19 Burst results for "Angela Duckworth"

Fresh update on "angela duckworth" discussed on No Stupid Questions

No Stupid Questions

00:58 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "angela duckworth" discussed on No Stupid Questions

"This is not scientific. This scientific ish. I'm angela duckworth. i'm steven dubner. And you're listening to know stupid questions today on the show. When is a good deed an invitation for more bad deeds. Holo the duck worse are not here to collect your poop. Also what is the most significant choice that a human being can make in their lifetime. Whether to part your hair on the left or right. I think is the obvious choice. Angela i have a question for you about moral hazard sort of and poop angels. Do you know to poop angeles. I think i know what moral hazard is poop. Angels is a little tougher. So i learned the phrase in a post on next door. Which is this sort of neighborhoody version of facebook. I know next door so one. New york city resident was proposing that others join him in going around their neighborhood and pick up dog poop. That belongs to other people's dogs from those inconsiderate owners who leave it on the street. Even though it's theoretically illegal to leave dog poop on the street many people do it so this guy is saying look. It wasn't our dogs wasn't my dog but we'd all be better off if you will join me and being a poop angel. Walk around picking up the poop. So i wanna know what you think of the overall value of this idea. Would you consider it. An active civic mindedness as disgusting as it may seem with the net gain or do you think it is a sort of case of moral hazard where you not only let the offenders off the hook but you encourage them and potentially others to infect offend more because now they know these poop angels will be taking care of things in no this walk their dogs and not even take a plastic bag with them when they leave the house. Maybe they'll go by dogs for the express purpose of boosting. Because you know that the angels are gonna take care. Well stephen you may or may not know this but now that you define the term. I would say that my husband. Jason is in fact poop. Angel true no true story. Oh worlds colliding in the most disgusting way ever. What you guys don't have a dog. We've never had a dog. But here's how my husband is a poop angel. We used to live on this street next to a convenience store and for whatever reason people would leave their dog poop which by the way they would take the care to put it in a little plastic baggie but then they would just deposit the plastic baggie on the stoop of the convenience store it is unusual and actually the store had this iron great that closed overnight and some of these strange and rude dog owners would not only take the time to curb their dog. Put it into plastic bag but also they would tie the little plastic bag tool the great of the store. This is not sound like typical. This sounds like some kind of poop. Vandalism poop devils if he well did you know the people who ran the convenience store. They offended the dog owners. These were like salt of the earth people and we moved and also the commute store has since closed but love this family and i think the reason why people would do this is because maybe people think that convenience stores ought to have a trash can which they didn't have in front and maybe they thought that gave them the right to deposit the bagged poop on the stoop of the convenience store. It's so interesting because it's also like you know those stories about how an architect when they're designing a university campus. They'll think well. I could lay out the sidewalks in this way or i could just leave a field for now and see how people walk and then once i see how people walk. Then we'll pave it and make it a path so it's a kind of inverse path dependency. I guess it is literally half dependency but starting in a more organic way but it's almost as though one person one day left one bag boop at the convenience store and then the whole neighborhood decides this is where we put our philadelphia is so weird. I have to say it's going to be really hard to defend philadelphia right now. I mean honestly and so this is happening and we really felt terribly denigrating. This guy had to literally snip off. Era scissors these poop bags and then deal with them. Snip him off because they tied them to the gate. Yes so then. I had various schemes to create webcams and catch the perpetrators. Because we lived right next door interesting. So you immediately go for the punitive but your husband's swoops in as the poop angel i did i was like and i don't wanna repeat the language you know what begins with 'em and my husband was like no you don't we're gonna do because my husband is like mr civic activist. He's mr poop angel. Let's go to home depot by one of those big industrial trash cans. Install it on the light pole. That was inbetween our house and the commune store. And then let's get those special size bags and let's change it as soon as it fills up with poop so much to say about this number one kudos jason it number to you and i have talked a little bit on this show and a little bit more offline about the idea of millennium handling of problem solving so kurt. Lewin is a famous long-dead psychologist. And i know that. Danny katamon who is a very famous alive. Psychologists talked about lewin being his main influence in the following regard. In that when you're trying to change behavior or solve a problem very often the way civilizations respond or especially institutions that have authority over people. Respond is by setting rules are enforcements and trying to essentially crackdown trying to prohibit or motivate like incentives or whatever exactly whereas in fact you can find a way to fight the inclination in a slightly more organic way or less punitive way. So what's interesting is here. You went straight for the old guard like let's track these people down and punish them right. Let's put up. Cameras will find these people on arrest them. And i have to say i often think like you. In fact i once came up with a scheme to cut down on dog poop. We wrote a new york times combat. This believe it or not. I can't believe they published it know. This is the sort of tragedy of the commons problem or moral hazard problem. That if one person does it. It's not a big deal. But if one hundred people do it starts to become big deal so we wrote a column suggesting that the way to deal with dog poop left on the streets is to require. Dna testing as part of the licensing procedure. Because you're supposed to have a license if you own a dog in the city like new york the fact is that most people don't so that wouldn't really work but anyway the idea is you do. Dna testing as part of your licensing. You'd submit it. Then you'd have dna database and then if poop were left on the street someone could collect a sample test against the database. And just send that person a ticket for two hundred dollars. That's interesting that's actually possible. I guess it is possible. And in fact in a few places around the world this has happened like singapore. Or something. I wanna say in. Petah tikva israel. Somebody did it. I've heard of it happening. In homeowners association communities that have the technology and the resources to do so anyway. That would.

Danny Katamon Steven Dubner Angela New York Jason Singapore Lewin Facebook Two Hundred Dollars Angela Duckworth One Hundred People Today Israel One Day ONE One Person One Bag Boop
Is Optimism a Luxury Good?

No Stupid Questions

06:08 min | 3 months ago

Is Optimism a Luxury Good?

"Angela. I'd like to ask you a question today. Sent in by listener named ben all right and this is about something that i feel. We've discussed on the show at least once or twice which is the power of optimism. I think it's safe to say that. You and i are both all things considered optimistic people. Yes so in a way benz question is a challenge to that which i like he writes. How do you square the benefits of with the harsh realities. That might make any reasonable person. A pessimist so look. I think this is a great question. A couple of levels. I think we should appeal it by first asking about the supposed benefits of optimism as ben puts it. Wasn't you first house. What litter tries to say about that. So optimism can be defined in different ways but the way that is often defined is the tendency to look for in a way biased by information. That things are going to get better and that you can make them better and the benefits are enormous. And i wanna say ubiquitous just in the sense that when you think about all the possible life outcomes like doing well at work making more money living longer having more friends being happier. These are all koretz of optimism. So first of all. I have to say your claim about. The benefits of optimism sounds really enthusiastic. Like optimistically enthusiastic. Tuesday sounds like you say. They are enormous and ubiquitous. But when i look into the literature which you know much better than i. Here's one paper. I see optimism is associated with exceptional longevity in two epidemiologic cohorts of men and women. So that sounds good. But then i read a little bit of it. It makes the claim that optimistic people have reduced risk for cardiovascular disease mortality compared with their less optimistic peers but to me this sounds like potentially classic example of correlation without causality. It could be that the same behaviors that result in or drive optimism. Also result in dr healthy behaviors. It could be that healthier. People have more reason to be optimistic. Because they're healthy. Yeah the causal arrow could go the other way like. Wow your life is great. No wonder you're an optimist so persuade me some of those correlates for some of the outcomes of optimism. Get into the causal. Okay and let me also say even that when i say enormous i mean you can't take back enormous. You said it. I might need to take back. Are you gonna take back ubiquitous to now. I'm going to go with ubiquitous. Let's leave that one but you know. Listeners should know that nothing predicts anything with truly norm or enormous food. Life is complicated right so relatively speaking these effects are really impressive. But i don't want to exaggerate too much there. Okay so first. Let me just say you're right. Correlation is not causation. Can you say that again. Look you have a point. I'm going to back down from that too. It's quite obvious that the causal aero could go the opposite way. You're having a great life therefore you're optimistic. It's also possible that some third variable like being rich or something drives it. But here's some evidence to suggest that the causal arrow is also from optimism to outcomes one example. Is that when you look at the relationship to an optimism and health outcomes one reason that we think that this is really optimists doing something differently. Is that when you actually measure. How physically active. They use to be what they eat whether they smoke. It turns out that optimist tend to engage in healthy behaviors. So optimism can drive behaviors that have better health outcomes. That's still correlation evidence by the way it's just that it's a little more of a satisfying story. It is satisfying and one can imagine the mechanism by which that's true. One can say. If i feel like the activity that i do is going to have a real result like feel optimistic about my leverage their then i'm probably more likely to do as opposed to. I can do this all day long. It's not gonna help. Yeah like my life is terrible and it's not gonna change. I'll stay in bed and smoke the cigarette. Let's flip it for a second and talk about what the listener ben wrote in about the harsh realities of life. That would make any reasonable person a pessimist. This calls to mind a famous. Ish story called the stockdale paradox. You familiar with this. Just vaguely admiral. James stockdale when he was in captivity in vietnam. I think in the famous hanoi hilton which was not a hotel by the way it was prison. That the american prisoners called the hanoi hilton. He was years later. Asked what he had learned from that experience about dealing with helplessness and torture and imprisonment. He said i can tell you who didn't survive. It was the optimists and his argument. Was that the optimist. Felt like oh. We're going to be out by christmas. And then chris would come and go and you were now and as he put it they died of a broken heart which i think is probably not exactly what happened. False hope right. And that's where. i think. This question is really interesting for all of us. Because i think these are natural tendency to reach for optimism but there should be a natural cautionary vibe against letting your optimism become delusion. I don't know the story very well. And certainly never interviewed stockdale. But i don't know that optimism. Like i know by christmas. Everyone's going to be vaccinated kind of optimism. I don't know that that's truly at the core of these findings. I think the best kind of optimism. Is you know what. There's gotta be something that i can do here. It's just that of all the things you could pay attention to. Should you pay attention to the things you can't control or should he try to pay attention to things that you can. So couple your optimism with agency. You're saying yeah in fact if you want to say that. Optimism of the a gigantic flavor is the optimism that angela duckworth really likes. That's the phrase was reaching for optimism of the genetic flavor. Yes i thought so.

BEN Cardiovascular Disease Mortali Benz Angela James Stockdale Hanoi Hilton Vietnam Stockdale Chris Angela Duckworth
"angela duckworth" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

06:36 min | 4 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"So much for your time. today. I'm going to get right into it with my very cool. Guess angela duckworth who you may have heard about as an expert on grit so angela. Thanks for being here. Angela is a phd in psychology university of pennsylvania. She has her own nonprofit that she's founded and she directs called the character lab focusing on character development for youth. Super excited. Talk about that. She's the author of a book titled grit something. Seals know about the grit the power of passion and perseverance. And i've watched her ted talk and it's been viewed over twenty million times. That's pretty cool. Angela i mean. Did you expect that when you gave that ted talk. I think there are lots of kids. All around the world who've been forced to watch my head tara formally apologized each. And every larry right makes lot of sense. That's hilarious. so let's get. I give us a sense of your background where you're from. How you got interested in this topic and You know your sense of angela and your place in the world just ground us. Yeah now. I'd love to do that. I grew up in cherry hill new jersey. Which is exist for off of the new jersey turnpike a southern new jersey for a little while. And i used to always say what talking about and you know of southern new jersey. The butt of a lot of jokes. But i will say that i was raised there by my parents who were immigrants from china And my dad was very very interested. I mean i would say obsessed with achievement. And he. I think gave me a legacy of you know asking this question new. Who's successful in life and who was really successful life So i think that's the kind of long story of like how i got interested in this topic. I am a research psychologist who got to her career. By way of being a schoolteacher. And so i'm also very interested in how success plays out over a lifetime and you know what is look like in kids and You know in general. I'll just say this. I think what we all want is to be good. People like in lim- live good lives for ourselves and for others. I think re is part of that. Not all of it. yeah. I agree so did you. What did you study. Did you study like general psychology when you went to harvard undergrad. And what was your phd in like or did you. Won't you studied. Grit thing is will. They didn't have grit one is giving. Slaves isn't court on. I'll tell you this. I started it. I i'm teaching for the first time of course called grit lab so i guess i just wanna one But what. I was an undergraduate not have Any courses in that and also i wasn't even a psychology major. I think took my very first real real psychology class aside from a summer school class when i was a high school kid like when i was in graduate school so as neurobiology in neuro science majors a more like studying the brain neurons and and i think it all connects obviously but This interest. I think though it had early roots kind of Got much more serious after it had been a teacher. Because i think anybody who's trying to motivate other people something you know. A lot is out You know you become sort of instantly. A devotee of psychology. Because cheryl you wonder why what you're doing isn't working. Yeah no i agree with that one hundred percent and a lot of my research and kind of self learning over the past. Ten years has been in both western and eastern psychology. Because it's just. I mean of avation and grit and resilience him mental toughness. I mean it's it's all there right. You just have to study human behavior and understand how the brain works and Mine has been very experiential. In fact i went through the ultimate grit lab. Us navy seal training. But i love talking to people like you who've studied it across different populations and have developed some great distinctions. That have been very helpful for me. So i appreciate your work. One thing. i kind of anecdotally as funny. When i was going through when i was at seal team three i heard about a study. That was done at buds. Because it's always been this drive to try to figure out what makes a successful seal canada. So they can kind of target those individuals right and then get into the pipeline program to save money and time to get the right person to the force and they spent like several hundred thousand dollars and whoever did this research study basically came back and said you know what we can't tell you who re we can only tell you. What makes someone successful at buzz in. That is grit or we can't tell you who has it and how they develop it or how it's going to show up and the sales were like okay. Great we kind of told you that right before you even before we sign the checks grit. So how would you define it. you know. i've got my ideas. But what would you say his grit. I'll give you a definition that actually in a way goes back one hundred and fifty years to the very first scientific study of outliers and success. So i'll give you my definition in my words. But i'll say that there are some historical reasons to believe this is true. It's the combination passion and perseverance sustained over a really long time not just a flash of these flash of hard work but really the ability to diligently sustain a commitment to a goal and then to work toward it over years or really i think when you look at greatness it's it's almost always over alleged gains if not a lifetime exactly so when i say that this goes back one hundred and fifty years. It's because of the very first scientific investigation of outliers of a super achievers. It was noticed that there was quote a combination of zeal. Which is kind of like i. Guess you're you know eighteen hundreds way of saying you know and then The capacity for hard labor Said the scientists who is real hard labor. I love that. Yeah yeah so yet. Grid is one of those words that is kind of in order to define it. You just have to bring a bunch of other bunch of words. Define it right. There's no simple explanation. I love that you know..

angela duckworth psychology university of penns new jersey Angela angela cherry hill tara ted larry harvard china cheryl navy canada Us
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:47 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"That's we're why did they break off just the Philippines? I think it's better to be breaking it down to more specifics. Sure. But let's say it said the school was twenty percent Asian thirty percent. Chinese. Twenty percent white. It's just weird to break out I don't know if you know Filipino one percent Hispanic Latino thirty three percent, white forty percent. Multiple other zero percent. English weather's no others there. Well, no that includes this is in parentheses include American, Indian, Alaskan, native, and native. Other Pacific Susan American Indian. It does oh English learners eighteen percent special education eight percent free reduced lunch forty, three percent..

Pacific Susan American Indian Philippines
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:41 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So live in an age where there are close So to me, it's like whenever they are uncomfortable about the fact that I'm naked, you'll see these European families. Go you go to a park in Germany, the whole goddamn families, naked jer in the park and its cultural. Whatever are weird. Again, I do not WanNa, see my mom naked and yet if I had grown up in jeopardy or France I, probably wouldn't give a shit. So it has to be cultural. Sure. But I've seen in your children that they, they have flirtations that there are boys that they're kind of in that. Yeah. So I, I do think there is something happening in them. Now, I don't think they're putting together. Pena's. That's what I'm saying, yes, they think. I. Have Like like an elephant and I have another device to breathe from or something. It doesn't mean that they're not bad. It's not a sexual organ to them yet, right? Right. Right. It's just an appendage is goofy looking coming. Coming off my body and they don't understand whether it's hair around it. Yeah. The whole thing is just a goofy mystery. Sure. Sure. But I'm saying as far as hormones the and stuff happening it is happening it just they haven't put the pieces together. Yes. Literally, and physically what I'm saying is I think once they realized that that thing will get hard and be used for quotas. It's time to put a robot you. Yeah, that's fair. I guess, right? You can kind of let them dictate. Angela Duckworth Oh Angela board I like her yeah. She was wonderful. We were saying affects she has podcast with Stephen Dumber who we love freakonomics. And we were saying what a fun podcast that must be because they have so many thoughts in their head. Yeah. But this episode, our episodes, Stephen were so meandering in a fun way Yay covered. So many different things. Their podcasts must be all that and I bet it's great. CanNot wait to listen to it. Same. So she said outliers is an outlier bestseller list collective five years. Two, hundred, seventy weeks. Okay. So published in two, thousand, eight outliers debuted at number one on the bestseller list for. For The New York Times in the US and the Globe and Mail in Canada okay. It came out on, November eighteenth. It was on the bestseller list the next week November twenty eighth holding the position for eleven consecutive weeks between two thousand eleven when the paperback version was released in February two, thousand seventeen, the book made the New York Times Bestseller List for paperback nonfiction two hundred, thirty, two times. Holy smokes how much money do you think he's made off of this year? Belie me to. Deserves it. Yeah. So special, we love him. Okay. So first generation, you are very adamant that you knew. Yup and let me tell you don't because there's really very little consensus like most. Say It's very Willy Nilly. So here's what I found. Okay. The term first generation immigrant refers to an immigrant, a foreign born resident who has relocated and become a citizen or permanent resident in a new country. Okay. We could've guessed that that's that's yeah. There are two possible meanings of the adjective first generation according to the Merriam Webster Dictionary first generation can refer to a person born in the US to immigrant parents or American citizen. Both types of people are considered to be US citizens. The US government generally accepts a definition that the first member of a family to acquire citizenship or permanent resident status qualifies as the families. First Generation. But the Census Bureau defines only foreign born individuals as generation birth in the united..

US Stephen New York Times Bestseller Census Bureau Angela Duckworth jer France Germany Merriam Webster Dictionary Pena Willy Nilly The New York Times Canada
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

03:27 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"So live in an age where there are close So to me, it's like whenever they are uncomfortable about the fact that I'm naked, you'll see these European families go you go to a park in Germany the whole goddamn families naked jer in the park and its cultural whatever are weird again, I do not WanNa see my mom naked and yet if I had grown up in Germany or France I probably wouldn't give a shit so it has to be cultural. Sure. But I've seen in your children that they. They have flirtations that there are boys that they're kind of in that. Yeah. So I I do think there is something happening in them. Now I don't think they're putting together. Pena's that's what I'm saying, yes they think I have like like an elephant and I have another device to breathe from or something. It doesn't mean that they're not bad. It's not a sexual organ to them yet, right? Right. Right. It's just an appendage is goofy looking coming. Off My body and they don't understand whether it's hair around it. Yeah. The whole thing is just a goofy mystery. Sure. Sure. But I'm saying as far as hormones the and stuff happening it is happening it just they haven't put the pieces together. Yes. Literally and physically that's what I'm saying is I think once they realized that that thing will get hard and be used for quotas. It's time to put a robe on your. Yeah. That's fair. I guess right you can kind of let them dictate. Angela Duckworth Oh Angela board I like her. Yeah. She was wonderful. We were saying fact she has podcast with Stephen Dumber who we love freakonomics. And we were saying what a fun podcast that must be because they have so many thoughts in their head. Yeah. But this episode, our episodes, Stephen were so meandering in a fun way Yay covered. So many different things their podcast must just be all that and I. Bet it's Great. CanNot wait to listen to it. Same. So she said outliers is an outlier bestseller list collective five years two, hundred seventy weeks. Okay. So published in two thousand, eight outliers debuted at number one on the bestseller. List for the New York, times in the US and the Globe and Mail in Canada Okay it came out on November eighteenth it was on the bestseller list the next week November twenty eighth holding the position for eleven consecutive weeks between two thousand eleven when the paperback version was released in February two, thousand seventeen, the book made the New York Times Bestseller List for paperback nonfiction two hundred, thirty, two times. Holy smokes how much money do you think he's made off of this year belie me to. Deserves it yeah. Deciding special. We love him. Okay. So first generation, you are very adamant that you knew Yup and let me tell you don't because there's really very little consensus like most. Say It's very willy. Nilly. So here's what I found. Okay. The term first generation immigrant refers to an immigrant, a foreign born resident who has relocated and become a citizen or permanent resident in a new country. Okay. We could've guessed that that's that's yeah. There are two possible meanings of the adjective first generation according to the Merriam Webster Dictionary. First, generation can refer to a person born in the US to immigrant parents or a naturalized American citizen both types of people are considered to be US citizens. The. US..

US Pena Stephen New York Times Bestseller Germany Angela Duckworth Merriam Webster Dictionary New York France Canada
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Newest show is stupid questions and everyone loves governor. So put you two together and I. I can't imagine why anyone would not go I. He's a great guy he's. Doing it I'm like, okay. I'll talk to you every week. It's good. So it's once a week. Apparently I was like Oh does the season end and he was like, what do you mean I was like well, you know like podcast coming seasons he was like, no, this is a weekly podcast. I literally didn't know that. Very recently, but now I know all right. Well, we're in love with you and we're going to talk to you. Thank you. It's been a pleasure and I will see you soon. Okay. Thanks. Bye. And now, my favorite part of the show the fact check with my soul mate, Monica Pacman. Welcome welcome welcome. Back to the fact. Doing Ray I just had a macho. Had like half a macho let's be honest and you've been having half a macho since we got here at ten am and it's two thirteen. Now I'm past I can't drink anymore. I can't because now it's too close to the evening I love what caffeine lightweight you are. Yeah I mean I can't drink any caffeine except Mata. And even still sometimes, it's too much too much. Yeah. No I. Get a goal bonkers. But as I was saying, this is an update. Oh good. I've been on these antidepressants for almost a month now at least three weeks and I think they're doing a lot of things I want them to do. Yeah. I. Feel much less irritable I'd say I mean is dangerous. Say You notice that? That's not to say I thought you were irritable bowl. I was I knew I was I could tell that something was wrong because of that because I was like a things that wouldn't normally bother me this much are and it's hard for me to know which I think maybe a lot of people might have this issue. I don't know but you know I have a lot of opinions y'all and I have a lot of thoughts on things. And I am Kinda High, Strung Ya and and and I think when you're depressed like obsessive thoughts. Yeah. But see it's hard for me to know when it's extra. It's just me because that's my personality as well. Let's right that can't go away with a pill and I don't want it to not but I want the access to go away and I took me a long time to realize there was excess and it wasn't just my regular personality. I have noticed that that that edge is just rounded a tiny bit and that's really all I wanted last week I was sad about something and for a second. They're not working, and then I was like, no, I'm still going to be sad if things are making me sad and I should be sad of something's making me. Sad. So that's actually a good sign..

caffeine Monica Pacman Ray Mata
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Yeah. In my wife would even tell you I would run into people in God Brennan to a Guy Screaming at a woman on a stop light and I get involved or at A. Restaurant or Get, getting the mix right injuries. Yeah, and so well thank you. So my wife finally said, you know this thing you do where you think you're protecting people the result of it is I feel more dangerous. I feel scared whenever I don't know what you're going to get into in I. Feel scared. So it's having the opposite outcome as you think it is, and then once I said, okay, wow, that's new information in shocking and the opposite outcome I wanted I said I can no longer make that a cornerstone of mild. then. Lohan fucking behold I. don't see anything anymore I haven't had intervened with. These like victims everywhere. Information bias you're just not receiving the information to confirm your free yet okay. Confirmation bias and the CBA fact have that in common, which is like whatever it is that you hypothesize is true. You selectively attend to that secures. Here's what I you know what we're talking about attention away. This is why attention is. So fascinating everybody knows attention is limited. We're like, Oh, I'm paying attention to you. I'm not paying attention you know whatever the clock ticking you know the tree outside I window the clouds in the sky. Yeah. There's a million things could be paying attention to, but here's the point that I don't think is obvious. Our attention is so selective that it's as if we're seeing a pinprick of light and everything else is total darkness. because. Then that makes you think like you know if you have the mindset of somebody who is a rescuer then like your little tiny little pin light just like searches reality. And like looks for all the details that make you, and then soon as you're like not thinking that you know that all goes black and then you're your little pen light on something else and it just makes you realize how subjective and. Maybe not arbitrary but just how limited human beings are able to really process like the real world yes. In that you walk, you're constantly in search of confirming your narrative right so are you married? I am married to a guy named Jason Jason Twenty something years. Yeah. Okay. I. I got a hunch. He's a catch just based on..

Jason Jason Brennan CBA A. Restaurant Lohan
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

04:52 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"It's like the bridges, the buildings Howard works and architect. By the way Monica it's been there is it's basically based on Frank Lloyd Wright right that that was her are. Supposed to loosely be Frank Lloyd Wright Oh who was himself pretty darn selfish. Yeah. A, you can't even pick up the furniture in this house will build the furniture for this house I designed because I have. His you know romantic and personal relationships like he was incredibly selfish. So here's the thing after a week of being an objective in high school. I was like Oh wait a second this complete account like because there's another part of you and maybe there's a delay. But like I do really think young children even when they are shoop or young and you probably saw in your own kids, they have these very moral impulses like most kids when they see another kid get hurt. Like. They don't have to be taught like you should feel bad they just do and so part of us is deeply altruistic and but right Meghan argument. Yes we are also a social primate the our survival selfishly depends on our ability to be empathic when necessary, sympathetic when necessary to maintain these relationships that we know we need to survive. Right so you're thinking like these pro social emotions are like just really instrumental for our survival. So ever always comes back to like self. Like. We're we're paying a price to acknowledge that. Okay. Yeah. That's how we're hardwired. Now let's come up with some cultural layers that make us rise transcend that but I I think you gotta start by recognizing people need incentives people are going to try to make themselves feel right trying to make themselves better off. What's that Adam Smith like hypothetical like most of us would rather ten thousand people die in another country than like us lose our little finger so Yeah I mean you can make all these like Philisophical arguments, but I will say this like after that week of objective as where you know like the strong view is don't listen to the voice in your head that says, Oh have sympathy for this. You know that's not great i. know this week to I was like that's not a great philosophy that's repugnant. Yeah. Yeah, and it also undercuts the notion that ninety nine point nine percent of the people on planet. Earth aren't Frank Lloyd Wright. So if we are all behavioral were Frank Lloyd Wright but we never signed a great house..

Frank Lloyd Wright Monica Howard Meghan Adam Smith
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:47 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Who was himself? Pretty, darn selfish yeah. A you can't even pick up the furniture in this house will build the furniture for this house I designed because I have. His you know romantic and personal relationships like he was incredibly selfish. So here's the thing after a week of being an objective in high school. I was like Oh wait a second this complete account like because there's another part of you and maybe there's a delay. But like I do really think young children even when they are shoop or young and you probably saw in your own kids, they have these very moral impulses like most kids when they see another kid get hurt like. Like they don't have to be taught like you should feel bad. They just do, and so part of us is deeply altruistic and but right? Meghan argument. Yes. We are also a social primate. The our survival selfishly depends on our ability to be empathic when necessary, sympathetic, when necessary to maintain these relationships that we know we need to survive. Right. So you're thinking like these pro social emotions are like just really instrumental for our survival. So ever always comes back to like self. Like we're paying a price to acknowledge that. Okay. Yeah. That's how we're hardwired. Now, let's come up with some cultural layers that make us rise transcend that. But I I think you gotTA start by recognizing people need incentives. People are going to try to make themselves. Feel right. Trying to make themselves better off. What's that Adam Smith like hypothetical? Like most of US would rather ten thousand people die in another country than like us lose our little finger. So. Yeah. I mean you can make all these like Philisophical arguments, but I will say this like after that week of objective as where you know like the strong view is don't listen to the voice in your head that says Oh have sympathy for this. You know that's not great i. know this week to I was like that's not a great philosophy. That's repugnant. Yeah. Yeah, and it also undercuts the notion that ninety nine point, nine percent of the people on planet Earth aren't Frank Lloyd Wright. So if we are all behavioral were Frank Lloyd Wright, but we never signed a great house, we've paid this huge price for really no reward are the people. People that are really great and I don't just mean like rich and successful in Hollywood. But just like the people that you may be artistically respect, the most are they, you know in that sense narcissistic, are they like? So self absorbed and like Os convinced, they're right or not all the ones that I really admire and look up to are like amazing collaborators and I think it's what ends up sustaining their career long beyond after they've given you their point of view, the only ride on that for so long before you need to start collaborating right for inspiration, but.

Frank Lloyd Wright US Meghan argument Hollywood Adam Smith
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:20 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So. As you climbed through, you went to Harvard and then you went to Oxford. What was your pattern? So like you I went to public schools like you I send my kids to public schools. One feature of that decision is that when you go to a school, like Harvard, there are kids who went to like andover. And you sit next to them, your own, my God like like they're like eighteen, but they like they re. It's almost as if they had already gone to college, right? So the preparatory school really prepare them for not. Maybe. They come preparatory school and I didn't I went to a very solid. You know suburban, I went to like the sixteen candles. So I learned other life lessons but not exactly how to thrive at Harvard. So it was hard for me. I think a lot of people have this crisis whether it's when you go to college. So it's like the time you enter a bigger pond than the one you're in before and I think that crisis you resolve in one of two ways right you. You either just get kind of you know destroyed confidence. Wise or for me, I was like I don't know for some reason. My reaction was like, okay. There are a total geniuses year. They're also people words like miles ahead of me. It's like what I said about like not being Danny Common I will never be at any conman, but that's okay. I can. Can Be an Angela Duckworth. So I just had some kind of ego defense rose just like our Adams going to do Mike thing and I'm going to do it. Well, it might be different. So when I went to Oxford, I went on a Marshall Scholarship and the Marshall. Scholarship. Like half of the people who get marshalls become professors I think you have to. To have like a a three eight even to apply and it's it's very selective and I remember we took the q two over. It was some like no anniversary year of the scholarship may decided it'd be fun to send us over on a boat. So I remember all the quaint, the Queen Elizabeth two. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So I run into John Adams. No I think actually my dad I think told me that when he came to this country, he was on a Queen Elizabeth one. Just caught it. The Queen. Elizabeth. They probably called Queens you. Didn't know there's going to be a sequel to be clairvoyant to do that. So I remember being on this boat and I. Remember thinking like it was yet another on where like it was like the next level of competition. Right? And I was like, Oh, so the you know many of us in life if you are successful you like you get to more and more competitive things, you know I, think, maybe what really happened is that like I learned to stop comparing myself. Like instead of being like how big of a fish. In this pond. How many other fish are there like? What can those other fish do? I just didn't ask that question anymore and I think I did learn that in the college. I..

Harvard Marshall Scholarship John Adams Oxford Angela Duckworth andover Elizabeth Marshall Mike
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"So as you climbed through, you went to Harvard and then you went to Oxford what was your pattern? So like you, I went to public schools like you. I send my kids to public schools. One feature of that decision is that when you go to a school like Harvard, there are kids who went to like andover. and. You sit next to them your own my God like like they're like eighteen but they like they re it's almost as if they had already gone to college right so the preparatory school really prepare them for not. Maybe. They come preparatory school and I didn't I went to a very solid. You know suburban I went to like the sixteen candles. So I learned other life lessons but not exactly how to thrive at. Harvard. So it was hard for me. I think a lot of people have this crisis whether it's when you go to college. So it's like the time you enter a bigger pond than the one you're in before and I think that crisis you resolve in one of two ways, right? You either just get kind of you know destroyed confidence wise or for me I was like I don't know for some reason. My reaction was like, okay. There are a total penises year. They're also people words like miles ahead of me. It's like what I said about not being Danny Common I will never be at any conman, but that's okay. I can. Be An Angela Duckworth so i. just had some kind of ego defense rose just like our Adams going to do Mike thing and I'm going to do it. Well, it might be different. So when I went to Oxford I went on a Marshall Scholarship and the Marshall Scholarship, like half of the people who get marshalls become professors I think you have to. Have like a a three eight even to apply and it's it's very selective and I remember we took the q two over it was some like I dunno anniversary year of the scholarship may decided it would be fun to send us over on a boat. So I remember all the quaint the Queen Elizabeth two. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So I run into John Adams. No. I think actually my dad I think told me that when he came to this country, he was on a Queen Elizabeth one. Just, caught it the Queen Elizabeth they probably called Queens you. Didn't know there's going to be a sequel to be clairvoyant to do that. So I remember being on this boat and I remember thinking like it was yet another on where like it was like the next level of competition right and I was like, Oh, so the you know many of us in life if you are successful you like you get to more and more competitive things, you know I think maybe what really happened is that like I learned to stop comparing myself. Like instead of being like how big of a fish. In. This pond, how many other fish are there like what can those other fish do I just didn't ask that question anymore and I think I did learn that in the college I think that's the guest..

Harvard John Adams Marshall Scholarship Oxford Angela Duckworth andover. Mike
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Finding the right person for a specialized role. House wire could relate they needed to hire ambitious reporter to cover news stories on the US mortgage and housing markets. So they turned to Ziprecruiter Ziprecruiter. SMART matching technology finds people with the right experience for your job..

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:36 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Generally, you know beyond a middle school or high school math class like maybe your ability is different from your motivation and navy. We should spend as much time talking to kids like your own kids age. Like that very fact. So they don't count themselves out of things to early, right? Okay. So now got a circle back just for one second to my first question which. What do you think it is about your personal journey that had you even interested in the notion of achievement and success in what are the building blocks of it, where you push to succeed and speak about my own family? I'M NOT GONNA. Try speak about like all Chinese families and I can try to speak out of his. In my family, you could sum up a billion and a half. True. Statement about them. They all came from. Yeah, right. No. I'll. I'll be a little more specific in my family achievement was huge Lee. Important. I think is because my dad was a really domineering force in my family. Only my mom cared as much once my dad, we getting into some kind of heated argument. This is like when I was A. Gosh I think it was when I decided to become a teacher like soon after college and he was very disappointed. So unlike Monica's parents, my parents were not as open minded and they really wanted me do like quote unquote at least get a PhD an in this argument, my dad said. Minimum credit you at least be a senator like. Also. Achievement as the front and center, and he honestly would much rather have been and I asked him once successful than happy. Sure. Sure. Sure. Sherzer. What's again getting back to common that doesn't surprise me because that's the narrative self and it doesn't some people would trade the narrative self for the experiential self in all of us do at times and not at other times, right. So steeper than that, I think with immigrants. Immigrants because they literally do not know the difference to them. One equals the other. It's one thing right there like when you ask them, would you rather be happier successful? It's true. My Dad was like I. Mean he took him allowed I, process the answer because he was like happy successful like what do you mean and then when I was like you know happy like in a good mood like you're smiling like. Could ever. Like, you know your famously successful and yet hands down, and so he talked a lot about Gina's. He would like literally debate at the dinner table like who is the greater genius, Newton or Einstein? Debates, they're really fun but scared when you're growing up and that's all you talked about. Yeah..

senator Monica Gina Lee Newton Einstein
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:52 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"That's how I started thinking about my own a non Straw man argument out of what they were trying to. So a lot of the research that I've done has been in schools and many but not most I think of those schools are charter school. Ah First of all many charter schools, not all but many are like. One hundred percent non white I. Semi Daughters to Charter School. That's predominantly not white. Yeah. Okay. In La. Y-. I'd say like seventy percent of the kids are on assisted launch and stuff. Yes. While you are Jerry unusual by the way the right don't you think like near. The. Most of my peers do private school I have a chip on my shoulder 'cause I grew up poor and I want them to be able to interact with all people not just are rich bubbles. That's good and that's not to say I won't change if one of them has some extreme learning disability like I had and that requires something I'll change or if they're not, they're not doing well Nike feel like they need some other I can I say something really racy he? When I grew up even though I was dyslexic and I had a really long journey to learning how to read and whatnot. Once I got a handle on that in junior high that was unmanned team and stuff at any moment. If I would have really dedicated myself, I could've finished in the top ten percent of my anything. Yeah. Yeah and my wife is the exact same way. Yeah. Now we went to. All white schools in the suburbs of Michigan. Now my kid goes charter school. They have the big end of year first grade thing you come look at all the pictures on the wall and they do an essay right and of course, we go straight to our daughter's because that's all we care about you're reading all my God she did, and then all of a sudden I just zoom and I go. Oh Look at the rest of the essays. The rest of the essays look like they had been tight like the penmanship was insane The Grammar was on point the spelling was there is in first grade sees. And then I looked at the big board where you got stars next to your name in different..

Charter School Nike Jerry La Michigan
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:02 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"It's like when they say athletes can see the stitches of the ball. It's like you're paying such attention that you're absorbing so much information that it in that sense like Thomas Linda but anyway, everything I think is about like where you pay attention and there's something about what you're looking at. Okay. Can I hit you with one more theory? Okay. So yeah, let's say you when they get in a car accident people feel like time slowdown right Yeah. Very common as I've had that experience. You were in a car accident or been in dozens of accidents and motorcycle accidents and surgery daredevil race cars cycles. Oh. My God. Okay. You Go. Sorry. Like in your experience time slows down when you are in an accident. Yeah, and of course, I end up talking with other folks that have been an accident there seems to be consensus around this. Okay. So when you're watching a movie and you see slow motion. Like the Matrix right to get that slow motion, they actually ran the camera at two or three times the speed Oh that makes sense they're running it at at three times the speed. So it's getting three times as much information, and then when they play it back at normal speed, that's what slows it down as it has three times the amount of frames. Right. Yes. So I started thinking Oh that's why your memories feel like time slowed because soon as you're in a car accident and the adrenaline kicks in, you start taking on three times much mansion and it's all stored in when you play that memory back at what is normal speed for memories yet, there's three times as much. Information actually feels like it's slow motion. I am one hundred percent convinced by that theory. Like I'm like, yeah. That sounds totally right. Do you think I should publish this? Probably somebody already you know who to ask them here's you should you should have danny condominium. So many people have told us that we're ended. Not yet generally Adam grant who you must know he's our conduit to everyone interesting and so. We'll just kind of in don't don't don't limit them. They're betty knows the best mechanic in the World Adam grant every person in the world and he is so helpful connecting with those people. Yeah. We gotta get on Dan Economist comes up all the time in the experienced versus narrative life. The reason I said you should do Dan economy is that he wrote a book actually before thinking fast and. Slow he wrote in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety six and it has got attention and effort and he he's really interested in attention and you'd be a good person to ask but he's writing a new book and I think he just finished the first full draft and it's on noise in your judgments and he's really excited about it does he teach somewhere is at Princeton technically, but he's like sternest. He's living in New York I don't know who's actually Princeton right now. Do you daydream of that future where you'll be one of those people? It's like you got a position somewhere but you know we Steam, that were like whatever man live at central park and I literally wrote to Danny my last e mail said I realized when I read your chapter that I will never be identity common so I will just have to be an Angela. Duckworth. No, he is. Like I think he's the best living psychologists in the world you'd have to figure out how to get him a microphone. May We? All, send him one what we can we might phone. A microphone for every Nobel laureate. Every time I interview experts. I am most interested in why they ended up studying what they study I..

Dan Economist Duckworth Princeton Thomas Linda Danny Adam betty New York Angela
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:21 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome. Welcome. Welcome to Armchair expert I'm Dan Sheppard I'm joined by miniature mouths. Maximum Dax scare you when I go. meow because myself rate a cats. Oh. ooh, maybe it was announced in another life because I I'm sorry I know everyone's going to be mad at me. I do not like cannot your animal? Dislike them. You just would never own one about that, but you know what? I don't like them. Okay. That's fair to. I gotTa tell you. We really had a blast talking to this guest. She will remind you a lot of our conversation. Was Stephen, dubner from freakonomics. If you remember that conversation, it has the same meandering facts popping up here and there it was really really. Quality and the guest is Angela Duckworth. Angela. Is An academic psychologist in science author. She is the Rosalie and Egbert Chang, Professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania where she studies grit and Self Control Sherman the Macarthur Award. Right. Genus grant my goodness. What underachievement she has a couple of great books. Kita success, how to be successful in the habits of successful people, and of course, Grit, the power of passion and perseverance. Yes. Also has a Ted talk of the same name and most importantly, she has a new podcast and I'm so excited about with her and Stephen Dubner called. No stupid questions. So no stupid question or questions questions. Yeah. Questions come on. No one. Say, no stupid question. That was a stupid question. That was we just proved their stupid question. Lease. Enjoy Angela Duckworth, we are supported by quip, let's talk about brushing our teeth seventy, five percent of us. Use old worn out bristles that are ineffective in even more people forget to flaws daily. I gotTA say quip makes brushing my teeth really fun, and it's kind of like working out with a trainer in. You know you don't have to count reps when you're working out with a trainer. Likewise, you should be brushing your teeth for full two minutes, and the toothbrush has timed sonic vibrations with thirty second pulses to guy. Recommended two minute routine, and there's even a size down version designed for kids.

Angela Duckworth Grit Dan Sheppard Rosalie Stephen Dubner Stephen Macarthur Award Professor of psychology Egbert Chang Ted University of Pennsylvania Sherman
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:18 min | 9 months ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome welcome. Welcome to Armchair expert I'm Dan Sheppard I'm joined by miniature. Mouths. Maximum Dax scare you when I go. meow because myself rate a cats. Oh. ooh, maybe it was announced in another life because I. I'm sorry I. Know Everyone's going to be mad at me. I do not like cannot your animal? Dislike them. You just would never own one about that, but you know what? I don't like them. Okay. That's fair to. I gotTA. Tell you. We really had a blast talking to this guest. She will remind you a lot of our conversation was Stephen. dubner from freakonomics. If you remember that conversation, it has the same meandering facts popping up here and there it was really really. Quality and the guest is Angela Duckworth. Angela is an academic psychologist in science author. She is the Rosalie and Egbert Chang professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania where she studies grit and Self Control Sherman the Macarthur Award Right. Genus grant my goodness. What underachievement she has a couple of great books. Kita success, how to be successful in the habits of successful people, and of course, grit the power of passion and perseverance yes. Oh has a Ted talk of the same name and most importantly she has a new podcast and I'm so excited about with her and Stephen Dubner called. No stupid questions. So no stupid question or questions questions. Yeah. Questions come on. No one would say, no stupid question. That was a stupid question that was we just proved their stupid question. Lease Enjoy Angela Duckworth we are supported by quip let's talk about brushing our teeth seventy five percent of US use old worn out bristles that are ineffective in even more people forget to flaws daily I gotta say quip makes brushing my teeth really fun and it's kind of like working out with a trainer in that you know you don't have to count reps when you're working out with a trainer likewise, you should be brushing your. Teeth for full two minutes and the toothbrush has timed sonic vibrations with thirty second pulses to guy a dentist recommended two minute routine and there's even a size down version designed for kids paired.

Angela Duckworth Dan Sheppard Stephen. dubner Angela US professor of psychology Ted Egbert Chang Rosalie University of Pennsylvania Sherman
"angela duckworth" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"angela duckworth" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Super enlightening. Angela Duckworth. Hey, Angela, thanks for being here. Thank you. I was so excited to talk to you. I really when I started this podcast, I was like, I want to have Angela Duckworth on. I think I talked about you in the very first episode and here you are. So let's dive into it. He wrote a book and the whole world is talking about it. It's called grit, the power, passion, and perseverance. Let's just start where we need to start. What is grit? And why does it matter? I've been studying high achievers across all different fields, dancers and scientists CEO's asking the question, what makes people successful, no matter what it is they're trying to succeed at. And I don't think the answer is that it is only one thing, but in my research, I have found one of the common denominators to be this combination of passion and perseverance over the really long term. And I think the key to grit is that kind of sticking to it stamina that sets apart the people who are, you know, still showing up and still working on their craft and still trying to get better from those who start off with a lot of intensity and then basically fall out of the race. Yep, exactly. How can you sort of describe what it means to really. Have grit and really show up if that when you look at people who are great, what you find is that they are in a way voluntarily obsessed. You know, when I look at somebody who is a world class mathematician, for example, they'll tell me that, you know, sound like they're just doing math like, you know, between nine in the morning and five the afternoon, it's like five or one they stop thinking about the math problem. They're actually thinking about all the time. You know you're having like a shower or you go for a walk, like waiting for the coffee to brew. And this voluntary obsession want poet that I interviewed and studied a MacArthur winning Cody was then why can been buying as he said, it's kind of like a dog with a rag in its teeth, and then he skipped a beat and he said, but I'm the rag. So it's, it's really like you feel like something has you in its scripts. And and I guess the important thing it is voluntary obsession..

Angela Duckworth Cody CEO MacArthur