19 Burst results for "Andrew Weiss"

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:41 min | 2 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of it. Weekdays at noon. On WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Leila Fulton, Russia is expanding its territory by taking Ukrainian land. Vladimir Putin will sign treaties with four occupied Ukrainian provinces and annex them after staged referenda where many people were coerced to vote in favor of joining Russia. He will speak just hours after an attack inside that occupied territory near separation. That attack killed more than 20 people and wounded dozens more. The U.S. and much of the international community is calling the annexation of violation of international law. Here's White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre. We will never recognize these illegal and illegitimate attempts at annexation. Regardless of Russia's claims, this remains Ukrainian territory and Ukraine has every right to continue to fight for their full sovereignty. For more, I'm joined by Andrew Weiss. He's the vice president for studies at the Carnegie endowment for international peace. Welcome. Great to be here. So what does Russia's annexation of these four occupied Ukrainian territories? What does it mean for the future of Russia's war? It's a really important moment. The Russian government has been on the defensive since the Ukrainians launched their counter offensive at the end of August. And now the referenda and annexation moves today are basically Vladimir Putin's attempt to flip the script. He's trying to escalate the conflict, and he's trying to tell the Russian people he's at war with the west, not Ukraine, and that everything he's doing is somehow defensive. It's an upside down set of logic, but it really does potentially change facts on the ground. It potentially makes this conflict more dangerous, militarily, and it really digs him in. It sort of backs him into a corner. So another escalation, a broadening of what this war means. So at this point, with these land grabs, in the midst of active conflict, is there a path at all for diplomacy to get to a place of peace? This is a way too early to imagine any kind of diplomatic process that's meaningful. The Russians have never engaged in good faith and any diplomatic efforts since this war began in 2014. And now by basically saying this is all part of mother Russia. They're doing two things. One, they're trying to scare the west and western publics in western governments that things could get out of hand because now any attack in these parts of Ukraine are somehow tantamount to an attack on mother Russia. And the other thing they're doing is basically saying no Russian lands could ever be given away. So, you know, Russia is not in the business of carving itself up and handing out presents. So Vladimir Putin is basically sat here. I'm locking in. I'm not going to change what I'm doing. So as you said, Putin has dug in and you say he's sort of backed up to a wall without any way to back out of this. And the west is saying, well, this is illegal. But that hasn't been a deterrent for Putin is there a deterrent that will work at this point. So I think the real deterrent is watching the determination of the people of Ukraine and their military as they defend themselves against this unprovoked invasion. The danger for everyone is that this conflict goes on. And that there is no sort of decisive moment where you are Putin acknowledges all his loss. This has been a horrible blunder of epic proportions, and he has to basically look for some kind of way out to kind of sneak out the back door and hope we don't we don't hold it against him. I think that's very improbable at this point. The real question is, how much can either side endure? We're basically now in a pain contest between Ukraine on the one hand with its western partners in Russia on the other. What about domestic pressure? I mean, this annexation comes after Putin gave this order to mobilize and other 300,000 troops to fight in Ukraine, but a lot of people were running away from that draft. And there has been domestic criticism, and even admitted unusually to mistakes in implementing of that order saying some wrong people had been drafted. Is there domestic pressure that could change the course of this war? So there's no doubt that the deeper Putin is going all in on the war by mobilizing Russian society for the past 7 and a half months. He's basically allowed the Russian public to live their lives and act as if nothing has changed, that there's not a big war going on. That's all different now. And everyone in the country is worried about their husbands, their sons, their brothers, being summoned to go fight in this war. The real danger, of course, is that the Russian people are not going to solve our problem. We're in a contest with Putin. And the government is not running for reelection anytime soon. Andrew Weiss vice president for studies at the Carnegie endowment for international peace. Thank you for your time. Great to be here. Thank you. Hurricane Ian is not done yet. After devastating parts of Florida, it is on track to hit South Carolina today. Although it's far weaker than the storm that came ashore near Fort Myers Wednesday. Yesterday, communities from Naples to St. Petersburg started to figure out just how much damage has been done. Insurance claims by homeowners and businesses are expected to be as high as 40 to $50 billion. And pierce Greg Allen visited some of the hardest hit areas yesterday and joins us to talk about it. Hey, Greg. Good morning, Rachel. Where is the damage the worst? Well, Lee and Charlie counties are the areas that were hit hardest by the storm. Florida governor Ron DeSantis was there to survey the damage yesterday. He called it indescribable. To see a house

Russia Ukraine Vladimir Putin Putin Andrew Weiss NPR news Rachel Martin Leila Fulton karine Jean Pierre Russian government Carnegie endowment for interna WNYC White House Russian society U.S. Hurricane Ian pierce Greg Allen Fort Myers South Carolina
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:11 min | 2 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Island jail in New York City show just how dangerous the situation is for detainees and inmates. The presentation also shows a detainee locked in a caged shower for nearly 24 hours, and it shows incarcerated people even admitted during chest compressions themselves. Matt Katz joins to talk us through it all. I'm Melissa Harris Perry, and that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three, on 93.9, FM. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin, and I'm Leila fallen in southern Ukraine nears upper Asia a missile hit a convoy of cars. The attack held more than 20 people and wounded dozens more and it comes just hours before president Vladimir Putin plans to announce that Russia has expanded its territory, including with separation. He'll sign treaties with four occupied territories in Ukraine officially annexing them after staged referendums where many people were coerced to vote in favor of joining Russia. The U.S. and many other countries call it a violation of international law. Here's White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre. We will never recognize these illegal and illegitimate attempts at annexation. Regardless of Russia's claims, this remains Ukrainian territory and Ukraine has every right to continue to fight for their full sovereignty. For more, I'm joined by Andrew Weiss. He's the vice president for studies at the Carnegie endowment for international peace. Welcome. Great to be here. So what does Russia's annexation of these four occupied Ukrainian territories? What does it mean for the future of Russia's war? It's a really important moment. The Russian government has been on the defensive since the Ukrainians launched their counter offensive at the end of August. And now the referenda and annexation moves today. We're basically Vladimir Putin's attempt to flip the script. He's trying to escalate the conflict, and he's trying to tell the Russian people he's at war with the west, not Ukraine, and that everything he's doing is somehow defensive. It's an upside down set of logic, but it really does potentially change facts on the ground. It potentially makes this conflict more dangerous, militarily, and it really digs him in. It sort of packs him into a corner. So another escalation, a broadening of what this war means. So at this point, with these land grabs, in the midst of active conflict, is there a path at all for diplomacy to get to a place of peace? This is a way too early to imagine any kind of diplomatic process that's meaningful. The Russians have never engaged in good faith and any diplomatic efforts since this war began in 2014. And now by basically saying this is all part of mother Russia. They're doing two things. One, they're trying to scare the west and western publics in western governments that things could get out of hand because now any attack in these parts of Ukraine are somehow tantamount to an attack on mother Russia. And the other thing they're doing is basically saying no Russian lands could ever be given away. So, you know, Russia is not in the business of carving itself up and handing out presents. So Vladimir Putin is basically set here. I'm locking in. I'm not going to change what I'm doing. So as you said, Putin has dug in and you say he's sort of backed up to a wall without any way to back out of this. And the west is saying, well, this is illegal. But that hasn't been a deterrent for Putin is there a deterrent that will work at this point. So I think the real deterrent is watching the determination of the people of Ukraine and their military as they defend themselves against this unprovoked invasion. The danger for everyone is that this conflict goes on. And that there is no sort of decisive moment where the New York Putin acknowledges all his loss. This has been a horrible blunder of epic proportions, and he has to basically look for some kind of way out to kind of sneak out the back door and hope we don't we don't hold it against him. I think that's very improbable at this point. The real question is, how much can either side endure? We're basically now in a pain contest between Ukraine on the one hand with its western partners in Russia on the other. What about domestic pressure? I mean, this annexation comes after Putin gave this order to mobilize and other 300,000 troops to fight in Ukraine, but a lot of people were running away from that draft. And there has been domestic criticism. He had even admitted unusually to mistakes in implementing of that order saying some wrong people had been drafted. Is there domestic pressure that could change the course of this war? So there's no doubt that the deeper Putin is going all in on the war by mobilizing Russian society for the past 7 and a half months. He's basically allowed the Russian public to live their lives and act as if nothing has changed, that there's not a big war going on. That's all different now. And everyone in the country is worried about their husbands, their sons, their brothers, being summoned to go fight in this war. The real danger, of course, is that the Russian people are not going to solve our problem. We're in a contest with Putin. And the rapport is not running for reelection anytime soon. Andrew Weiss is vice president for studies at the Carnegie endowment for international peace. Thank you for your time. Great to be here. Thank you. Hurricane Ian is not done yet. After devastating parts of Florida, it is on track to hit South Carolina today, although it's far weaker than the storm that came ashore near Fort Myers Wednesday. Yesterday, communities from Naples to St. Petersburg started to figure out just how much damage has been done. Insurance claims by homeowners and businesses are expected to be as high as 40 to $50 billion. And Paris Greg Allen visited some of the hardest hit areas yesterday and joins us to talk about it. Hey Greg. Good morning, Rachel. Where is the damage the worst? Well, Lee and Charlotte county's are the areas that were hit hardest by the storm for the governor Ron DeSantis was there to survey the damage yesterday. He called it indescribable. To see a house

Russia Ukraine Vladimir Putin Island jail Putin Matt Katz Melissa Harris Perry Andrew Weiss NPR news Rachel Martin karine Jean Pierre Russian government Carnegie endowment for interna Leila New York City White House Asia Russian society U.S. Hurricane Ian
"andrew weiss" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:31 min | 6 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Swim mobile to find the one that's right for you. Biden's moves on NATO come amid fear Russian war will expand past Ukraine. By Brian Bennett. Vladimir Putin's name barely came up as Joe Biden stood with the leaders of Finland and Sweden on Thursday under a bright may sun and praised their new found interest in joining the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But the question of how the Russian president would react to the development loomed large over the proceedings in The White House rose garden. New members joining NATO is not a threat to any nation. It never has been. Biden said to reporters, although he may as well have been speaking to Putin directly. NATO's purpose is to defend against aggression. That's its purpose to defend, let no one make a mistake of the meaning of this historic day. But as a seismic shift in alliances in Europe unfolds, some Russia experts warn that the long-term effects are difficult to game out and are concerned that the Biden administration is not fully thinking through the far reaching ramifications, as it careens forward in the region. Since Russia began its invasion in February, the U.S. has gotten progressively bolder in its efforts to support Ukraine's military and bolster NATO, even as Putin has claimed the alliance's actions and particularly the prospect of Ukraine joining it at some point were factors in his decision to launch the current war. Asked a day earlier about what preparations Biden was making in case Putin decided to escalate the war in retaliation for Finland and Sweden joining NATO. Karine Jean Pierre, The White House press secretary said, I'm not going to go into hypotheticals. We're going to focus on what's happening here and now. Hours after the meeting of world leaders at the rose garden, Congress approved sending an additional $40 billion in assistance to Ukraine's defense. The largest single foreign aid package of its kind in decades. The U.S. and European allies have already shipped massive amounts of artillery and firepower to Ukraine as its forces fight to reclaim territory taken by Russia since February. Nonetheless, Putin isn't backing down. The Russian leadership is showing no signs of self doubt about the necessity of fighting on, says Andrew Weiss, the vice president for studies at the Carnegie endowment for international peace and a former director for Russian Ukrainian and Eurasian affairs on the National Security Council staff. Russia still has vast resources to keep the fight going, he notes, even as its economy has cratered under international sanctions. A grinding land war that continues with no end in sight remains a possibility. The Russians are definitely waging a war in a way that is brutal and sloppy, says Weiss. But the ability of the Russian state to find the resources to keep doing that is rather open ended. Russia also has other tactics it hasn't reached for yet, including cyberattacks against European countries and the U.S., says Michael Kaufman. The director of the Russia studies program at CNA, a think tank, and a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson international centers Keenan institute. The U.S. is very much a material party to this conflict as are other European states, Kaufman says. Just because you haven't seen Russian cyberattacks or another form of retaliation against the United States in the war so far, doesn't mean it won't happen. Kaufman thinks the risk of Russia using nuclear weapons remains low, despite Putin's announcement that he had put Russia's nuclear forces on a higher level of alert. The pressure to deescalate the conflict is likely to grow as the impact is felt around the world. Russia has largely blockaded grain exports from Ukraine, contributing to global shortages and price spikes. Sanctions against Russian energy sales imposed after the country's armored units advanced on the interior of Ukraine in late February has led to a worldwide increase in fuel costs, contributing to rising inflation in the U.S. and increasing political liability for Biden and the Democrats going into the midterm elections in November. Biden is committed to supporting Ukraine in the long term. John Pierre said on Thursday in response to a question from time. This is something that's incredibly important to the president. John Pierre said. But also to our partners and allies that we make sure that Ukraine is able to defend their democracy. At the end of his appearance in the rose garden with president sali nista of Finland and prime minister magdalena Anderson of Sweden, Biden hugged Anderson as a reporter shouted a question asking what Biden had to say to those who might be worried right now during this vulnerable transition. Biden didn't stop to answer and the three leaders turned to walk back into the west wing..

Putin Brian Bennett Kaufman Andrew Weiss Joe Biden Michael Kaufman Vladimir Putin Thursday National Security Council John Pierre Karine Jean Pierre North Atlantic Treaty Organiza Congress February CNA Biden Weiss late February three leaders November
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:14 min | 7 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"She told us what she wanted most was peace that she was concerned about her son who's in the harkey region Another area that's close to the front lines She hasn't seen her son in 6 months She said and she wants her grandchildren to be able to visit I can't imagine that she's paying attention to a visit to Ukraine by Nancy Pelosi Nevertheless it's significant right That the Speaker of the House visited Kyiv That's right Pelosi led this congressional delegation that met with zelensky over the weekend And that's the second senior U.S. delegation to do so after the secretaries of state and defense visited about a week ago Now President Biden has requested $33 billion in funding from Congress to help aid Ukraine through the end of September And Pelosi said they were already writing legislation to reflect those initiatives Overnight The White House announced that First Lady Jill Biden will be traveling to Romania and Slovakia to spend Mother's Day with Ukrainian refugees who have fled the country due to violence NPR's Tim Mac thanks so much to me appreciate your reporting as always Thank you So what's it like to watch Putin's war in Ukraine from another country that was also once part of the Soviet Union This year alone the Russian military has been operating in 5 countries outside of its own borders for Russian leader Vladimir Putin it's a way to maintain influence beyond Russia's borders but is it really working And Pierre's Greg myrie has been looking into this and joins us now Hey Greg Hi Rachel Let's just establish where these Russian troops are active right now outside Ukraine Right so after that obvious one we don't have to go very far to find more just a few days ago a couple communications towers were blown up in Moldova and this is a tiny country that borders Ukraine to the southwest Russia has about 1500 troops in a separatist region in the eastern part of Moldova They've been there for the past 30 years and very much against the will of Moldova's government It's still not clear who's behind these explosions but they do raise concerns that the war in Ukraine could spill over into Moldova I mean the most significant support for Russia's war when it comes to former Soviet republics is Belarus right Yes absolutely The leader of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko is closely tied to Putin He's allowed Russian troops into Belarus and then they use the Belarus as a launching pad to invade Ukraine So the specifics of the very widely in these three countries Belarus Ukraine Moldova but there is a common theme here Putin says the west wants to undermine Russia and he wants these former Soviet republics as well as the others to be this protective buffer for Russia But Andrew Weiss a Russia expert at the Carnegie endowment for international peace says a lot of these countries aren't so keen on playing this role Nearly all of the post Soviet countries have a lot of heartburn about looking to Putin as a benevolence security guarantor It left to their own devices None of these countries really wants to be back under the Kremlin's way That's interesting What about the war itself I mean what about people living in these countries Do they support Putin's war Well we haven't seen a lot of that Not only from the people but even from the leaders there's been a lot of ambivalence So when there was a UN resolution many of these former Soviet republics abstained And Putin likes to say in Ukraine and elsewhere that he's trying to protect ethnic Russians who live outside of Russia's borders And that takes us to a fourth country with Russian troops which is Georgia on Russia's southwestern frontier Putin said he was protecting Russians when he sent troops there in 2008 for a brief bloody conflict Russia seized a big chunk of Georgian territory Russian troops are still there to this day in a conflict that is effectively frozen And we should note that some of the Russian troops in Georgia have been sent to help in Ukraine which is an example of how these conflicts overlap Putin also sent troops to prop up friendly leaders He's done this before right When they get in trouble remind us of the situation in Kazakhstan Yeah just back in January Putin sent troops into the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan to help the countries autocratic ruler put down these widespread protests Now the unrest was stamped out and the Russian troops left after just a few weeks So you might think that a grateful Kazakh leadership would stand with Putin when he invaded Ukraine just a month ago but that hasn't been the case Kazakhstan says it supports Ukraine's full sovereignty It's in the humanitarian aid to Ukraine Certainly not the way that Putin expected to be repaid We often hear about Putin wanting to reconstruct the Soviet Union up Soviet reunion if you will but this really seems to be a challenge in a bit of a fantasy NPR's Greg myrie thank you so much for this Greg My pleasure Scientists at the national Institutes of health are now recruiting about 20,000 people as part of an ongoing research project to get to the bottom of long COVID Yes this is pandemic began many people have reported COVID symptoms weeks and months after recovering from their initial illness Last year the national Institutes of health awarded 470 million researchers all over the country to learn why And they're looking at more than just fatigue and brain fog in the weeks after infection They want to know why some so called long haulers go on to develop brain or heart problems metabolic disorders even autoimmune conditions And Pierre's Alison Arbery is with us Alison Good morning I mean we've been hearing about long COVID for a long time Two years after the pandemic has begun have most people improved or recovered from these lingering symptoms Well there's some data to show that most people who were sick enough to be hospitalized with COVID had not fully recovered one year out and that's concerning but not completely surprising given many of these patients were older had underlying conditions but most people Rachel don't fall into this category and many who experience lingering symptoms after COVID do go on to make a full recovery whether it's most is something this.

Ukraine Russia Putin Moldova Greg myrie zelensky Pelosi Tim Mac Greg Hi Rachel Jill Biden Andrew Weiss Kyiv Nancy Pelosi NPR Soviet Union Kazakhstan Alexander Lukashenko Vladimir Putin Biden
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:07 min | 8 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Answer is me Me me me Stephanie Miller That's the answer Okay You did very well Thank you very much Oh by the way the pressure is getting ugly Uh oh Wait really you people are getting ridiculous The pressure's just getting too intense Hang on where is it Hold on Hopefully Try and finally I will put her Yes you did Right Somebody said I looked 25 Okay people stopped I've already experienced people One woman have pardon me That's just someone who wanted to hear their own name on the radio that fading you Really fast Now I lost it Now I lost the tweet So it was my mommy you know what are you looking for your 30s And then someone's like who's that 25 ish Oh Oh please That's just correct Is that what you're thinking Seems correct That's desperate Yeah Well now I've lost that person tweet All right I was thinking of Eric boehler We are all trying to be Eric And when none of us are Eric but I was trying to bullard as fast as I could On MSNBC Saturday A lot of people I have to say doing some bulletin for the lord as we call it yesterday Oh I did not because I apparently I have a little more self esteem than I did not watch I watched a few minutes of chuck Tod most people covered it for me Uncovering the truth said chuck chuck Todd said Biden is paralyzed by the immigration issue Greg Abbott is kidnapping and trafficking migrants but chuck blames Biden Trump never built the wall but chuck blames Biden Why does chuck blame Biden for Republican problems why is chuck Todd still employed by MSNBC Thank you Okay Right Wait there's more There was another one Hold please Oh speaking of Greg Abbott hoodlum says Greg Abbott is a criminal who ruined almost a quarter of a $1 billion of fruit and produce at his border stunt to try to make Biden look bad This is no longer politics It is criminal behavior Thank you Correct Thank you See forwarding Okay Oh this one wells Said I've been thinking more and more that newsrooms need to hold an all staff meeting where they invite democracy experts and historians and really do a massive reset of how we are covering what's happening in our country right now It's not about partisanship but about covering reality Isn't that exactly it Eric's last piece that we keep talking about The people more people think we've lost jobs when we have in fact gained more than any in history 7 and a half million That is a massive failure of the media Okay Andrew Weiss Weinstein said only in America is a mass shooting knocked out of the news by another one a day later I can't even keep track now over the weekend right There are three that I saw reported widely Yeah Also Jared Kushner's story we will talk to AG about that just by the way she's going to stay with us for the hour because God loves us and wants us to be happy Jared Kushner did not have top secret clearance who gave him the info to sell to the Saudis the new $2 billion question Thank you We're going to talk to AC has a lot to say about that We also remember Trump overrode them and got him his security clearance And there was a reason why he couldn't get clearance before that Right Right Oh I have another guest The quote.

Greg Abbott Biden Eric boehler Stephanie Miller chuck chuck Tod Eric chuck chuck Biden Trump bullard chuck Todd MSNBC Jared Kushner Todd Andrew Weiss Weinstein America Trump
"andrew weiss" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:17 min | 8 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In there they form a U.S. national security adviser on Bloomberg in the last 24 hours from New York City this morning Good morning to you Futures are negative two tens of 1% on a S&P about an hour and 12 minutes away from the opening bell on the NASDAQ 100 down a quarter of 1% Yields higher TK up by 8 basis points almost inching towards two 48 sub two 50 at two 47 45 We've traded ourselves on sharp conversation of this war in Ukraine from general Kim general Hodges and reedus Elliot Ackerman the Marina on the other day and yesterday John Bolton and thank you for the fierce comments on John Bolton always informative and controversial We continue that discussion today and we do so around the Carnegie endowment for international peace This was simply formed out of Endo Carnegie's outrage of World War I He died within a year of the end of that war Andrew Weiss joins us to this morning vice president at Carnegie endowment for international peace Andrew I want to talk about autocracy from the past to Hitler it Stalin Putin is mentioned this We have Putin We have a massive win in Hungary with Orban as well How do we control manage or end these outcomes of autocracy as we see in Ukraine So it's great to be here with you Tom I am always skeptical that the United States has within its power great ability to shift the ultimate political direction of Russia and as much as what president Putin is doing in Ukraine is horrible And as much as the world must level whatever tools it has to try to slow down Russia's war in Ukraine we need to be realistic that regime change in Russia is something that has eluded western policymakers now throughout Putin's tenure And every day of Vladimir Putin wakes up when he comes into work he's mostly concerned about the safety and survival of his regime And he's prepared to escalate and do things to protect himself against that threat And that's been basically what's been animating him throughout the past two decades If the people of Russia and the various peoples of Russia find out what's going on will they give him support or will they walk away from mister Putin We need to be careful about what Russians are willing and aren't willing to accept And one of my colleagues at the Carnegie Moscow center wrote about this very powerfully in Russian earlier this week Russians are living in an information vacuum and for the most part they are doing that by choice They are not seeking out the truth They don't believe that their country is responsible for atrocities or war crimes in Ukraine And if we puncture that information bubble which is a big if I'm not sure that people in Russia are prepared to take action to deal with the problem of living in a country that's ruled by Vladimir Putin And it's just for a very simple reason The instruments of repression that Vladimir Putin has built up over the past two decades are intimidating They are prepared to use violence and other measures to keep Russians off the streets and to prevent political dissent from spilling over into questions of how their country is ruled And you see that level of fear among average people as well as the elite And so for the west to be banking on either a split within the elite or bottom up pressure on the regime to take care of our Putin problem I think is really unrealistic The way we're going to deal with our Putin problem is action by western leaders It's not going to come from within Russia itself unfortunately Where does China fit into this Andrew given the fact that over the weekend and frankly yesterday The New York Times put out an article talking about propaganda that China has made that actually paid Vladimir Putin in a very nice light for some of the party members So I think a lot of what China is providing right now is moral support as you say and the propaganda sphere in terms of supporting Russia's lies about possible biological weapons and things like that that it claims Ukraine has all of which is made up whole cloth But when it comes to the ways Russia needs help right now the main support China is going to provide is by providing the bid on Russian oil and gas resources which China buys on at the moment As much as it wants from Russia the longer term problem for Russia is that China can not be expected to be the backstop and the fiscal authority for its government And so as Russia comes under increased pressure from western sanctions it's going to be turning to China out of desperation It's going to be looking to China to be its savior I would be very surprised particularly in the technological area which is affected by western export controls if Chinese firms are going to be willing to step up and provide inputs to the Russian industrial sector that it can't buy now from the west Andrew just to wrap things up and we only have a little bit of time What do you think the west could do to bring this to an anti more quickly I think that the west is going to keep ratcheting up sanctions The problem isn't that there isn't a ton of headroom left short of a full scale embargo on the Russian economy And so if the west is prepared for example to cut off all imports of Russian oil and gas which I think Germany is not willing to countenance at this point If the west does not prepare to go to that length I think the most likely outcomes that this war simply drags on And over time it's likely to morph into something similar to the Balkans wars of the 1990s on a much faster scale Andrew we appreciate your time It's a clinic for all of us Andrew Weiss of the Carnegie endowment Tom Kean and what a difficult time And it's got harder not easier over the last few weeks and the last month for that matter too These are atrocities are a major shift major major shift John in that before this invisible maybe or not believing in this in our lack of news it was about NATO It was about diplomacy It was suits and ties flying around And that's just vaporized in the last four or 5 6 days Tell me something you said at the start of the invasion The social media has changed the way we absorb war How we witness it even all these miles away thousands of miles away from where it's taking place Right And some that ramps up the pressure on the politicians to do more Can a Europeans this week get away with just offering a proposal on facing gap Russian coal After what we all saw over the weekend I think the reporting is a proposal's got to go further I don't have knowledge on that John I would do this overlay The second Chechen war was grim That ended 2009 ish 2008 ish Twitter started yes a few years before it But can you imagine the Russian wars in Georgia or Chechnya were the kind of social media today And again this Biden approach I don't know whether to give the president approach but John the Biden approach of showing immediate intelligence is one of the original points of this moment Yeah and some think that he's been congratulated for.

John Bolton Tom Andrew Weiss Stalin Hitler Tom Kean Andrew Ukraine Biden Vladimir Putin Hungary Georgia New York City Bloomberg 2009 yesterday John Elliot Ackerman Chinese John the Biden
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 8 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So Ukraine is a mosaic And Vladimir Putin has tried to portray that as suggesting that it's not a real country and that it's been cobbled together over various decades I don't think that's true What you have seen in Ukraine though is a transformative moment and that transformative moment came in 2014 when Russia invaded the country And so a lot of those geographical or regional divisions were erased by virtue of the unifying presence of a Russian invasion So yes there are parts of Ukraine in the eastern section where there's heavy sort of post industrial economy There's a greater level of russification that occurred in the Soviet era but the majority of the population has looked at what Russia has done since 2014 with total horror and they're the people who today are rejecting Russia's claim that Russia should rule that part of the country Are you telling me that if Ukraine ever was not a country Vladimir Putin has made it a country Absolutely So by virtue of what Russia did in 2014 by annexing Crimea and then invading parts of the dome boss and occupying them since 2014 Putin basically chained trajectory It changed the outlook of its people and it basically made it impossible for a pro Russian leadership ever to hold sway and Kyiv And that's the buzz saw that Vladimir Putin walked into on February 24th I'm trying to figure out how there can ever be a peace agreement at this point given that effectively there has been a war for about 8 years now and Russians are sitting on territory including Crimea which they say they've annexed that they'll never give back and Ukrainians are saying we can not agree to a peace deal that compromises our sovereignty or gives away land Exactly So the prospect of peace is I think a very dim one at this point There's a horrible humanitarian tragedy unfolding across Ukraine and then there's a remarkable story of resistance both from the Ukrainian military and from average people who've taken up arms to defend their country I don't see any Ukrainian leader being able to sit at a table across from Vladimir Putin offer up significant chunks of their territory give up parts of their sovereignty and as Putin wants basically give away their ability to defend themselves from such an invasion in the future How do you see the future of the war then I think we're going to see the conflict begin to morph and resemble the Bosnian war of the 1990s but on a much vaster scale So the people who are listening to your program today should be prepared for this conflict to go on and unfortunately for the humanitarian toll and the suffering of civilians to go to continue into the coming months if not years Sorry to hear it but thanks for the insights mister Weiss Great to be here Andrew Weiss is vice president for studies at the Carnegie endowment for international peace A federal judge says it was more likely than not that former president Donald Trump violated the law and tried to obstruct Congress and his efforts to overturn the 2020 election This finding is narrowly focused on communications involving pro Trump lawyer John eastman which had been sought by the house panel investigating the January 6th attack on the U.S. capitol That committee met yesterday shortly after the judge issued his 44 page ruling NPR's congressional reporter Claudia grisales was there The House select January 6th committee is down to the final months of its probe before they present their findings to the public We are entering a critical stage of our investigation That's Wyoming representative Liz Cheney the panel's ranking Republican at a public meeting to refer to former Trump officials ex trade adviser Peter Navarro and former deputy chief of staff Dan scavino for criminal contempt of Congress for defying their subpoenas We've now taken the testimony of hundreds of witnesses with knowledge of the events of January 6th Including more than a dozen former Trump White House staff members The panel also met privately to discuss Jeannie Thomas the wife of Supreme Court Justice clarence Thomas to testify committee chairman Benny Thompson had mentioned the plan earlier to reporters I.

Vladimir Putin Russia Crimea Putin mister Weiss Andrew Weiss John eastman U.S. capitol That committee Carnegie endowment for interna Claudia grisales Donald Trump Liz Cheney Congress Peter Navarro Dan scavino NPR Wyoming house Trump Trump White House
"andrew weiss" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:14 min | 9 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Editing centric, don't look up from the editing God Hank corwin, like I loves a cut. Joe walker for dune, Pamela Martin, for king Richard, Peter sebastis for The Power of the Dog, and Myron kirstein and Andrew Weiss Blum for tick tick boom. Interesting set here, this is a category that is widely considered very indicative of the strength of a film if the film does not have a best film editing nomination. It's believed that it's going to be a tough road to best picture. You'll notice that there is no coda in this category. I find that fascinating. I don't have a super strong feel for this one, Joe, because king Richard won the ace Eddie award a few weeks ago and I didn't see that coming. And so now to The Power of the Dog is the ostensible best picture favorite does it have editing really its strength in its story? I think there's a strong case to make for it and I might make it right here, but I'm a little bit stumped on this one. What are you thinking? I think king Richard was an interesting win of these. I think when you think about dramatizing a game of tennis, which shouldn't be hard, you know, plenty of people tune in to watch high stakes tennis, but I think there's something to be said for that between sports and war movies. I feel like those two things tend to feel like flashy, interesting. I think tick tick boom. I mean, I don't think it's a FrontRunner, but I think editing wise tick to boom is actually pretty interesting. I think a power of the dog has some precursors in its favor, but again, I think dune deserves to run these craft categories. I think it deserves this Mad Max glory in that regard if it's not going to get best picture. So I will go with my heart and I'm saying dune to win and that dune should win. Do you mind if we just look at some previous best film editing winners? Yeah. Because this is a, it's an unusually important category, like I said. So the winner last year was Sound of Metal. The winner of the year before that was Ford.

king Richard Hank corwin Pamela Martin Peter sebastis The Power of the Dog Myron kirstein Andrew Weiss Blum Joe walker tennis Joe Ford
"andrew weiss" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:03 min | 10 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on Planet Money

"I know, but trust me. Check out everyone and their mom. Every Wednesday in the wait wait, don't tell me podcast feed. Okay, sanctioned proofing. The last time Russia invaded Ukraine, the U.S. hit Russia with all sorts of sanctions. Vladimir Putin didn't like that. He wanted to be able to do whatever he wanted to do without repercussions. So he started trying to make Russia immune to future sanctions so that he could put himself in this position to say, go ahead, impose your sanctions. They're not going to hurt us. Vadim Putin has been preparing for this moment for the past 8 years. Andrew Weiss is with the Carnegie endowment for international peace. He's a Russia expert, was on the National Security Council. And he has been very closely watching as Russia has put up its defenses. He says there are a few things Russia has been doing. Like it started stockpiling foreign currency. Russia has huge reserves in a few different currencies and gold. Right now, the Russian government basically has stuck away in a mattress somewhere on the order of $635 billion. These are huge amounts of money that would give rush to the ability to brazen out new forms of western pressure and sanctions. So that's one way that Russia has tried to sanction proof its economy by stashing cash that it can tap into at any time. But the reserve might not be enough. So Russia has done other things to prepare for this moment. Putin has been building relationships with China to work around future U.S. banking sanctions. He made Russia's exchange rate free floating, which basically just means Russia is less dependent on the dollar. And, and here's the big important thing, he's reduced his reliance on foreign investment on western financing. Basically, Putin decided, I think we're going to stop borrowing money. Vladimir Putin is allergic to borrowing money. So back in 2014, 2015, Russian companies borrowed tons of money in the west, had tons of banking relationships, all that has slowly scaled back in the subsequent 8 years. And so he's not looking to use the banking system in Russia or access to western capital to make Russia great. And Andrew says there's one big reason Putin can pull this off, how he can run a country without borrowing a lot of money. Putin thinks he can pay for a lot of what Russia needs by exporting oil and selling it on the global market. This is his Trump card. Basically, every day that Russian government in some form or another pumps out four plus million barrels of oil a day, and it sells those on world markets. And if oil is priced at as it is right now, around a $100 a barrel, that is a lot of money every single day. By the way, Russia can still sell oil because no one has put sanctions on Russian oil, yet it could happen. But stopping Russian oil exports would be terrible for the global economy. It's a horrible dynamic in terms of trying to choke off the ability for Putin to finance himself. And he has all this dollar income that's coming in every day from selling oil and gas. How does he have access to U.S. dollars by selling oil? All major transactions involving oil and gas are conducted in western currencies. So every time Russia sells oil, it's mostly receiving either dollars or Euros. I mean, it's certainly undermines the sanctions in a very big way if the idea is shut them off, freeze them out to U.S. dollars, and then they have this unlimited access to U.S. dollars through this other way. Yep, Russia has the world over a barrel. And Vladimir Putin knows this. It's part of his whole calculus with Ukraine. Yep. So the idea is we know that the things we sell are too important to you for you the west to sanction them. So does this make Russia sanction proof then? We're going to find out Putin feels he can basically tough things out. He can tighten his belt at home. He can continue to run a very tight budget and make the average Russian bear the brunt of any adjustment. That's the structure of the Russian economy that Vladimir Putin has deliberately built. It's a fortress mentality. A fortress that is how everyone is describing Russia right now and listen. Even people like Andrew, who think that Russia is pretty well positioned, say that these sanctions will hurt. If just some of your banks get cut off, you can maybe tough it out. But if all the big ones do, which could still happen, that would be harder. Plus, the U.S. has announced another kind of sanction to prevent Russia from getting pretty important technology that's been developed in the U.S.. The goal here is to cut Russia off from technology it needs for its military. It's shipping industry. It's space program. Andrew Weiss says the U.S. has rolled out maybe.

Russia Putin Russian government Vladimir Putin Andrew Weiss Vadim Putin U.S. Carnegie endowment for interna Ukraine National Security Council Andrew China
"andrew weiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:09 min | 10 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on KOMO

"King County are so fed up with property crime that their dishing out thousands of dollars to track anyone coming in and out of their neighborhood Almost Jackie Kent reports the technology is being used by more and more people in our state And went upstairs went through all her jewelry ripped all her stuff off It was that devastating home burglary and other property crimes and his neighborhood that inspired dawn to look into getting extra security We do feel that this is a viable crime prevention and fighting tool The older meadow HOA invested in a so called flock camera The camera snaps the license plates of anyone entering or leaving this community Not everybody wants these cameras They are concerned with privacy There was a big debate before and we had a vote of all the homeowners and it was go for it The ACLU of Washington tells us it's concerned about neighborhoods acting as surveillance partners with law enforcement calling this data storage invasive and enabling law enforcement to undertake widespread systematic surveillance Jackie Kent come on news Man's died in the hospital at Bellingham after being shot last week by a sedro woolley police officer 51 year old David Babcock was shot late Wednesday night after officers attempted to stop him in the area of fruitdale and mcgarry roads the shooting happened at short time after police in Mount Vernon say Babcock fled a traffic stop there the investigation into the shooting continues Now the debate intensified the state capitol today over those do it yourself ghost guns John lobert reports They can be voted online put together at home there's no background check no serial number Jordan Ferguson Spokane PD These weapons can not be traced by law enforcement making it harder to solve crimes House bills 1705 would ban ghost guns sponsored Liz berry Between 2016 and 2020 law enforcement recovered near 24,000 ghost guns And we know there are so many more out there that are being recovered But if the gun was made before 2019 this law wouldn't touch it Andrew Weiss is worried about the unintended consequences Black people are more likely to get searched by police and be charged with 9 but I'm suggesting crimes just like the one that's built creates This will lead to an even greater number of black people arrested in jail If the bill passes all firearms bought in Washington including ghost guns would require unique serial numbers be etched into the weapon John lobert northwest news radio the bill of modifying the standard for use of physical force by law enforcement has already cleared the state house today they had a hearing in the Senate the measure would allow physical force when someone flees an investigatory stop In some cases we've tipped the balance the wrong way and unfairly hamstrung our officers without instead of decisiveness leaving them with confusion rather than clarity This Renton mayor Armando pavone a Republican's unsuccessfully pushed for a measure that would allow police officers to engage in vehicular pursuits when there is reasonable suspicion that someone has committed a violent offense And the Richland Fred Meyer store will one person was shot and killed and another person was wounded earlier this month is now open for business once again Reopened Sunday after being closed for nearly two weeks the accused shooter 39 year old Aaron Kelly will be formally arraigned this week So you've been charged with count one first degree murder.

Jackie Kent John lobert woolley police David Babcock Jordan Ferguson King County Liz berry Andrew Weiss ACLU Bellingham Washington Babcock Mount Vernon Spokane Armando pavone Richland Fred Meyer store Renton Senate confusion Aaron Kelly
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:07 min | 10 months ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nantucket several of the main downtown roads were covered in a foot of seawater There were videos where it's really hard to tell where the ocean ends and roads began in front of the local movie theater And at one point a group of high school students were even paddling the streets in a canoe So what about for people who live really close to the ocean They must be concerned about the long-term impact of storms like this one on their homes Oh absolutely Beyond flooding beach erosion is a really big problem for a number of those homes And a lot of attention right now is specifically on the sand dunes across the region because they're incredible They provide this service to the coast every time big waves come they act like this cushion but the problem comes when people build their homes on top of the dunes because they're eroding Also So in this one town called sandwich there are several dozen homes built on top of a dune And we don't yet know exactly how much erosion the storm caused but a state official who monitors coastal damage told me the dune has definitely changed Before the storm there's this kind of healthy slope down to the beach below Now it's a steep 8 foot drop And sandwich isn't alone There are other towns across the region where you can clearly see this storm has damaged the dunes Okay so given that what's top of mind for officials in these towns is to start to think about the reality of climate change there are likely more severe storms like this one in the future Absolutely I think that preparation is key for coastal towns generally one sandwich town official named Dave de canto said he's focused on cleaning up what's just come through of course but his mind is also on potential storms of 2023 already It's a long-term process and the planning has to go so far ahead We should be planning for storms now for next winter Storms like this underscore that sea level rise more frequent and intense storms all these impacts of climate change are forcing some in these towns to ask whether we need to rethink where we're building and perhaps whether we need to retreat altogether in some areas Eve took off with member station W C AI Thank you eve Thank you Leila Back in 2021 long before Russian troops began massing on the borders of Ukraine Russian president president Vladimir Putin published a long and rambling essay His writing referred to centuries of history and he argued that Russians and Ukrainians are essentially the same people He also suggested that the Ukrainians did not deserve to keep their current borders Putin was at least correct that Russians and Ukrainians share a lot of history but Ukrainians have a very different view of the past And Pierre's Greg myrie reports Ukraine was the breadbasket of the Soviet Union in the 1930s when Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin sees the rich fertile land from the local farmers They were forced into a collectivized state run agricultural system So these farmers had something that the Soviet Union considered to be too much and oftentimes this was something like they had a cow or a little bit of land It didn't mean that they were rich John shutter is a fulbright scholar He's been in Ukraine studying this period for his doctorate in history at Michigan state They are working in the fields and they are producing everything for the state and the state is giving them really nothing to eat The result one of the worst famines of the 20th century Between three and 5 million people died Survivors protested in rebelled for the next 20 years They were crushed but those events still resonate with Ukrainians when they talk about today's crisis And Ukrainians and especially the ones I talked to it comes up often It's a point of reference Well look what happened to my grandmother in 1932 33 or look what happened to my family I reached John shutter as he was reluctantly packing to leave Ukraine for neighboring Poland due to the threat of a Russian invasion The U.S. State Department told him to leave he's unsure when he might return When the Soviet Union was falling apart back in 1991 Ukraine held a referendum on independence A whopping 92% voted in favor Accelerating the collapse of the Soviet Union Professor Sergey plucky heads the Ukrainian research institute at Harvard He said some were surprised by that lopsided vote he wasn't That was the 5th attempt in Ukraine to declare and maintain independence in the 20th century Just last month Ukraine marked 30 years of independence but ploy says The sad irony of the situation is that we see Ukraine under attack Ukraine's independence has been rocky plagued by weak governments rampant corruption and a feeble economy Putin has made it even harder by repeatedly meddling in Ukrainian politics seeking to keep pro Russian leaders in power In 2004 Ukrainians pushed back with massive protests The so called orange revolution In a decade later in 2014 another round of demonstrations sent the country's president fleeing to Russia Putin has been a serial bungler when it comes to Ukraine Andrew Weiss is with the Carnegie endowment for international peace He says Putin's moves in Ukraine have often produced the opposite of what he wanted He's reanimated the NATO alliance He's given Ukraine more national cohesion and a stronger national identity And frame that identity on an anti Russian trajectory When Putin lost out politically in Ukraine in 2014 he sent the Russian military to seize Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula Today he's massed more than a 100,000 troops near Ukraine's borders He claims he's not planning to invade but also says he doesn't consider Ukraine a real country Scholar sir he plucky says Putin should ask Ukrainians how they feel The answer of the Ukrainian people will be are Ukrainians We want to live in Ukraine And we want this nightmare to end For now they're waiting for Putin's next move.

Ukraine John shutter Dave de canto Soviet Union Leila Back Putin Greg myrie Nantucket Vladimir Putin U.S. State Department Joseph Stalin Sergey plucky Ukrainian research institute Pierre Michigan Andrew Weiss Poland Harvard
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Little more realistic about what that means of Andrew couple mechanical questions for let you go here because obviously, whenever we do polling people say, Well, I don't trust polling or nobody called me or how can 400 people basically determine what 900,000 people think of walking through the science of what you guys did or how you did it? Yeah. So, uh, what? I don't want to get too technical because that would just bore people to death. But essentially, you know, from a statistical standpoint, what you're allowed to do is take a representative sample of a larger audience. And then from there, you're able to make inferences about that larger population. And the key is that it's a random sample. And so you're right. We didn't contact everybody. Um, Frankly, that would be sort of, uh, on, you know, first of all, from A cost standpoint, it would be expensive, but from a practical standpoint, obviously not everyone's going to answer their telephone. Not everyone is going to, uh, you know, answer a survey whether it's delivered in this instance from online or text message surveys, which is how we perform this one. And so again, we're able to get a representative sample. And so what we looked at was the overall registered voter population in Marion County. And we said Okay, for example, you know, we need to make sure that our Gen Er is about right. And so it needs to look like the overall population and so registered voters in Marion County. It's about 53% female about 47% male, and so we look to balance that out and ensure that our sample again this random sample is representative of that we need to ensure we have enough young voters enough older voters enough white enough black voters and then also from sort of a geographic area as well. And so when you look at that Statistically speaking, This is a sound practice and, um, measure of what the larger population looks like. But you know, there is a margin of error. And so that's where that 4.9% margin of error comes into play. Because statistics while great isn't perfect, But it is from a mathematical scientific perspective. Very sound waves measuring overall opinion. Something else you folks did, too. Which I thought was interesting was he did, uh The old posters where you Go pick up the phone and call call random folks are based on voter to voter data list. He did online and also text messaging. Uh, white Online. Why tax and why not just No go to go to the old random. You grab an old phone book. Remember, the phone book is and just start calling people. Yeah, well, so you know, one of the easiest ways to explain. That is cost. So, um Phone that you know, to get a live agent in Indiana. Or you do need a live operator to conduct a survey. You know, in order to make, uh you know, uh, yes. 400 Sample survey, you know, say 60,000 phone calls. Obviously, you know, you gotta pay the live operator agents to make 60,000 calls And so those costs add up, and, uh, That doesn't necessarily though, mean that it is a better product from a cheaper option, which again is serving text messages as well as online surveys. And so the reason we chose this was from a practical standpoint, it's just more cost efficient. And if you think about younger voters, actually minority voters, they actually they're easier to reach now online and via text messages anyways, you know, in 19 year old Kid probably doesn't have a landline phone. First of all, or pick up a phone call from some random number, but you know, they're sitting on a train there, sitting waiting at a friend's house who knows doing whatever they see a text message come in. They're very inclined to sit there and actually answer a survey. And so we find that the quality remains the same. But we're able to keep costs a little more efficient and Thought that pink. Um uh, recommendations coming out of sort of 2020 and pulling postmortems was a diversification of methods in how you conduct polling and the old gold standard of the live operator survey being conducted over the telephone still has its purposes. But again, it's a little more expensive. But you also you miss out on some of these voters who again don't have landlines or don't pick up their cell phones. Um you know young kids nowadays like Don't Even talk on the phone. It's all text message. It's all email that sort of thing. And so, um In order to ensure that random sample we look at various ways that we can reach out to people that are sort of outside the box and text message. Online. Surveys have been around for a couple election cycles now, but they are extremely accurate and viable way to conduct surveys that sort of reflect the changing times and societies practices and that's how it's going to ask you about the 2020 next 2016 elections as well. Because the polls are sort of kind of wrong and all over the place. How did you folks compensate for all the things we learned in the past couple election cycles? Well, so the good news is, you know, in an off year, you know people are left are more likely to answer a survey. It's really it's when you come down to the last two months. And, you know, people have had 15 surveys come through whether they're less likely to answer a survey. But, um, you know, I think what I saw in 2016 and 2020 is that Public polling and I'll talk about it in terms of public private, but the public polling that is the stuff that you saw largely, um, you know from Gallup, or, uh, you know, some of the universities are like, you know, NBC or whatever doing these national polls. You know, The problem with those national polls is that there's a lot of what I'll call sort of armchair polling critics and so they look at the methodologies and they'll go well. This is wrong, and so people are left. Apt to change and adjust based on what sort of the data is telling them and in 2016 1 of the takeaways was that You know, uneducated or I should say, uneducated, non college educated Excuse me, white voters and sort of rural areas where being up under represented, and so people wanted to see the education breaks and started to think. Well, it needs to be sort of X percentage of college educated voters. X number of non college educated voters. And people weren't able to deviate from those because these sort of pulling critics without well, that's that's not. That's not what it's going to be. That's wrong. And so people aren't able to change. I think as well as sort of the private pollsters, which look at the gate and what the data is telling them and say, Oh, well, actually, we see You know this trend happening or that trend happening? And so I think a lot of the private polling was actually pretty spot on. Um, it was more so some of the public polling where he saw some of the issues, but, um, you know, we we saw plenty of other colleagues pulling my own polling where we saw some of the data coming back. And you see things like, Oh, you know, A lot of these voters who we would never have expected as a quote unquote likely voter. Maybe they hadn't voted in the last four or five elections, all of a sudden expressing a strong interest in this election. It's Oh, well, Maybe we're going to see an increase in turnout. And so we're able to make some of those adjustments. Um, that may be a public facing, you know, sort of publicly scrutinized pole aren't necessarily able to make All right, Well, we covered a lot of ground today. Our guests the program's been Andrew Weiss, Sir Andrew is the principle of a RW strategy supporting from that We hired any politics to talk about the city of Indianapolis and to some of the big issues going in there..

Andrew Weiss Indiana 60,000 calls Indianapolis NBC Andrew Marion County 400 people 15 surveys 60,000 phone calls 2020 900,000 people today 400 Sample about 47% 19 year old five elections 1 Gallup First
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I find it hard to believe that a lot of these voters are just going to say, you know, he's doing a great job. But it's time for somebody else. You'll see that in the dissatisfaction with the job approval and his overall image if those voters ultimately are going to move away from the mayor, our guests on the program today is our good friend Andrew Weissert. Andrew is the principle of a RW strategy supposed to that we hired it into politics. To take a look at the city. Indianapolis is some of the big issues that are out there in about Andrew. One of the things that we did that we looked at registered voters versus likely voters. How does that change their response? Well so and with registered voters. Obviously, this is everybody who is a registered voter in Marion County. Um, where you get into likely voters? Obviously, you need to start looking at well. What is what are the what are they likely voter of? And so is that a likely voter of a presidential election? Is that a likely voter of an off year presidential election? Or that a municipal election and the demographics of each of those elections are going to look very different from each other and very different from the registered voters overall, Um, broadly speaking, um, registered voters typically are going to skew more Democrat and you're going to have a larger diversification. The younger, middle aged older voters, um And it will look a little more like a presidential year election when you get and I don't know the actual turnout numbers, So forgive me for marrying county in an off year presidential etcetera, But, you know, typically, you're going to get something like 70 to 80% of registered voters show up to vote in a presidential year election and so it'll look a little more like registered voters. But then you get into an off year election or even a municipal election and there's some municipal elections. I have where you know 20 to 30% of Registered voters show up to vote and it's predominantly Republicans. Republicans show up a lot more in off year elections than Democrats and older people show up to vote a lot more in like municipal elections in off year elections. And so you see less younger voters. You also a lot of times you're going to see less minority voters. You'll see less Democrat voters. And so if you start getting into a likely verse registered voters, it's really it depends on the election and in this instance why we chose registered voters because we're talking about Total variety of issues. Um, you know, state issues, local issues. Um sort of regional issues, and so registered voters at this point is the best way to encompass what is well, you know what is the larger population as a whole? Think about what's going on. That's not to say in the next municipal elections, 70% of people could turn out to vote. But at this point we don't know who is going to turn out to vote. And so Registered voters is the best way to capture what is sort of the overall city and county field for important issues and their elected officials. Our guest today is Andrew Weiss, Sir Andrew is the president. Principle of a RW strategy is supposed to be hired at any politics to take a look at some of the big issues in and around the city of Indianapolis up and go in a circle back to the crime issue. And I thought it was interesting because we also asked. In addition to, you know, crime being the most important issue. We have some sort of perfunctory ancillary questions as well. Is the city you know more or less safe? Do you support increased funding for mental health? Do you support defended police walking through some of those responses if you could? Yeah, Absolutely. So, uh, just sort of going question by question. So one of the things we did ask, um And I guess I would say to what you know to process it. We didn't Asked, you know, Would you say that the city of Indianapolis is headed in the right direction, or is it gotten off on the wrong track, and that was an even split, 40% said. Right direction, 40% said. Wrong track so clearly, you know, there's a little bit of dissatisfactions and hesitancy about where the city of Indianapolis is heading. Um, although you do again see that the mayor is generally speaking like, um, but then later on, what we did ask is, you know, how do you feel about Indianapolis and Marion County? Being more or less safe than it was a year ago, And frankly, I was a little shocked with the numbers, although Again as we talked about with sort of a rise in crime. I guess it doesn't surprise me. But just 21% said that they feel more safe and almost two thirds of voters say they feel less safe. 63% said that they feel less safe, so obviously you see, there's something going on again. That's reflected in what's the most important issue, 43% said. Combating crime, Um And as far as people's approve or disapproving of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's handling of the rising crime you actually saw plurality disapproved. So just 33% approved 37% disapprove. And I think you know, voters don't have all the answers that they have some general ideas about things that I think they would like to see a number one. Uh, it looks like they like to see a greater civilian participation. In an oversight in the local police policies. 62% of voters support that greater oversight. In addition, 79% support increased funding for providing mental health and other social services just 8% opposed. So I say, that's a pretty no brainer issue. Um, but then you know, one of the want to be immediate reactions. I think you might get from people is Oh, well, you know, the police are totally at fault. Well, not totally. I think again. It's more sort of some reforms. Some oversight to help them. They do. They are dissatisfied with it. But when you talk about the defund the police movement Um 50 we did afternoon. Do you support or oppose efforts to defund the police 50% oppose and just 32% support So clearly, it isn't a case of Let's tear down the police force. It's not one of those. I think it's clearly something is going on in the city. There's an issue of crime. You know, in our who bears the most responsibility 31% society as a whole, 23% said, criminals themselves So you know, we need to find some creative solutions. Maybe it's increased mental health funding. Obviously. People support that. Maybe it's greater civilian oversight into some police policies. It's at But the funding the police that you know that isn't necessarily the answer there. Andrew Weissmann with us on the program for a few more minutes. He is the principal pollster at a RW strategies opposed reform that we hired at any politics. It took some of the issues. Going on the city and want to change gears have been talking about schools, choice and charter schools and vouchers in particular, and I thought it was interesting because while the public was for the most part, uh, you could say, I think the schools are on the wrong track. They did support the voucher program, which is interesting. You know, Indianapolis's of sort of a very herbal, very heavy urban Sort of democratic area and don't necessarily put Democrats in vouchers in the same group. No, that's totally right..

Andrew Weissert Andrew Weissmann Andrew Weiss Marion County 33% 70 37% 20 50% Andrew 62% 70% 79% 40% 63% 43% 21% 31% 8% Indianapolis Metropolitan Poli
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"When I started I V Tech. I lacked the confidence to do what I do now. They gave me confidence and they helped me know that I could do anything. It actually puts you out there with the people that you're going to be working for. When we hire a graduate from Ivy Tech. We know that that individual is going to come to us. Very knowledgeable student can two years he had a degree that prepares him for job. It's a partnership and It's been great for us and great for them. I'm doing things now. I never dreamed I'd be doing years ago. Welcome back to any issues. I'm your host up to Kim Shahbazi, editor and publisher of any politics that or we'll recently we did some polling about what residents think in Marin County about different types of issues. The mayor, County prosecutor crime Covid, 19, school choice and, of course, marijuana legislation. And so our conversation is with Andrew Weiss. Sort of a RW strategies was our poster. We also discussed methodology. And while we use registered voters as opposed to likely voters, so, Andrew, thank you for being with us. Pleasure to join you. All right, So let's go ahead and get started here. What did you find specifically about our poll when it came to crime, the mayor of the prosecutor? Yeah, Absolutely. So I think one of the first things that start with is you know, we asked and overarching question about what's the most important issue for the City County Council to focus on and one of the things that stood out right off the bat was crime and public safety. That's the top of voters. Mind. 43% of voters chose combating crime, and that was a plurality by A pretty large margin of what voters sort of top of mind. Um, second was fighting covid 19 in the pandemic, but that was only 17%. So when you see kind of a disparity in those numbers, obviously there's something going on. Um and obviously in our discussions talking about you know what's been going on locally and in the area, there has been a rising in some crime and violent incidents. And so it doesn't surprise me that that That that popped a little bit. Um, as it relates to Ryan nears, you know, obviously he's new on the job, and I think we discussed that and pointed that out and sew his name. Identification had sort of a modest number two it 35% of voters approved of the job is done. Um, but you also had 45%. So almost a majority. We don't have any opinion of them. Um, And so he's got a lot of work to do. I think, um, and going into an election next year. Um, you know you want that name might need to be higher, obviously, on a positive side of things, but what I think is you're going to see the voters look to spine somebody as sort of a scapegoat for well, why is crime The way it is. And while we did ask, um you know, what do you think, is the main reason or who bears the most responsibility for despite in crime in Indianapolis and Marion County, and and while prosecutor mirrors was only 4%, I think you can see him become a scapegoat if you know, viable opponent comes about and leverages that dissatisfaction with crime and sort of voter on. He's about At the direction of the city, feeling less safe. And so I think he was just he needs to work on making sure that he doesn't end up being the one that voters blame. Um as far as the mayor's goes, you know, he he's pretty likeable actually, from voters in the region and still a majority of voters, 55% and a favorable opinion of them. Just 29% had an unfavorable one eye and of his job approval. Um even more so 57% approved of the job he's doing just 32% disapproved. Obviously, Democratic base is really drive. In force behind those numbers. Um And when we did ask, though, about would you vote for his reelection? Voters haven't completely consolidated around dogs it just yet if he does run for reelection, and that's something, my friend I thought was interesting. The fact that the mayor's job approval ratings were in the mid fifties. But it's only his reelect at least right now amongst registered voters, and we'll talk a little bit about everything. Registered voters versus likelihood is because there's a little bit of a difference between the two and the response of the gap. The mayor's reelect was only 37%. So my question is Uh, what is it? I know you and I kind of talked about this. I think it be interested share with the audience. Does that mean that voters just you know, like the man, but they think they're they're just done with him right now, or the fact that he's running against an empty chair. If he decides to run for a third term. Yeah, I think right now look, he No, we're a little ways away from the election or a potential reelection. And so I think at this point voters, uh, sort of they think about what is the possible and so you have the mayor and one side And then as you said, an empty chair and in that empty chair a lot of times, and we see this phenomenon all over the place when you don't have an actual candidate Voters start creating in their minds. This perfect candidate and you know, whatever. The five Or six most important issues that Uh, they you know, are going to think about when they evaluate who they vote for. Mayor, they go. Well, this person is going to check this box. They'll check that box will check that box. So in that instance Yeah, I'm going to vote for this person. Even though I kind of like the mayor. Well, as you and I both know And obviously I think a lot of your listeners know, uh, that's not always the case. And when you do get a defined opponent, all of a sudden they come with You know some baggage or some policy differences from what you the voter think, and they have some works on them. And so ultimately the voters go. Oh, yeah. You know what That person wasn't exactly what I was thinking. And so I think When we look at these numbers, look at it with a little bit of caution and just take it with a grain of salt and I do point out there's a couple things just sort of drive home that point among Democrats, 52% said they'd vote for haunt set but 31% are under Sided. I don't think 31% of Democrats. You're just going to abandon the back. I mean, I think, um, at some point, you know those voters would come home, but right now Um, It's not that they're you know, seeking somebody different? They just They haven't totally committed to it because again, they see an empty chair and they put you know the perfect candidate up on a pedestal there. Um, And so second, you know the thing I'd point is that a large portion of voters who approve of the job he's doing, um, probably going to side with the mayor. Ultimately. Now I know when you have a large number of undecided voters And I've heard you make this point. And it is true. So I'll just reiterate it. You listeners if you have, you know, undecided voters, they do sort of break about 2 to 1 Do a challenger but again at this point, we don't have a challenger. And so I think these voters it isn't fair to say Oh, well, these are going to break 2 to 1 against the mayor. I think it's more just a case again of that. This is an empty chair that voters are painting the perfect picture of an opponent for and are saying, Well, yes, that's the case. I might vote for him. But again, I think Democrats So come home. And I think you know 57% approve of the job he's doing. I find it hard to believe that a lot of these voters are just going to say, you know, he's doing a great job. But it's time for somebody else. You'll see that in the dissatisfaction with the job approval and his overall image.

Andrew Weiss Kim Shahbazi Andrew Ivy Tech Indianapolis 55% 35% Marin County 45% five Ryan 52% 43% Marion County six 31% I V Tech 29% Democrats two years
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In for Tony Katz in for Tony today and tomorrow. Here at 93. W I. B. C Our guest today is Andrew Weiss, Sir Andrew as the president principle of a RW strategy supposed that we hired in any politics to take a look at some of the big issues in and around the city of Indianapolis, Indiana Circle back to the crime issue. And I thought it was interesting because we also asked. In addition to, you know, crime being the most important issue. We have some sort of perfunctory answered any questions as well. Now is the city more or less safe. You support increased 20 for mental health. Do you support defunding police walking through some of those responses if you could. Yeah, Absolutely. So, uh, just sort of going question by question. So one of the things we did ask, um And I guess I'll say to what you know to profits it we did. Ask you Would you say that the city of Indianapolis is headed in the right direction, or is it gotten up on the wrong track, and that wasn't even split, 40% said. Right direction, 40% said. Wrong track so clearly, you know, there's a little bit of dissatisfactions and hesitancy about where the city of Indianapolis is heading. Um, although you do again see that the mayor is generally speaking like, but then later on, what we did ask is, you know how do you feel about Indianapolis and Marion County B. More or less safe than it was a year ago. And frankly, I was a little shocked with the numbers, although again as we talked about with sort of a rise in crime, I guess it doesn't surprise me. But just 21% said that they feel more safe and almost two thirds of voters say they feel less safe. 63% said that they feel less safe, so obviously you see, there's something going on again. That's reflected in what's the most important issue, 43% said. Combating crime, Um And as far as people's approve or disapproving of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's handling of the rising crime you actually saw plurality disapproves. So just 33% approved 37% disapprove. Um, and I think you know voters don't have all the answers, but they have some general ideas about things that I think they would like to see a number one. It looks like they like to see a greater civilian participation in Oversight into local police policies. 62% of voters support that greater oversight. In addition, 79% support increased funding for providing mental health and other social services just 8% opposed. So I say, that's a pretty no brainer issue. Um, but then you know, one of the want to be immediate reactions. I think you might get from people is Oh, well, You know, the police are totally at fault. Well, not totally. I think again. It's more sort of some reforms. Some oversight. To help them. They do. They are dissatisfied with it. But when you talk about the beef on the police movement, um 50, But we did after the support or oppose efforts to defund the police 50% opposed in just 32% support, So clearly, it isn't a case of Let's tear down the police force. It's not one of those. I think it's clearly something is going on in the city. There's an issue with crime, you know, in our who bears the most responsibility 31% that society as a whole, 23% said. Criminals themselves. So, uh, you know, we need to find some creative solutions. Maybe it's increased mental health funding. Obviously, people Support that Maybe it's greater civilian oversight into some police policies. It's that, but defunding the police that you know that isn't necessarily the answer there. Andrew Weissmann with us on the program for a few more minutes. He is the principal pollster. At a RW strategies opposing form that we hired at any politics and took on some of the issues are going on the city and want to change gears have been talking about, uh, schools, choice and charter schools and vouchers in particular, and I thought it was interesting because while the public was for the most part, uh, you could say, I think the schools are on the wrong track. They did support the voucher program. Which is interesting, You know Indianapolis's of sort of a very her but very heavy urban, uh, sort of democratic area and don't necessarily put Democrats and vouchers in the same group. No, that's totally right. Although I think you you know you look at some of the city is not just an Indianapolis but some other cities around the country that has sort of urban populations. And I think, um, you know, you see a recognition that Wow, the school system isn't really working. So what's the what's the alternative or what's the solution? And rather than a A complete overhaul The school system people sort of support the idea that like, Well, you know, instead of over a complete overhaul, I could instead get a voucher and send my child to a better school that suits my needs. Yeah, I'd be in favor of that. And as we said, you know, a clear majority 59% do support school choice. Overall, um Opposition to school choice is most pronounced among self identifying Democrats with 31% opposing, but it's just 31%. A majority still support school choice and and so I think it's not an abandonment of the public school system as a whole again. It's well, there's easier solutions because I think people recognize overhauling school systems and changing schools. The public schools in general is not exactly an easy task. Um But you're right. Just 27% of registered voters believe the public schools in Marion County are going in the right direction. And 38% say they've gotten off on the wrong track. Um, obviously, um, you know, I think it's no surprise. You see a more optimistic view. Charter schools were 34% believed they're headed in the right direction. But 22 23% excuse me say they've gotten off on the wrong track, So I do think it's sort of interesting that Um, you know, almost 60% support school choice. But the way that charter schools reviewed in Marion County is an overwhelmingly supportive, it's generally positive. But it's not like 50% say, Oh, you know, we think they're going in the right direction. And that was our good friend Andrew. Why should he is a poster for a RW strategies. He pulled for me over at Indy politics dot org and, by the way you can actually head over the website actually see those poll results? Actually there at wnbc dot com as well, something else I thought was really interesting folks in that poll that we did Was we asked about marijuana Legalization is, you know that's a big deal in the country these days, and a total of 85% supported some form of legalization. Whether it was legalization for medicinal and recreation, which is like 65% or 20% that supported medicinal. Only only 10% of the population actually oppose legalizing marijuana, which I thought was like, Wow. Okay, that I'm gonna do it for a little bit of a loop there, But you can see all those results over at any politics at all. It is 6 41 here at 93. W I, B. C mark and rock.

Andrew Weiss Andrew Weissmann Tony Katz 65% Indianapolis Tony 40% tomorrow 43% 27% 85% 59% Marion County Andrew 20% 31% 62% 34% 79% 21%
"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"From this weekend. We'll be talking in the seven o'clock our to our good friend Kevin Brown. Of the State Chamber of Commerce on the state of Labor here in Indiana. Covid 19 is sort of Hit everything. And the fact that unemployment runs out for a lot of people today if my memory serves me correctly. So that would be like what seven million people off unemployment. But at the same time I mean, how many signs you see people help wanted help want it? $15 an hour signing bonuses. Seems to me that the free market ladies and gentlemen has taken care of, um Those quote a living wage concerns. We'll talk about that this morning with our good friend Kevin Brand eager and in the eight o'clock our September is national drug recovery Month, and so we'll speak with Stephanie Anderson. Recovery America in Indianapolis. About recovery and addiction. Because once again in the world of Covid 19. Addictions are still out there, Whether it's fitting all whether it's Oxy cotton, it's still it's still a big problem. Out there and actually would be kind of exacerbated to a certain degree by Covid 19. These folks can necessarily meet face to face with their addiction treatment addiction counselors. So we'll talk to Stephanie about that in the eight o'clock hour. Then the six o'clock hour. Um, but some of the folks may be aware of we did a poll over my website and the politics about sin of Indianapolis. About the mayor. We talked about crime. Covid schools. Marijuana legalization all that And so we're going to talk this morning, uh, to my poster jump by the name of Andrew Weiss sort of aid RW strategies. About our polling results, which, by the way you can find actually over at any politics dot org It'll be interesting. It's interesting. The results we got Particularly that's the Mayor was likable. But politically speaking, his future is kind of questionable here in Sitiveni Annapolis. Let's talk about the prosecutors race. Which is also wide open. We also chatted about crime. You got 63% of you, Uh Mayor Kenney residents don't think the cities as safe as it was last year, this time. And who gets the blame? I also thought was interesting, too. There's lots of stuff out to get to today. Lots of stuff to talk about. Course we'll have our Weather in our sports no traffic today because once again it's labor Day, so Hey, Matthew Bear the day off, too, but that will be back tomorrow. We should give him a hard time then. So, like I said, a lot of stuff to get to folks this morning. All we need is a shoe just.

Stephanie Anderson Kevin Brown Kevin Brand Stephanie 63% Indiana tomorrow seven o'clock Andrew Weiss last year Sitiveni Annapolis eight o'clock Indianapolis eight o'clock hour six o'clock hour Matthew Bear today September Covid 19 Mayor
"andrew weiss" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

11:01 min | 1 year ago

"andrew weiss" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Go to grow dot google slash certificates this point meghna chakrabarti and today we are talking about what might be in. Russian president vladimir. Putin's playbook ahead of the meeting between putin and us president. Joe biden later this week. Now let's listen back to some of the back and forth between the two leaders earlier this year in march president biden was interviewed by abc news and his words created a backlash from the russian government and including from vladimir putin himself. Here's what president biden said. Look most important thing dealing with foreign leaders. In my experience. I dealt with an awful lot of more. My career is just no the other guy. So you know vladimir putin you think he's a killer Do so what price must he pay. Price is going to pay. We'll you'll see shortly. Putin responded on russian television he said every nation has its own quote bloody events and then he taunted biden knighted. And you know. I remember in my childhood. When we argued in the courtyard we used to say it takes one to know one. And that's not a coincidence. Not just children saying or joke. It has deep psychological meaning. We always see our own traits and other people and think they are like how we really are and vladimir putin also had this response after biden mentioned. Putin's interference in the twenty twenty. Us elections putin asked what he would say to the american president in response. And here's how he answered. We couldn't course as he said we know each other. Personally what would i replied to him. I would say. I wish you health. I wish you health. I say that without any irony or joke joining us now is nina khruschev professor of international affairs at the new school in new york senior fellow at the world policy institute. She also the great granddaughter of former soviet premier nikita khruschev and author of putin's footsteps searching for the soul of an empire across russia's eleven timezones professor khruschev. Oh welcome to on point incubator. Rewriting me also with us. Today is andrew weiss. He's a russia expert with the carnegie endowment for international peace worked on the national security council and state department and pentagon in the administration of george h w bush and bill clinton andrew weiss. Welcome to you grew to be here so first of all professor khruschev. Let me start with you. What do you read in the back and forth interviews and media between putin and biden over the past several months. How would you judge its significance. Well it is significant because russia has been the american mind for a long long time. Russia is the premier enemy. Even if it's not probably its capacity certainly in its imagination so It has been you know if there is a story about russia every newscast and with putin everybody's eager to interview him and catch his beings of this and that so that really deficit prize here. It's pretty much. The same thing is that you know. America sees us as an enemies. So we are seeing america's anatomy to and therefore we're going to catch little details of how joe biden walk so how donald trump speaks or how barack obama respond so bid. Really doesn't surprise me what i find interesting and i wish for america american leader stop insulting putin personally because i actually think that that damages any possibility of better relationship because if you see when putin response he very rarely talks about personalities. He talks more unless he's asked particularly. He talks. More about america's a country about american russian relations in some such So when american leaders concentrate so much and putin that's why actually wrote my book about eleven time zones because russia's bigger than putin and more interesting in fact than putin that he also by Having so much concentration on his personality he loves that He's an exhibition as he has shown that even in body language in showing Seen it the years. And so. I think that is absolutely Absolutely a kind of logical from ovid of all their attention that both countries get inside the country but also with each other against other. also andrew weiss. Let me turn to you on this. Because i it's fascinating to hear a professor khruschev talk about a her advice for the united states to tone down. Its personal focus on On putin the man himself. However i mean we just came through four years of the trump administration where former president trump was giving attention to vladimir putin but it was almost universally positive and flattering. And it doesn't seem to me that that approach reduced russia's aggressive stance in places like ukraine or these of in albany etc. So does it really matter at all. Sort of how. The united states how the. The president talks about putin himself. It's i think it's doesn't serve anybody to get hung up on personalities. The united states and russia have very problematic relationship and the grievances on both sides have been piling up for a very long time. So if you go back even to the very first meeting that president obama had with putin in two thousand nine. He asked putin a very simple question. Tell me some things about what's gone right and us. Russia relations and putin literally just launched into this diatribe that lasted more than sixty minutes with all of his pent up frustrations grievances and chips on shoulder about the united states. So for the united states to get hung up on putin is and what makes them tick. Those are largely unknowable. Fangs what we do know. Is that the relationship between two countries is important. It's been horribly Difficult for the last seven plus years. The united states has largely been in a reactive posture dealing with all the problems. That ambassador mcfaul was just talking about a few moments ago and the question is what do the russian what sort of changes their calculus. What would force them to behave differently. I think that's the real big question that's facing president biden. This week is can he say anything in geneva that makes putin think twice about some of these conduct conduct that have been caused the united states so much trouble so so professor khruschev. Return back to you on that because as you heard in my conversation with ambassador mcfaul earlier i pointed out that in twenty fourteen then vice president biden wanted president obama to adopt a much more aggressive stance towards russia following the ukraine invasion But will a more aggressive stance weather in this meeting or policy wise or through a more american muscular american diplomacy reach vladimir putin in any way will it cause him to change his behavior or decision making as the russian president. I don't believe so. I think it's pretty much case of wishful thinking because one of the things that Certainly the russians and gotten used to and putin enjoys that even because he plays with it quite well. Is that you know. When america gets the muscular approach the russians are saying well look those cowboys they just think the charge in and Give everybody a gun. It's going to solve everything or if you don't beat. Unlike behavior is going to be sanctions and whatnot. So i don't think it's I don't think it's going to do anything in fact And i think ambassador mcfaul was correct. In saying that putin's favorite game is what about is my bet certainly going to happen there. Because for example joe biden wada position. He uses putin of instability in the world and putin himself has a very long laundry list of american instabilities. The war in iraq It's stain ability to deal with arab spring in the outcomes of et invested a mcfaul mentioned libya. And how you can help partial to that decision president then president bettega was but then you know they'd kill kovno qaddafi so that will russians know that you never can trust trust those democratic movements on the part of the united states so i think andrew would know better because he worked for the government I think it's very little given take that is going to happen. I think that one of the important questions will be about twenty twenty twenty two because the midterm elections coming and although i'm not of the school of thought that russians change with their disinformation campaigns change any outcomes of any american Elections still would be better not to have those kind of trump and we see trump was going to charge on with his new information about his winning elections in two thousand twelve twenty two. So how would russia respond. That could be conversation. And i think in this sort of tough price to pay would be an important thing because we don't know exactly what kind of wealth of riches put himself has and wear his people. I mean they've been sanctioned but really not much information is available about you know. Say some Bank accounts in switzerland or in london aware so embarrass them kind of that. The red line. I guess they can look into chatter. What kind of the outcome of that cyber Cyber crimes that are going to face each other's Each other's counterparts. But i really think that the The respectful conversation nor the you are the killer but not respectful but at least you know anglo-saxon slight disdain but credible politeness would really serve. Joe biden well. Okay andrew. what do you think about that. I think that it's really important for joe biden to come into this meeting as he is with a sense of confidence that your the united states is going to come out of this pandemic..

Joe biden nina khruschev andrew weiss switzerland donald trump Putin london meghna chakrabarti khruschev albany putin vladimir putin new york joe biden two countries bill clinton joe biden wada four years march trump
At least 8 killed in shootings at 3 Atlanta-area spas, suspect in custody

WBZ Morning News

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

At least 8 killed in shootings at 3 Atlanta-area spas, suspect in custody

"At Asian spas and Atlanta, Georgia, leaving eight people dead. Police are saying the potential of a hate crime investigation is real, the latest this morning in a special report from ABC News Asians apparently targeted in a serious of shootings at a massage parlor and two spas in the Atlanta area. That left eight people dead. Six of them Asian women supervisors to get with the beat officers there. Any agent Spaz? I think we have a couple of Northside Drive. We need to get out of second quickly. Atlanta police Communications captured my broadcast. If I Andrew Weiss lives near one of the murder scenes, someone out of their mind and Obviously not in a right state of mind and definitely no heart. I mean, I don't know how you got in there. What kind of motive would drive you to do? Such a thing? Three hours away in southern Georgia's crisp county 21 year old Robert Aaron Long was taken into custody. The nation has

Atlanta Abc News Andrew Weiss Georgia Crisp County Robert Aaron Long
Did Paintings Portray Food More Realistically Than Instagram?

BrainStuff

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Did Paintings Portray Food More Realistically Than Instagram?

"The first ever see X. Thirty go to Mazda USA dot com slash Iheart, and don't forget to explore their strongest options. Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Vauban here. With through your instagram feed and what do you find and juicy burgers who's in with cheese massive steak slathered with Butter Deep Fried Candy Bars Atop Mountains of ice cream and is that gold leaf powering bloody Marys crown with Bacon and corn dogs and pizza and enough already who actually eats all this even during a global pandemic, these posts haven't gone away. They've just been supplemented with. Banana bread. Is Our obsession with hashtag crave worthy hashtag food porn Hashtag moms ever going to end. Well if history's any guide and it is not anytime soon. A study out of the Cornell Food and brand lab from two thousand sixteen found that at least since the sixteenth century. C, e Western painters have depicted food, love juries rare and indulgent than what people have the time actually from day to day. In a press release Co author Andrew Weiss Local said our love affair with visually appealing decadent or status foods is nothing new. It was already well established five hundred years ago. Narrowed down from an initial group of seven hundred and fifty paintings. The researchers focused on one hundred and forty western European and American paintings that depicted small family meals. The paintings span five hundred years and depicted a grand total of one hundred four different types of food. Focusing on a time of change in European and American cuisines allowed scientists to look at a context in which medieval dishes and cooking styles persisted but innovative techniques and newly traded ingredients from around the globe were becoming more well known as the drive for colonization introduced Europeans everything from cinnamon to tomatoes. To analyze the changes over the years, the researchers grouped paintings into three categories according to year of creation, the era of European exploration and colonization. That is fifteen hundred to sixteen, Fifty, the of enlightenment, sixteen, Fifty, one to eighteen fifty and the industrial slash post industrial era eighteen, fifty, one to two thousand. The researchers focused their examination because most paintings of feasts or banquets are perhaps obviously hard to square with what's historically known about how people really eight from day to day. Not, that wildly lavish banquets didn't happen by the fifteen hundreds decorating food with the aforementioned gold leaf was so passionate Italy the authorities in Padua suggested that in order to preserve the supply of cold, no more than two courses of any given feast should be gilded. But that wasn't a daily thing for most people. And just as nobody today is getting instagram famous with pictures of their microwave dinners or plates box pasta painters of your also avoided the humdrum of Hammer Porridge in fact, the most frequently eaten foods which included chicken eggs, cheese milk, and squash, or the most infrequently painted. And here are some other interesting takeaways from the study. Italian paintings depicted sausages at more than twice the rate of other countries. More than half of the paintings from the Netherlands contained lemons, which is a decidedly non-indigenous fruit imported from the tropics and shellfish were most commonly painted in countries with the smallest coastlines but its frequency of appearance dropped over time as shellfish became more prevalent in those

Lauren Vauban Cornell Food Mazda Andrew Weiss Bacon Padua Netherlands Italy