reasons why you may want to do that it could be taxed as an s inc and you have all the profits flowing through and then the more common wanted the way that l._l._C. is taxed or two separate breakouts. One is a single member L._l._c. a small business owner. That is the sole owner. You can have it as an l._l._C.. It's limited liability ability. We can talk more about that. In a little bit with the importance of having that is what taxation wise it's a disregarded entity means it just flows through and if you have multiple partners three four five partners you would form a limited liability company and have taxed as a partnership partnership and then the gains and losses would flow through okay so really when somebody setting this up that instead of running to <hes> you know legalzoom for example. I mean really looking and seeking counsel to really help understand that it's not just about setting up a corporation. They have to look long term and the impact of all that as they go forward. I think it's absolutely essential I mean there are people that are reasonably priced that you could use your using you know men and women and their professional expertise <hes>. I think legalzoom is neat in the sense that it's it's it's opened up the the is if you will business entrepreneurs people starting businesses to the needs of having those things and it does prompt I mean I've gone through the system. It prompts questions and things like that it can't think for you doesn't have artificial intelligence as much as they say that there's a lot of reasons why you would want to have certain corporate structures or not for example limited liability company. It doesn't have to have an annual meeting of shareholders. You have to have one in a corporation and that becomes really really important when when you think about why you former business why you use an N._t.. Why don't we just do Angelo Ponzi sole proprietor the reason why you would want an entity is for limited liability and that's so that when the business goes out and acts with other people and goes out with like such ages employee's or counterparties or consultants or suppliers or vendors or customers that if there's liability something happens with the product that your service that you're providing the product that you're selling or there's some kind of a lawsuit if you respect the corporate form and you and you do things like have annual meetings in a corporation and you keep your your assets separate in the entity you will have limited liability meaning that any claims are left at the corporate or entity level and don't in your to you personally and that's the benefit of forming an okay so a lot of times I hear this term about piercing the corporate veil that sends to be people that are not doing the annual meetings not filing the paperwork? They're supposed to be doing and frankly doing things like using their corporate cards is to buy go to the movies and buy groceries and then those kinds of things talk talk a little bit about the do's and don'ts that the listeners hopefully. Nobody's doing that out there now if you are if you are. We're going to tell you right now why you shouldn't what we could do yeah and it's interesting. <unk> embedded in your question or two of the three critical points with your entity that you want to maintain and respect to prevent against any sort of piercing the corporate veil or trying for example typical it easy when explain Elaine has a has a lease and for whatever reason <hes> you need to break the lease could be a lot of different reasons doesn't necessarily mean the business going out of business but at that point you have a contract you could be in breach. There could be a claim. There could be issues. The question is is it going go to Angelo personally into your your personal wallet or is it going to stop at the entity level the things you have to respect or three full the first two you actually mentioned the first one is keeping the respecting the form of the entity. That's why at L._l._C. in some ways it's easier because a limited liability doesn't a company doesn't require that you have an annual meeting still up to maintain books and records minutes same thing like that corporation. You have to do those things as well using the entity as a personal piggy-bank. You mentioned that to strike too. You don't WanNA use the company to pay for your personal gardening service or quite frankly your personal travel. I mean as long as you do something as simple as keeping a separate corporate it could be a personal credit Gordon a lot of times I get that question and the company the entity could just reimburse them but just keep that card separate for business expenses doesn't have to be the name of the company. If you respect those those things then you're going forward and then there's the third and the most important under funded undercapitalised company you don't WanNa keep the company so undercapitalized that you're treating it as if it wasn't really an operating entity began with so you want to think about a company that would be well funded enough and if you keep those things in order there is a very low likelihood practically nil that in any sort of meltdown or crisis or something or litigation that the companies would be the what they call piercing the corporate veil that the actual limited liability of the company would be disregarded and they look at the owners generally it stops there so this might be more of an l._l._C. or or you know somebody just operating under a fictitious name I mean if you talk about keeping the company well funded so if someone's sounds like paying themselves in cash taking extra cash out of the company and basically bleeding it downs ultimately probably to pay less taxes in the end. I mean that's kind of the areas where they get themselves in trouble right. It's a very very what we call. Maybe the red zone the zone of insolvency you always have to be careful about what they call the zone of insolvency at that point we have to really look very closely at what are the obligations of the company. Maybe if you're if you're winding down. That's something you've got to think about and you WANNA keep enough money in there that would be reflective of actual operating company most businesses in small businesses do this okay so I was reading one of your blogs <hes> the other day and it <hes> you talked about closely held family owned businesses. They are kind of two to three months that an an attorney should council this client on so one is independent director to serve on the board or an independent board altogether a succession plan and a shareholder agreement or buy sell agreement..

Angelo Ponzi general counsel Mike Carroll attorney Practices Corp Jen Council Mike Welcome C. Corporation Jen Council business owner S Corporation Cathay Managing Partner McDonalds United States US Delaware Limited chief marketing officer officer standard oil