35 Burst results for "Andy Andy J"

Governor says FEMA denying too many requests for assistance

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Governor says FEMA denying too many requests for assistance

"High Mike Gracia reporting Kentucky's governor says fema is denying too many requests for assistance During a tour of flood ravaged eastern Kentucky Monday president Joe Biden said I don't want any Kentucky telling me You don't have to do this for me Oh yeah we do Thursday Kentucky governor Andy beshear said the federal emergency management agency is denying too many requests for assistance from Kentucky residents offering the mantra appeal appeal appeal Bashir said anyone getting turned down should take their case directly to fema representatives in the region At a news conference Bashir said he did not have figures on how many applications for aid had been denied by fema Fema officials did not immediately offer a response At least 38 deaths are attributed to the flooding that inundated communities across eastern Kentucky I Mike Gracia

Kentucky Fema Mike Gracia Andy Beshear Bashir Joe Biden
Search Warrant Regarding Trump FBI Raid Won't Be Released

The Dan Bongino Show

01:00 min | 3 d ago

Search Warrant Regarding Trump FBI Raid Won't Be Released

"The greatest miscalculation in American history Really I've never seen a bigger miscalculation on what you thought was going to happen versus what actually happened He is breaking news on Fox Search warrant copy won't be released I'm not surprised I'm not surprised none of this is going to be released And you know what's really telling here Well I'm going to get Andy McCarthy on The DoJ is silent in this But you know what's really telling not just sorry I'm just watching I want to put up a timeline If I Jim just keep your eye on this and because this is big they're not going to release the warmth The DoJ silent because they have nothing to say that is going to benefit them at all They know they've lost the narrative They are now the jackbooted thugs We thought they were they are the DoJ and the people involved in this is the management of FBI made this decision and anyone who carried this out They know they've lost the story now And they're silence is deafening

Fox Search Andy Mccarthy DOJ JIM FBI
Brewers' Keston Hiura cranks a two-run home run against the Reds

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Brewers' Keston Hiura cranks a two-run home run against the Reds

"The Cardinals lead the NL central by one game following the brewers 7 5 loss to the reds Jose barrero hit his first two major league home runs and drove in three Joey Votto and Donovan solano each had a solo Homer for the reds who hadn't scored more than three runs since an 8 two win July 30th against Baltimore Andrew mccutcheon crushed a 420 foot solo Homer and kesten hero hit a two run 428 foot Homer for Milwaukee Buck farmer worked a scoreless sending to get the win Andy ashby slumped to two and ten yielding four runs over four and two thirds I'm Dave fairy

Jose Barrero Donovan Solano Joey Votto NL Homer Cardinals Andrew Mccutcheon Brewers Kesten Reds Buck Farmer Baltimore Andy Ashby Milwaukee Dave Fairy
Andy Ogles: We're Going to See a New Contract With America

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:21 min | Last week

Andy Ogles: We're Going to See a New Contract With America

"Are sick and tired of the Liz Cheney of the world and maybe she'll get her comeuppance in the next week or two, but do you see the right kind of Republicans winning primaries around the country? Obviously you're one of them. Well, you know, the freedom caucus has been fairly aggressive, recruiting candidates to run to increase the numbers. And so that's how I connected with them. They saw this as an opportunity. They looked at the field. I was clearly the one that most fit the freedom caucus mold. And so they set me down. They interviewed me and clearly, you know, they very quickly endorsed me. But yeah, I think there's a huge opportunity here to steer this ship and get us back on track. And it's not going to matter whether you're a freedom caucus congressman or just more of the quote unquote conservative congressman. We have to fix things. And this is based off of that. It's based off of economic and it's not partisan. It just map and I think that's going to cut through a lot of the noise. I think you're going to see a new contract with America in this next Congress. It's going to, you know, it's humbling to know that as we move forward in 2022 and obviously I got to fight. I've got to fight. I've got to win in November. But that being said to be a part of this next contract with America where we get America back on track and we move forward with the Trump's policies and making America first again.

Liz Cheney America Congress Donald Trump
Andy Ogles: Earning the Edorsement of Trace Adkins

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:39 min | Last week

Andy Ogles: Earning the Edorsement of Trace Adkins

"You've been endorsed by the freedom caucus. I know that Jim Jordan, Scott Perry, who's the chairman of the freedom caucus, Mark Meadows, who helped found it, who was Donald Trump's chief of staff. They've all weighed in already. They're all already helping. You've also been endorsed, I think in one of the, one of the cooler endorsement trace Atkins who doesn't get involved politically a lot, but he stepped up. How did you get trace involved? Well, you know, and we also can't leave out senator Ted Cruz. I mean, here at the end, when we felt that the race might be tightening a little bit, he without hesitation jumped in. He said, look, I need a fighter. We need more fighters like you up here in Congress and it would be an honor to endorse you. And so, but trace Atkins really goes back to COVID. You know, I refuse to comply with the mandates. I refuse to shut my community down. You know, the way I looked at it is if you're a single mom with two kids, your job was essential. If you're a small business owner, you're leasing your savings, your lives on the line, your business is essential and how dare the government. How dare the government tell you that you need to shut down. And so I refuse to comply with any of that nonsense. And because of that, trace had reached out just as a thank you gesture to say, hey, you want to go have dinner. And we started connecting and we had a concert. That first year of COVID, on the square, had over 35,000 people there. Because for me, it was about finding a solution. Look, COVID is real. I had a good friend that died from it, but I was unwilling to just cower and hide under my desk. We had to find a way through it. And that was by trusting people to make good decisions for themselves and not relying on the government to run our lives. Well,

Scott Perry Mark Meadows Senator Ted Cruz Jim Jordan Atkins Donald Trump Congress
Andy Ogles: We Outworked Our Opponents

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:43 sec | Last week

Andy Ogles: We Outworked Our Opponents

"Race. It was bitterly contested. You had national super PACS out of Massachusetts spending a $1 million to attack you and yet you ended up winning and I think it was about a 9 or ten person primary by 12 points getting about 38% of the vote. How did that happen? Well, you know, it was a decisive victory. We just outwards our opponents, a lot of great candidates in the field and I'm grateful for everyone who ran. But at the end of the day, the attack ads were just noise and a distraction. I think what people were wanting was people who had real ideas who had a track record of getting things done and substance rule today.

Massachusetts
Big Wins Across State Primaries This Week

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:48 min | Last week

Big Wins Across State Primaries This Week

"Had Kansas and Missouri Arkansas having battles, Missouri. We saw Eric Schmidt, the attorney general over there when the nomination in the battle of Eric's Donald Trump chiming in with an endorsement of Eric with two candidates having the same first name, Eric Schmidt ended up getting the win and will face off to try and make sure the Missouri Senate race stays in Republican hands and then down in Arizona. Carrie Lake finally gets the final nod that she's the winner in Arizona. Maricopa County, Phoenix that screwed up the 2020 election has done no progress in getting any further along at being able to actually count votes and get through an election process. You know, you've got other countries where they can literally hand count ballots and they can do it in 24 hours. Maricopa County can't even get it done in a few days and they had chaos, they had confusion, like we saw in 2020, despite all the denials that there was any election problems in Arizona that it didn't get stolen from Trump, but a big week there, and then in Tennessee, where we're broadcasting from in Memphis, Andy ogles wins the Republican primary in the Tennessee 5th congressional district. Last night, as Republicans redrew that district in Tennessee, it's been a 9 congressional district state for a while. Traditionally, you've had 7 Republicans to Democrats in recent years. Well, with redistricting, Republicans redrew the lines in Nashville, dividing Nashville up, adding some of the suburban counties to it. And for the first time for the first time since reconstruction, the Civil War, Republicans have an actual shot to pick up Nashville and probably do that new district is about a 12 plus Republican district Donald Trump carried it by over a dozen points,

Missouri Eric Schmidt Carrie Lake Arizona Maricopa County Eric Donald Trump Tennessee Arkansas Andy Ogles Kansas Senate Phoenix Confusion Nashville Memphis
Steam bath weather adds to misery after Appalachian flooding

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last week

Steam bath weather adds to misery after Appalachian flooding

"The death toll in eastern Kentucky remains at 37 from last week's deadly flooding with the governor now raising concerns about dangerous heat in areas without electricity Temperatures are expected in the 90s and governor Andy beshear is warning people We've already lost at least 37 kentuckians We don't want to lose any to what it's going to be vicious heat The National Guard is distributing thousands of cases of water meanwhile Bashir says the rebuilding process is going to be a real challenge Imagine scratching and clawing for ten 15 years To be able to have something you call a home But it's not insured And it's wiped out As is every other thing that you own He says the cost of flood insurance was too expensive for most I'm Julie Walker

Andy Beshear Kentucky National Guard Bashir Julie Walker
Please Support the 'Food for the Poor' Campaign

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:06 min | Last week

Please Support the 'Food for the Poor' Campaign

"Me invite you to once again go to Michael line. Dot com, Michael line dot com. Click on the send food banner as we rush urgently needed emergency meals to thousands of displaced children and families around the world. When everything is ruined and their previous lives due to ongoing wars and other conflicts, when the plans are dreams of children forced to relocate as refugees are destroyed, food for the poor and their ministry partners, they report that the kindness of people just like you give kids and families hope. Listen to Andy Carr a spokesman for feed my starving children a nonprofit relief organization helping to distribute mills to some of these refugees children. Right now, the need is exceeding the supply. And the only way that we catch up with that is with the generosity of people stepping forward, making that contribution in whatever way that they can. And that will allow us to reach those people that are there right now, sheltered in place or ending up in a refugee situation. You're allowing us to respond to this and go further faster.

Michael Line Andy Carr Mills
Infrastructure damage hampers flood recovery in Kentucky

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Infrastructure damage hampers flood recovery in Kentucky

"Eastern Kentucky where more than two dozen people are confirmed dead from last week's flooding and many remain missing is getting more bad weather rainfall rates of one to two inches per hour are possible governor Andy beshear Next couple days are going to be hard We've got rain and maybe even a lot of rain that's going to hit the same areas Please pray for the people in these areas Meanwhile the recovery continues As do the rescues the National Guard using helicopters and boats to rescue stranded people General Daniel hokanson But our air cruise have done amazing work to get in there In fact they've rescued over 400 people by helicopter Besides so many destroyed homes the floodwaters took out roads and bridges I'm Julie Walker

Eastern Kentucky Andy Beshear Daniel Hokanson National Guard Julie Walker
 At least 28 dead in devastating Kentucky flooding, with more expected: Governor

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

At least 28 dead in devastating Kentucky flooding, with more expected: Governor

"At least 26 people including children are dead in Kentucky from historic flooding in the governor says sadly the death toll will go up Governor Andy beshear says many are still missing We do know of additional bodies that have been recovered but we can not confirm those deaths at this time This is the same areas already devastated by floods prepare for more rain Make sure you stay safe Make sure you have a place that is higher ground Hazard resident unis Howard saw the floodwater rush into her home and just made it out before she got swept away with it I

Governor Andy Beshear Kentucky Unis Howard
Sebastian Welcomes Captain Henry Hendrix (Ret.) to the Show

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Sebastian Welcomes Captain Henry Hendrix (Ret.) to the Show

"End studio captain Henry J Jerry Hendricks, U.S. Navy retired. Welcome in studio. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you for having me, doctor gorka. So we had a super fun discussion. I think we bought everybody around us because we got into the nitty Gritty of national defense, the navy personnel, very, very rapidly at this little soiree. Tell our audience, who you are, what's your background and what you have done in and out of uniform to serve this nation? Well, I joined the navy in 1988 out of an ROTC scholarship at Purdue. I served in the P three community doing maritime patrol and reconnaissance. I flew in Saudi Arabia during desert storm. I flew over Yugoslavia during the 1990s doing maritime surveillance over land doing ISR. And then 9 11 occurred. I was actually here in Washington, D.C. serving with the chief of naval operations staff when 9 11 occurred. I knew a number of shipmates who were killed in The Pentagon. My career sort of changed to strategy after that. So I went back and got a master's in diplomatic history, became a strategist largely worked for Andy Marshall in the office of net assessment. Yoda. Yes, and it's a great pleasure and honor to work for that man. Ended up working for the secretary of the navy as the director of his advisory panel and then finally, because no good deed goes unpunished, I served out my last three years as director of naval history since they figured out I had a PhD. And then I retired and I worked in a think tank as ahead of a defense program and now I work as a consultant and also with the sagamore institute of think tank in Indianapolis, Indiana. All right,

Navy Henry J Jerry Hendricks Gorka Washington, D.C. Rotc Andy Marshall Purdue Office Of Net Assessment Yugoslavia Saudi Arabia Pentagon Yoda Sagamore Institute Of Think Ta Indianapolis Indiana
Andy Biggs: Glad Dem Mayors Finally See Illegal Aliens as a Problem

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Andy Biggs: Glad Dem Mayors Finally See Illegal Aliens as a Problem

"Not that you're laughing, but are you looking at the mayor's nimby here and thinking, told you so? Yeah, I think well, I'm glad that there are at least finally acknowledging that illegal migrants and aliens coming across the border can potentially be a problem. So, I mean, yeah, I mean, to see mayor Bowser mayor Adams, they're just having a fraction of what happens on the border. I mean, you've got, you've got cities of 20,000 people that are seeing four or 500 people a day coming through towns just a 100,000 that a thousand a day. They're complaining about a total of 4000 busted them from Arizona and Texas. And you know, well, grow up. I mean, let's face it, let's work together now and secure the border.

Mayor Bowser Mayor Adams Arizona Texas
Appalachian floods kill at least 16 as rescue teams deploy

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

Appalachian floods kill at least 16 as rescue teams deploy

"Search and rescue teams are looking for people missing in record floods that wiped out many Kentucky communities Kentucky governor Andy beshear expects the death toll to keep rising Tough news is 16 confirmed fatalities now And folks that's going to get a lot higher Bashir says emergency crews made close to 50 air rescues and hundreds of water rescues Thursday and more people still need help The administrator of the federal emergency management agency DN criswell says Kentucky residents need to be alert and follow the advice they are given Please pay attention to your local officials listen to the words that they're telling you Listen to the evacuation orders as this is still a very dynamic incident and they're still so many hazards that are out there President Biden has declared a federal disaster to direct relief money to more than a dozen Kentucky counties I'm Mike Hempen

Kentucky Andy Beshear Bashir Criswell Federal Emergency Management A President Biden Mike Hempen
Andy Puzder Explains How Biden Caused the Inflation Crisis

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Andy Puzder Explains How Biden Caused the Inflation Crisis

"Andy, last night, Lee and Garrett and yesterday, Dwayne and I were coming back from lunch and then Uber, driven by Ali. And all he's a great black guy who is getting on my case. He's seen me on MSNBC and NBC, and I don't think he watches Fox. And all he says, do you really think Joe Biden causes inflation? I said, they spent $2 trillion that we didn't need to spend. Of course they did. And then they added on the infrastructure Bill. Of course they caused inflation. I don't know who they want to blame Putin. What do you think of that argument? Well, the argument that Biden didn't cause this is ridiculous. Larry summers came out, who was the Larry summers isn't like some far right Republican. You know, he's not going to be having lunch with you and Andy. This is a guy from Harvard who was secretary of treasury under Clinton. He ran the council of economic advisers for president Obama. He came out before they passed this $1.9 trillion bill and said, do not pass this bill. He came out in The Washington Post with an article that said, this will ignite inflation. You're going to end up with hyperinflation if you pass that. They pass it, and it ignited hyperinflation. Jason fuhrman, another leftist economist, said the same thing. Steve ratner, who was an Obama economist, said the same thing. Do not do not do this spending bill. They did it anyway. It ignited inflation, and it caused the current problems we're having. You know, look, if demand is way up and the fed's trying to bring demand down, don't spend money. What you could do, what you couldn't do to support the fed's efforts is try and increase supply. Because if supply and demand meet, it doesn't matter how high demand is. If we have enough supply to meet it, there's no inflation. That was the case under president Trump. Plenty of supply, plenty of demand. Now we've got this excessive demand and limited supply. Encourage the supply side. Reduce regulation. So businesses want to produce. This is the key to the key.

Larry Summers Andy Dwayne Garrett Joe Biden Msnbc Jason Fuhrman ALI Steve Ratner NBC Council Of Economic Advisers Putin LEE Biden FOX Harvard Treasury President Obama
'Liberal Misery' Author Eddie Scarry on the Unhappy Nature of Leftists

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 2 weeks ago

'Liberal Misery' Author Eddie Scarry on the Unhappy Nature of Leftists

"Right now is Eddie's scary. He's author of a new book liberal misery. How the hateful left sucks joy out of everything and everyone. Getting straight to the point by Eddie scary, Eddie, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Hey, happy to be here. So basically, I mean, I haven't read the book, but the summary seems that explains what drives America's left to be such a wet blanket. Liberals Democrats and leftist tendency to zealously spread discomfort and misery has been somewhat of a mystery. You even say that conservatives are showing to be have better mental health and liberals. So if I could just cut straight to the chase, if you're dealing with depression and you're a liberal, stop being a liberal and become a conservative. Is that about right? I think that's a question for a doctor, but I will say yes, as you said, this whole concept of liberal misery and liberal anger and bitterness that was something that I think me and I'm sure you and every one of your listeners and viewers have experienced and I would say experienced to some degree for quite some time, but when I really started to notice it was in 2020. I live in Washington, D.C., so it's all liberals all the time. Most of the people I associate with are just going to happen to be liberal. But I noticed that in that year it was just becoming very, very obvious that there was something wrong here and I felt that the politics and the bad nature of the whole thing was only coming from one side. And I kept asking myself, why are liberals so miserable? Why do I keep having these even just normal stuff? What should be normal pleasant social interactions if the pandemic came up if any of the Black Lives Matter stuff came up if the campaign came up and discussion suddenly it's an all out war with these people and I kept thinking, why is this? What is this anger about? So

Eddie Scary Charlie Kirk Eddie Depression America D.C. Washington
Why America Is More Miserable Than Ever Before

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Why America Is More Miserable Than Ever Before

"So there's a very fascinating chart here that I believe is one of the reasons why America is becoming significantly less free. Modern families in our households have changed since the 1970s. So for example, I'll narrate this and then we'll put it up on screen. The percentage of 25 to 34 year olds living with a spouse in the United States in the 1970s, 82% of 25 to 34 year olds were living with a spouse. Now it's 38%. That's right. Not only have marriage rates gone down since 1970, but a dramatic decline, a 44% decline of who, young people are living with. It's going to be put up on screen. The percentage of 25 to 34 year olds living with parents or relatives, in 1970, 11% of 25 to 34 year olds were living with their parents. Now 29%. But in addition, cohabitation has increased, living with an unmarried partner, 17% of young people are living with an unmarried partner. Whereas that number was about 1% in the 1970s, 10% of people are just living alone, whereas in 1970, it was 5%. So America is less married than ever before. More people are living with spouses living without spouses or living with their parents or other relatives or the living with roommates are living with a cohabitated partner, and yet we're more miserable. Isn't it interesting how that all works.

America
The Latest on the January 6th Political Prisoners With Julie Kelly

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:06 min | Last month

The Latest on the January 6th Political Prisoners With Julie Kelly

"I want to be meticulous here. Because you've done such a service that I think hasn't gone the requisite attention outside of American greatness and some shows. You've been on tacos show. You've been on my show regularly, but we need to really document people need to read your book January 6th and we need to document what's happening in the last year and a half. So let's talk about, again, what's happening in the courtrooms? Will you share with us the details? Well, let's start what's happening in the prisons. What is the conditions, only a handful of Republicans have dared have shown the fortitude to actually go and visit these prisons. It's Matt Gaetz, Marjorie Taylor Greene, Louie gohmert, Paul gosar. I may have missed one or two, but it's a handful of sorry. Andy bigg. Andy Biggs, of course, just a handful out of the hundreds who should have gone. We share a little bit about what the conditions are like and how they're being treated in the prison in the nation's capital, Julie. So right now, Seth, there are roughly 70, 75 political prisoners about half of those men are in this D.C. gulag. Some of them have been there for now 16 months and counting. The DoJ, U.S. marshal service are actually transferring some men who have been detained in other parts of the country for months on end, moving them to this D.C. gulag. I mean, it's exactly what you would think, jail in Washington, D.C., would look like. They're mostly held in solitary confinement conditions. They are tormented by jail officials, jail guards who have nothing but contempt for them is Trump supporters. Their defense attorneys complain incessantly in court to D.C. district court judges who are duty bound to protect the rights of defendants against this vengeful government, they have failed to do it. The defense attorneys can not get access to their clients. The jail guards are withholding, discovery evidence that is sent to the jail for months on end. So they are prevented from their constitutional right as a defendant to build their own defense.

Matt Gaetz Marjorie Taylor Greene Louie Gohmert Paul Gosar Andy Bigg Andy Biggs D.C. Washington, D.C. Seth DOJ Julie D.C. District Court U.S. Donald Trump
"andy  j" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:57 min | 8 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Christmas Day. It is called American underdog. It's the story of Kurt Warner. It's a faith film at the same time. It's just a film film and we were hoping to get one of the Irwin brothers on, and as you know, they're big deals now. They're like opening in 3000 theaters on Christmas Day. They're not going to stoop to the level. And then I realized, no, no, one of them was willing to stoop to the level of coming on. Andy, Erwin, thank you for stooping. Eric, there's no stupid involved when it's when it's Eric McDonald. We see eye to eye, and I'm always glad to talk with other you can or does you can say any nice thing you want. I'm not going to stop you. But I will know an album can bear me up. I will know that I've really made it in your eyes when you actually cast me in one of these films. You let me disappear into a role the way Dennis Quaid just becomes coach dick for Malik. He just becomes somebody else that someday Albin. I'm telling you, I don't know what it's going to be a monster movie or something, but I'm going to be on there doing a Scottish accent or something. I'm looking forward to that day. But to this film, now for people who don't know the story of Warner, just give us the nutshell. I mean, you did briefly before, but give us a nutshell because it's not really, I mean, it's a football story, but it's not a football story. It's really a, it's an American story, I guess. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And hence the title of American underdog. You know, the idea before it is kind of in the vein of classic sports movies, like hoosiers, you know, like Rudy and ultimately kind of one of the biggest inspirations for this film was the original rocky. Is the idea of just the everyman that person that's down on their look just can't seem to catch a break. This guy was out of football for 5 years working at the supermarket, living on food stamps. And ultimately, the main inspiration was what happened at home. Everybody knows kind of the guy on the field, but what they don't know is the strong woman in the stands and her family that really gave him the heart of the champion. And when Kurt Warner was a 5th year senior at the university of northern Iowa, he just couldn't catch a break. He had been a benchwarmer for four years, didn't he got he got a chance to get drafted, got a brief chance with the packers. But what happened was he fell in love with this woman who was a single mom, former marine who had a special need son named Zach. And Zach was blind and it was through this family and him falling in love with his family that they gave him the heart of a champion to fight for them and that's ultimately what led to 5 years later him being MVP of the Super Bowl. So supermarket the Super Bowl, it's alleged. And it's funny too because there are certain stories. I mean, the idea that this is not fiction. Rocky is fiction. Now rocky is a great film, but it's fiction. And the idea that you have a film here that it's like fiction. I mean, it's mythical, beautiful. It's all these themes, but it's a true story. I mean, it's pretty extraordinary. And of course, there are many Americans who remember, you know, when this happened and remember that Super Bowl and it is just an extraordinary story. It's funny you bring up rocky because I think that those are the stories that always resonate. The underdog story. Now, the difference between this film and rocky is that Talia Shire is not in this film, correct? Right. Unfortunately, we couldn't get unbelievable. Get some of the original cast. But, you know. But you, but I mean, it's just funny because when you think of rocket, I mean, I remember I was a kid and rocky like the budget was like nothing for rocky. I mean, this was like a Hail Mary pass from Sylvester Stallone trying to make this film. But people are looking for films that have this kind of heart. And I think, you know, what's interesting, Andy, is that you and your brother have been making films enough now where you realize it's easy for a story like this to become hokey and how do you tell a story that has such heart, but that it's not hokey. It's real. There's an element of grittiness to it. I think lion's gate. And I want to be clear too, because people who don't know this, but lionsgate, really did a huge thing by coming to you and your brother and saying, we want to do films that don't shrink from faith that we want to do that. What do you think it was that lionsgate was willing to do that? Because Hollywood again traditionally, there's sort of wary, you know, sometimes they're openly hostile, but other times I just think they're wary. They don't know that language. They don't know that. I mean, a relationship that you had with them. How did it happen? Because this is good news for America. Yeah, the exciting thing is, you know, I don't think, you know, there are those that are hostile towards Christianity within the industry. But as a whole, it's a business, and it's about making money and a lot of times they're afraid to risk on things that are unknown. And until you prove that there's an audience there. And the thing I love about landscape is they have this entrepreneur spirit. And so they're willing to take risks on filmmakers that connect with a very specific niche. And they like to develop that. They did it with Tyler Perry and there's others that they've done it with over the years. And so they really got our entrepreneur spirit. We connected on that level. I can only imagine kind of prove the theory that there was an audience there. And at that point, they really kind of went all in on us. And on our audience. And it's bigger than John and myself. There's an audience there that's underserved. And so when you have a film like this and what we tried to do in the film like this, we try to make it broad. We really embrace that it was something that could branch out beyond the church walls..

Kurt Warner Eric McDonald football Super Bowl Zach Dennis Quaid Albin Erwin Andy Talia Shire Malik university of northern Iowa Rudy Eric Warner dick lionsgate packers Sylvester Stallone Hail Mary
"andy  j" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:29 min | 9 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks I hope you're excited as I am. American underdog, by the way, what a title, American underdog. It's like, was that taken? It wasn't taken. Let's use that. American underdog doesn't get better. Andy Irwin, how are you credited? You guys are just producers on the film. How does that how do you and your brother work that stuff out? Yeah. I mean, John and I are blue collar. So filmmaker kind of encompasses all of it. But we produce and direct together along with our other producers, Mark charity and Kevin downs. And then John wrote the script for it with a group of other writers. David Aaron Cohen and John Gunn, but it was but you direct together. Yeah, we direct together. Does anybody else direct together to the others direct together? How does that work look? There's a lot of brother director teams, whether it's the Coen brothers or the duffer brothers do stranger. Hitchcock brothers. You can forget the Hitchcock brothers. So there's a lot of brother teams and I think, you know, it's dysfunctional every sense of the word we argue a lot. But in that, we had this policy of best idea wins. It's friction with respect. And there's a necessity of friction and creating really good stories. And that's how we work. Well, it must be exciting for you to get to work with people like Anna is it paquin or paquin? I always get this pack when to work with her to work with Dennis Quaid, people have been now and I can only imagine you got to work and I just would have done anything to meet close leachman. She is one of the great absolute just an amazing, brilliant actress comedian. But it must be gratifying to get to work with folks like this who know their way around a film set, so to speak. Yeah, for me, each time I get to work with a legend like floras or John Voight or, you know, others are garce and east who's one of my heroes. You know, whenever I get to work with one of them, you know, it makes my job so much easier as a director. I just sit around and ask for tell me the stories of kind of the early days. And just kind of the romantic stories of old Hollywood is something I love. You know, on this one, we got to work with Bruce Miguel, who, you know, he's been in everything. And Bruce, I would just sit around and say, tell me how Michael man does it. Tell me how Steven Spielberg does it. And just I would just hear these stories and be like, oh, I'm stealing that. I'm stealing that. So we love it. And I think it's Christians. The cool thing is, like, for years, it was very hard for us to kind of get traction with the talent that we wanted in front of the cameras. And now the doors have really been opened up to this massive amount of talent that's willing to work on things that have to do with faith. And I think that's exciting to see that conversation kind of go outward. Well, look, it really is. And part of the reason that I get so excited about this and that I've been talking about this kind of thing for years is I really do believe and I know you and your brother get this that you really have to speak through the culture about God. That if people just hear it in religious contexts, then they put it in that box. It doesn't come into their world. And a lot of these stories. I mean, they're so few films like this. I mean, you have to go way back to chariots of fire or to a man for all seasons. I mean, it's like you're lucky enough once a decade, you get a story like this. So I actually believe that in part because of what you and John are doing, that there's a renaissance. There's something happening that is deeply healthy for our culture. We need this. We've been. Disproportionately secular. You probably don't know this, but I think literally 30 years ago, Michael medved wrote a book called Hollywood versus America. And in the book, now imagine this is 30 plus years ago, but he was basically showing how if you're in Hollywood, you want to make money, these are the kind of films like G rated films, family films. Those are the big money money makers. But there's a culture and again it's here in New York and you see it in Hollywood where people want the respect of their friends and their friends are saying like make a Gritty R rated movie. You know that even though the money would be more in making an ET or something like that. So for folks like lionsgate, just to have the wisdom to say, yes, we're willing to go in this direction. A lot of people could say like that's where the money is, but not everybody else is going in that direction. So it's a really it's a cultural it takes a certain amount of courage and vision. And so I'm just thrilled the lion's gate has done this with you and your brother. Now, American underdog, I wish I could invest because it's very rare that something comes along like this. What do you see for your future? Because I know you guys are probably working on other projects. Anything that you can mention, I don't know. Yeah. You know, the exciting thing is, Eric is, you know, each opportunity that the audience shows up, they're voting with their movie ticket for more content like this. And it's not about John and I as a brand. It's really about the reason why we named our company kingdom story company is we wanted to do things that could build things for entertainment, but also have a kind of a double bottom line that kingdom eternal purpose to kind of elevate other voices that are up and coming to tell their stories. So the thing I'm excited about is that playing field continues to broaden and widen. And we've got projects coming out, not just from John and me, but from other filmmakers like John guns, who directed case for Christ, he's got an incredible film coming out in March called the unbreakable boy that's a lot like a movie like wonder, just an incredible true story. We've got Jesus revolution about the early days of the Jesus movement that's a feature that my brother is directing. I'm developing a war movie that I can't talk about yet, but it's based on a New York Times Best Seller and I'm really excited about it. But I can't announce it yet. And so there's a lot of really makes me want to get based on a New York Times Best Seller. And he can't talk about it, but it's a war. But the war happened, right? It's not a future war. No, no, no, it's not. I can't talk about don't worry about it. We're not going to be I'm not here to get you in trouble. But I'm excited that I will come back and we'll talk about when we announce you'll be the first person to tell. So wow. Alvin did you hear that write that down, write that down? We're going to hold these guys. Seriously though, this is I think I'm excited for you and I'm excited for the film. But I'm really excited for entertainment in America because it's been a long time. You know this. It's been a long time so that when you get to tell a story like this and open in 3000 theaters on Christmas Day, that's a milestone in the story of American entertainment. We can't, you know, this is not business as usual. We don't have this kind of stuff happening all the time. So you guys have been so faithful over the years. And I just want to say congratulations to you. And everybody involved with this film, I can not wait to see it. I know that my audience is properly excited to see it. But God bless you, Andy, give our best to John and.

Andy Irwin paquin Mark charity Kevin downs David Aaron Cohen John Gunn Hitchcock John John Voight garce Hollywood Bruce Miguel leachman Dennis Quaid Steven Spielberg Michael medved Anna Bruce John guns lionsgate
"andy  j" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:15 min | 9 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Out on Christmas Day. It is called American underdog. It's the story of Kurt Warner. It's a faith film at the same time. It's just a film film and we were hoping to get one of the Irwin brothers on. And as you know, there are big deals now. They're like opening in 3000 theaters on Christmas Day. They're not going to stoop to the level. And then I realized, no, no, no, one of them was willing to stoop to the level of coming on. Andy, Irwin, thank you for stooping. Eric, there's no stooping involved when it's when it's Eric McDonald. We see eye to eye, and I'm always glad to talk with other you can you can say any nice thing you want. I'm not gonna stop you. But I will know an album can bear me up. I will know that I've really made it in your eyes when you actually cast me in one of these films. You let me disappear into a role the way Dennis Quaid just becomes coach dick for Malik. He just becomes somebody else that someday Albin. I'm telling you, I don't know what it's going to be a monster movie or something, but I'm going to be on there doing a Scottish accent or something. I'm looking forward to that day. But to this film, now for people who don't know the story of Warner, just give us the nutshell. I mean, you did briefly before, but give us a nutshell because it's not really as a football story, but it's not a football story. It's really a, it's an American story, I guess. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And hence the title of American underdog. You know, the idea before it's kind of in the vein of classic sports movies, like hoosiers, you know, like Rudy and ultimately kind of one of the biggest inspirations for this film was the original rocky. Is the idea of just the everyman that person that's down on their look just can't seem to catch a break. This guy was out of football for 5 years working at the supermarket, living on food stamps. And ultimately, the main inspiration was what happened at home. Everybody knows kind of the guy on the field, but what they don't know is the strong woman and the stands and her family that really gave him the heart of the champion. And when Kurt Warner was a 5th year senior at the university of northern Iowa, he just couldn't catch a break. He had been a benchwarmer for four years. He got a chance to get drafted, got a brief chance with the packers. But what happened was he fell in love with this woman who was a single mom, former marine who had a special need sign named Zach. And Zach was blind and it was through this family and him falling in love with his family that they gave him the heart of a champion to fight for them and that's ultimately what led to 5 years later him being MVP of the Super Bowl. So supermarket the Super Bowl, it's alleged. And it's funny too because there are certain stories. I mean, the idea that this is not fiction. Rocky is fiction. Now rocky is a great film, but it's fiction. And the idea that you have a film here that it's like fiction. I mean, it's mythical, beautiful. It's all these themes, but it's a true story. I mean, it's pretty extraordinary. And of course, there are many Americans who remember, you know, when this happened and remember that Super Bowl and it is just an extraordinary story. It's funny you bring up rocky because I think that those are the stories that always resonate. The underdog story. Now, the difference between this film and rocky is that Talia Shire is not in this film, correct? Right. Unfortunately, couldn't get unbelievable. Some of the original cast, but you know. But you, but I mean, it's just funny because when you think of rocky, I mean, I remember I was a kid and rocky like the budget was like nothing for rocky. I mean, this was like a Hail Mary pass from Sylvester Stallone trying to make this film. But people are looking for films that have this kind of heart. And I think, you know, what's interesting, Andy, is that you and your brother have been making films enough now where you realize it's easy for a story like this to become hokey and how do you tell a story that has such heart but that it's not hokey. It's real is there's an element of grittiness to it. I think lion's gate. And I want to be clear too because people who don't know this, but lionsgate, really did a huge thing by coming to you and your brother and saying we want to do films that don't shrink from faith that we want to do that. What do you think it was that lion's gate was willing to do that? Because Hollywood, again, traditionally, there's sort of wary, you know, sometimes they're openly hostile, but other times I just think they're wary. They don't know that language. They don't know that. I mean, a relationship that you had with them. How did it how did it happen? Because this is good news for America. Yeah, the exciting thing is, you know, I don't think, you know, there are those that are hostile towards Christianity within the industry. But as a whole, it's a business and it's about making money and a lot of times they're afraid to risk on things that are unknown. And until you prove that there's an audience there. And the thing I love about lionsgate is they have this entrepreneur spirit. And so they're willing to take risks on filmmakers that connect with a very specific niche. And they like to develop that. They did it with Tyler Perry and there's others that they've done it with over the years. And so they really got our entrepreneur spirit. We connected on that level. I can only imagine kind of prove the theory that there was an audience there. And at that point, they really kind of went all in on us. And on our audience. And it's bigger than John and myself. There's an audience there that's underserved. And so when you have a film like this and what we tried to do in the film like this, we try to make it broad. We really embrace that it was something that could branch out beyond the church walls, but that was safe for our audience. It's a family film. It's not cheesy. We really embrace the bumps on the road that Kurt went down. He said, you know, I don't want to make a pollyanna story. But in that, there's something really all American and wholesome about it that on Christmas Day, you can take your whole family to..

Irwin brothers Kurt Warner Eric McDonald football Super Bowl Zach Dennis Quaid Albin Andy Talia Shire Irwin Malik university of northern Iowa Rudy Eric Warner dick packers lionsgate Sylvester Stallone
"andy  j" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on Good Life Project

"This is a book, and then like, you know, it spends a chunk of years before he figures out what Ashley is worthy of this. One nugget that he had years before. As the 6 letters or whatever it is, that becomes eventually this massive massive phenomenon out in the world. So it's sort of like it's the iteration of that idea. I love that. So working artists basically like you create in so many different domains now. You've referenced a number of times your podcast, creative pep talk, which is fantastic, by the way, everybody should be listening on a regular basis. Why that? Because, you know, and you talk to a lot of interesting people. But also you show up and there's a lot that's in your mind. It's like your thoughts, your process. This is the way that I see the world. These are ideas of how to step into it. What inspires you to go from Andy J pizza, the creator to also and not or and the teacher? Yeah. Well, you know, there's so many pieces there, but so by the time I started my podcast in 2014, I was already a full-time illustrator. I was teaching a class. I was teaching one class at the art school. But I already had a bunch of clients and a whole practice doing illustration. And then, you know, I did a little talk, just like a community talk. And I'd actually bombed a few times like doing talks early on in my career to the point of like, I'm never doing that ever again. That was the worst experience. If anybody's bombed on stage, doing anything, you know. It is like death. And so I avoided it for a long time. And then I kept getting invited to do this little community talk. And I went up and I was really telling more of my personal story than I was telling the illustrations to have for creative stuff. And because I bombed, I put extra effort in. I was like, I gotta find I gotta just really do my work because I have to avoid that awful experience of bombing at all costs. And so I did this talk. And while I was doing it, I felt like I'm tasting something I've never tasted. This feels so much more like me than anything I've ever done. And after I got off stage, again, one of my taste tests go to people is my wife. She happened to be in the crowd, luckily. Now sometimes in my practice up to that point, I would do something that would feel like I think there's some magic in this and I'd give it to her and she'd be like, I don't see it. You know, that kind of thing. Just keeping you sensible. And I after I got off stage and I was feeling all these feelings, I thought, I'm gonna check in with Sophie and see if she felt any of that. I was like, what did you think of that? And she was like, I don't know what that was. And I was like, no, what did I pick the wrong career? Like, what am I doing with my life? And for a minute, I was tempted to just be like, I'm going to throw my illustration practice in the trash and just go try to do whatever this thing is. And then I instantly remembered, I have children. I have bills. I have all these things that I have to do. And I like, I really, there's a lot I love about illustration. But I thought, you know, what could I do that was kind of a synthesis of this? And it felt really risky because although I was deeply inspired by the designers and illustrators that were doing talks, people like Lisa congdon and Aaron draplin, were these just huge heroes of mine. I knew that if I went and did talks, they would have to integrate storytelling personal journey a lot of stuff that nobody else was really doing at the time. And I always, whenever I'm working with creative people, they'll do something. I'll be like, do more of that and they'll be like, but nobody where I am from does that. And I'm like, exactly. That's what creativity is, but at the time I didn't know. This is gonna be the secret sauce of this thing. Like go tell your stories, tell your analogies, tell your metaphors. And I went through this period of time after I started my podcast where I really felt unintegrated. I'm living two different lives. I don't make any sense. I'm doing illustration for my job, but I feel like my thing is these metaphors, these analogies, these stories. And it wasn't until I heard a public speaker, I think it was like a TED Talk, and they were going through something and I was like, eating it up, and they're like, I'm just going to give you, I'm going to tell you a little story to help further my point. Let me give you this illustration. And I thought, they're the same thing. They're doing the same thing. Whether I'm doing it with pictures or I'm doing it with words and analogies, it's all storytelling. You know, when I think about illustration, my favorite definition of that is writing with pictures. And I'm always trying to illuminate something. I'm always trying to bring something to life. I remember what the question was, but there was some it was in there, the answer was somewhere in there. But yeah, that's kind of what happened I thought, okay, maybe I can mix my what I do know, which is illustration with what feels like my gift. And I think I mentioned this to you when you were on my podcast about kind of finding my spark type, finding this performer thing. Instead of just like, I loved what you say in your book because instead of just being like, all right, that's my gift. I have to divorce my entire life now. I instead used it to innovate within what I was doing. You know, in my own little tiny way, I use that word innovate lightly. But that's what the podcast was. How can I put these together? And it also was like, it was strategy mixed with writing on stage. It was like, I want to get booked doing conferences and talks and stuff like that. And so I thought, I'll just create a portfolio of talks. And that's why my podcast is so monologue centric. And then I'll also learn as I go. And so now my podcast is something where I put my ideas when they're fresh out of the oven. And I'm just like, I don't even know. I'm working on these. And then they turn into a class or a book or a talk later. But yeah, that's kind of the journey of that. Yeah, I love that because also there's sort of you know in the podcast space that are certainly become this, well, there are 5 types of podcasts and these are the former formats and this is why you do it and so I love you taking that same lens that you brought to everything and saying, okay, so this is how and why I'm doing it and this is the role that it serves in my life and my bigger ecosystem. I'm using it in a different way. You know, yes, I'm creating art, yes, I'm providing value. And sometimes I'm just testing stuff to see how it feels for me and for other people to see whether it's worth expanding on. So it's sort of like you've created your own audio laboratory that just happens to have a global audience to participate and give data into that experience too..

Andy J pizza Lisa congdon Aaron draplin Ashley TED Talk Sophie
"andy  j" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

05:40 min | 9 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And I feel like so often that the greatest benefit that those people who drop into our lives can provide is to actually not tell us left or right. But basically sit there and say, well, let's talk about this. What matters when you're making that decision? Yeah, I completely agree. And one of the kind of patterns in the creative hero's journey that I see, it starts with, I actually think that it starts with finding people that are almost exactly like you. But I don't and I want to get back to I'm in a circle back to the whole thing of the master not giving you the answer kind of thing. But I think part of the reason we get it wrong is that we focus so much on the inflection point of when you become the hero, which is when you disobey your master. That's the key. Like Luke becomes a Jedi when he disobeys Yoda to save Han and Leia. That's when he finds out what kind of hero he is, which and he comes into his own, right? So we love that part. George Carlin has this iconic moment where he goes out on stage on live television, and he has this cardboard cutout of himself that's in a suit, how he's always performed in the past, and he was really mimicking, I think he said Danny Kay, like this hero of a comedian. And he said, this guy right here, he's dead. And he throws him off the stage, and you're not going to see that guy anymore. And then he becomes the George Carlin that we all know the legend. Now artists love that story. I love that story because it's like someone being like, I'm not like anybody else. And I think the lesson that is the wrong one to take is that it's all like don't have any heroes. Don't look to anybody. Don't learn from anybody. Just be yourself, do your thing. But I think the lesson is more being like somebody else who you feel like is so close to who you are, is maybe the pathway to finding who you really are. He actually spent an enormous amount of time being an imitation of his hero. And if you go dive into the creative grades, you're gonna see that pattern over and over. And it's so under told because that period of development isn't the story. That's the pre story, but it's so much of the pattern. And so when it comes to education, I'm always encouraging artists like, you're not that special. You go find the people that you just want to pattern yourself after and learn from. And that whole moment of disobeying your master, that will come, and it will be a huge inflection point for me. One little part of it was calling myself Andy J pizza. Like none of my creative heroes that are very like serious illustrators or whatever call themselves pizza. And so that was a big thing of like, am I going to do this? It feels right, but it also feels wrong. So yeah, I think it's little patterns like that that are kind of an obsession of mine. How can we find your creative journey as is unique, but there are some philosophical big picture touchstones that you can kind of hold onto as landmarks as you go. Yeah, I love that because it's more of it's actually a gentler process. It's an evolutionary process, but also it speaks to something that I think a lot of people. I feel like there's an expectation of instant now at a part of his delta. The speed of society, the speed of technology, the speed of interactivity these days. And so now we just expect that we blink and all of a sudden we're at that moment where we figure out, like, oh, this is why we're profoundly different and real and this is the authentic thing. And for sure their tools that can help in their processes. But I mean, I look at the analogy of music, right? You know, what's the process there? The greatest people in the world very often, they didn't start out like they didn't pick up a guitar or sit down at a piano and start playing their own music. You know, they sat down and they started learning scales. And it was merciless. And then they started learning like the most basic things from the people who were masters who came before them, and then they learned the more complex things. And then learn the more complex things. And then at a certain point, they start to have enough of understanding where they would take the people not just who other people told them were the greats, but who they felt were the greats, and they wanted to learn something from them, and they would deconstruct their work or maybe they'd go find the tab where somebody else deconstructed the guitar lakes and they would learn note for note the way that their favorite musician played this thing and they would just master that. And then something just kind of happened years into that process where they started adding a note or a riff or a bend of a string or like they hit the keys differently, and then they started to break free, but they wouldn't have gotten to the point where they knew how to do that in a way that was not just different, but cool. Yeah. But for the fact that they had actually devoted themselves to all of that work beforehand. And I think so often, we don't acknowledge how valuable that is. And that's why I love the metaphor of the journey because it's baked in there like this is going to take some time. You know, when I said, when I got out of college, I had that deep seated fear that if I don't get successful, I'm going to end up like my mom. And so I, you know, when I went to go say yes to the.

George Carlin Danny Kay Andy J pizza Leia Yoda Han Luke
"andy  j" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on Good Life Project

"We leave finding yourself to like a 30 minute visit to the high school guidance counselor office and be like, who are you? Okay, you know, you took the little task aptitude thing. This is what you're all about. And really, it's like decades long, finding that thing. And there's no other better way to spend your time on the earth. Okay, so imagine going through life with the name Andy J pizza. Well, that is what my guest today goes by. But it wasn't his given name, but rather his claimed name, this is the name he said yes to later in life, and more on that when we talk and why that in fact is the name he goes by. So Andy was the kid who was kind of perpetually zagging when everyone else zigged and at a young age he saw this same pattern in his mom, and he was so much like her which, in part lit him up, he loved that, but it also terrified him, because in his mom, these same impulses were married to mental illness that led to a life of struggle and he feared. That's where he was headed to. He wondered if that was sort of the only way that these things could show up in life. Until a realization drop that would not only lead him down his own path, but also empower him to embrace life differently. And trust that he could make it work and indeed he has in the largest ways. Andy has since built a beautiful family and incredible life a stunning career as an illustrator author of kids books animator contributor to everywhere from The New York Times to Apple, Nickelodeon and countless other mega brands and experiences really driven to share and inspire others in the creative community. He heads up the fantastic creative pep talk podcast where by the way, I was a guest recently, and Indy is a master of the stage as well. With this public style of speaking that's one part Ted, one part one man show at the sprinkle of stand up comedy. His friends actually call his approach lay down tragedy because it's the opposite of stand up comedy in that instead of shooting.

Andy J pizza Andy Nickelodeon The New York Times Apple Ted
"andy  j" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"andy j" Discussed on Good Life Project

"We leave finding yourself to like a thirty minute visit to the high school guidance. Counselor offense and who are you okay. That took the little tasks aptitude thing. Scour you're what you're all about and really it's like decades long finding that thing and there's no other better way to spend your time on the earth. Imagine going through life with the name. Andy j pizza. Well that is what my guest today goes by. But it wasn't his given name but rather his claimed name this is the name he said yes to later in life and more on that when we talk and why that in fact is the name he goes by so andy was the kid who was kind of perpetually zagging when everyone else zigzagged and at a young age he saw the same pattern in his mom and he was so much like her which in part him up he loved that but it also terrified him because in his mom these same impulses were married to mental illness that led to a life of struggle and he feared that's where he was headed to. He wondered if that was sort of the only way that these things could show up in life until a realization drop. That would not only lead him down his own path but also empower him to embrace life differently and trust that he could make it work and indeed. He has in the largest ways. Andy has since built a beautiful family. Incredible life a stunning career as an illustrator author of kids books animator contributor to everywhere from the new york times to apple nickelodeon and countless other mega brands and experiences really driven to share and inspire others in the creative community. He heads up the fantastic creative pep talk. Podcast where by the way. I was a guest. Recently and indie is a master of the stage as well with this public style of speaking. That's one part ted. One part one man show with a sprinkle of stand up comedy. His friends actually call his approach. Lay down tragedy because it's the opposite of stand up comedy that instead of shooting for laughs.

Andy j pizza andy nickelodeon Andy the new york times apple ted
"andy  j" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"andy j" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"Book. Yes i'm going to change. I'm trying to change my behavior on my wife. So my favorite steven king book is the stand. The scariest book of his ever read was it. I don't know if it was my time of life. But i was freaked out entirely by it interest. And then but i but another one of my favorite books of his is Gerald's wife Game cheers thank. You dallas guard. That has a netflix station to. That's crazy. I haven't seen it and i've been dined. It wasn't a great book. It was a great book. And when i read it was like it's dirty too dirty sexual stuff in it. Because the first book i have read was The dark half and then right after that was needful things and then gerald's game. There was like a preview of gerald's game in the back of the dark half and there it started with like a sex scene. I was always like oh man this book and it was good. Yes just psychological. The whole thing takes place in her head. It's crazy they're able to make the whole thing takes place in her. It's you have to be such a good right. I think he is so underrated as a writer. So do i. What i always say people think about him like horror horror but i think what he does better than anyone is he creates characters that you immediately fall in love with like within the first chapter and then they get put in these crazy situations and they respond like real people respond. I i love everything out greg character development great story is simple. Easy to follow is really digestible and is really easy to read. I think he writes very conversationally. So you don't have to. There's no effort in reading him. You just get lost in the words and you go on the story. I've i've read so many of his books. I think the first book of his i read was salem. Lot and i did not sleep Forever i mean forever enslaved but i didn't scare me as much as it is scared. The shit outta me saw i saw it on. Tv whenever when it came out on tv and it fuck me up there and anything happening with children bothers me. Anything that were children get child gets hurt or that really fox meals pretty and i hate clowns. I really hate joke about it. I said I know when the is also a balloons. I hate worse. Start with it. And so the joke was i think that i think that when they wanna balloon pops they should when people blow up balloons. They should put their secrets in berlin. So that when they pop we hear all their secrets. And so you go pup. And it's like i was molested by clown clown pop off ounce do as most people ha- fucking clowns know. Andy's one of my favorite comics he really is. And what's so funny. Is he has a joke in. Sometimes it's with like comic like nicobar godsey or daniel tosh to. I'm telling you my favorite comics right now..

dallas guard gerald steven king Gerald netflix greg salem berlin Andy nicobar godsey daniel tosh
"andy  j" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"andy j" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Us perfect alright. The saw record our andy if you can introduce yourself for the tape yet. Hi andy slavic. What else can i tell you. Tell us about About your past work about about your book. yeah. I was just finishing up as the white house. Senior adviser covert response team and the bucks called preventable and it's about our experiences a country in the first year of covered it refunds. There are few people who've experienced this pandemic quite like andy slaven. A former obama official he had an insider's perspective on how the federal government to handling pandemic as it kicked off but of course he was on the outside and then all that changed when he joined. President biden's covid nineteen task force. He's written a new book. Preventable out today about the pandemic. Join me to talk about what he learned on both the inside and outside of the pandemic and what we need to do to prevent the next one. Your experience in healthcare is is interesting. 'cause you didn't come by healthcare on the usual path and this is also the service that you're coming off of on the biden administration. It's not your first rodeo. You served in the obama administration as the acting head of cms. What got you interested in health and healthcare you actually got into healthcare. A lot of people end up dude. Unfortunately which is a personal experience. In my case i had a roommate.

today andy slavic first year President biden both andy slaven first rodeo white house obama biden nineteen task force
"andy  j" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"andy j" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"In the sense that they're both like unknown right like But i i. There's so much packed in that scene. That's amazing the what if we get sick of each other and we're already sick each other. It's the best I thought that was one of the best lines. I've heard long time. And it's so it's so well describes what a partnership is. I think like it's not this fairy tale thing it's it's getting sick of each other and then finding new and beautiful ways to like appreciate this things that you're sick of and i it's like a never changing. It's always moving and progressing. And i guess ideally but But it's built out of like mundane at the same time that it's built that if like these beautiful little moments and I dunno delivers that line. So well to it if you like. That just clinched so many things there. Yeah i feel so fortunate that i had to incredible actors to To make all that so much better than than any right to be. But i mean that line to me that is That's a thesis statement of the movie that and and then when roy says Nothing worse than going through this shit alone Those were always like those those. I don't think. I had those lines early on but there was. You know in the idea behind those with always kind of like this pool throughout the throughout the movie because the other part of this whole process was you know it was written right after wedding Going through and rapper wedding all the way up to like the final draft before we took it out for financing with with andy. Sandberg them involved. That was a month after my first daughter was born. So like Those decisions to get married. Take that leap of actually committing To have a child That's all that's all part of it. The only to Also love how you tied the odds of being stuck in the time loop with your favorite person like just being a metaphor for like what's the odds of you being married to partner with your your favorite like you have no other context favorite person is. I never even never even thought that that was actually. I think there was one of andy's suggestions. Somebody andy's here. Between anti laura. This is sandra one of his suggestions. And that that line the the odds getting second time loop. It's great because it. There's honestly no difference thinking about between that and like getting stuck or whatever you wanna put in a relationship like it's like you don't know every person on earth you don't know you you don't have like you're not working on this massive scale of Out of every person. Who would i best buy. It's like no. This is the person that you're with and this is the person that you're you know it's the best to be sick. Whatever like it's it's great Can we talk about the dinosaurs. Demystify them to day. But i'm assuming care about the mystifying. There's a connection to the dinosaurs on the side of the road driving out. Saddam springs or. Now it's funny. There's a way kapadia page. Someone had put in that it's like a reference to the cap is on matters and now that's not it's not a reference to that i mean i've i've seen i make. I can't say that there was like that's not in there. There was actually another version of this. I might be complaining to different things. There was there was a a thesis film that maximum i had written together about a family. That goes to this Resort in palm springs to for a funeral of uncle. And i think they either either either in that organ the earlier version of this movie that They actually stop at the cap on dinosaurs and talk about how. It's it's bizarre. That's become a creationist museum. And so i didn't want have definitely wanted to have dinosaurs in there. Because i think that you know. The creationism is is bad for evolution of humanity And so i do not definitely not a reference to two those a but at the same time. Maybe somewhere even my subconscious. That's why they popped up. But i mean the more powerful thing in my subconscious is park as that is the. That is the movie that in seeing in june of ninety three has a just shy of my second birthday Just made me feel everything It made me wanna do this. Complete this know career path at some point But in that that the strange thing about the dinosaurs are actually nothing that someone brought up there. They're just Hallucinating them because it's on shrooms. And that's another thing. I i say i say no to. But if that's what people want to believe to that's fine it's this movie is not mine anymore. It's it's out in the world but from my standpoint Why dinosaurs came up. I remember reading that scene and everything. I described earlier of like.

Sandberg one second time first daughter two both sandra Saddam second birthday earth laura roy june of ninety three best lines a month each suggestions
"andy  j" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"andy j" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"I remember the glad to meet you what. We'll get more into What i wanna dig into what i like starting off. If i warned you about this. I always forget I like to start off asking people what would cause them to have a deep sense of wonder about the world when they were a kid. What would what did like when just when you think about your childhood. Like what was the. What were they like touchdowns of like things that would just make you trip out about life or the universe or whatever and thinking moments where my i feel like my my world expanded and in growing growing up in a very very conservative suburban bubble of yorba. Linda you remember those moments where the world expanse and you like. That's the world is bigger than this this here. Oddly enough. i think it's is through movies. I know that seeing seeing drastic bark. Dinosaurs real yeah. Yeah exactly. i'm looking at a picture on the wall here from the german. Show where you know the where. He's walking up the steps at the end of the truman show and that movie hit me really really hard as a an that came out in nineteen ninety eight maybe ninety seven and so i was ten eleven but like living in a suburban community like i said in the moment where he like he goes through the door. I feel like now that i'm thinking about it. But my in the guest room of our house guestroom slash office and my parents whenever they come up here To kind of help out with our three month old or two year old They stay in this room and my dad just point he brought. He pointed out last week. I'm going to show you what he pointed out last time he was here. that there's some kind of thing with hands that is going on that. I never even noticed. There's the two thousand one painting. There's two thousand one this was. This is a collage that my my are based on our van noah been He had made it. I remember when i saw this. I was like i love that. And he he got it frame for me and gave me as president. And then i have this book of of symbols here. That is just a giant hand. On and i i never i never connected all those dots. Why but it was when my dad pointed that out to me. I like my mind was kind of kind of blown a little bit and i think the reason i bring that up to bring it back to the movies trim. Two thousand one was another movie. That i remember when my brother. This showed that to me. The stanley kubrick box set the box. I think sometime around ninety six or seven or something like that whenever that came out and and he told me like you got watch this thing. It's like it's basically it's going to change your life. And i remember watching it and i think i did. I didn't know what. I was watching with a friend and i pretended to have like say. Wow man i don't think understood it at all. But it's still at the same time i think back on it and then like maybe that was. That was a moment where i my. My my wonder in the world was expanded a little bit again. I don't think understood what was going on movie but i. I know that i was supposed to feel something to make that trip myself. Into field feeling something while watching that long way of saying those are those are moments that through movies and storytelling where my sense of wonder of the world and the universe expands a bit dawson. Any kind of story can do that. Thing that you're talking about like a whether it's a novel or movie or I don't know what else like. What are you can do that any any form. The story and like what do you feel like is unique about like the screen. And what draws you to that. I don't maybe like the path into it for you. Like what was that like into writing for this. I remember very clearly writing short stories right like pretty much from drafter. Drastic barks third fourth fifth. Sixth grade I remember writing like a time machine. Sorry called stuck in the past which was about people who go back and get stuck in the past I wrote a i wrote a sequel to that That i mean this was for myself really That i but in my mind. I was like people are going to love the sequel but it was stuck in the past two. When they went to back they went back to Save abe from assassination And that that. I wrote that That masterpiece in three hours in fifth grade. So i i think just there was something about. I love trouble reading in elementary school. like trouble focusing I remember getting d.'s. On my comprehension quizzes for a line which in the wardrobe and i i remember forging my parents signature and i to have raised it a bunch of times and it was like when my teacher got it actually like she just knew right away. A million rates marks on this. Your parents did not sign this. And i got. I got in trouble for that. But i i just had trouble focusing on it On reading or did not see us. Louis one of those two But but i find but i was able to focus on writing. I really zero in the same way. That I think people you know people who have trouble reading. Also sometimes they'll paint or they'll do different things that I remember. I remember writing little make believe short stories that that was a way for me to really focus in which was just weird. 'cause i had trouble reading so but not reading my own stuff So from that point. I was always like attracted to storytelling. I don't think i knew how to tell a story attracted to it and this stuff that feeling of like maybe that is why i was to movies and television is that like my brother has a straight a student and you know in all the honors and ap classes. And i i was. I didn't want to not be in that. And i was trying to follow in his footsteps And so but i remember in that same cycle of like getting bad grades on these comprehension quizzes and is probably so fucking boring to anyone listening to get into great expectations so reading great expectations. I was getting these. These these comprehension quizzes in monitoring majority yeah freshman year and i was going to be bumped down It was again about just focusing. Couldn't couldn't focus and the my mom took me to library. She and she's like let's try. Somethin' checked out on audiobooks of great expectations. And then i started just like reading along with audiobooks and then all of a sudden the next day my next comprehension quiz and has got a. I felt like this is so easy. All you have to do.

Linda last week Louis ninety seven two year old three hours Save abe yorba three month old Two thousand one fifth grade two thousand Sixth grade nineteen ninety eight german seven two truman one painting third fourth fifth
"andy  j" Discussed on LFCC Stories

LFCC Stories

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"andy j" Discussed on LFCC Stories

"Young by all accounts when it comes to dealing with something like cancer. Yeah so you don't even really know. At least i didn't understand it back then. It didn't really hit me until he went through at the second time and i started understand it a little better. I was sixteen. He was twenty when it happened the second time. So how long is this just been kind of gnawing at you. This is it maybe not specifically nursing that. There was something else that you needed to be doing. I would probably literally go back. Twenty passed away. And i just started driving truck when that happened. I started few months before he died before he passed away. I started when i was over the road like that. I would just be gone. I probably only come home every three to five months usually. How long did it take you from then until when you actually registered for school. I registered for classes in fall of seventeen and i started in january eighteen. You tell somebody. They waited and waited and put off and didn't think that this was something they were going to do. Because you've done it you're in it now. I really wish i hadn't waited this. I i understand when people wait because there is so much uncertainty. Sometimes some people have to stop working. I'm going to school but students who are still working fulltime job doing this and i don't know how how they pull it off. I went part time right before the semester started and just like now with clinical. Starting like. I don't even know where i'm going to try to fit one ship. Cologne four or five like some people are doing so i mean kudos to them. They're pulling off. It's my wife. Did the same thing. She went through nursing school and worked thirty plus hours a week the entire time. And it's like how and i've always wondered. How did you do that. Especially even more so. But i mean the longer you put it off some parts of it might be easier like as we mature. That might make it easier for you to be in school. You've learned how to organize the discipline a little bit more. There's definitely a little more disciplined personally for me than when i was eighteen for sure you get through this piece of it. What's next when you talk about. Pediatric oncology. what does that mean. Does that masters is that. Where else have you have. You thought that far ahead because sometimes it's scary to. I've toyed with the idea of a masters. I'm not quite sure. I guess i to feel it out after. I get my bachelor's how i feel but i i'm definitely getting my bachelor's for multiple reasons obviously required almost anywhere. You go anyway for a new situations. And if i specialized there's probably gonna be Situations where it comes in handy to have that especially depending on where you wanna work. They're going to look at that. And how much time you put in the schooling and so if the masters calls me from degree standpoint like if it's something i realized i have to do i wouldn't say no right now feels i don't know like it's very scary. Thought to think about the master's degree at this point. You gotta get through the next four classes and is that advice that you'd give to people that finally do make the leap is just one at a time because it may be tough but i had no idea what to expect and the support structure here from the professors is nothing like i've experienced in high school or my one year in college prior to this even going back to grade school. I can't remember support structure like this where the teachers are always there for you. In pre pandemic was a lot easier by knocking their office. Hey you got a second talk about and now it's email or separate zoo bounce back and forth emails. Try to schedule a zoom. You know you're not home. They're not in the office hours. When you're around. Yeah make make the step start with like me. I mean it was english. I started with english and threw in the math mediary classes in the first semester that i had to do and the math was almost like one on one. I mean you're in there with an instructor. You're you're learning off a computer system when you're doing the remedial classes but the instructors there for any of the students meal. Just go if there's a line. He just goes to where all the students are in the order to raise your hand. I mean so. Start with one glass. The one you think might be the easiest to take you know. I mean by started with english. One eleven with ruth homes. And i was really nervous. I don't know what do i just remember. Sitting there sweating the first day of class. You talk the diversity. That class was probably every socioeconomic. Background guys girls. Every different race john extremely diverse and in an english class. I mean sometimes you write about you wrote about personal experiences so you get to know. Some of the students really well. I'm still in touch with someone time. I haven't seen since pandemic a lot of people that some of its everything sleeping. Well thank you for coming and hanging out and chatting with me today. I look forward to talking to you after graduation. How about that year and a half..

Cologne cancer ruth john
"andy  j" Discussed on LFCC Stories

LFCC Stories

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"andy j" Discussed on LFCC Stories

"We are having a conversation today with andy. Basic is a current student at lord. Fairfax community college in the nursing program. Andy all i know about you is it says truck driver to nursing program. That's got to be a story. i've been driving trucks in two thousand and eight on and off. I talk about a five year break from twenty through twenty seventeen. I had an opportunity down in florida at work. I reading company. So i ran a facility down that way i enjoyed it. Believe it or not. I had less time with my wife working in an office job then i did driving then i would drive in truck now now. I'm just part time with nursing program but it was That was seventy plus hours every week. Doing that what made you decide to to make this major. Change a little more history. I'm one of ten kids. And yeah i am one of two and that was one too many when i was growing up a little more comical. Both my parents were only child. Five boys and five girls. There was a point. If i remember correctly we're all of us lived under one roof even though we're just over twenty years apart between all ten of us and there was a point ten of us were under one roof and luckily that's when we had the biggest house to house growing up in the one when all of us were home at one point was the big one but it was still only a four bedroom house a lot of bunk beds bunk beds and i wanna say my oldest brother actually i think my oldest brother when he was there. His bedroom was in the den. Because know i guess. I was technically a fifth bedroom at that point if we were all home every dinner without the dining room table so a really big night entering table and when i was twelve years old my sixteen year old brother was diagnosed with cancer. And i guess when you think about almost every family in the world deals with that in some way shape or form everyone differently. So i'm sure. There's maybe some uniqueness to my story on some nod depending on how you want to look at it but anyway so he was diagnosed with liver cancer when he was sixteen was still pediatric end of that age and he fought it three times until he was thirty. And how old were you. When he was diagnosed i was twelve and he was sixteen so we were four years apart. He was the one who was. I one sister between me and him so he started that when he was sixteen. And i guess. I've always wanted to do something to try to his honor memory but i never thought that it was something. I was capable of getting into the medical field. It seems intimidating to a lot of people. A lot of people just think anything. Medical related is just big for them. It is like the first semester. Because i got all my pre recs most of my out of the way before the program started right now is for nursing classes and four doesn't seem like a lot until you're actually doing it. It's probably about fifty hours a week worth of work. I have one last is giving me a really hard time right now. It's not that they're easy but one is extremely difficult for me right now but anyway i wanted to do something to honor my brother and after years and years of i guess avoiding it because i said earlier. It's not something i thought i'd do. My wife who is already. a nurse. took her a few years but she finally convinced me. I was capable of doing something along this line. And so hopefully eventually. I'd like to work in pediatric oncology. I know it's not something you jump right into out of nursing school to something that takes several years of experience and getting different certifications that all require literally time into the job. So hopefully that's in the n. Word will end up a facility. Like saint jude's so this is therapeutic for you. I sense in in a lotta ways. Yeah that is. That's a good way to look at it. I'm not gonna lie. Makes you a little emotional now and then thinking about it. Even though it's been it's been twelve years since he passed away so quite a long time even after i lost him before i decided to move in a direction or think i could. What did you at lord fairfax why this particular nursing program. I had heard it was a a competitive program to get into. I wasn't like a lot of the private schools where i know. This sounds weird. You apply and you get into you. Write a check in your end. Exactly this was. I wanted to be part of a program that was good weed out the ones who either not to sound me in the ones who couldn't make it i mean what if i'm one of them hopefully not but they weed out a lot beforehand and then i'm sure there'll be unfortunately some meeting during the program but i'm a competitive person. I don't like to not do well. When i attempt something especially since i i look back at most of my life and getting through high school for me was a challenge and everything else i just. I drive myself fat to try to do as well as i can something so this is probably the hardest thing i've done since then i have to say even only six so. Tell me about your classes. You mentioned that one is a bit more of a struggle than some of the others in theory is sounds like a simple class introduction nursing concepts but it is the testing. That is the extremely difficult part. Because it's not just hey it's not like anatomy and physiology. Hey this is bladder. What does it do. This is the nervous system. How does it affect our body. They give you a situation that relates to what you're studying like skin integrity and mobility. That was the most recent the most recent concept we were concepts we were going over. So it's a question related to that and then there's potentially they're all the answers right and you've got to pick the absolute best right answer. The rightist right answer exactly doing that. Because it's what you have to be able to do in person when you're in a medical profession as well as testing for the licensor in the end. So what was it like for you making that decision though. You've decided you're gonna do it. And you've decided lord. Fairfax is going to be the place. And then here. You are every time. I started a new semester because i never took more than a couple of classes at a time to get ready every semester would wonder am i gonna make it through the semester. Can i can. I do this class. I started off with english and mathematics and developmental psychology and sociology. And and i still every time this semester starts is like i got to put myself in gear to be ready for it. Because i've no idea what to expect time semester starts literally all new to me one hundred percent. Do you enjoy it. You managed to get yourself through it though you keep doing the next semester. What makes you keep doing. The next semester is more than just proving that i can do for me again. I go back to my brother. It's something that's i want to be able to do. Not just for me but for him and to help people who are going through the same thing he went through. You're going to be a very unique position to be able to help people in that way because you have gone through it yourself. I hope so. I hope so. It's it's still scary. And i guess you would say sad to think about situations like that you can get emotionally involved. Obviously and that's it can be emotionally draining. I just think back to my own experience and i wasn't even in the medical profession. It was just a family member. And when you're that young when you're twelve you're not really that involved you know what's going on but you're not really in the weeds that by trying to sound mean but you're you're pushed to the side as it's handled by the adults. You know to describe it when you're that how did some of your other family members deal with enemy. Do you have brothers and sisters that are in the medical field. They.

Fairfax community college liver cancer andy Andy saint jude florida cancer Fairfax
"andy  j" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"andy j" Discussed on RPM45

"For me to change into absolutely Dini because every record astor that was was like I'm sounding with Rodney gently when you were being produced by other people. then. You know your voice sounded one way. But when you were the producer, you were able to be the more authentic you. Another Persona Abou-. Me Wasn't so much that I'd change consistent. I didn't speed up. I just sang differently, I was on my own. Look if is is there's is, is this terracing come and see me live and then you'll hear it all and for me it's GROWING UP I was coming at it from a different place. Well, I think what's so fantastic and wonderful about the story is that when you are the authentic you, you had a number one song, you had the biggest hit of your career as a performer. Yeah. That detached semi was I. Literally, I will be honest with you. You know after many months of being turned down and starting my own label and then moving, you know it says that be brave. Ninety warriors will come to your aid, well, that president of the. capital promotion came to my aid and really heard the song and its truest form on the radio, but somehow or other to to people, and for me, I, just it was just such a blessing. 'cause reaffirmed something within the. Well, I'll tell you I really. Do appreciate your taking the time with me and I think your inspiration I. Really do I appreciate your work and I've learned about you as a person and it's inspirational. Well know what it means a lot to me. 'cause I know you're talking to a lot of people in the time that you've been doing this and the fact that you stayed on the phone and you didn't say I gotta go. 'cause. I appreciate that. Okay. Well, let's stay in touch I'll get your email and we will do it. Okay. Thank you. Thank you so much. Okay. I know you're GONNA. This is GonNa be a ten minute interview. Time. It's Not that much of an editor, it will definitely be shorter. I can guarantee you that but not ten minutes now. Thank you my friend. Thank you. Thanks again to Andy Kim, and we'll be back again next Wednesday with another addition, of RPM, forty five..

Rodney Dini Andy Kim producer president editor
"andy  j" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"andy j" Discussed on RPM45

"Hey. This is marquess off, and this is Rpm forty-five. Are Talk with Andy Kim the singer songwriter who had big hits in the late sixties including the tap ten baby I. Love You then made a huge comeback in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four with this number one, hit rock me gently. But beyond his music I, found his attitude toward life positive and inspiring. See what you think now are talk with Andy Kim. What. Made you want to go into the music business which someone described to me the other day as a shark tank? Can Be Shark tank. You have to be born with a little bit of common sense and understand that Your life is what you're dreaming about. But also there are certain pitfalls. So you you must have signed warriors to help you out. But back to me. grew up in attendance of Montreal. As my salvation was my transistor radio. Was Glued to my, transistor? Radio. and. Not only for the music, but it's with the DJ's taught about how they made the artists bigger than life. So. I needed. To ruin away from home. The aspect of both of my being a musician, there's also taught. I didn't come from a musical family Everyone was surprised that. I, this is what I wanted to do. In. Time everything I heard was that in order to find success. You have to either go to New York. Nashville or LA. And living in Montreal, there was a L- not that much that I could glean from. The music. World. So I was so connected to us. Radio. and Top radio. That's Swear I needed to go. It took me a little while to convince my parents to let me get on a bus and go to New York City. I. Was going for. Like three four days. Luckily, I have relatives in New Jersey. My mind as felt a little safer even though I had to call collect. Off Five six times a day. To. Make sure that was okay. 'CAUSE I. I'm really as. A stranger in a strange world trying to do something that was completely aliens from family history. Yeah. That's tough. And to make it even more interesting. All I knew was. I was lucky enough to be brave enough. To walk walk into the Brill building in the city sixty, nine hundred. And one to meet just very. 'cause a lot of the songs that I loved. And he an La Greenwich. And sometimes feel specter involved. So I really kind of connected to those the sounds of those songs and the Brill building. Just a amazing place to be for someone like you and your interests. Carole King Gerry Goffin. Berryman. Since you lyle, you get Don Kirshner desiring belt course. Yes. That's where his offices were. Lebron installer had their offices in in sixteen nineteen, but it was such a great music community. Amazing, when did you get there what what year was that? But here's that. I really started to to find my way in was in sixty seven and I was given a few moments which the just buried. And I walked in and I had a shirt Allen to parochial school side, a shirt and tie and. Jacket and all. I was dressed like that and I walk in and. You know just. Cowboy. Boots signed saving, looking great looking rock and roll and all of that. You. Know. So anyway, so I played, I played him. That's course. and He loved the first two versus I, didn't have a chorus I went. On. Words here you know. Well, he ended up liking the ball allows without any worries and I thought, Oh, well, he's just kind of made I never heard of that before. And they didn't like dessert enforce fourth verse and In kind of like he was running late. was running. Late. look finish it out and and then come and see me again and. It was like. Two. Fast too surreal. excited. I had no idea what was going on and he said, you know I've thought I'm running late, I gotta go to the studio. And I think that The angels came to me and gave me. A question that really kind of changed. Project Serie of of the search. And I turned him and I said, can I come with you? All I'll only be a couple of minutes. I had never been in a studio before. How Great? and. He looked at me and he said Have you had lunch? And I said. Yes. But I hadn't eaten forever almost. And I said Okay I usually get a sandwich only task. So. ugly. The other half, and here I am walking down seventh and Broadway with. Just Bury Z. Just Berry. And the encouragement that I received from. The few minutes you know went into the studio with him. There wasn't a session on anything but. Ended up going into the studio and and talking to someone, and I just eventually. So snuck out and went back to the Brill. Building. To get all the information I needed like you know what's the address that I can send that attain to? What do I do? Whatever you just all of that Dallas like the first opening of my life. 'cause at that moment I. Really Self. Okay. I I've. I met. Someone. In. That someone happens to be someone who's On every probably every hit record that I've been excited about it and listening whether it was on that Soda Crystals or All, the other stuff you know. How did you get the appointment in the first place? I walked in. Oh. Yeah. Well, you know the. Lau is in, retrospect? When you get older and you talk all? Wow. You take that and I said well, yeah, because it's less. This is something that I felt deep down inside. So I said Hi, My Name's Sandy Cam on I'm I'm from Canada I'm only in for another day and as a possible to have a couple of moments with Barry. The. Unemployment I said. No I. Don't have an appointment but I just. Kind of. Thia I. Think she felt a little sorry for me, and then I sat down and waited for like an hour. and. I, just. The this comfort. You know starting to get.

Andy Kim Montreal New York City New Jersey Carole King Gerry Goffin Brill La Greenwich Nashville DJ Berryman Thia I. Lebron Lau Canada Sandy Cam Don Kirshner LA Boots Allen lyle
"andy  j" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"andy j" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"To achieve <Speech_Male> your goals. If you're, <Speech_Male> it's again, <Silence> it's looking beyond <SpeakerChange> the hood. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> paint, such a great <Speech_Male> coal Andy, <Speech_Male> now one <Speech_Male> of the two of the most important <Speech_Male> things I'd like to <Speech_Male> touch on is <Speech_Male> when people want <Speech_Male> to learn <Speech_Male> more about <Speech_Male> the voices. <Speech_Male> Where are they going <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> go? And <Speech_Male> where can I find <Speech_Male> this book? <Speech_Male> And thanks for asking <Speech_Male> and this has <Speech_Male> been a pleasure. You ask <Speech_Male> great questions <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> I thank you for the opportunity. <Speech_Male> It's been great. <Speech_Male> My website <Speech_Male> is mid <Speech_Male> advisors dot <Speech_Male> com, and it's got <Speech_Male> access to all <Speech_Male> my services. <Speech_Male> All my thought leadership, <Speech_Male> the book itself, <Speech_Male> and you can <Speech_Male> also you. There's <Speech_Male> a link to the book. <Speech_Male> You can also find <Speech_Male> the book on Amazon <Speech_Male> in in <Speech_Male> e book form <Speech_Male> or in print <Speech_Male> copy. It's called <Speech_Male> grow like a pro <Speech_Male> if people want <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> get any <Speech_Male> of the tools <Speech_Male> that I kind of <Silence> referenced <Speech_Male> throughout our conversation. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <hes> they <Speech_Male> can fill out a contact <Speech_Male> form on my website, <Speech_Male> and just show <Speech_Male> some interest in what they <Speech_Male> want and <SpeakerChange> I'll <Speech_Male> give them a link <Speech_Male> to that This <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> one of those Coz <Speech_Male> Andy whipping, <Speech_Male> just so much <Speech_Male> great content on the show <Speech_Male> today <Speech_Male> and I just like to <Speech_Male> say in closing. Thank <Speech_Male> you so very much <Speech_Male> for spending some time <Speech_Male> with me on the my <Silence> future business show. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you appreciate you having. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Thanks for <Speech_Male> joining us today.

"andy  j" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"andy j" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"It means to make a difference. And and maybe even more specifically what it means to make a difference with your art. Can you only make a difference with your art? If you spell out all of the meaning and purpose behind the work that you create can you only make a difference with the art if you work for a nonprofit where a socially conscious brand. Or is there more to is there an ability that we have to perhaps move hearts and minds just by creating beauty just by filling the world with good things. And while we're kind of on this topic. What is defined as art can you create art if you're not a painter or a designer or a photographer or musician? I'm so excited this week to have Andy j Miller on the podcast, or as many folks know him online. Andy j pizza any somebody who for me has clarified all of these questions to some degree. He's somebody who I think lives out these questions, and I would almost call him an expert on this idea of of how you can move the needle with art. And maybe do it in ways that we don't often think of as traditional Andy is an illustrator super talented. He's the host of the podcast creative pep talk. One of my favorites Amy's, a public speaker. And he so engaging. Andy is just this wonderful blend of optimistic and real if you check out his Instagram, and you take a peek at his Illustrated's, they are colorful in their playful, and they're fun, and has podcast is energetic and peppy and hopeful at the same time. He's also willing to go deep. He's not just keeping things on this high optimal level he's willing to dive in and share about his struggles. And ultimately use that to encourage and support people. And that's something that I think we dive into a lot podcasts is people. Who are really willing to go there? And that's where we get to find connection. We always connect more with our struggles than our successes more on our weaknesses than our strengths on mcginnis. Andy is just somebody who I deeply admire for his ability to do that. And he is also kind of deal he has created illustrations and done work for clients. Like, the New York Times, Nickelodeon and Amazon a YouTube and worry Parker, and I am pretty sure you've seen his work. Whether you knew that it was him that did it or not Andy is also the founder like I said of create a pep talk the podcast, which is just so wonderful and has been featured by apple and BuzzFeed and threatless and he also released creative pep talk. The book in September twenty seventeen I'm not lying when I say that this is one of my favorite conversations that I've had in a long time for those who are new I am Brandon Harvey. This is sounds good. This is the weekly. Podcast where we have conversations with inspiring people who are rejecting cynicism and using their lives to make an impact sounds good is not your typical three steps to success podcast..

Andy Andy j Miller Andy j Brandon Harvey New York Times mcginnis Amy founder YouTube Parker BuzzFeed Nickelodeon apple Amazon