3 Burst results for "Andrew Pedigree"

"andrew pedigree" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:57 min | 5 months ago

"andrew pedigree" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Famous, of course, in singing in the ring. Oh yes. You know, this is actually great that I can listen to old 78. From the Library of Congress. The really feels like one. That's old timey. That's great. It is. This is why you need to read. Matthew kirschenbaum's bitstream is the future of digital voters heritage, because it's kind of about just that. So this is all stuff that's going to be public domain on January 1st. Musical compositions, some Big E's here, gentlemen prefer blondes. Wow. Bye bye blackbird. Someone to watch over me, George Gershwin. Oh, wow. Are you lonesome tonight? When the red red Robin comes bob, bob bubba, oh, you mean I own a royalties for all the time I have sung that? I know. I know. The Hawaiian letting us act love song. I love song. Can't play that, though, right? Because there's no recording. That's the composition. Yes. A piece of music. There are of course two distinct copyrights performance and create, right? So this is public domain time. I love this. And this is all because Congress has neglected for the last few years to extend copyright. Which they normally do in honor of Mickey Mouse every few years in honor. At the beach, so that's great. And public domain is so important. Yeah. Speaking of public domain, here's a good book if you guys have time over the holidays. It is, I don't penciler did an anthology an espionage anthology book. It's the great big book of espionage. And it is such incredibly old stories in the intro to each story and then the intro to the book takes a really thorough look at the history of spy novels. And oh, this is Fleming Eric ambler. These are classics. So but it goes, it's classic all the way up. He does such he's very educated in the history of these books, so he takes like a college level course. It's excellent. I will tell you if you get it on audible. It is 48 hours. That's a lot of spine novels, but I am going to put it on my audible because I would love this. I mean, this is really well audible. Yeah. You want a great audible recommendation? Sure. Go for it. The layman trilogy, which is on Broadway now, limited term big deal. It's actually it's written in essentially unstructured free verse history of Lehman bank from the beginning to the end. Oh, wow. Creatively written in ways I can't begin to describe performed beautifully in this recording and it's wonderful. I just bought the library that you recommended so I just wrote about that. The library by Andrew pedigree, but if you think the layman well, I think the library is also great. They're very, very, very different. 40 hour big book of espionage. That's the best. If you go to my medium, I'm going to plug plug here. If you go to my medium page, after I first let medium dot com, I have two new posts. One is about the library and about bitstreams. And the continua, I saw in them about how everything is processed and everything has a conversation. Nice. So in that library, what libraries I don't know what it is. I just stole the photo, but it's magnificent, isn't it? Yeah. I saw that photo because somebody said, he or she was being rushed out by security guard, wondering why I want to take a picture of that. What are you doing here? Why would you want to take a picture of life? Guy escort would be a baffle Wesley was secret to building and take this picture, yes. I would like to know what the library is. The famous library at the melk Abbey in Austria is the model for. The library in the name of the rose, I think so. But anyway, one of the great things I love libraries. Pedigree and dividends, the library of fragile history. At the beginning, of course, they start with the library of Alexandria, because you have to, right? And the funny thing was, when Nixon went to Alexandria in a triumphant tour of Egypt, he asked to see.

Matthew kirschenbaum bob bubba Fleming Eric ambler George Gershwin Library of Congress Lehman bank Mickey Mouse Andrew pedigree Robin bob Congress melk Abbey Wesley Austria library of Alexandria Nixon Alexandria Egypt
"andrew pedigree" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

07:19 min | 5 months ago

"andrew pedigree" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Time. Thank you. Yeah. They try to make that. Okay, so in fact, I don't think I've ever done enough to say I'm trying to think. They try to make it fun by going some are good, right? A rich company go to Hawaii if you're just a regular company, you go to Monterey. And then what these people you try to get away from every day at 5 o'clock. And then you have things like lots of brainstorming sessions and stuff. And you get drunk and people do embarrassing things and women get them right after. Hit on. It sounds awful. They're awful. Oh, they're awful. Speaking of brief time by Mary brief time as an executive of time age, but we're taking the company jet down to The Bahamas. Wow. I sat there saying what I thought and that was not welcome. And that's the last time they let you on the jet. He's out of the club. Well, I was. Soon thereafter. For ten years, taya may bauman has been on Instagram as at metaverse. I think you can see where this is going. You can see where this is headed. The minute Facebook decided to call itself meta, her count was disabled. The app said, quote, your account has been blocked for pretending to be someone else. I've been pretending to be me for ten years, she said. It came days after Facebook announced its new name. She told The New York Times the account is a decade of my life and work. Imagine if your Facebook account would just Instagram account or just shut down all those images. I didn't want my contribution to the meta verse to be white from the Internet. This happens to women in tech to women of color and tech all the time. I don't think it has to do with that. I think it has to do with at meta verse. But she started metaverse makeovers in 2012 to showcase her art and technology, she's an Australian woman. She created an app that would display virtual holograms of her company's fingernail designs. Anyway, it doesn't matter what she was doing with it. But for crying out loud, Facebook I mean, please, you can't just stop on everybody. It's prior to you. Right. And what's going to happen with this? What's The New York Times, right? And then suddenly it started working in what's going to happen. Facebook said, the account was incorrectly removed for impersonation, and we've now restored it. Sorry, it happened. Never mind. Never mind. I thought that they would probably send her a check and say, you know, that would have been the smarter thing. Yeah. Well, the other thing was, there's another story I've been in there about how they got met at. And when I was in the business, if you wanted to buy somebody's domain, you never did it yourself. You had a third party go in and say, I have a client. Would like it. Oh, they're just a little. They're just a little Phillip. It's a family thing, you know? And so you try to buy it first. So there was a little U.S. regional bank called meta financial court. Oh, let's try this there. Yes. Meta financial group. And I guess Mehta went in guns ablazing. Because they ended up giving them $60 million for the name. $60 million, and metaverse, what did she get? She got her Instagram account back. Instagram hits 2 billion monthly users 2 billion. Monthly users, you're not surprised, Dan, are you? You love Instagram. I like it. I have a decent community there on Instagram. I just hate the fact that every time I open it up, it says a meta product. That's good. We don't know how many of those 2 billion users are finstas. I thought Congress was going to outlaw fences by now. How have they done anything? Nope. No. They still trying to figure out what it means, sir. I love it. Let's see. Let me see here. Where we are in the flow of things. Let's do a few more. Then I'll, I guess we could do the change log too. I do have the change log. All right, so we're going to get a couple more than the change log. I mentioned this on Sunday. I think it deserves the shaming. Democratic Illinois democratic state representative Marcus Evans. Noting a surge in carjackings around the Chicago area has decided it's because of Grand Theft Auto, which came out by the way in 1997. And he is planning to introduce a bill in the state of Illinois to ban sales of the game. State legislators can be some of the dumbest people on earth. Carjacking is not normal and carjacking must stop, says Marcus Evans. He paired on the cause. He paired up with early walker community activists to start operations safe pump, which could mean so many things. But in this case, security teams patrol gas stations to protect people while they're pumping gas. Now tell me the truth. When I said operation safe pump is that the first thing you thought of, that would be no. No. This guy is not the sharpest tool in the shed. I'm just saying. And apparently early walker, the activist agreed with Evans about the game, representative Evans and I says early walker have researched. They've researched note and concluded that these very young offenders of carjacking are greatly influenced by the Grand Theft Auto video game. And this sounds just like the late 1980s early 1990s with the warning labels on the hip hop albums. Oh, God, this has been going on for years. Oh yeah. I truly believe there's bipartisan support to ban this game from being sold in Illinois well. You introduced that Bill, we'll see. We'll see exactly how much bipartisan support there. It goes back, obviously to comic books. And I just read a wonderful, wonderful book. This is the British version, but the U.S. is out called the library of fragile history by Andrew Bolton. I'd love to read. It's really, really quite good. It's also audible. And fiction was seen as a really dangerous influence on especially women. Yes. And all sorts of ideas. Library shouldn't be stalking fiction because it can do terrible things to the morals of women and young people. Wow. Andrew pedigree and Arthur vadu win. He pedigree is the dean of book historians. He's quite read tons of his books. He is brilliant. University of saint Andrews. All.

Facebook Instagram The New York Times taya meta financial court Meta financial group bauman Monterey The Bahamas Marcus Evans Hawaii meta Mary Illinois Mehta walker Phillip U.S. Dan
To the People

5 Minutes in Church History

04:15 min | 2 years ago

To the People

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode. We're going back to one of our favorite times to the time of the reformation and one of our favorite figures, Martin Luther. Well, there's a recent book on Luther welts five years old now, but relatively recent. That talks about how luther used the printing press. To advance these ideas and the theology of the reformation. But in addition to using the printing press, this book also talks about how Luther uses something rather innovative for scholars theologians. At the time he used the language of the people and not Latin. The author of this book Andrew Pedigree Says Luther was a cultured and purposeful theological writer. He wrote fine Latin and his. Latin works measured up well against those of talented adversaries by saying that he was cultured meant he was educated. And saying that he was a purposeful theological writer means that he could get into the technicality. He could be exacting in his writing and in his logic, and he could go toe to toe with those in the academy, but then Dr Pedigree says that Luther made the decision to make the case in German. This was with a very crucial moment publication, his fifteen eighteen sermon on indulgence in grace. Now we know in fifteen seventeen. Of course we have the ninety five theses. They were written in Latin. They were intended to be a debate within the church. We also know that they were quickly translated from Latin into the German and through the printing press, and these printing presses popped up all over the hamlets and cities of Germany. That Luther Ninety, five theses were quickly distributed spread like wildfire cross German speaking lands. But what he wrote in fifteen eighteen this sermon, he purposely wrote it in German. An had it printed in German. And the reason is very simple. The people needed to hear this message. They needed to hear this message because they lived in darkness. Well going back a few decades to nineteen fifty. We have that wonderful biography of Luther that classic biography by Roland Bayton. Here I stand. This is how Bayton and biography. The God of Luther. Moses. Was the God who inhabits the storm, clouds and rides on the wings of the wind. At his nod, the earth trembles, and the people before him are as a drop in the bucket. He is a god of Majesty and Power, inscrutable, terrifying, devastating and consuming in his anger. Yet the all terrible. Is The all merciful to. Like as a father piteous his children. So the Lord. But. How shall we know this? In Christ. Says only in Christ. That was luther message that was luther trembling before a holy God. Feeling the anger, the wrath of a righteous God against him. A very unrighteous man. And yet he realized that in Christ. This all terrible one. Is, the all loving one. And loved Luther with a love that would not let him go. Well. That was the message of Martin Luther. He preached his whole life. Any new was a message that was far more than simply a debate within the academy. It was a message that had to be taken directly to the people, and that's what he did. Through the use of the German language and the use of a printing press. He sent that message around Germany. And even as the centuries-old on around the world.

Martin Luther Luther Ninety Germany Writer Andrew Pedigree Roland Bayton