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"andrew tennant" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Bob Lee, who's taken a long vacation. He calls it a sabbatical. It's really vacation. He says he's coming back in April. I I'm not holding my breath. We welcome to the show. Now. It's always interesting when you get to interview your boss, the executive producer of e sixty a man who's won about forty seven national sports EMMY awards, but who's counting my good friend. Andrew Tennant, Andy. How are you L O? Jeremy I'm holding my breath speak into the microphone. Okay. I know. This is what you do. But why why don't we speak into the microphone this make this easy for the producers? Okay. I know you're a visual guy. It's a visual medium television, east sixties about production values, but this is audio e sixties back this past week in the season premiere the story about parkland about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland Florida, and it's football team trying to cope in the aftermath of the horrific school shooting that took place a year ago this week on February fourteenth two thousand eighteen that was a story that in many ways is emblematic of what sixty is done. Sure. It's a story that sports, but it's also not a story about sports. It's also story that required a full year's worth of reporting and producing for Martin quota bashing in particular, I was the reporter. But most of the work is as is. Usually the case you'd be the first to say that is done by the producer. Obviously there was an anniversary this week. But why did why did sixty choose to tell this story about parkland? I think for us. It's about yes. We work for a sports network. Yes. We're a sports show. But our responsibility is to go out there and find stories that are compelling and are just about life where there's a lesson to be learned where there's, you know, something that provides the next chapter to a story. You know, I think at a certain point the coverage of the parkland stoneman Douglas mass shooting ended, and so people moved on the cameras went away the store there were still coverage, obviously because many students have been have been politically active since then, but on the ground in parkland when the cameras go away a lot of coverage goes, yeah. And know, they weren't in the headlines anymore and know for us it was about telling the longer story. You know, what is the next chapter? And what was the sports angle for us? And here's a football coach, you know, who who gave his life, you know, to try and save children. Here's another football coach who on one day in an instant lost his assistant coach also his boss. The director who were both killed in the mass shooting. And you know, we wanted to know we wanted to sort of tell the story of of those relationships, but we also wanted to tell the story of of of strength, a story of courage story of how do you move on? You know, how do you take these kids and and push forward in the aftermath of something as horrific as that? We're speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer of e sixty which returned on Sunday to ESPN one at nine o'clock eastern time for its twelfth. Season. And as I said earlier, the show has evolved from twelve to fifteen shows year, you could find them in prime time. We never knew exactly when they were gonna be on when the season was gonna take place was it going to be during football season not during football season. Now, we have regular schedule as we have had for the last couple of years. We're on every Sunday morning on ESPN one. When football is not being played. And we're on ESPN two every Sunday morning when football is being played. So now, we're in the heart of it since the Super Bowl two weeks ago. How did the move from primetime to Sunday morning change the way you think about what the show should be? That's a great question. I mean, I think for us. It was really always about having a consistent time slot. You know, I think when we were in primetime and often following sportscenter. You know, we were we were leading shows with our our signature profiles of the biggest athletes in sports, you know, bringing our fans up close and personal to these big stars in a way that you know, they they weren't being brought by our traditional studio shows. So, and that's really how we differentiate ourselves from the rest of ESPN. And also, you know from most of the sports shows that are out there. When we moved to Sunday mornings. It was like we finally had the answer to the age old question for us is I love the show. I just have no idea when it's on. And so the fact that we're on in some capacity, whether it's ESPN one or ESPN two on a Sunday morning at nine o'clock. It's just for us. It's a great way for people to wake up and to be told a great story that's going to set the tone for the rest of their day or for the rest of their week. And I think we really wanted to focus on you know, who is the audience on a Sunday morning versus who's the audience and a prime time during the week. And you know, what are the metrics telling us what who are the demos out there? And I don't want to dive deep into that. It did it did force us to rethink the show a lot about what was going on. On sundays. What's going on that we can set the tone for the week? Also, you know, what just provides great content that complements sportscenter which is on both before us and after us in Sundays speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer v sixty and I say we go back a long way we worked on pieces as reporter and producer twenty years ago. And if you did I'm not going to get into any specifics that might be to you, and you made some bad decisions about how little camera time. You gave me some things never change. But. You know, we considered ourselves lucky back. Then if we got seven minutes for a piece that was long TV germs and somehow counter intuitively, the conventional wisdom being that the attention span of the audience gets smaller and smaller over time and digital distractions. You know of made it harder to keep people's attention. All that are are stories. Now, we twenty minutes stories all the time we do half hour shows on single topics all the time hours pretty frequently as well. There was a time. When people said that's too long for TV how did that philosophy evolve? Where there's almost no limit to the time allotted to a story. Listen, I I've said this before I think thirty for thirty was the game changer. In fact, you know, you asked how was the most significant change between prime time and Sunday morning and a lot of it is the length of the pieces. Know, we just we'd go more in depth. We dive deeper into these stories and into these characters we're on every week because we're on every week. But also, I think look when when the show was, you know, the idea for the show was originally being developed. You know, a lot of executives here were were saying, you know, more story shorter stories, you know, look it within that hour to get like six or seven stories at like six to eight minutes because of the attention span that you were speaking of and then thirty for thirty we figured out. It's really just the executives attention. Right. But then, you know, thirty for thirty came along, and they were telling stories longer than anybody else at ESPN and the response was overwhelming. And we started to look at ourselves as storytellers and say, you know, maybe we don't have this. Right. Maybe maybe shorter isn't better maybe longer is better. And so, you know, we really spent a lot of time rethinking things considering the the success that our colleagues there had, and you know, and I think it's really been a game changer. It's has such such a significant impact not only on how we tell stories, but on how you know, everyone tells stories across the board sports speaking with Andy executive producer of e sixty which is on of course, every Sunday morning at nine eastern time on ESPN. It's twelfth season. Just underway. There's a lack coming up this year. There's lot coming up this season. But but more important than just promoting the show, which is kind of the concede here. I wanna ask you. There's some talented people on the show. There's some great reporters. Great producers, who's the best reporter on the show a bubbly. Bob doesn't report. He had to take a sabbatical. He needed to reflect not he's not a professor he needed to take months hosts, he's a very capable did, very briefly. But it's I keep telling him, it's not a sabbatical. If you're not a professor, it's vacation, well, considering he's now giving the commencement speech. At Seton Hall in in may, I mean, I think there is an honorary degree that goes along with says, there is believe he's not shown up not giving him some kind of degree. We should have him on next week to talk about this. But that was very adeptly handled press. Andrew Shannon is the executive producer of e sixty back every Sunday morning on ESPN ESPN one at nine eastern time. Any thank you for keeping me on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you. Jeremy was was in any way, this better than a Harvard Cornell hockey game, I play obviously, I just watched those laws reaction Cornell beats Harvard on the ice don't say that we worked for some Harvard guys, don't we? Next.

ESPN executive producer Andy Tennant football producer reporter Jeremy Bob Lee Marjory stoneman Douglas high EMMY Andrew Tennant stoneman Douglas Harvard professor Martin director Seton Hall Florida
"andrew tennant" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Sporting life this past week east sixty kicked off its twelfth season on ESPN the show goes back to two thousand seven for most of its history. It was a monthly show. But for the last two years, it's been a weekly show on Sunday mornings, nine o'clock eastern time who stood by yours truly in that that guy. Bob Lee, who's taken a long vacation. He calls it a sabbatical. It's really vacation. He says he's coming back in April. I I'm not holding my breath. We welcome to the show. Now. It's always interesting when you get to interview your boss, the executive producer of e sixty a man who's won about forty seven national sports EMMY awards, but who's counting my good friend. Andrew Tennant, Andy. How are you? Hello. Jeremy I'm holding my breath speak into the microphone. Okay. I know. This is what you normally do. But why why are we speaking of the microphone? Let's make this easy for the producers. Okay. I know you're a visual guy. It's a visual medium television, east sixties about production values, but this is audio east sixties back this past week in the season premiere the story about parkland about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland Florida, and it's football team trying to cope in the aftermath of the horrific school shooting that took place a year ago this week on February fourteen twenty eighteen. That was a story that in many ways is emblematic of what e- sixty is done. Sure. It's a story about sports. But it's also not a story about sports. It's also story that required a full year's worth of reporting and producing from Martin Cody bashing in particular, I was the reporter. But most of the work is as is. Usually the case you'd be the first to say that is done by the producer. Obviously there was an anniversary this week. But why did why did you sixty choose to tell this story about parkland? I think for us. It's about yes. We work for a sports network. Yes. We're a sports show. But you know. Our responsibility is to go out there and find stories that are compelling and are just about life where there's a lesson to be learned where there's something that provides the next chapter to a story. You know, I think at a certain point the coverage of the parkland stoneman Douglas mass shooting ended, and so moved on the cameras went away the store there were still coverage, obviously because many students have been have been politically active since then, but on the ground in parkland when the cameras go away a lot of coverage goes the they weren't in the headlines anymore and for us. It was about, you know, telling the longer story, you know, what is the next chapter. And what was the sports angle for us? And here's a football coach, you know, who who gave his life to try and save children. Here's another football coach who on one day in an instant lost his assistant coach also lost his boss. The director. Who were both killed in the mass shooting? And you know, we wanted to know we wanted to sort of tell the story of of of those relationships, but we also wanted to tell the story of of of strength story of courage story of how do you move on? You know, how do you take these kids and and push forward in the aftermath of of something as horrific as that. We're speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer of east sixty which returned on Sunday to ESPN one at nine o'clock eastern time for its twelfth season. And as I said earlier, the show has evolved from twelve to fifteen shows year, you could find them in prime time. We never knew exactly when they were going to be on when the season was going to take place was it going to be during football season not during football season. Now, we have regular schedule as we have had for the last couple of years. We're on every Sunday morning on ESPN one. When football is not being played. And we're on ESPN two every Sunday. Morning when football is being played. So now, we're in the heart of it since the Super Bowl two weeks ago. How did the move from time to Sunday morning change the way, you think about what the show should be? That's a great question. I mean, I think for us. It was really all about having a consistent timeslot. You know? I think when we were in primetime and often following sportscenter. You know, we were we were leading shows with our our signature profiles of the biggest athletes in sports, you know, bringing our fans up close and personal to these big stars in a way that you know, they they weren't being brought by our traditional studio shows. So, and that's really how we differentiate ourselves from the recipe SPN, and also, you know, from most of the sports shows that are out there. When we moved to Sunday mornings. It was like we finally had the answer to the age old question for us is I love the show. I just have no idea when it's on. And so the fact that we're on in some capacity, whether it's ESPN one or ESPN two on a Sunday morning at nine o'clock. You know, it's just for us. It's a great way for people to wake up and to be told a great story that's going to set the tone for the rest of their day or for the rest of their week. And I think we really wanted to focus on you know, who is the audience on a Sunday morning versus who is the audience and the prime time during the week. And you know, what are the metrics telling us what who are the demos out there? And I don't want to dive too deep into that. It did it did force us to rethink the show a lot about you know, what was going on on Sundays. What's going on that we can set the tone for the week also provides great content that complements sportscenter which is on both before. And after us on Sundays speaking with Andy Tennant, executive producer v sixty and say, you know, we go back a long way we worked on pieces as reporter and producer twenty years ago. And if you did I'm not going to get into any specifics that might be embarrassing to you, and you made some bad decisions about how little camera time. You gave me some things never change. But we consider. It ourselves lucky back. Then if we got seven minutes for a piece that was long and TV germs and somehow counter intuitively, the conventional wisdom being that the attention span of the audience gets smaller and smaller over time and digital distractions. You know, have made it harder to keep people's attention. All that are are stories. Now, we do twenty minute stories all the time we do half hour shows on single topics all the time hours pretty frequently as well. There was a time. When people said that's too long for TV how did that philosophy evolve? Where there's almost no limit to the time allotted to a story. Listen, I I've said this before I think thirty for thirty was the game changer. In fact, you know, you asked how what was the most significant change between primetime Sunday morning and a lot of it is the length of the pieces. You know, we just we go more in depth. We dive deeper into these stories and into these characters because we're on every week because we're on every week. But also, I think look when when the show was, you know, the idea for the show was originally being developed, you know, a lot of executives here were we're saying, you know, more story shorter stories, you know, look within that hour to get like six or seven stories like six to eight minutes because of the attention span that you were speaking of and then thirty for thirty we figured out. It's really just the executives attention. That's right. But then, you know, thirty for thirty came along, and they were telling stories longer than anybody else at ESPN and the response was overwhelming. And we started to look at ourselves as storytellers and say, you know, maybe we don't have this. Right. Maybe maybe shorter isn't better maybe longer is better. And so we really spent a lot of time being rethinking things considering the the success that our colleagues there had. And and and I think it's really been a game jenner's has such such a significant impact not only on how we tell stories, but on how you know, everyone tells stories across the board sports speaking with Andy Tan, executive producer of e sixty which is on of course, every Sunday morning at nine eastern time on ESPN. It's twelfth season. Just underway. There's a lot coming up this year. There's lot coming up this season. But but more important than just promoting the show, which is kind of the conceit here. I want to ask you, there's some talented people in the show. There's some great reporters. Great producers, who's the best reporter on the show a bodily. Bob doesn't report. He had to take a sabbatical needed to reflect not is not a professor needed to take the host. He's a very capable did, very briefly. But it's I keep telling him, it's not a sabbatical. If you're not a professor, it's a vacation, well, considering he's now giving a commencement speech. At Seton Hall in in may, I mean, I think there is an honorary degree that goes along with says, there isn't he's not showing up at the not giving him some kind of degree. We should have him on next week to talk about this. But that was very adeptly handled press. Andrew Tennant is the executive producer of e sixty back every Sunday morning on ESPN ESPN one at nine eastern time. Any thank you for keeping me on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you. Jeremy was was in any way, this better than a Harvard Cornell hockey game, I play obviously, I just watched those games those laws reaction Cornell beats Harvard on the ice. So let's say that we work for some Harvard. Guys. Don't we?.

ESPN executive producer football producer reporter Andrew Tennant Andy Tennant Bob Lee Jeremy Marjory stoneman Douglas high EMMY Harvard stoneman Douglas professor Andy Martin Cody Seton Hall
"andrew tennant" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"O'clock eastern time hosted by yours truly in that that guy Bob Lee, who's taken a long vacation. He calls it a sabbatical. It's really vacation. He says he's coming back in April. I I'm not holding my breath. We welcome to the show. Now. It's always interesting when you get to interview your boss, the executive producer of e sixty a man who's won about forty seven national sports EMMY awards, but who's counting my good friend. Andrew Tennant, Andy. How are you? Hello. Jeremy I'm holding my breath speak into the microphone. Okay. I know. This is what you normally do. But why why don't we speak into the microphone that's season for the producers? Okay. I know you're a visual guy. It's a visual medium television, east sixties about production values, but this is audio e sixties back this past week in the season premiere. We had a story about parkland about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland Florida, and it's football team trying to cope in the aftermath of the horrific school shooting that took place a year ago this week on February fourteen twenty eighteen. That was a story that in many ways is emblematic of what sixty is done. Sure. It's a story. That's sports. But it's also not a story about sports. It's also a story that required a full year's worth of reporting and producing from Martin quota bashing in particular, I was the reporter. But most of the work is as is. Usually the case you'd be the first to say that is done by the producer. Obviously there was an anniversary this week. But why did why did you sixty choose to tell this story about parkland? I think for us it's about yes, we work for a sports network. Yes, we're a sports show. But our responsibility is to go out there and find stories that are compelling and are just about life where there's a lesson to be learned where there's, you know, something that provides the next chapter two story. You know, I think at a certain point the coverage of the parkland stoneman Douglas mass shooting ended. And you know, so people moved on cameras went away the store any there were still coverage, obviously because many students have been have been politically active since then, but. On the ground in parkland, yet when the cameras go away a lot of coverage goes, you know, they weren't in the headlines anymore and for us. It was about telling the longer story. You know, what is the next chapter? And you know, what was the sports angle for us. And you know, here's a football coach, you know, who who gave his life to try and save children. Here's another football. Coach who on one day in an instant lost his assistant coach also losses boss, the athletic director who were both killed in the mass shooting. And you know, we wanted to know we wanted to sort of tell the story of of those relationships, but we also wanted to tell the story of of of strength, a story of courage, a story of how do you move on? You know, how do you take these kids and and push forward in the aftermath of of something as horrific as that. We're speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer of e sixty wh. Which returned on Sunday to ESPN one at nine o'clock eastern time for its twelfth season. And as I said earlier, the show has evolved from twelve to fifteen shows year, you could find them in prime time. We never knew exactly when they were going to be on when the season was going to take place was going to be during football season not during football season. Now, we have regular schedule as we have had for the last couple of years. We're on every Sunday morning on ESPN one. When football is not being played. And we're on ESPN two every Sunday morning when football is being played. Now, we're in the heart of it since the Super Bowl two weeks ago. How did the move from time to Sunday morning change the way, you think about what the show should be? That's a great question. I mean, I think for us. It was really always about having a consistent time slot. You know, I think when we were in primetime and often following sportscenter. You know, we were we were leading shows with our our signature profiles of the biggest athletes in sports, you know, bringing our fans up close and personal to these big stars in a way that you know, they they weren't being brought by our traditional studio shows. So, and that's really how we differentiate ourselves from the rest of ESPN and also from most of the sports shows that are out there. When we moved the Sunday mornings. It was like we finally had the answer to the age old question for us is I love the show. I just have no idea when it's on. And so the fact that we're on in some capacity, whether it's ESPN one or ESPN two on a Sunday morning at nine o'clock. You know, it's just for us. It's a great way for people to wake up and to be told a great story that's going to set the tone for the rest of their day or for the rest of their week. And I think we really wanted to focus on you know, who is the audience on a Sunday morning versus who is the audience and prime time during the week. And you know, what are the metrics telling us what who are the demos out there? And I don't want to dive too deep into that. It did it did force us to rethink the show a lot about you know, what was going on on Sundays. What's going on that we can set the tone for the week? Also, you know, what just provides great content that complements sportscenter which is on both before. And after us on Sundays speaking with Andy Tennant, executive producer v sixty and I got to say, you know, we go back a long way we worked on pieces as reporter and producer twenty years ago. And if you did I'm not going to get into any specifics that might be embarrassing to you. And you made some bad decisions about had a little camera time, you gave me some things never change. But we considered ourselves lucky back. Then if we got seven minutes for a piece that was long and TV germs and somehow counter intuitively, the conventional wisdom being that the attention span of the audience gets smaller and smaller over time and digital distractions. You know, have made it harder to keep people's attention. All that are are stories. Now, we do twenty. Minute stories all the time. We do half hour shows on single topics all the time hours pretty frequently as well. There was a time. When people said that's too long for TV how did that philosophy evolve? Where there's almost no limit to the time allotted to a story. Listen, I I've said this before I think thirty for thirty was the game changer. In fact, you know, you asked how you know, it was the most significant change between primetime Sunday morning. You know, and a lot of it is the length of the pieces. You know, we we just we'd go more in depth. We dive deeper into these stories and into these characters because we're on every week because we're on every week. But also, I think look when when the show was, you know, the idea for the show was originally being developed, you know, a lot of executives here, we're saying, you know, more story shorter stories, you know, look within that our to get like six or seven stories at like six to eight minutes because of the attention span that you were speaking of and then thirty for thirty we figured out. It's really just the executives attention because. That's right. But then, you know, thirty for thirty came along, and they were telling stories longer than anybody else at ESPN and the response was overwhelming. And we started to look at ourselves as storytellers and say, you know, maybe we don't have this. Right. Maybe maybe shorter isn't better maybe longer is better. And so we spent a lot of time being rethinking things considering the the success that our colleagues there had, and you know, and I think it's really been a game changer. It's has such such a significant impact not only on how we tell stories, but on how you know, everyone tells stories across the board sports, we're speaking with Andy Tan, executive producer of e sixty which is on of course, every Sunday morning at nine eastern time on ESPN. It's twelfth season. Just underway. There's a lot coming up this year. There's lot coming up this season. But but more important than just promoting the show, which is kind of the concede here. I want to ask you, there's some talented people in the show. There's some great reporters. Great producers, who's the best reporter on the show a bubbly. Bob doesn't report. He had to take a sabbatical you needed to reflect not he's not a professor he needed to take six months. Hosts he's a very capable now did very briefly. But it's I keep telling him, it's not a sabbatical. If you're not a professor, it's vacation, well, considering he's now giving the commencement speech. At Seton Hall in in may, I mean, I think there is an honorary degree that goes along with says, he's not showing up if they're not giving him some kind of degree. We should have him on next week to talk about this. But that was very adeptly handled. I'm impressed. Andrew ten is the executive producer of e sixty back every Sunday morning on ESPN ESPN one at nine eastern time. Any thank you for keeping me on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you. Jeremy was was in any way, this better than a Harvard Cornell hockey game, I play obviously, I just watch those games those laws. Reaction's Cornell beats Harvard on the ice. So let's say that we work for some Harvard guys only..

ESPN executive producer football producer reporter Andy Tennant Andrew Tennant Jeremy Bob Lee Marjory stoneman Douglas high EMMY Harvard stoneman Douglas Andy professor director Seton Hall Florida
"andrew tennant" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"O'clock eastern time hosted by yours truly in that that guy Bob Lee, who's taken a long vacation. He calls it a sabbatical. It's really vacation. He says he's coming back in April. I I'm not holding my breath. We welcome to the show. Now. It's always interesting when you get to interview your boss, the executive producer of e sixty a man who's won about forty seven national sports EMMY awards, but who's counting my good friend. Andrew Tennant, Andy. How are you? Jeremy? I'm holding my breath speak into the microphone. Okay. I know. This is what you normally do. But why why are we speaking of microphones? Let's make this easy for the producers. Okay. I know. I know you're a visual guy. It's a visual medium television, east sixties about production values, but this is audio e sixties back this past week in the season premiere story about parkland about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland Florida, and it's football team trying to cope in the aftermath of the horrific school shooting that took place a year ago this week on February fourteenth two thousand eighteen that was a story that in many ways is emblematic of what e- sixties done. Sure. It's a story about sports. But it's also not a story about sports. It's also a story that required a full year's worth of reporting and producing from Martin bashing in particular, I was the reporter. But most of the work is as is. Usually the case you'd be the first to say that is done by the producer. Obviously there was an anniversary this week. But why did why did you sixty choose to tell this story about parkland? I think for us. It's about yes. We work for a sports network. Yes. We're a sports show. But our responsibility is to go out there and find stories that are compelling and are just about life where there's a lesson to be learned where there's something that provides the the next chapter two story. You know, I think at a certain point the coverage of the parkland stoneman Douglas mass shooting ended, and so people moved on the cameras went away the store there were still coverage, obviously because many students have been have been politically active since then, but on the ground in parkland when the cameras go away a lot of coverage goes there, they weren't in the headlines anymore, and you know, for us it was about, you know, telling the longer story, what is the next chapter, and what was the sports angle for us. And you know, here's a football coach, you know, who who gave his life to try. And save children. Here's another football coach who on one day in an instant lost is assistant coach also lost his boss. The director were both killed in the mass shooting. And you know, we wanted to know we wanted to sort of tell the story of of of those relationships, but we also wanted to tell the story of of of strength story of courage story of how do you move on? You know, how do you take these kids and and push forward in the aftermath of of something as horrific as that. We're speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer e sixty which returned on Sunday to ESPN one at nine o'clock eastern time where it's twelve season. And as I said earlier, the show has evolved from twelve to fifteen shows year, you could find them in prime time. We never knew exactly when they were going to be on when the season was going to take place was going to be during football seat not during football season. Now, we have regular schedule. We have had for the last couple of years. We're on every Sunday morning on ESPN one. When football is not being played in. We're on ESPN two every Sunday morning when football is being played. Now, we're in the heart of it since the Super Bowl two weeks ago. How did the move from prime time to Sunday morning change the way, you think about what the show should be. That's a great question. I mean, I think for us. It was really all of these about having a consistent time slot. You know, I think when we were in primetime and often following sportscenter. We were we were leading shows with our our signature profiles of the biggest athletes in sports, bringing our fans up close and personal to these big stars in a way that you know, they they were being brought by our traditional studio shows. So, and that's really how we differentiate ourselves from the rest of ESPN. And also, you know from most of the sports shows that are out there. When we moved to Sunday mornings. It was like we finally had the answer to the age old question for us is I love the show. I just have no idea when it's on. And so the fact that we're on in some capacity, whether it's ESPN one or SPN to on a Sunday morning at nine o'clock. You know, it's just for us. It's a great way for people to wake up and to be told a great story that's going to set the tone for the rest of their day or for the rest of their week. And I think we really wanted to focus on you know, who is the audience on a Sunday morning versus who is the audience and a prime time during the week. And you know, what are the metrics telling us what who are the demos out there? And I don't want to dive too deep into that. Did it did force us to rethink the show a lot about you know, what was going on on Sundays? What's going on that we can set the tone for the week? Also, you know, what just provides great content that complements sportscenter which is on both before. And after us on Sundays speaking with Andy tendency, executive producer v sixty and I got to say we go back a long way we worked on pieces as reporter and producer twenty years ago. And if you did I'm not going to get into any specifics. The might be embarrassing to you, and you made some bad decisions about how little camera time. You gave me some things never change. But. You know, we considered ourselves lucky back. Then if we got seven minutes for peace that was long in TV germs. And somehow counter intuitively, the conventional wisdom being that the attention span of the audience gets smaller and smaller over time and digital distractions. You know, have made it harder to keep people's attention. All that are stories. Now, we do twenty minutes stories all the time we do half hour shows single topics all the time hours pretty frequently as well. There was a time. When people said that's too long for TV how did that philosophy evolved? Where there's almost no limit to the time allotted to a story. Listen, I I've said this before I think thirty for thirty was the game changer. In fact, you asked how what was the most significant change between prime time and Sunday morning and a lot of it is the length of the pieces. We just we go more in depth. We dive deeper into these stories and into these characters we're on every week because we're on every week. But also, I think look when when the show was, you know, the idea for the show was originally being developed, you know, a lot of executives here were were saying, you know, more story shorter stories, you know, look within that hour to get like six or seven stories at like six to eight minutes because of the attention span that you were speaking of and then thirty for thirty we figured out. It's really just the executives attention. But then, you know, thirty for thirty came along, and they were telling stories longer than anybody else at ESPN and the response was overwhelming. And and we started to look at ourselves as storytellers and say, you know, maybe we don't have this, right? Maybe maybe shorter is better maybe longer is better. And so we really spent a lot of time being rethinking things considering the the success that our colleagues there had and and. And I think it's really been a game changer. It's has such such a significant impact not only on how we tell stories, but on how you know, everyone tells stories across the board sports speaking with Andy Tennant, executive producer of e sixty which is on of course, every Sunday morning at nine eastern time on ESPN. It's twelfth season. Just underway. There's a lot coming up this year. There's lot coming up this season. But more important than just promoting the show, which is kind of the concede here. I would ask you. There's some towns people on the show. There's some great reporters producers who's the best reporter on the show a bodily. Bob doesn't report is a cold. Why he had to take a sabbatical you needed to reflect not he's not a professor you needed to take months. He's a very capable did, very briefly. But it's I keep telling him, it's not a sabbatical. If you're not a professor, it's a vacation, well, considering he's now giving the commencement speech. At Seton Hall in in may, I mean, I think there is an honorary degree that goes along with says there is he's not shown up giving him some degree. We should have him on next week to talk about this. But that was very adeptly handled many press. Andrew, Shannon is the executive producer of e sixty back every Sunday morning on ESPN ESPN one nine. Eastern time. Any thank you for keeping me on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you. Jeremy was was in any way, this better than a Harvard Cornell hockey game, I play obviously, I just watch those games reaction's going Cornell beats Harvard on the ice. So let's say that we worked for some hardware guys. Don't.

ESPN executive producer football Andy Tennant producer reporter Andrew Tennant Jeremy Bob Lee Marjory stoneman Douglas high professor EMMY stoneman Douglas Martin director Seton Hall Harvard Florida
"andrew tennant" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Seven for most of its history. It was a monthly show. But for the last two years, it's been weekly show on Sunday mornings, nine o'clock eastern time hosted by yours truly in that that guy Bob Lee, who's taken a long vacation. He calls it a sabbatical. It's really a vacation. He says he's coming back in April. I I'm not holding my breath. We welcome to the show. Now. It's always interesting when you get interview your boss, the executive producer of e sixty a man who's won about forty seven national sports EMMY awards, but who's counting my good friend. Andrew Tennant, Andy. How are you? Hello. Jeremy I'm holding my breath speak into the microphone. Okay. I I know this isn't what you normally do. But why don't we speak into the microphone this make this easy for the producers? Okay. I know you're a visual guy. It's a visual medium television e- sixties about production values, but this is audio east sixties back this past week in the season premiere. We had a story about parkland about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland Florida, and it's football team trying to cope in the aftermath of the horrific school shooting that took place a year ago this week on February fourteen twenty eighteen that was a story that in many ways is emblematic of what e- sixty is done a story about sports. But it's also not a story about sports. It's also story that required a full year's worth of reporting and producing for Martin co Bosch, and in particular, I was the reporter. But most of the work is as is usually the case, it'd be the first to say that is done by the. Juicer obviously there was an anniversary this week. But why did why did e sixty choose to tell this story about parkland? I think for us. It's about yes, we worked for sports network. Yes. Where a sports show. But you know, our responsibility is to go out there and find stories that are compelling and are just about life where there's a lesson to be learned where there's, you know, something that provides the next chapter to a story. You know, I think at a certain point the coverage of the parkland snowmen Douglas mass shooting ended, and you know, so people moved on cameras went away the store there were still coverage, obviously because many students have been have been politically active since then, but on the ground in parkland yet when the cameras go away a lot of coverage goes, yeah. And you know, they weren't in the headlines anymore and no for us. It was about, you know, telling the longer story, you know, what is the next chapter. And you know, what was the sports angle for us. And, you know, here's a football coach, you know, who, you know, who gave his life, you know, to try. Save children. Here's another football. Coach who on one day in an instant lost his assistant coach also lost his boss. The director who were both killed in the mass shooting. And you know, we wanted to know we wanted to sort of tell the story of of those relationships, but we also wanted to tell the story of you know, of of strength story of courage story of how do you move on? You know, how do you, you know, take these kids and and push forward in the aftermath of something as horrific as that. We're speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer of e sixty which returned on Sunday to ESPN one at nine o'clock eastern time for its twelfth season. And as I said earlier, the show has evolved from twelve to fifteen shows year, you could find them in prime time. We never knew exactly when they were gonna be on when the season was gonna take place was it going to be during football season not during football season. Now, we have regular schedule. We have had for last couple of years. We're on every Sunday morning on ESPN one. When football is not being played and were on ESPN two every Sunday morning when football is being played. So now, we're in the heart of it since the Super Bowl two weeks ago. How did the move from prime time to Sunday morning change the way, you think about what the show should be. That's a great question. I mean, I think for us. It was really always about having a consistent time slot. You know, I think when we were in primetime and often following sportscenter. We were we were leading shows with our our signature profiles of the biggest athletes in sports, you know, bringing our fans up close and personal to these big stars in a way that you know, they they were being brought by our traditional studio shows. So, and that's really how we differentiate ourselves from the rest of ESPN. And also, you know from most of the sports shows that are out there when we moved the Sunday mornings. It was like we finally had the answer to the. The age old question for us is I love the show. I just have no idea when it's on. And so the fact that we're on in some capacity, whether it's ESPN one or ESPN two on a Sunday morning at nine o'clock. You know, it's just for us. It's a great way for people to wake up and to be told a great story that's going to set the tone for the rest of the day or for the rest of their week. And I think we really wanted to focus on you know, who is the audience on a Sunday morning versus who is the audience and a prime time during the week. And you know, what are the metrics telling us what who are the demos out there? And I don't want to dive deep into that. I it did it did force us to rethink the show a lot about you know, what was going on on Sundays. What's going on that we can set the tone for the week? Also, you know, what just provides great content that complements sportscenter which is on both before us and after us on Sundays speaking with Andy tendency, executive producer v sixty and I to say we go back a long way we worked on pieces as reporter and producer twenty. Years ago. And if you did I'm not going to get into any specifics that might be embarrassing to you. And you made some bad decisions about had a little camera time, you gave me some things never change. But you know, we considered ourselves lucky back, then if we got seven minutes for peace that was long TV germs and somehow counter intuitively, the conventional wisdom being that the attention span of the audience gets smaller and smaller over time and digital distractions. You know of made it harder to keep people's attention. All that are are stories. Now, we do twenty minutes stories all the time we do half hour shows on single topics all the time hours pretty frequently as well. There was a time. When people said that's too long for TV how did that philosophy evolve? Where there's almost no limit to the time allotted to a story. Listen, I I've said this before I think thirty for thirty was the game changer. In fact, you know, you as to how you know, it was the most significant change between prime time and Sunday morning. And a lot of it is the length of the pieces. You know, we just we'd go more in depth. We dive deeper into these stories and into these characters because we're on every week because we're on every week. But also, I think look when when the show was, you know, the idea for the show was originally being developed, you know, you know, a lot of executives here were were saying, you know, more story shorter stories, you know, look it within that hour to get like six or seven stories at like six to eight minutes because of the attention span that you were speaking of and, you know, then thirty for thirty at it's really just the executives attention. That's right. But then thirty for thirty came along, and they were telling stories longer than anybody else at ESPN and the response was overwhelming. And we started to look at ourselves as storytellers and say, you know, you know, maybe we don't have this. Right. Maybe maybe shorter isn't better maybe longer as better. And so, you know, we really spent a lot of time think rethinking things considering the success that our colleagues there had and an I think it's really been a game generates has such such a significant impact not only on how we tell stories, but on how you know, everyone tells stories across the board sports, we're speaking with Andy tendency, zek, your producer of e sixty which is on of course, every Sunday

ESPN football Andy Tennant executive producer producer Marjory stoneman Douglas high EMMY reporter Bob Lee Martin co Bosch Andrew Tennant Jeremy director Florida twenty minutes eight minutes seven minutes two weeks two years
"andrew tennant" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

12:05 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Message and data rates may apply to become okay for men to be Lazier softer fatter. We need to bring the men of this country back to greatness, and it's easier than ever with ageless male max, a patent pending formula within ingredient that helps boost your total testosterone promoting greater increases in muscle size and twice the reduction of body fat percentage that exercise alone. Plus an amazing sixty four percent increase in nitric oxide, which can be handy in the gym and in the bedroom. Take your manhood to the max by trying your first thirty day Buttle free just pay shipping and handling not ten days not fifteen days, but a full thirty days supply free. When you text the word dash to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine finally a formula that boosts total testosterone if you'll results with ageless male max or two in tents, please decrease us for your free bottle. Text dash to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine text D A S H two seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine. This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy chef this past week. He sixty kicked off its twelfth season on ESPN the show goes back to two thousand seven for most of its history. It was a monthly show. But for the last two years, it's been a weekly show on Sunday mornings, nine o'clock eastern time who stood by yours truly in that that guy. Bob Lee, who's taken a long vacation. He calls it a sabbatical. It's really a vacation. He says he's coming back in April. I I'm not holding my breath. We welcome to the show. Now. It's always interesting when you get to interview your boss, the executive producer of e sixty a man who's won about forty seven national sports EMMY awards, but who's counting my good friend. Andrew Tennant, Andy. How are you? Hello. Jeremy I'm holding my breath speak into the microphone. Okay. I know. This isn't what you normally do. But why don't why don't we speak into the microphone? That's make this easy for the producers. Okay. I know you're a visual guy. It's a visual medium television e- sixties about production values, but this is audio east sixties back this past week and the season premiere we had a story about parkland about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland Florida, and it's football team trying to cope in the aftermath of the horrific school shooting took place a year ago this week on February fourteen twenty eighteen that was a story that in many ways is emblematic of what e- sixty is done shorts. A story about sports. But it's also not a story about sports. It's also story that required a full year's worth of reporting and producing from Martin co two Bosch, and in particular, I was the reporter. But most of the work is as is usually the case. And you'd be the first to say that is done by the. Juicer obviously there was an anniversary this week. But why did why did e sixty choose to tell this story about parkland? I think for us. It's about yes. We work for a sports network. Yes. Where a sports show, but you know, our responsibility is to go out there and find stories that are compelling and are just about life where there's a lesson to be learned where there's, you know, something that provides the next chapter to a story. You know, I think at a certain point the coverage of the parkland snowmen Douglas mass shooting ended, and you know, so people moved on cameras went away the store there were still coverage, obviously because many students have been have been politically active since then but on the ground in parkland. The when the cameras go away a lot of coverage goes and know, they weren't in the headlines anymore and no for us. It was about, you know, telling the longer story, you know, what is the next chapter. And you know, what was the sports angle for us. And, you know, here's a football coach, you know, who you know, who gave his life. To try and save children. Here's another football coast who on one day in an instant lost his assistant coach also lost his boss. The director who were both killed in the mass shooting. And you know, we wanted to know we wanted to sort of tell the story of of those relationships, but we also wanted to tell the story of you know, of of strength story of courage story of how do you move on? You know, how do you, you know, take these kids and and push forward in the aftermath of of something as horrific as that. We're speaking with Andy Tennant, the executive producer of e sixty which returned on Sunday to ESPN one at nine o'clock eastern time for its twelfth season. And as I said earlier, the show has evolved from twelve to fifteen shows year, you could find them in prime time. We never knew exactly when they were going to be on when the season was going to take place was it gonna be during football season not during football season. Now, we have. Schedule as we have had for last couple of years. We're on every Sunday morning on ESPN one. When football is not being played. And we're on ESPN two every Sunday morning when football is being played. Now, we're in the heart of it since the Super Bowl two weeks ago. How did the move from prime time to Sunday morning change the way, you think about what the show should be. That's a great question. I mean, I think for us. It was really always about having a consistent time slot. You know, I think when we were in prime time and often following sportscenter. You know, we were we were leading shows with our, you know, our signature profiles of the biggest athletes in sports, you know, bringing our fans up close and personal to these big stars in a way that you know, they they weren't being brought by our traditional studio shows. So, and that's really how we differentiate ourselves from the rest of ESPN. And also, you know from most of the sport shows that are out there when we moved the Sunday mornings. It was like we finally had the answer to the age old question for us is I love the show. I just have no idea when it's on. And so the fact that we're on in some capacity, whether it's ESPN or ESPN2. on a Sunday morning at nine o'clock. You know, it's just for us. It's a great way for people to wake up and to be told a great story that's going to set the tone for the rest of their day or for the rest of their week. And I think we really wanted to focus on you know, who is the audience on a Sunday morning versus who is the audience and a prime time during the week. And you know, what are the metrics telling us what who are the demos out there? And you know, I don't want to dive too deep into that. I it did it did force us to rethink the show a lot about you know, what was going on on Sundays. What's going on that we can set the tone for the week? Also, you know, what just provides great content that complements sportscenter which is on both before us and after us on Sundays speaking with Andy ten the executive producer v sixty and I say, you know, we go back. A long way we worked on pieces as reporter and producer twenty years ago. And if you did I'm not going to get into any specifics that might be barest to you, and you made some bad decisions about a little camera time, you gave me some things never change. But you know, we considered ourselves lucky back, then if we got seven minutes for peace that was long TV germs and somehow counter intuitively, the conventional wisdom being that the attention span of the audience gets smaller and smaller over time and digital distractions. You know, have made it harder to keep people's attention. All that are are stories. Now, we do twenty minutes stories all the time we do half hour shows on single topics all the time hours pretty frequently as well. There was a time. When people said that's too long for TV how did that philosophy evolve? Where there's almost no limit to the time allotted to a story. Listen, I I've said this before I think thirty for thirty was the game changer. In fact, you know, you asked how? You know, it was the most significant change between prime time and Sunday morning. You know, and a lot of it is the length of the pieces. You know, we we just we'd go more in depth. We dive deeper into these stories and into these characters we're on every week because we're on every week. But also, I think look when when the show was, you know, the idea for the show was originally being developed, you know, you know, a lot of executives here were were saying, you know, more story shorter stories, you know, look it within that hour to get like six or seven stories at like six to eight minutes because of the attention span that you were speaking of and, you know, then thirty for thirty figured out. It's really just the executives attention. That's right. But then, you know, thirty for thirty came along, and they were telling stories longer than anybody else at ESPN. And you know, the response was overwhelming. And we started to look at ourselves as storytellers and say, you know, you know, maybe we don't have this. Right. Maybe maybe shorter isn't better maybe longer as better. And so, you know, we really spent a lot of time think rethinking things considering the the success that our colleagues there had, and you know, and I think it's really been a game changer. It's has such such a significant impact not only on how we tell stories, but on how you know, everyone tells stories across the board sports speaking with Andy Tan, executive producer of e sixty which is on of course, every Sunday morning at nine eastern time on ESPN. It's twelfth season just underway last week with stories about Marjory stoneman Douglas high school parkland, Florida about Bob Kostas and his removal from the Super Bowl. Last year fascinating story conversation with Mark Famer, WADA. There's a lack coming up this year. There's lot coming up this season. But but more important than just promoting the show, which is kind of the concede here. I want to ask you, there's some talented people in the show. There's some great reporters or some great producers who's the best reporter on the show ably. Bob doesn't report cold he had to take a sabbatical. You needed to reflect not greatness is not a professor he needed to take months V hosts, he's a very capable our Allah, did, very brilliant. But it's I keep telling him, it's not a sabbatical. If you're not a professor, it's vacation, well, considering he's now giving the commencement speech. At Seton Hall in in may, I mean, you know, I think there is an honorary degree that goes along with says there isn't panoply. He's not shown up if they're not giving him some kind of degree. We should have him on next week to talk about this. But that was very deputy handled press. Andrew Tennant is the executive producer of e sixty back every Sunday morning on ESPN ESPN one at nine east. Eastern time. Any thank you for keeping me on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you. Jeremy was was in any way this better than a Harvard Cornell hockey game, I play obviously, I just watched those game shows laws reaction's going Cornell beats Harvard on the ice. I let's say that we worked for some Harvard guys. Don't like I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time. Message and data rates may apply. When did it become ok for men to be Lazier softer fatter? We need to bring the men of this country back to greatness, and it's easier than ever with ageless male max a patent pending formula with an ingredient that helps boost your total testosterone promoting greater increases in muscle size and twice the reduction of body fat percentage that exercise alone. Plus an amazing sixty four percent increase in nitric oxide, which can be handy in the gym and in the bedroom. Take your manhood to the max by trying. Your first thirty day bottle free just pay shipping and handling not ten days not fifteen days, but a full thirty days supply free. When you text the word dash to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine finally a formula that boosts total testosterone if you'll results with ageless male max or two in tents, please decrease us for your free bottle. Text dash to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine text D A S H two seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine.

ESPN executive producer football testosterone Marjory stoneman Douglas high reporter Jeremy Andrew Tennant Jeremy chef producer Florida Andy Bob Lee EMMY Andy Tennant Harvard Jeremy shop
"andrew tennant" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Reagan national rail Lee on Washington's mall now Larry O'Connor show. AM six thirty. Aref ten days for the Democratic Party in the Commonwealth of Virginia. We've reached out to many Democrats to discuss. And we got one taker Philly get Mark Levin, he is representing the forty fifth district of Virginia. That's a part of Arlington county, Fairfax county and part of the city of Alexandria. And he joins us now. Thank you, Mr. delegate good talking to you again. Thank you Larry for me on. Now. My understanding is you have in fact called for the resignation of governor north of Andrew Tennant governor Fairfax is that correct? Yes. So on one basis should the governor resigned in your opinion. Well, in my view, the governor has mishandled frankly from the beginning I called for the resignation on Friday after the governor said he admitted to being in that incredibly racist photo of the the guy in black face of dressed up like a classic racist minstrel. Yeah. Next to that Ku Klux Klan and wants the governor said he was in that photo. I thought he should resign. Now, then I admit. The next day. He had a different story. And he said he wasn't in the photo, which sort of made my head spin. And he may not be in the phone. In fact, I tend to think he wasn't now. But then my question is why did he say he was in the first place. Yeah. There's also that's only the first question. Well, yeah. And my thought is that well he said he was in the first place because he thought he might have been in such a photo. So that concerned me and also there's his nickname which I don't want to say on the air. But most of your listeners probably know what it is it came it came out of his BMI your books. Now, let me say this. I do not think today in two thousand nineteen the governor Ralph Northam, it's racist. I think that he has worked very hard for racial equality. I do think that he's a good, man. I I like him personally that being said given what happened given what he did and given his his inconsistency on it. I think it'd be better to have another governor. All right. And I wanna I wanna I appreciate that. I just a couple of questions on that just stand the. Principled position you have here. First of all, you said, you don't believe he is in the picture now why based on what you know. He said he wasn't now he may be you may not be. But I've met him. I know what he looks like I've met him many times in person. He's he's a tall guy. He doesn't look to me like the person in black face. Right. Ben. Isn't it obvious? From that person. And so, you know, and the Ku Klux Klan dressed person was was shorter was kind of sort of narrow shoulders. It might be a woman. I don't know how a lot younger then. But you're you're doing the whole CSI forensic. I'm doing my best. Obviously, I don't know. I wasn't there. But, but you know, in the fact that the governor frankly at the beginning couldn't say which one he was and apparently never said in private that. He was in the photo, the problem, of course, is public statement said he was, but, but I actually don't believe he was in the phone if I had to guess. But. He's the guy in the hood know. You know, I don't know if you've met Ralph north he's pretty tall. He's on basketball team. He's like, I don't know do six three and the other person was even taller. I I don't think he's the guy in the hood based on the height. And I don't think there's any real ratio. You can't compare the the guy in the hood is not tall compared to what the other guy because the guy who would have to be like six six or so, I don't really know. I know let me ask you this. This is because you said you don't believe that he's racist. And I listen, I I have no day nineteen I have no measure of knowing whether he's a racist. Or not really, however, don't you find it odd that in his big interview that was obviously planned and rehearsed in his first statement to Gayle king, he referred to slaves African slaves as indentured servants. I mean, that's actually part didn't surprise me. And I'll tell you why today is the this is the four hundredth anniversary this year in twenty nineteen both of the house of delegates race it the oldest isolated body in the western hemisphere. But also the the fortieth anniversary of the first Africans. Arriving to our shores, if you look at Virginia history, and I have and I find it very interesting blacks and whites came to our shores originally classified under law as indentured servants. Now, what eventually happened, of course, is that the blacks were made into slaves and the whites were like go after their time ended so slavery began in Virginia. But the very very beginning of sixty nine thousand four hundred years ago, it wasn't it wasn't clear. Remember, Virginia, invented slavery. There was no there are no other American states around. There's I'm I don't mean to say, invented slavery. Obviously there slavery in the world. But in the new world in the American colonies, that's where slavery began and slavery based on race is kind of uniquely American thing Brazil had slaves but they weren't based on race. So I actually don't I see. Community historically accurate. It's not the way. I would have phrased it. But but I don't think that ended up itself is a racist guy. I don't think it is historically accurate. I understand they were called indentured servants at the time. But we know it to be the beginning of slavery. I think put it this way. Nineteen eighty couple of decades later if my kid were given a history exam on slavery begin in America. The answer would be sixteen nineteen. Well, it's not the way. I would have phrased it as I I don't think the dot com. My reason these not based on that comment. But now, here's what here's what's odd. To me. You are not alone in calling for a governor north to resign. Many Democrats did virtually all over that picture, including attorney general, Mark herring. Now when attorney general Mark called for Ralph northern to resign over this picture. He knew full well that he had a black face history of his own that he revealed several days later, so I mean, that's the height of hypocrisy, and how were you not calling for his resignation? Well, I guess I see a difference. I think that black face. Is bad. It's always bad. But I think there are levels of bad, and as far as I'm concerned dressing up as the classic racist minstrel character, the kind that you know, we see in the worst stereotypes throughout American history next to a clansman. I see as is an order of magnitude worse than dressing up at nineteen is your favorite rap star. Which I think good, I'm not defending it. Yeah. I do think there are levels of baggage. I also think that Ralph was discovered the yearbook was discovered and Mark Karen came forward. Nobody discovered this. He came forward. I mean, I mean, he did it obviously because he knew that was. But he came forward ahead of time. He apologized profusely for it. And he also made clear that that, you know. I just think the circumstances are different. I honestly if the governor had only done the Michael Jackson black face without the yearbook without the the racist nickname without changing his story. I think he could have gotten past this as well. But I just think that there's black is always bad, but but that picture with the Klansman's, downright evil. I mean, it's it's just even worse. And and with regard to Mark hearing, I'm curious because I've been thinking this through in one thousand nine hundred eighty one who do you think his favorite rap group was because I mean, it wasn't. It was hardly the height of rap in America. I mean, a a young Virginian.

Virginia Ku Klux Klan America general Mark Larry O'Connor Mark Levin Ralph Northam Democratic Party Arlington county Alexandria Andrew Tennant Washington Philly Fairfax county Fairfax basketball Ralph north CSI Gayle king Michael Jackson
"andrew tennant" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"andrew tennant" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Offers all kinds of new features la toya drake google technology expert says that that includes the nod but those who have a lot of emails in their inbox it will bring an important email to the top of your inbox g mail is using a lot of smart technology trying to figure out what might be important to you and it will remind you that you've received this email a few days ago would you like to reply this might be important to you it's sort of the elbow a little nudge don't miss out on this this could be critical drake says that the biggest update in g mail history makes it smarter safer and easier a security feature called the confidential mode allows users to set expiration dates on emails and restriction on who can forward those emails and if cellini township ma'am will spend the next four years and eight months behind bars for trying to lure a minor for sex authorities say thirty six year old andrew tennant attempted to solicit on the internet what he thought was a thirteen year old girl from texas to come to michigan for sex but was actually a homeland security agent the washtenaw county prosecutor's office says at ten and also convinced an out of state minor to send nude photos and offered a mother five thousand dollars for sex with a twelve year old daughter tenant was convicted of similar charges in two thousand five a makeshift memorial has sprung up at the spot in toronto where a van plowed down pedestrians two days ago killing ten people in entering fifteen toronto mayor john tory came to the sidewalk memorial to show his support this place pervious car one of the things all scars well wishers leaving notes and flowers at the site the nomination of ronnie jackson to lead the veterans affairs is under threat amid a series of allegations including repeated drunkenness on overseas trips and improperly dispensing medications correspondent ed o'keefe described some.

drake prosecutor toronto john tory ronnie jackson google cellini andrew tennant texas michigan washtenaw county ed o'keefe five thousand dollars thirty six year thirteen year eight months twelve year four years two days