8 Burst results for "Andy Waldon"

"andy waldon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing its all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of churn a lot of uncertainty. Annalise Koger at the Brookings Institution, says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching. Where are the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are in some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or childcare issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic. So food service so I have lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare. Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars. In just three months, April to June. Cute, too, and to boot. It's what's known as Tapa ble Equity, the amount you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it marketplaces. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the onset of the pandemic two. You're just saying boon of equity for these homeowners when you're seeing them tap into that available equity. Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform Creditkarma tried to find out among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt. Credit Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says, Because interest rates are so low you can both cash out money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in for parents plans, the overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home when a fairly good housing market and take out that equity the share of homeowners who would take a loss if they have to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth. Is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. San Francisco, Berkeley,.

Annalise Koger Erica Grow Andy Waldon Andy Taylor Laurie Goodman Amy Scott Nick Bunker Samantha Fields 1.7 million Black Night 20% Creditkarma San Francisco August Brookings Institution Black Knight $63 billion July Credit Karma June
"andy waldon" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:22 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Rebel Wednesday. Today, the eighth of September. Good is always stand along everybody. This might not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing. It's an all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of churn a lot of uncertainty. Finally scholar at the Brookings Institution says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching. Where are the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are in some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or child care issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic, so food service so that's lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars. In just three months, April to June. Cute, too, and to boot. It's what's known as Tapa ble Equity. The email, you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it marketplaces. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the onset of the pandemic. You're just saying boon of equity for these homeowners when you're seeing them tap into that available equity. Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform creditkarma tried to find out Among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt credit. Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says. Because interest rates are so low, you can both cash out money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in forbearance plans. The overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home when a fairly good housing market and take out that equity The share of homeowners who would take a loss if they had to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. San Francisco, Berkeley, New Orleans..

Andy Waldon Amy Scott Nick Bunker Erica Grow Samantha Fields Laurie Goodman Andy Taylor Black Night August Bureau of Labor Statistics Black Knight 20% Berkeley Today San Francisco Brookings Institution $63 billion July New Orleans April
"andy waldon" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:20 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on WBUR

"Carlos No. Wednesday Today, the eighth of September Good has always stand along, Everybody. This might not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing its all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of turn a lot of uncertainty. Annalise Cougar at the Brookings Institution, says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching, where the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are In some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or child care issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic, so food service so that's lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars. In just three months, April to June. Cute, too, and to boot. It's what's known as Tapa ble Equity, the amount you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it marketplaces. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the onset of the pandemics. Are you just saying boon of equity for these homeowners when you're seeing them tap into that available equity? Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform creditkarma tried to find out Among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt credit. Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says. Because interest rates are so low, you can both cash out money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in for parents plans, the overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home when a fairly good housing market and take out that equity the share of homeowners who would take a loss if they had to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth. Is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. San Francisco,.

Andy Waldon Nick Bunker Annalise Cougar Andy Taylor Laurie Goodman Erica Grow Amy Scott Samantha Fields Black Night 1.7 million 11 million Bureau of Labor August Bureau of Labor Statistics 20% Black Knight Brookings Institution San Francisco July $63 billion
"andy waldon" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:25 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"In Los Angeles I'm color Brazil Wednesday Today the eighth of September get is always stabbed along, everybody. This might not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing its all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of churn a lot of uncertainty. Finally scholar at the Brookings Institution says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching. Where are the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are in some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or child care issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic, so food service so that's lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars. In just three months, April to June. Cute, too, and to boot. It's what's known as temporal Equity. The email, you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it marketplaces. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the answer. The pandemics are just saying boon of equity for these homeowners when you're seeing them tap into that available equity, Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform creditkarma tried to find out Among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt credit. Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says. Because interest rates are so low, you can both cash up money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in forbearance plans. The overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home when a fairly good housing market and take out that equity the share of homeowners who would take a loss if they had to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth. Is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. San Francisco, Berkeley, New Orleans. Also, New York.

Andy Waldon Amy Scott Nick Bunker Andy Taylor Erica Grow Laurie Goodman Samantha Fields 1.7 million Black Night Bureau of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics August 20% Los Angeles New York San Francisco Black Knight Berkeley Brookings Institution July
"andy waldon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:24 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Car Brazil Wednesday. Today the eighth of September get is always stabbed along everybody. This might not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing. It's an all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of churn a lot of uncertainty. Annalise Cougar at the Brookings Institution, says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching. Where are the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are in some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or childcare issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic, so food service so that's lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars. In just three months, April to June. Cute, too, and to boot. It's what's known as Tapa ble Equity, the amount you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it. Market polices. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the answer of the pandemic, So you just saying boon of equity for these homeowners? You're seeing them tap into that available equity. Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform Creditkarma tried to find out among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt. Credit Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says, Because interest rates are so low you can both cash out money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in for parents plans, the overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home when a fairly good housing market and take out that equity the share of homeowners who would take a loss if they had to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth. Is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. San Francisco, Berkeley, New Orleans. Also,.

Andy Waldon Laurie Goodman Annalise Cougar Erica Grow Amy Scott Nick Bunker Andy Taylor Samantha Fields 1.7 million Black Night Bureau of Labor 20% August Bureau of Labor Statistics Black Knight Today San Francisco Creditkarma Brookings Institution Berkeley
"andy waldon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:11 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The eighth of September Good as always stabbed along, everybody. This might not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing its all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of turn a lot of uncertainty. Annalise Cougar at the Brookings Institution, says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching. Where are the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are in some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or child care issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic, so food service so that's lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars. In just three months, April to June. Cute, too, and to boot. It's what's known as Tapa ble Equity. The email, you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it marketplaces. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the answer the pandemics are you just saying boon of equity for these homeowners when you're seeing them tap into that available equity? Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform creditkarma tried to find out Among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt credit. Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says. Because interest rates are so low, you can both cash out money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in forbearance plans. The overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home in a fairly good housing market and take out that equity the share of homeowners who would take a loss if they have to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth. Is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. Yeah. Mhm. San Francisco, Berkeley, New Orleans. Also, New York introduced vaccine mandates last month, New York is going to start enforcing its mandate. On Monday. So if you go to a theater, a museum and aquarium bowling Alley gym Convention Center casino, you want to eat and drink inside a restaurant or bar. I mean, This goes on right? You've got to be at least partially vaccinated as to what that looks like an actual practice. Whole lot of people, especially people who run or work at bars and restaurants. We're trying to figure that out right now Marketplace and Marielle Segarra went to Brooklyn to talk to some of them. Sunset Park is one of those New York City neighborhoods where you could eat every meal at a different restaurant for weeks and never get tired of your options. For a 50 block stretch. You'll find soup dumplings, hand pulled noodles and Penelas tamales, tacos pizza. And now you'll.

Annalise Cougar Erica Grow Andy Waldon Andy Taylor Amy Scott Nick Bunker Laurie Goodman Samantha Fields Brookings Institution Black Night August Bureau of Labor Statistics 20% Black Knight $63 billion Marielle Segarra San Francisco Monday New York City July
"andy waldon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:22 min | 9 months ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on KCRW

"In Los Angeles I'm kind of Brazil Wednesday today, the eighth of September Good as always stabbed along, everybody. This might not sound like a lot to the casual consumer of business and economic news. But believe me when I tell you that the fact that there were 11 million job openings in this economy as July came to a close It's kind of amazing its all time high, also about 750,000 more job openings than there were at the end of June. So we learned today from the monthly job openings and labor turnover survey jolts and the lingo produced courtesy of the Bureau of Labor statistics. But At the same time that is July. The number of hires workers actually hired into jobs stayed pretty much the same. So what's up with that marketplace? Samantha Fields gets us going. There's a lot going on in the labour market right now. A lot of flux a lot of turn a lot of uncertainty. Annalise Koger at the Brookings Institution, says it's not exactly a labor shortage. It's like a real mismatching. Where are the jobs are and where the qualified people with experience are in some sectors. There aren't enough job openings, construction, education and the arts and in others. There are too many healthcare and retail and food service. An employer doesn't just want any worker. They're trying to fit the candidate with what the job entails. And likewise, a worker doesn't want just any job with so many openings and so many people looking, she says. It's kind of inevitable that it will take a while for everyone to find the right fit. On top of that we are still at the whims of the pandemic. Nick Bunker is an economist at indeed, which is a marketplace underwriter, he says. There are still a lot of people who aren't ready to take jobs yet because of covid or child care issues, or both. And there are also signs in job posting data from August on, indeed that employers in some sectors are starting to pull back sectors that are really sensitive to the pandemic, so food service so that's lots of restaurant and bar jobs. Also, childcare Still, there was a record number of open jobs at the end of July. Erica Grow, Shin, the former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, says If employers are having trouble hiring, they should ask themselves some questions. Are the wages as high as they need to be. Are the benefits appropriate? What about their working conditions? And, she says, are they may be passing people over who have the skills they're looking for, but not certain credentials like a four year college degree. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. Homeowners piled on another trillion dollars in equity in the second quarter of this year. That's from the real estate data firm Black Night, and that is a trillion dollars in just three months April to June. Cute, too. And to boot. It's what's known as Tapa ble Equity, the amount you could cash out and still have 20% equity in the home in question. Now? Yes, that is mostly paper wealth. We get that as home prices have kept on going up at double digit rates, But more homeowners are turning those gains into actual cash and spending it marketplaces. Amy Scott covers real estate for us. Between April and June, More than one million homeowners cashed out a collective $63 billion in home equity by refinancing, both of which are the highest level in nearly 15 years. Andy Waldon is vice president of market research at Black Knight. We've seen the average home increase in value by 25% since the onset of the pandemics. Are you just saying boon of equity for these homeowners when you're seeing them tap into that available equity? Black Knight doesn't track how people spend the money. But earlier this year, the consumer financial platform creditkarma tried to find out Among homeowners who tapped their equity in the past 12 months. The top three expenditures were renovations, emergency expenses and paying down debt credit. Karma's VP of home, Andy Taylor says. Because interest rates are so low, you can both cash out money from your home equity but also refinance at a better rate and have a better cash flow situation on a month by month basis anyways. Rising equity also provides a cushion for people struggling to pay their mortgages of the 1.7 million homeowners in forbearance plans. The overwhelming majority still have at least 10% equity in their homes. Laurie Goodman with the Urban Institute says that could help them hold on to their homes when those plans expire If they still can't afford their payments, and if they have to sell, they're going to be able to sell their home in a fairly good housing market and take out that equity the share of homeowners who would take a loss if they had to sell because they owe more than their homes are worth. Is less than 1% a record low. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace on Wall Street today, kind of a downer, but not too bad. All in all, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. Mm. Mm hmm. San Francisco, Berkeley, New.

Annalise Koger Andy Waldon Erica Grow Nick Bunker Laurie Goodman Andy Taylor Samantha Fields Amy Scott Black Night August 20% Bureau of Labor Statistics Los Angeles Berkeley Brookings Institution San Francisco Black Knight July $63 billion Brazil
"andy waldon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"andy waldon" Discussed on KCRW

"3rd good to have you with us. We begin today with climate change a top priority in President Biden's administration. Ah, huge problem to tackle to be sure, but there is some low hanging fruit, some relatively easy fixes that do have bipartisan support. Case in point today, the Environmental Protection Agency released a proposed rule to phase down the use of HFCs hydrofluorocarbons. These are chemical refrigerants and products we use every day and they do a lot of damage to the climate. Marketplaces. Kimberly Adams gets us started. The EPA in line with the law, passed late last year, wants to reduce the production and importation of HFCS by about 85% before 2035 Dan Lashof is the U. S director of the World Resource is Institute HFCS, he says they're super pollutants used in refrigeration. Mostly that can have thousands of times the global warming impact of carbon dioxide and says Lashof, citing EPA is numbers. The net benefits of this rule are expected to be about $280 billion through 2050, and that's mostly from reducing global warming impacts. But some of those benefits are from improved efficiency of the new refrigerants and everyday things. David Doniger is with the natural resource is defense counsel HF Caesar and refrigerators air in the air conditioner of your car there inform installations that you might find in the wall. The House and Doniger says most consumers won't really notice the transition kind of like when we phased out CFC's chemicals that damage the ozone layer. We've gone through two generations of these refrigerant changes already, and you can't see the difference in the price of new air conditioners and the industry is on board knowing the plan, even if they'd like some tweaks allows them to plan Helen Walter Taryn Oni is with the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. There's been an estimate of 39,000 jobs will be created with the face down of HFCs because all those systems will eventually need to be replaced. And someone has to manufacture the next generation refrigerants. I think that no matter which side of the coin, you look at it, it's kind of a win all around. And you know what? These days. Let's just take the win in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. In the housing news. Mortgage delinquencies are way down as of last week, more than 91% of homeowners had made their April payment the largest share in any month during the pandemic so far That's the latest from mortgage data firm Black Knight. It's yet another sign of the improving economy and the impact of pandemic relief checks. But beneath the headline numbers are some stark disparities. Marketplaces. Amy Scott has more Back in November, Brooke Lauren and her husband paused their mortgage payments. She's a home school teacher and crypto currency trader and Colorado Springs. He'd been out of work for several months and then found a low paying job in HR. We're making late payments so rather than pay $50 a month Late fees every month. He just did it for barracks for three months. Then in March, just as therefore, Barents was about to expire. Their pandemic relief check arrived when her husband found a higher paying job that came in just at the right time. We're actually stood for doing pretty well because he's got two jobs and propels doing pretty well. Tooth Lauren Story is in some ways the story of the economy right now. Andy Waldon with Black Knight credits the combination of government stimulus, a stronger job market and a typical seasonal bump in people's pocketbooks from tax refunds and bonuses. Walden says two thirds of homeowners who were in for parents plans at some point over the past 12 months have now left them over 40% of those homeowners or re performing. Another 15% of paid off their mortgages go through selling their home or through refinancing their mortgage. That leaves more than two million mortgages still in for parents, and the improvement hasn't been equal. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia found that last month 11% of black homeowners were in for parents compared to just 4.5% of white homeowners. Leanne Adams is with Neighbor Works America, a nonprofit housing and community development group. She says black homeowners could be at higher risk of foreclosure when for parents protections expire. We know from the last crisis that black homeowners were really disproportionately impacted. And she says it took longer for them to recover. I may be Scott for marketplace. On Wall Street today. I'm not saying it's inflation. I'm on Lee, saying Rising prices are leading some companies to record profits. Good amount of green out there today. Details when we do the numbers News today that Verizon is selling Yahoo and AOL well to the private equity firm Apollo Global Management for $5 billion in cash and stocks. That's about four billion less than Verizon paid for those two companies. Not all.

Verizon Leanne Adams Brooke Lauren Andy Waldon Amy Scott David Doniger AOL Dan Lashof $50 Yahoo Kimberly Adams 11% Environmental Protection Agenc March Walden $5 billion Scott Lee Washington Lashof