18 Burst results for "Andrew Mullet"

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"This Sunday, the 2022 World Cup will kick off in albite stadium on the outskirts of alcor city in Qatar. The first match we'll see Qatar, the hosts, take on Ecuador. Qatar versus Ecuador is not to understate matters audaciously a fixture possessed of mythical luster. We are a long way here from Germany versus the Netherlands or England versus Argentina, or really anybody versus anybody. Qatar will be playing at their first World Cup. Ecuador are playing at their fourth, but at only one of their previous three have they struggled out of the group stages. In 2006, when they were beaten in the round of 16 by England, a David Beckham free kick thwarting whatever dreams Ecuador may have dared nurture. David Beckham. Do we know? To organize the two 22 FIFA World Cup is Qatar. Qatar was named as the 2022 World Cup host in 2010 in the same announcement that granted the 2018 tournament to Russia, almost as if FIFA were hoping to get to choruses of incredulous jeering out of the way at once. So the world has had 12 years to get used to the idea of a World Cup in Qatar, a country half the size of Wales, which had when it was awarded the tournament roughly the population of Minsk. Plus a climate brutally inhospitable to outdoor exertion, a human rights record difficult to contemplate without an amount of wincing and zero footballing tradition to speak of. Qatar has at least since made some progress in the latter department the high point winning the 2019 Asian cup, beating Japan in the final, credit where due and so forth. As for the others, well, we'll get to those presently. What we first need to consider is what FIFA was thinking. And it was the right decision. You think for FIFA to take the tournament to Qatar, not for everybody, but for me, I vote for Qatar because I think it was nice to go in another part of the world with people whenever receive their World Cup. At the time, FIFA explained the award of the World Cup to Qatar with an amount of breezy flannel about it being high time the Middle East had a go at staging the global games paramount event, pitching it as a sort of overdue sequel to South Africa hosting in 2010, which had been the first World Cup held in that region. A few Flint hearted skeptics did suggest, however, that FIFA's decision may have been tilted by less lofty motivations. FIFA corrupt and venal the very idea, et cetera FIFA did commission an inquiry into such aspersions, which cleared Qatar of any nefarious Ness. Who cooperated with the FIFA inquiry? The English? Yes. No one except the English and the Australians and definitely not the Russians and all the qataris. But which amusingly did take a swipe at England's Football Association for overstepping the mark in its efforts to win the favor of a particular FIFA official for England's bid to host the 2018 World Cup. Though Qatar certainly spent lavishly on its bid, it was not found to have directly bought votes. There was a thing with Qatari football administrator and FIFA executive committee member Muhammad bin hammam seeking to purchase support for his attempt to become FIFA president, but this was deemed unrelated to the World Cup bid and bin haman was banned from football for life. Have you ever tried to buy votes and attended to do so all my life? Did you ever give any money to those officials in the Caribbean or the novel? Nobody can claim that. And they have been various things with the 22 FIFA executives who awarded Qatar the World Cup. 17 of them have since been on the receiving end of bans indictments investigations or accusations. FIFA's then president Sepp Blatter is currently banned from football. I'm sorry that time as president of FIFA, this punching ball and I'm sorry for football. I'm sorry. But I'm also sorry about me. How I am treated in this world. FIFA's then vice president Jack Warner is fighting extradition from Trinidad and Tobago to the United States. It did not work out to my family's detriment. And I'm seeing very, very, very far from black. You couldn't look up the others yourself. Even if, however, Qatar behaved entirely scrupulously in acquiring the World Cup, honestly, your honor, we had no idea of the wretched cast of pirates and rogues we were dealing with. There are several other reasons why it remains ridiculous that Qatar is hosting it. There is the treatment of the workers who built the fabulous stadiums in which this World Cup will be played. The figure of 6500 deaths of migrant workers which is frequently bandied is debatable. That is the total from hundreds of thousands of migrant workers from 5 countries who died in Qatar between 2010 and 2021, where the working on the World Cup or not, whether from work related mishap or not. Qatar claims that 37 people have died on World Cup construction sites and only three of those from work related accidents. The international labor organization claims 50 deaths in 2021 alone and nearly 40,000 injuries. By way of contrast, working on the 2012 London Olympics cost nobody their life. It is indisputably the case that many, if not most of this World Cup's workers have been remunerated and accommodated miserably. Suzanne would often complain about the conditions in Qatar, the heat, the grueling work that he wasn't receiving the agreed wage, but he often had to wait months to be paid. If Qatar can afford to spend north of $200 billion hosting the World Cup, it can afford to pay people better than 50 bucks a week. And then there's the fact that any gay football fan inclined to attend will at the very least have had to think about the wisdom of doing so. Homosexuality is illegal in Qatar and Qatari police have form for hassling and detaining and abusing gay people. I am not one big whistling, but because the damage in the mind. That right there should disqualify any putative host of any allegedly inclusive global event. Qatar has endured considerable criticism for all of the above and will endure more, and rightly so, which prompts the question of why Qatar bid for the World Cup in the first place. The answers are all the obvious ones, prestige, influence, recognition, and maybe who knows, even an amount of pure hearted inclination to hospitality. At the very real risk of echoing an observation made in this space about Russia's hosting of the 2018 World Cup, and even more obviously absurd and monstrous decision by FIFA, the hazard of inviting the whole world to pay attention to you is that the whole world pays attention to you. For monocle 24, I'm Andrew mullet.

Qatar FIFA World Cup Ecuador albite stadium alcor city David Beckham England football Muhammad bin hammam bin haman Asian cup president Sepp Blatter Minsk Argentina Netherlands Russia Germany Wales Flint
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Design <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> firms <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to some of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the larger brands, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> whether it's throughout the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> image, et cetera. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> So <Speech_Music_Female> everybody's living within the <Speech_Music_Female> same space. And I think <Speech_Music_Female> that that's what makes <Speech_Music_Female> it interesting <Speech_Music_Female> because it's not <Speech_Music_Female> categorized, <Speech_Music_Female> per se. You <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> know, you have all different offices <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> next to each other. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> So in the lift, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you bump into all different <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> kinds, <Speech_Music_Female> including <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> CEOs of major <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> leading <Speech_Music_Female> brands. So <Speech_Music_Female> I think that when everyone <Speech_Music_Female> sits together, <Speech_Music_Female> it creates a <Speech_Music_Female> space that <Speech_Music_Female> creates <Speech_Music_Female> more and more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> discussions or <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> discourse. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And you know, you might be <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sitting in the cafe downstairs <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you're sitting beside <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a CEO of a major <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fashion house. <Speech_Music_Female> And you can <Speech_Music_Female> naturally hear what they're <Speech_Music_Female> saying. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> In most cases, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and I think that those <Speech_Music_Female> kinds of <Speech_Music_Female> best practices <Speech_Music_Female> or that kind of <Speech_Music_Female> sharing is part of <Speech_Music_Female> what makes the Dubai <Speech_Music_Female> design district very interesting. <Speech_Music_Female> We <Speech_Music_Female> also are <Speech_Music_Female> working in partnership <Speech_Music_Female> with <Speech_Music_Female> Dubai culture, <Speech_Music_Female> which really <Speech_Music_Female> helps also <Speech_Music_Female> to foster <Speech_Music_Female> all of this growth. <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I think that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Dubai has really <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> committed to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this cause. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And it's not an easy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> one because the creative <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> community is a very <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> diverse community. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> People with all <Speech_Music_Female> different talents. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Music_Female> between both <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Dubai <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> design district, antibiotic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> culture, <Speech_Music_Female> they've created <Speech_Music_Female> this beautiful bubble <Speech_Music_Female> where we could all <Speech_Music_Female> live in the <Speech_Music_Female> same space. <Speech_Music_Female> And really be <Speech_Music_Female> able to <Speech_Music_Female> communicate on <Speech_Music_Female> what makes Dubai a <Speech_Music_Female> special place. <Speech_Music_Female> A friend of mine <Speech_Music_Female> actually has <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a design <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> house <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and now he's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> actually exporting <Speech_Music_Female> outside <Speech_Music_Female> of Dubai <Speech_Music_Female> to London <Speech_Music_Female> to LA <Speech_Music_Female> and he created <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a small <Speech_Music_Female> label on it <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that says meat and fabulous <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Dubai. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And I love that. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You know, I love the <Speech_Music_Female> idea that <Speech_Music_Female> Dubai is <Speech_Music_Female> nurturing this <Speech_Music_Female> scene. <Speech_Music_Female> And that <Speech_Music_Female> it's become something <Speech_Music_Female> now to <Speech_Music_Female> say, oh, I <Speech_Music_Female> got it in Dubai. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Music_Female> it's that movement <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that gets me <Speech_Music_Female> excited. Having <Speech_Music_Female> lived here for 15 <Speech_Music_Female> years, I've seen the building <Speech_Music_Female> of a new city. <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> it's exciting. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Nobody is jaded. <Speech_Music_Female> Everyone gets <Speech_Music_Female> behind <Speech_Music_Female> ideas and, <Speech_Music_Female> you know, <Speech_Music_Female> your Friends and your <Speech_Music_Female> family. Everyone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sort of coexist <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> together. And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> everyone's pushing each other. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> think that <Speech_Music_Female> that excitement is <Speech_Music_Female> what makes <Speech_Music_Female> it so dynamic <Speech_Male> here. That was Dubai <Speech_Male> design week's Kate <Speech_Male> Barry speaking to <Speech_Male> Monaco's grace <Speech_Male> Charlton, and that is <Speech_Male> all for this edition of <Speech_Male> the briefing. It <Speech_Male> was produced by Rhys James, <Speech_Male> our research was Emily <Speech_Male> sands and our studio <Speech_Male> manager was norah. <Speech_Male> The briefing is <Speech_Male> back at the same time <Speech_Male> tomorrow. I'll be here with <Speech_Male> the monocle daily at <Speech_Male> 1800 London <Speech_Male> time, I'm Andrew mullet, <Speech_Male> thanks <SpeakerChange> for listening.

Dubai London Rhys James Emily Andrew mullet
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:23 min | 2 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"The end of the tycoon era in Hong Kong would be no bad thing, of course. Provided Beijing could be trusted to come up with a more transparent, fairer and more accountable alternative. Hong Kong's renowned for being Uber capitalist and one of the freest economies in the world. When in actual fact, a few family businesses call the shots and much the economy operates like a cartel. Billionaire businessmen and women. Enjoy a very cozy relationship with the government. An exercise a huge say in the running of Hong Kong. These power brokers support the status quo, stifle competition. And help keep a lid on local demands for universal suffrage. All in the interest of economic stability. In 58 years, Lee kushing has gone from having nothing to controlling four listed companies that are now worth 400 billion Hong Kong dollars. His story is a testament to the economic miracle at Hong Kong as created since the end of the war. The 94 year old Lee kassing is the archetypal Hong Kong tycoon. Millions of people live in his apartments, shop at his supermarkets. Use his electricity and connect via his phone network. His story of arriving from the mainland, buying a plastic flower factory and eventually taking control of one of the colonial era British conglomerates. Is the stuff of local legend. And his nickname Superman speaks to his actual business prowess as much as his fabled magical powers. For decades, Lea has had a direct line to the top guys in Beijing. But all that appears to have changed under Xi Jinping. When C first visited Hong Kong, as president in 2017. He shook hands with mister Leon stage in what was seen as a very deliberate display of Superman standing in Beijing. This time around, however, Lee wasn't even in the room during sea's visit. And many familiar faces from his first generation of tycoons were also missing. Officially, COVID-19 restrictions meant each tycoon family could only send one representative. And since the senior Lee retired from running his empire in 2018, his son, went in his place. A plausible explanation that didn't stop the conjecture, or the conspiracy theories. Lee was being punished by Beijing, they said, for showing some sympathy for the protesters in 2019. Instead of condemning them outright. It's a plea to have a peaceful solution to this crisis right now. He's also faced criticism from the mainland media. For investing more of his money in foreign jurisdictions, like the UK. In short, Superman is no longer red enough for the new patriotic era. And he can no longer be trusted to act in China's best interests. The huge sway Lee used to hold over the selection of Hong Kong's chief executive. Right up until 2017. Was watered down last year during Beijing's sweeping reforms of the electoral system. And this year, the job of running the city was given to a policeman. With no ties to the Hong Kong business establishment, an attract record for following Beijing's orders. Whatever really happened, Lee's absence from the political stage represents a major changing of the guard. Many of the first generation of tycoons icons of this city's rise. Have passed away during my time here. And their sons and daughters don't hold the same sway in Beijing. Nor, in the public's imagination. It is hard to imagine a Hong Kong that is not run for profit by a few extremely wealthy tycoons. But that day is a lot closer now than it was in 1997. And one thing is for certain. If Beijing does decide to directly intervene in the economy to speed things along. Then these masters of the universe will all be wishing that Lee's magical force field really did exist. For monocle in Hong Kong, I'm James chambers. That was monocles Hong Kong bureau chief James chambers. That's it for this episode of the foreign desk we'll be back next week and look out for the foreign desk explainer available every Wednesday. The foreign desk was produced by Christie o'grady, Christie also produces the foreign disk explainer. Don't forget to subscribe to Monaco magazine and our free daily email bulletins by heading to our website at monocle dot com. For me, Andrew mullet, thanks very much for listening until next time, goodbye.

Hong Kong Beijing Lee kushing Lee Lee kassing mister Leon Xi Jinping Lea James chambers China UK Christie o'grady Monaco magazine Christie Andrew mullet
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:04 min | 3 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Briefing on monocle 24, I'm Andrew mullet. Now, barring any outrageous shocks foreign secretary Liz truss will be anointed as the United Kingdom's new prime minister next week. She will face huge problems from day one, including tackling the country's energy crisis and soaring inflation after months of political inertia at the heart of Westminster. Well, let's get the latest now with Lance price who served as the UK's director of communications under Tony Blair, Lance now works for the opposition Labor Party. He joins me in the studio. Lance, first of all, the big question is there the remotest danger that the next prime minister of the United Kingdom and first lord of the treasury is not Liz truss. There's a very, very slight possibility, but it's so slight as to be almost undetectable on the sort of political radar. So I think we can be as confident as possible that Liz trusts as you say, the foreign secretary will be our prime minister in a week's time. One of your tasks is obviously going to be helping think about how to defeat her at the next election. So when you assess this trust from that perspective, what do you see as her strength and weaknesses? Well, you should never underestimate your opponents. And although the conduct of the Tory leadership election over the summer has given the opposition Labor Party that I now work for a huge amount of ammunition in itself, all we have to do is quote Tories back at Tories in order to undermine what she's been saying and in particular the economic proposals that she's been putting forward over the summer to try to win the Tory leadership election. Now, I've been in politics long enough to have some sympathy for people who say what they have to say in order to win the election that's right there in front of them. We have to remember that she's presently trying to appeal to an extremely niche electorate of a 160,000 insane retired brigadiers. That's your interpretation. I wouldn't be quite so cruel as that, but I see where you're coming from. Yes, I mean, at the moment, she's appealing to a segment of the population which is unrepresentative of the rest of us frankly. And it's more diplomatic in many ways. And obviously, she's been, well, it looks as if she's almost certainly been very successful in that and far more successful than Rishi sunak, who is a much more conventional centrist politician within conservative sort of terms. But she is going to face reality when she walks through the door of number ten and the officials come around her and say, look, things are a lot worse than you think they are. And a lot of the things that you've been floating during the leadership campaign simply aren't going to work. And the question is, she's a bit of a shapeshifter in politics anyway. She used to be a Republican. She's now a monarchist. She used to be a Liberal Democrat. She's now a Tory. She used to be a remainder. She's now a lever, and so no one really knows what the real Liz truss is, even though she tries to present herself as a sort of Margaret Thatcher style conviction politician she clearly isn't that unless unless your convictions can change faster than the weather. So that may play to her advantage, of course, because she may have shaped once again and listen to the sensible counsel and come up with much more sensible proposals than the ones that she's been floating during the campaign. Because it is fair to say, I was trying to think about this earlier that whether you sympathize with Liz truss or not and you clearly don't by conviction and a profession, but is it can you recall an incoming prime minister who has had quite this forbidding an intra? No, I don't think I can to be honest. It is the challenges are absolutely extraordinary and they would test the most talented and most skillful politician. Now maybe this truss is the most talented and most skillful politician that's yet to be to be proven. But it is a phenomenal challenge and it's not helped by the fact as you alluded to in your introduction that actually the government has sort of been asleep over the over the summer and there are conventions that say that you don't make big decisions when a new prime minister has been chosen because it's for that prime minister to make those big decisions and to determine the future direction of economic policy and so on. But the rest of us, the rest of the country have been looking at the prospect of the certainty of energy prices going up by 80%. That disposable income being slashed, the impact on not just on individuals. There's a lot of concentration on individuals, but the impact that that is going to have on businesses. Many of which are going to close. We're going to see a lot of business closures on schools on our hospitals. They all have to pay these energy bills. None of them are going to be helped by handouts or cuts in personal taxation to individuals. So the economy is heading for a massive, massive shock. And that would be a challenge for anybody coming in. All that being the case, how does the Labor Party play that? If we think that we are steering into what it's probably not an exaggeration to describe as a national crisis, is the role of an opposition at that point to absolutely whale on the government at absolutely every opportunity or do you try to do the actual constructive criticism bit because there is a risk, isn't there that you just end up looking like you're not helping that all you're interested in is maximizing your own position? Yeah, that's absolutely true. And it becomes more true the closer you get to a general election, and we are probably only 18 months or so away from a general election. So that's a crucial period in the electoral cycle anyway. Now it's perfectly legitimate for any opposition party to point out the reasons that we find ourselves in the mess that we're in. And not allow, for example, the Conservative Party and this trust to suggest that it's all down to Vladimir Putin and the invasion of Ukraine. And that somehow the British economy is fundamentally sound, were it not for that, because that isn't the case. But at the same time going forward, you do have to be able to show that you do have positive proposals of your own that are constructive that will be more effective than those that the government are being putting forward. And in the short term, I think secure stammer the leader of the Labor Party has done that over the summer with a proposal to freeze and home energy prices just through this winter. Now that's not a long-term solution. Of course it isn't and you have to put long term. You have to put long-term proposals in place as well. But the premise of your question is absolutely right, that you do have in this well at any time. But in this time in particular, to be able to show that you have got solutions of your own. Because there have been criticisms which you will obviously be aware of that secure style has been too quiet by half over the last few months. And is that, I mean, there's a couple of political conventional wisdoms that come into play there. One is that you don't offer up all your best ideas a year and a half from a general election because either the other mobile steal, the more by the time they come to vote everybody will forgotten you had them in the first place.

Liz truss Labor Party Andrew mullet Lance price UK Lance Rishi sunak Tony Blair Westminster Liz treasury Margaret Thatcher Conservative Party Vladimir Putin Ukraine
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:00 min | 4 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"We are all very conscious of the fact that time is running out. And that the weekend carries with a very grave risks for society in north down. For several long and grim decades, Northern Ireland looked like roughly the last place on earth from which a Nobel Prize for peace might be prized. By the late 1990s, Northern Ireland had been consumed for three decades by the miserable sectarian conflict known as the troubles. The troubles had killed three and a half thousand people injured perhaps 50,000 caused incalculable property damage and become regarded with gloomy fatalism as just one of those things about which everybody talks, but about which nobody is actually going to do anything. But in 19 98, the Nobel Prize for peace was shared by John Hume leader of the Irish nationalist social democratic and Labor Party and David trimble leader of the Ulster unionist party. Hume died in 2020 aged 80 three, trimble died this week, aged 77. The garlanding of Hume and trimble remains one of the more astute decisions of the Norwegian Nobel committee. Yes. 71.12 percent. After the good Friday agreement was signed earlier in 1998, bringing the worst of the troubles to a close, there might have been a temptation to ennoble the leaders of the paramilitary organizations who'd waged Northern Ireland's war and had now finally agreed to give it a rest. But it was Hume and trimble who did the difficult patient work of corralling mainstream opinion in their respective communities behind Northern Ireland Messi imperfect peace. Northern Ireland's place within the United Kingdom has been secured. The act of union, the fundamental piece of legislation defining northern position within the United Kingdom remains firmly in place. The act of union is the universe. Just a few years earlier, David trimble had seemed an unlikely peacemaker. In July 1995, trimble marched at the head of the orange order's traditional annual parade down the road in portadown county armagh. Porter down is a mostly Protestant town, but the gava road is a Catholic neighborhood, whose residents had long been rolled by the spectacle of orange sashed bowler hatted men thwacking lambic drums and singing of king Billy. In 1995, Catholic protesters blocked the parade. After a two day standoff punctuated by violent clashes, it was agreed that the parade would be permitted to proceed down the road as long as it did so in silence. Between ranks of local residents with their backs turned, David trimble led the parade alongside the reverend Ian Paisley, the thunderous fire breathing voice of hardline Ulster unionism whose habitual rejections of the mildest notion of compromise had earned him the nickname Dr. No. When they reached the end of the route, trimble clasped Paisley's hand in his and held at a loft. Well, we're delighted to be back down the traditional route. In Republican and nationalist circles in Northern Ireland, this image was read as confirmation that between unionism moderates and unionism headbangers, there was not a difference on which any outreach could long live. But when trimble was asked, he claimed that he had seized Paisley's hand to prevent Paisley from making the moment as Paisley so often did all about Paisley. If trembles telling is accurate, it stands as an unbeatable metaphor for his career. For all that trimble spent a life in politics, he was never a natural politician. He often seemed aloof and austere and certainly had a marked disinclination to tell people what they wanted to hear. But after becoming leader of the Ulster unionist party in 1995, he began trying to tell the UUP's corps constituency Northern Ireland's Protestant majority who wished to remain part of the United Kingdom, what he felt they needed to hear. Trimble's message was to paint an infernally complex picture with an extremely broad brush that there was good news and bad news. The good news was that peace in Northern Ireland was possible. The bad news was that peace in Northern Ireland would necessitate accommodation with and concessions too, not merely reasonable Irish nationalists like John Hume's SDLP, but militant Irish Republicans very much including the Irish Republican army. It is entirely likely that, during Northern Ireland, stumble and grasp towards peace in the late 1990s, trimble found dealing with the other side complicated and uncomfortable, though it was vastly easier than dealing with his own. Not only was Ian Paisley continuing to enjoy the applause usually attracted by melodrama pronouncing the entire peacemaking enterprise and negotiation with the devil, but many of the more moderate unionists who voted for trembles UUP were unhappy about the pinhead tap dancing around the decommissioning of the IRA's arsenal and about the prospect of the likes of Martin McGuinness, a former commander of the IRA's Derry brigade, playing a key role in the government. We've done our bit. Mister Adams. It's over to you. We've jumped. You follow. When trimble became the inaugural first minister of Northern Ireland's new look government in 1998, McGinnis was his education minister. Within a decade, Ian Paisley would be Northern Ireland's first minister and Martin McGuinness, his deputy, and the two men would somehow forge such a friendship that they would become known by bemused colleagues as the chuckle brothers. By then, David trimble was lord trimble of Liz. He eventually left the UUP for the UK's Conservative Party. David trimble did one of the hardest things that any politician indeed any person can do. He recognized that he was a beneficiary of the status quo and understood nevertheless that it needed to change. We rise from this table knowing that the union is stronger than it was when we sat down. From monocle 24, I'm Andrew mullet.

trimble Northern Ireland lord trimble Hume Ulster unionist party Paisley Nobel Prize Irish nationalist social democ John Hume United Kingdom portadown county Ian Paisley Norwegian Nobel committee orange order king Billy armagh Porter Trimble Martin McGuinness
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:41 min | 5 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Eric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> greitens <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for it is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he has brilliantly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and wittily <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> conflated the two <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> proceeding on the <Speech_Music_Male> doubtless correct assumption <Speech_Music_Male> that shooting both <Speech_Music_Male> kinds of rhinos <Speech_Music_Male> is the sort of thing of <Speech_Music_Male> which his voters would <Speech_Music_Male> approve. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Do you see what he has <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> done here? Honestly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> he must have had <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his best people up <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> all night on <Speech_Male> this one. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Rhino as in <Speech_Male> Republican in name <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> only is a term <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of abuse frequently <Speech_Male> flung by seething <Speech_Male> trumpets in <Speech_Male> the direction of <Speech_Male> those of their fellow <Speech_Male> conservatives who <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also maintain a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> passing interest in the <Speech_Music_Male> constitution, the rule <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of law norms and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conventions that kind <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of stuff. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Greitens <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> previously actually <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> governor of Missouri, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which we suppose <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> somebody has to be <Speech_Male> appears in his <Speech_Male> ad slash thinly <Speech_Male> veiled death threat <Speech_Male> carrying a shotgun <Speech_Music_Male> and surrounded <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by cosplaying <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ninny's <Speech_Music_Male> in khaki camouflage. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Join the maga <Speech_Male> crew, get a rhino <Speech_Male> hunting permit. <Speech_Male> There's no bagging limit, <Speech_Music_Male> no tagging limit, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and it doesn't expire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> until we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> save our country. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Intrigued enough <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to have a bit of a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> flip through the governor's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> CV, we learned <Speech_Male> though would <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> characterize our <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> surprise as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> short of complete <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that subheadings <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on his Wikipedia <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> page <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> include, but are by no <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> means limited to <Speech_Music_Male> indictment, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> impeachment <Speech_Music_Male> and resignation <Speech_Music_Male> campaign <Speech_Male> finance violations <Speech_Male> and a <Speech_Male> fair and sexual <Speech_Music_Male> assault allegations. <Speech_Male> It's always <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the ones you'd least <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> suspect <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for monocle 24 <Music> <Advertisement> and Andrew mullet. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Thank you very much, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Andrew. And <Speech_Male> that's all for this edition <Speech_Male> of the briefing. <Speech_Male> It was produced <Speech_Male> by John <Speech_Male> mccord, our researcher <Speech_Male> was Isabel Rosen <Speech_Male> and our studio <Speech_Male> manager was Kevin <Speech_Male> McLean. The briefing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is back on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Monday at the same time. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> Thanks for listening.

Eric Missouri Andrew mullet Isabel Rosen Andrew John Kevin
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:00 min | 7 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"It is an especially onerous imposition, bestowing yourself every few years to walk up the street and make a mark on a piece of paper. It's about the least you can be asked for the fabulous boon that is citizenship of a free democracy. Making it compulsory, gently reminds that this spectacular good fortune confers duties as well as privileges. For Monica 24, I'm Andrew mullet. And thanks, as always, too, Andrew. He's taking it says here a well earned break in Australia this week. I'll be the judge of that. But he hasn't been compiling his weekly what we learned monologue, Moore's the pity, but fear not because where we would have played that. Instead, we have this. I'm joined by Monaco senior correspondent. Hello. And also by our Latin America affairs correspondent lucinda Elliott, who's on the line from Buenos Aires to tell us about some of the stories making news in South America. And I'll come to you to send a first of all a good morning to you to where you are. Let's look towards Venezuela, really interesting. I love it when lots of to use a few slight generalizations. Some crooked politicians seem to always come back into circulation in your part of the world. What's happening in Venezuela? Tell us about this one. So Venezuelans opposition candidate leopoldo Lopez, who was long jailed, is actually planning to take part in primary elections. Well, considering also that Lopez lives in Madrid and he gave this speech at Harvard University this week and will likely have difficulties returning from exile to run in an actual race, means that the story says half of something really rather than what it may or may not reveal about president Maduro, who has sidelined many of his rivals since he assumed office is what the prospect of Lopez running again. There's about the Venezuelan opposition because they've long boycotted elections and now it appears that the opposition is changing to tactics and realizing that they have to take part in some form of electoral process in Venezuela, even if they argue that it's fraudulent, the Maduro is governing on lawfully, et cetera. And this is really sort of opening up a path once again, says Lopez to mobilize the Venezuelan people, but it's really a shift in the position of the opposition that has refused to take part in elections for years. Yeah, really interesting. And Fernando, let me bring you in here with someone else who has sort of exiled or had some run ins with the law himself, Lula, of course. Now what's happening with him because this sort of will he won't hear has been fascinating to watch. Where are we at in this amazing story? So basically this week, Lula won a landmark, a UN human rights appeal. So basically, there's been a pano at the UN and they said that the car wash operation in Brazil, which in fact imprisoned Lula, and he couldn't be a candidate in the 2018 elections. Well, basically they're saying that this operation violated Lula's rights. And in a way, our very own Supreme Court already did that. That's why he's a candidate, or he will be a candidate for this year's presidential elections. And you know, of course, Lula would say that he thinks that you and decision is so cleansing. And Sergio Moro who was the judge of the operation is interesting to see because he tried to be a candidate for president in this year, but he didn't work out, he was not doing very well with the polls so he became quite a minor figure and I remember at the time he was considered a hero. The international hero he was on the cover of all our weekly magazines and newspapers. But Tom Berlin, if you ask him and say, will this be helpful to a point, but I don't think Bolsonaro supporters, they will see this, oh, the UN said the Lili's innocence. So, you know, maybe I'll vote for him. I think it's so polarized right now, the Bolsonaro supporters, those 30% who remain of Bolsonaro, no matter what. I can't even imagine what Bolsonaro needs to do to stop voting for hand in a way. Which is a slightly along. It is. And what about Luna very quickly? What's his prospects? His chances. I mean, he's still very much the favorite. He's a polling consistently at 41%, but Bolsonaro is catching up a little bit. He's like with 30%. I still think Lula remains absolutely the favorite. But we should never underestimate Bolsonaro. We certainly should. No, at least, let's go back to you. I want to ask you a little bit about this story. Really intriguing from Guyana about oil reserves, more being discovered this week. I think it's Exxon's made some discoveries. Tell us how significant this is because obviously there's a very different appetite to talk about and consider oil reserve particularly at the moment with various other pressures, but it's kind of interesting in terms of what it tells us about Guyana more broadly. Yeah, I mean, I think one thing that very few people know first, I mean, with this discovery, it really puts Guyana on the map because very few people actually know that an English speaking country is part of South America to start off with. And Guyana is also a very diverse society, albeit a very small one, the country has a population of roughly 800,000 people that are a mix of Indian Chinese European and Creole descendants and that the Hindu community is particularly prevalent, one of their signature dishes is curry. And I think this discovery obviously they're going to have to think how they share the spoils. This has been one of the really big arguments really with these massive discoveries with such a small population. How do you get these massive offshore reserves and the royalties from that to benefit its people? Because it still remains one of the poorest countries in Latin America. Yeah, and there's lots of things about Ghana that people don't know that perhaps they should. I know in terms of its other features, not just its population, but its geography. It's a good reminder, isn't it, listen to that we should sort of look again at some of these geographies that sometimes we overlook. Yeah, I mean, it is home to one of the world's if you're brave enough, one of the world's widest and longest single drop waterfalls for anyone, as I say, brave enough to launch themselves off. And in part, because Andrew are presenter and sports fan is absent today also Guyana has a string of very noteworthy cricketers..

Lula Venezuela Lopez Andrew mullet lucinda Elliott leopoldo Lopez Bolsonaro president Maduro UN Sergio Moro Guyana South America Tom Berlin Latin America Monaco Buenos Aires Maduro Monica Harvard University
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:46 min | 8 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"This is the briefing with me, Andrew mullet, now much of Europe is presently flinching at gathering inflation the Euro area's rate was circa 7.5% in March. Little sympathy will be forthcoming from people presently attempting to keep up with the cost of living in turkey, however, where already rampant inflation has this week's surged further and cleared a yearly rate of 61%. Turkey's economy was listing even before the war in Ukraine, which has spiked prices of gas oil and grain. In defiance of conventional economic wisdom and indeed common sense, turkey's president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan continues to insist that low interest rates are a cure, not a cause. I'm joined with more by Hannah lucinda Smith, Istanbul correspondent for the times. Hannah, we have spoken about this before, but to give us some idea of how much weirder this is getting. What sort of impact is it now having on just trying to get stuff done at a day to today level? Yeah, well I think obviously the kind of businesses that have been most affected are the ones that rely on imports and that's because of the collapse in the Turkish currency. So just anecdotally on my street in the past couple of weeks, two shops, which were selling kind of foreign goods, one of the medallion won the mccloud shop have both shot down. It's just become unsustainable because as soon as you kind of convert the prices that you're paying in Euros or dollars or pounds or whatever into Turkish lira, it's just astronomical compared to a year ago and just something that even middle class or upper class Turks can't afford. It's only the kind of super rich you can really afford to be paying those prices anymore. Things like imported food products imported alcohol things like that. It just incredibly expensive. So that's where the most visible signs on the high street if you like are. But other things as well, turkey and ports almost all of its energy. Heating bills going absolutely through the roof. Every time we're looking at kind of gas bills, this winter, people just wincing. Petrol prices, again, going up and up and up. The taxi price is going up as a result of that. And of course, you know, turkey does produce a lot of its own food, particularly fruits and vegetables. But those have to be transported. So even things that are locally produced, there's still a knock on effect. So all of this bunched together is what's causing this absolutely sky high inflation that we're seeing here. I mean, those businesses will, of course, not be the only ones in turkey to have given up and therefore shut up shop in recent weeks. So are we seeing any sort of swift decisive response to this crisis from the government from the Central Bank from anybody? No, is the short answer. I mean, there are a number of things which are kind of beyond beyond the Turkish government's control, kind of worldwide factors which you mentioned at the start. You know, the war in Ukraine, you know, surging energy prices, all these kind of things. And that sort of things that are causing inflation everywhere. But the thing that's causing it to be kind of so out of control here in turkey is the kind of collapse in the Turkish currency. And that is down pretty much to one factor and that is the actions of the Central Bank who are basically refusing to raise interest rates. It must be said under pressure from president Erdoğan. Every kind of technocrats in that bank who's tried to go against him has basically been removed from their position. So Erdoğan has this idea that it's high interest rates that cause high inflation. Almost every other economist on the planet will say exactly the opposite. If you want to bring your inflation down, you have to raise your interest rates. But the fact is in turkey, people are living off credit in different ways either taking out credit to buy a new car, you know, using credit cards just to cover bills using multiple credit cards and a lot of cases. And I think, you know, Erdoğan knows that if there was a sudden credit contraction that would come along with raising interest rates, that's going to send a really sudden shock through the economy. So although on one level, you are starting to see the effects and certainly as well as kind of some businesses closing down prices just go every time you go and supermarket. On another level, you know, turkey is still very, very vibrant and there are people out and people in the cafes, but that's kind of built on sand really. And if the credit was whipped away from underneath the perks, I think there would be a really, really kind of big immediate shock. In Istanbul, thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing on monocle 24..

turkey Andrew mullet president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan Hannah lucinda Smith Ukraine Erdoğan Turkish government Istanbul Hannah Central Bank the times Europe president Erdoğan
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:41 min | 9 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"This is your. These are prosperous, middle class people, these are not people trying to get away from areas in North Africa. They look like any European family that you would live next door to. What could be a difference here from other conflicts, you know, that could seem very far away, you know, in Africa or Middle East or whatever. These are Europeans that we're seeing being killed. This isn't a place with all due respect. You know, like Iraq or Afghanistan, this is a relatively civilized relatively European. I have to choose those words carefully too. City, where you wouldn't expect that or hope that it's going to happen. We really should have learned by now what with two world wars, one 30 years war 100 Years' War the Napoleonic Wars more Balkan wars than there is time to list and uncountable other conflicts uprisings revolts invasions incursions occupations, battle clashes and skirmishes going all the way back to the etruscans first pop at Rome that Europe should probably get over any sense of its own pristine exceptionalism in this regard. And to go back to where we came in, kind of while we had learned that this was not really a time for the sad trombone glissando or similar audio JP, there was nevertheless justification to be found for firing up the sound effects if you knew where to look. Before we learned that in France far right presidential candidate and barely discernible improvement on her ghastly crank of her father, marine le pen had been obliged and at great expense to hastily pulp 1.2 million glossy election brochures which afforded great prominence to a picture of her shaking hands with her hero, Vladimir Putin. Go on, you know you want to. Because what we really learned this week was that we hadn't learned what we should have learned about the ultimate folly of attempting to indulge co op or cooperate with tyrants and or crooks. History contains vanishingly few examples of either and or both, knocking it off when asked nicely. And we've learned a fair bit about what it takes to stand in front of such oppressors. It is difficult to say whether it is a heartening or damning meta commentary on our age that we've learned it from Ukraine's voice of paddington bear and 2006 Dancing with the Stars champion. President tooth. My thoughts, nationalization. For Monica 24, I'm Andrew mullet. My thanks as always to Andrew Muller and he'll be here later today with the Monica Daley at 1800 London, and he'll be back tomorrow with a live edition of the foreign desk. That is, at midday, London time. Though, is all we have time for on today's edition of the briefing. It was produced by rich James and colotto rebello and our researcher was Lillian fawcett. Our studio manager was Nora hol my thanks to them one and all we'll be back at the same time on Monday that is noon London 7 a.m. if you're listening in Washington D.C. I'm Tom Edwards goodbye and thank you for listening..

marine le pen North Africa Middle East Afghanistan Iraq Africa Rome Vladimir Putin Andrew mullet Europe Andrew Muller France Monica Daley Ukraine rich James London colotto rebello Monica Lillian fawcett Nora hol
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:14 min | 9 months ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"These are prosperous, middle class people, these are not people trying to get away from areas in North Africa. They look like any European family that you would live next door to. What could be a difference here from other conflicts, you know, that could seem very far away, you know, in Africa or Middle East or whatever. These are Europeans that we're seeing being killed. This isn't a place with all due respect. You know, like Iraq or Afghanistan, this is a relatively civilized relatively European. I have to choose those words carefully too. City, where you wouldn't expect that or hope that it's going to happen. We really should have learned by now what with two world wars, one 30 years war 100 Years' War the Napoleonic Wars more Balkan wars than there is time to list and uncountable other conflicts uprisings revolts invasions incursions occupations, battle clashes and skirmishes going all the way back to the etruscans first pop at Rome that Europe should probably get over any sense of its own pristine exceptionalism in this regard. And to go back to where we came in, kind of while we had learned that this was not really a time for the sad trombone glissando or similar audio JP, there was nevertheless justification to be found for firing up the sound effects. If you knew where to look. Before we learned that in France, far right presidential candidate and barely discernible improvement on her ghastly crank of a father, marine le pen had been obliged and at great expense to hastily pulp 1.2 million glossy election brochures which afforded great prominence to a picture of her shaking hands with her hero, Vladimir Putin. Go on, you know you want to. Because what we really learned this week was that we hadn't learned what we should have learned about the ultimate folly of attempting to indulge co op or cooperate with tyrants and or crooks. History contains vanishingly few examples of either and or both, knocking it off when asked nicely. And we've learned a fair bit about what it takes to stand in front of such oppressors. It is difficult to say whether it is a heartening or damning meta commentary on our age that we've learned it from Ukraine's voice of paddington bear and 2006 Dancing with the Stars champion. But they are tooth, present tooth. National resources. For Monica 24, I'm Andrew mullet. Many thanks to Andrew there, and of course his program, the foreign desk coming up a little bit later today where he takes an in depth dive into the situation in Ukraine. Now, let's.

North Africa marine le pen Middle East Afghanistan Iraq Africa Rome Vladimir Putin Europe France Andrew mullet Ukraine Monica Andrew
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Learned or <Speech_Male> further hasn't peculiar <Speech_Male> to Australian <Speech_Male> motor sport and <Speech_Music_Male> to mount panorama <Speech_Music_Male> in particular <Speech_Music_Male> via possibly <Speech_Male> the strangest moment <Speech_Male> of motor sport <Speech_Male> commentary ever <Speech_Male> broadcast. Adam <Speech_Male> Curtis can send <Speech_Male> to find his fee to <Speech_Male> the usual address <Speech_Male> once he's overlaid <Speech_Male> it on that new radical <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> song <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or whatever. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Now, I was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just detailing mark <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in my experience <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> here we've seen kangaroos, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seen horses, we've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seen trees, we've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seen water. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We've seen bits of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cars scattered from one end <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the place to the other. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We've never seen in a kidnap. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We have never seen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a kidnap. We've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sent dogs. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> But we have not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seen in the kidnap <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on this racetrack. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This place is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just mad, isn't it? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What's <Speech_Music_Male> in an LP? <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> When you didn't <Music> believe me? No. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> See? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Not that hard. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Regrettably, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> unable to do proper <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> justice to the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> unexpectedly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> moving spectacle <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of high octane <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> supercars <Speech_Male> swerving suddenly <Speech_Music_Male> terrifying speeds <Speech_Music_Male> to avoid hitting <Speech_Music_Male> an echidna. We <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> would prefer to think <Speech_Music_Male> not just because <Speech_Music_Male> the drivers feared for <Speech_Music_Male> their tires. <Speech_Male> The echidna <SpeakerChange> was <Speech_Music_Male> fine, incidentally. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> And. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Yes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> learned that last December <Speech_Male> during what was <Speech_Male> supposed to be locked down <Speech_Music_Male> a Christmas party, <Speech_Music_Male> either did or did <Speech_Music_Male> not take place <Speech_Music_Male> in 10 Downing Street, <Speech_Music_Male> but if it did, <Speech_Music_Male> it was all fine, <Speech_Music_Male> even though <Speech_Male> if in fact, it had <Speech_Male> happened someone who hadn't <Speech_Male> even gone to it <Speech_Male> if it did <Speech_Male> had to be sacked once <Speech_Music_Male> we learned of it. <Speech_Music_Male> Let's have a <Speech_Music_Male> brief <SpeakerChange> stab of <Speech_Music_Male> circus music. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> What we really <Speech_Male> learned here to <Speech_Male> our scarcely <Speech_Male> expressible incredulity <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is that they're dwell <Speech_Music_Male> among us. People <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who did not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> embrace as one <Speech_Male> of the few consolations <Speech_Male> of lockdown, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the perfect <Speech_Music_Male> excuse, <Speech_Music_Male> not to attend <Speech_Music_Male> the office Christmas <Speech_Music_Male> party. <Speech_Music_Male> Weirdos. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Wesley <Music> <Advertisement> gong. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> For Monica 24 <Silence> <Advertisement> I'm Andrew mullet. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Thanks very much to <Speech_Male> Andrew and <Speech_Male> that's all for this edition <Speech_Male> of the briefing. <Speech_Male> It was produced <Speech_Male> by Rhys James and <Speech_Male> Emma Sierra, <Speech_Male> a researcher was <Speech_Male> really enforce it <Speech_Male> and our studio manager <Speech_Male> was not a heel. <Speech_Male> The briefing is back <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on Monday at the same time. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Goodbye <Speech_Music_Male> and thanks for <SpeakerChange> listening.

Curtis Adam Andrew mullet Rhys James Emma Sierra
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"He's <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Music_Male> me has said vendettas. <Speech_Music_Male> Quayle <Speech_Male> when there is <Speech_Male> other people are taken <Speech_Music_Male> your county. <Speech_Music_Male> You have joined <Speech_Music_Male> the y. <Speech_Music_Male> You participated <Speech_Music_Male> what <Speech_Music_Male> they're <Speech_Music_Male> i'm green. <Speech_Music_Male> The <Speech_Music_Male> what and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i want you <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> date in. <Speech_Male> The taliban <Speech_Male> might have been <Speech_Male> able to continue <Speech_Male> operating afghanistan <Speech_Male> so you miserable <Speech_Male> fundamentalist <Speech_Male> theme park. Had <Speech_Male> they not in the late. <Speech_Male> Nineteen ninety s <Speech_Male> offered haven to the <Speech_Male> saudi terrorist <Speech_Male> osama bin laden <Speech_Male> who had been <Speech_Male> a significant funder <Speech_Male> of the anti-soviet <Speech_Male> mujuhedeen <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> the united states <Speech_Male> came for bin laden <Speech_Male> in two thousand and <Speech_Male> one. The taliban <Speech_Male> were adjunct targets <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> of america's <Speech_Male> vengeance <Speech_Male> or than two weeks <Speech_Male> ago <Speech_Male> i gave taliban <Speech_Male> leaders a series <Speech_Male> of clear and specific <Speech_Male> demands. <Speech_Male> None <Speech_Male> of these demands were met <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and now <Speech_Music_Male> the taliban will pay <Speech_Music_Male> a price <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> destroying camps and disrupting <Speech_Male> communications. <Speech_Male> We'll make it more <Speech_Male> difficult for <Speech_Male> the terror network to <Speech_Male> train new recruits <Speech_Male> and coordinate <Speech_Male> their evil plans <Speech_Male> to taliban <Speech_Male> julie chased <Speech_Male> out of kabul <Speech_Male> and other major <Speech_Male> urban centers <Speech_Male> but as they <Speech_Male> are making increasingly <Speech_Male> clear <Speech_Male> never went altogether <Silence> away <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> however the question <Speech_Male> of who the taliban <Speech_Male> actually are <Speech_Male> now does not <Speech_Male> have a straightforward <Speech_Male> answer. <Speech_Male> It has been tempting <Speech_Male> for western media <Speech_Male> and one <Speech_Male> fears. Western <Speech_Male> policymakers <Speech_Male> to frame. The taliban <Speech_Male> is a monolith <Speech_Male> and afghanistan <Speech_Male> as therefore <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> binary conflict <Speech_Male> between a western-backed <Speech_Male> democratic <Speech_Male> government and <Speech_Male> fanatical theocratic <Speech_Male> militia. <Speech_Male> It is <Speech_Male> this arguably optimistic <Speech_Male> analysis <Speech_Male> which underpins <Speech_Male> the legitimacy <Speech_Male> of the ongoing <Speech_Male> negotiations involving <Speech_Male> afghanistan's <Speech_Male> government and <Speech_Male> the taliban in <Speech_Male> doha. <Speech_Male> It is debatable. <Speech_Male> However <Speech_Male> how much attention to <Speech_Male> the negotiations <Speech_Male> or the negotiators <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> being paid by <Speech_Male> the taliban legions <Speech_Male> which may now <Speech_Male> hold sixty five <Speech_Male> percent of afghanistan <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> climbing <Speech_Male> there are factions <Speech_Male> within the taliban <Speech_Male> who never much cared <Speech_Male> for the idea of peace <Speech_Male> with the afghan <Speech_Male> government the west <Speech_Male> and in some cases <Speech_Male> with each other. <Speech_Male> There <Speech_Male> are some running opium <Speech_Male> to raise funds <Speech_Male> for holy war <Speech_Male> and others waging <Speech_Male> holy war as <Speech_Male> a cover for running opium <Speech_Male> there <Speech_Male> are taliban factions <Speech_Male> based in and <Speech_Male> encouraged by <Speech_Male> iran and <Speech_Male> pakistan <Speech_Male> there <Speech_Male> are offshoots and splinter <Speech_Male> groups which are <Speech_Male> possibly better thought <Speech_Male> of as family <Speech_Male> run rackets <Speech_Male> for example. The <Speech_Male> economy network <Speech_Male> who self interest <Speech_Male> is demonstrated <Speech_Male> by the famously <Speech_Female> flexible allegiances. <Speech_Female> This is <Speech_Female> network that is as much <Speech_Female> like mafia <Speech_Female> as <SpeakerChange> it is <Speech_Male> a terrorist outfit. <Speech_Male> Ver- found <Speech_Male> the late. Gela <Speech_Male> ledeen connie <Speech_Male> was a see. Ya <Speech_Male> favorite during afghanistan's <Speech_Male> war against <Speech_Male> the soviets. <Speech_Male> It's currently <Speech_Male> his son. Syra <Speech_Male> judean hi. Connie <Speech_Male> is a wanted <Speech_Male> terrorist with <Speech_Male> ten million dollars <Speech_Male> of america's money <Speech_Male> on his head. <Speech_Male> There are those <Speech_Male> defending territory. <Speech_Male> And those <Speech_Music_Male> pursuing feuds. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's arguable indeed. <Speech_Male> The only thing <Speech_Male> afghanistan's <Speech_Male> querulous and competing <Speech_Male> clans and factions. <Speech_Male> Were able to <Speech_Male> get together on <Speech_Male> not for the first <Speech_Male> time. In afghanistan's <Speech_Male> history was <Speech_Male> the defeat of the common <Speech_Male> enemy furnished <Speech_Male> by a foreign <Speech_Male> invader <Speech_Male> and however the us <Speech_Male> tries to spin <Speech_Male> its withdrawal. The <Speech_Male> taliban certainly <Speech_Male> as they see <Speech_Male> it have accomplished <Speech_Male> exactly that <Speech_Male> we may <Speech_Male> now be witnessing. <Speech_Male> The beginning of the <Speech_Male> victims dividing <Speech_Male> the spoils <Speech_Male> a process unlikely <Speech_Male> to improve. <Speech_Male> The lives of <Speech_Male> afghanistan's <Speech_Music_Male> deserted people <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> for monocle twenty four. I'm andrew mullet.

taliban afghanistan osama bin laden america Gela pakistan iran Connie andrew mullet
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"There will <Speech_Male> be a surgeon cases <Speech_Male> in australia <Speech_Male> if there is any <Speech_Male> kind of loosening <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> even if people are vaccinated <Speech_Male> we know that <Speech_Male> vaccine uptake varies. <Speech_Male> We know that vaccine <Speech_Male> uptake geographically <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> socially <Speech_Male> we also know there <Speech_Male> are some harder to reach <Speech_Male> communities across <Speech_Male> australia. Who <Speech_Male> may or may not <Speech_Male> be so supportive <Speech_Male> of these sorts of measures <Speech_Male> and if <Speech_Male> they're allowed to <Speech_Male> be infected <Speech_Male> or see big outbreaks <Speech_Male> in those groups. <Speech_Male> It could be a disaster <Speech_Male> for them. And <Speech_Male> so all of these things. We <Speech_Male> prang on the minds <Speech_Male> of both the population. <Speech_Male> Generally <Speech_Male> and also policymakers. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> it's all going to be about probably <Speech_Male> a managed <Speech_Male> retreat. I would say <Speech_Male> stepping back <Speech_Male> gently <Speech_Male> from these measures. Having <Speech_Male> put in place the <Speech_Male> maximum number of <Speech_Male> safeguards to keep <Speech_Male> everyone as safe <Speech_Male> as possible <Speech_Male> but having explained <Speech_Male> to people there <Speech_Male> will be some cases. <Speech_Male> We've done our best to minimize <Speech_Male> them. But <Speech_Male> that's the price we <Speech_Male> have to pay ultimately <Speech_Male> as a country in order to <Speech_Male> restore everyone's <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> normality. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Dr chris. <Speech_Male> smith and professor <Speech_Male> mark is. Thank <Speech_Male> you both very much <Speech_Male> for joining us on <Speech_Music_Male> the foreign desk. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's it <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for this episode <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the foreign desk. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We will be back <Speech_Music_Male> next week with the first <Speech_Male> installment <Speech_Male> of our special historical <Speech_Male> summer <Speech_Male> series. Do <Speech_Male> tune in for that <Speech_Male> and look out for the <Speech_Male> foreign desk. Explainer <Speech_Male> available every <Speech_Male> wednesday. The foreign <Speech_Male> desk was produced <Speech_Male> by. So <Speech_Male> and christie evans. Christie <Speech_Music_Male> also produces <Speech_Male> the foreign desk. Explain <Speech_Male> for me <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> andrew mullet. Thank you very <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> much for listening until <Speech_Music_Male> next time <SpeakerChange> goodbye. <Music>

australia Dr chris christie evans andrew mullet Christie
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"The monaco daily is brought to you in association with alliens the us republican party expresses ambivalence about people actually voting hong kong's pro democracy tabloid goes to the presses for the loss time hungary cranks up. Its homophobic dog whistling to erhan variety decibels i'm andrew. Mullah the monocle daily in association with allience starts now. Hello and welcome to the monocle daily coming to you from studio sierra. Midori house in london. Boundary mullah my guest isabel hilton and vincent mcilvanney will be discussing all the day's big stories and we'll have the latest installment of this week series looking at the european football championships today. It's italy as the zuri baffled viewers by not doing that traditional impression of drying paint. That's all coming up right here on the daily in association with allience monico twenty. Four right now. This is the monocle daily. And i'm andrew mullet my guests. Today are isabel hilton editor of china. Dialogue and vincent mcilvanney. Who's a journalist and irregular politics commentator. He on monocle twenty four Welcome both to the monocle. Daily is bill. You have been back since we started. I have in fact. I'm only just getting over the excitement of my first visit to the studio and it's loved be back again whereas vinnie. This is your first in person. Appearance on the new-look monocle daily I do understand that listeners. On our weekend programs have been hearing from you. But what have you been up to recently apart from that. Yeah that's right. Well i'm For it ending business presenting for reuters as well so it's Just starting to get back to normal with being able to go into studios like this. Well we will have more from you both shortly but first this in a maneuver which suggests that the us republican party is increasingly resigned to or perhaps outright. Enjoying the role of pantomime villain gop senators appear to have sunk president. Joe biden's much cherished ambition of implementing. Nationwide election rules. Broadly speaking the democratic proposals would have made voting easier at a time when many state republican parties are trying to make voting more difficult especially for people unlikely to vote for republicans. Suzanne lynch is the washington correspondent for the irish times. She joins me now. Suzanne first of all what is the republican. Party's rationale for sinking this. Well according to the senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. He said this bill was Effort by democrats to as he puts it rigged the rules of american elections permanently in the democrats favor so he believes that democrats are introducing these new rules making it easier for people to host to benefit themselves when it comes to the battle because research has shown it's not conclusive these measures that people want to introduce like early voting greater access to drop boxes that january at this tends to benefit democrats that their voters are more likely to use some of of these measures so that is republican rationale. But they were very much united should on this folks behind senate minority leader. We didn't have one republican who broke ranks and they blocked this vote from even going to a procedure debate in the senate floor those mcconnell arguably have a case there is it possible that the democratic party is not necessarily preceding out of a pure heart or desire to expand the franchise necessarily the case. Because what happened. I mean i did say that. It benefits democrats but there are also examples where competit- republicans for example a lot of trump voters us early voting in the last election. So wash i think one of the issues in the background here. Is that a lot of new measures were brought in a state by state level because of the pandemic last year so there were more options for people to vote early to drop their ballots off in a safe box kind of thing. Republicans are arguing. That democrats are trying to make these measures permanent when there is no need to but there are so it measures thus republicans oppose that are obviously trying to suppress the vote in some cases. Black folks for example moves in texas to maybe a limit sunday voting. That scene is very much an attack on a practice known as sold to the polls here whereby a lot of churchgoing people in the black community and our go to the voting booth after church on a sunday for example so if you pick down through the various measures that are going on at state by state level here there are definitely some measures to actively suppress the vote it within certain communities vice president kamala harris who was of course in the senate to watch this idea be sunk has said that the fight is not over a use. The possible next step so the problem here is like a lot of Laws in america each a lot of power over how they run elections and this bill was an effort to bring in a federal nationwide standard. That has now failed so it now. Looks like the main option for democrats or for the biden administration if they want to try and stop what they see as suppression of ultra-right across the country and would be the justice department to maybe take a case against what texas doing. What george is doing. That's probably the most likely next step here. The other issue is that a lot of democrats are now calling for the filibuster to be abolished. Dot dot is the mechanism in the senate which essentially demands a sixty vote majority rather than a simple majority in the henderson to pass legislation. They are now saying that that is undone democratic quiet that you need sixty votes when when democrats have control of the senate the it's fifty fifty but with the casting. Vote of the vice president. Democrats essentially have a majority there and they are saying if democrats wants to advance something. They should be allowed to do that. Why do we have the sixty gold threshold. So we may see efforts to change that whole filibuster system in the coming months. I think it'll be greater pressure to do so now. Just a final quick thought. Susan does this in any way tie in with the the republican party's ongoing attempts Softly unsubtly to de legitimize last november's presidential election. I think it does. I think there is a connection here because the efforts that are going on in republican controlled states are directly response to the controversy over at last year's election and the unsubstantiated claims by president trump at sports that he actually wouldn't so if these states so it's in the very states where donald trump questioned the results that these efforts to suppress the will restrict voting access are underway..

Joe biden donald trump Susan isabel hilton mitch mcconnell Suzanne trump Suzanne lynch january texas vinnie sixty votes last year last november Democrats kamala harris republicans vincent mcilvanney italy Republicans
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"We are turning to the world of music and to get the latest news from that very sector. I enjoy now in the studio by monocle. Twenty four page reynolds a page. What are we starting with. I should say this is going to be a regular or semi regular new thing. We are going to attempt on the daily. You have even down. You've even broken down here into little formats so don't screw it up is what i'm saying pressure What are we starting with. Well as you said there's going to be before it. It might be subject to change. Perhaps i shouldn't voice exactly what it's going to be. It's going to be. I'm going to talk about dale. I'm going to talk about a launch. Usually kind of maybe in the tech world of music and then talk about a musical released. So we're gonna start today with the deal That is this week's deal between sony music. Entertainment and something else. Something else are. Uk's largest independent poke cost production company said it says sony music acquisition of a big causing company and this condo point so much broader trend that we're seeing at the moment within the global poll industry of tech giants Music streaming services bake labels wanting to get into that poku wild because you know way costas we can see the value in of course. But i think there's a lot of other people hunted industry minded people who also saying how kind of audio services a really really taking off quite interestingly I was reading about it. The interesting thing for music streaming services like spotify that got really into focusing as well amazon who have music streaming service apple of course who've had focused for ages. It's a way for music. Streaming services to kind of differentiate themselves in tons of content. Because of course they will have the same catalog of music but by acquiring different focusing services kind of offering exclusive poku within this streaming services than the able to quite different content. And so it's kind of a way for them to create some competition between themselves And you know we. We've seen other deals. We saw amazon by one degree that was in december for around three hundred million A huge american po cost network And at the moment it's looking like there's still quite modest who's emarketer suggests that the Poku costing will raise about a million a billion dollars In in ad revenue this year But i think there's kind of a bright future. Well let's move along to the launch. You mentioned spotify and spotify. Have something new up this leave. This it says here is going to be there. Rival to club house which was an app which sounded to me like more or less my precise idea of what hell will be like. So how he spotify thing going to be any different well. That's a good question. So i think th the reason that specifies is going to be slightly different is it. The app itself links People who have pre existing spotify accounts. I suppose to the app right. So if you already have a spotify account you can actually just log into spotify green room without creating another account for something They also have a feature which is if you host audio every so. Let's explain actually so to anyone who hasn't heard of clubhouse what are the sensually is is you're able to create a virtual audio room for discussions much. Let me in you sitting here. Let's say with hosts and then you can invite participants. Participants can virtually put their hands up and they can become part of the discussion. And it's all happening live to. That's what spotify wants to do with green room And i think what's going to happen is for people who already po cost or distributed. Poku three spotify. What they do is have a spotify green room virtual conversation perhaps for fans of the podcast and then what they can do is they can actually request that audio from spotify green room and then upload it as an additional podcast it also enables musicians. Perhaps you use spotify spotify for artists. They're able to host classified green rooms again with their fans. And then upload that audio afterwards so it's kind of Just creating another audio world. I think spotify and finally then what was and we've had the deal and the launch so now the release. What was the release you wish to discuss. So i'm cheating over because this song technically treating honestly this some technically came out last friday But it's chart entry for the uk charts happened today just before we went on air It didn't chalk quite as high as predicting it charted at seventeen as entry point This song is of course. New zealand's famous pop export lord. She's back with her new trucks. Solar power Have you heard it already or have not. It's it's a fantastic shoot it. I i listened to it. I and i was not fussed by it but then i kept going back to it. It's very subtle very is very you. Forex sounding. I think she said that this whole next upcoming album. She wants to basically sound like the sun. It also sounds a lot like a primal scream song from nineteen ninety. I don't you remember the summer. Load literally old enough to remember that when it actually came out at the time as a thing so so she's actually officially kind of said that the loaded actually sort of was the blueprint for this song or that kind of happened organically so i think she was in contact with primal scream and has said. I'm really sorry. I stole your song. But it did actually come out of my head so so they seem happy with it. And i think. I'm within my rights and probably not going to get a sued into oblivion by pointing out the loaded did itself bear certain resemblance to sympathy for the devil by the rolling. Exactly so you know. Perhaps the cycle continues. But it's a fantastic track is produced by jack antonoff. Who's with pretty much. Everyone under the sun he definitely. The man needs a holiday in the sun. Perhaps but i think we're going to listen to the section of it now we are. Lord is in fact going to play yourself page reynolds. Thank you very much for joining us. That is all for this edition of the monocle. Daily was produced by carlotta rebelo and research by sophie. Monaghan coons are sound. Engineer was steph jungle. I'm andrew mullet here in london. The daily returns at the same time on monday. Thank you for listening and have a great.

amazon london apple jack antonoff december carlotta rebelo sophie spotify Twenty four page seventeen monday this week dale today andrew mullet last friday Poku one degree this year around three hundred million
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"To attract more fire from his opponents and the media like in coming days. Monaco's new york city correspondent henry sheridan. They're finally on today's program. Swearing and this is an introduction to the topic at hand rather than an invitation to demonstrate one's capabilities on this front family show and so forth a survey by the british board of film classification has revealed that people are swearing more. Well it's not like the last few years haven't given us reason quinton. I use wearing more than you might have been a few years ago. Do you think. I have a horrible feeling. The answer may be yes. I find myself aswering a swear word and instantly thinking regretting it a big. Oh my god. I shouldn't have said this in these circumstances but newsrooms which i grew up pinson on. We're terrible places for swearing in a sub editors assing journalists for their lousy copy and they probably used much stronger words than that. Although i remember once i wonder how far i can go on there. I joined the financial times on this as a young journalist on the foreign desk. And i used to have to go down to the print room where they were putting together the pages and one day. I went down there to take my shift when the prince who was sitting that and he said loudly l. Luckier a- comes little old phone. Certainly put me in my place. I treasure the recollection of the chief sub editor written absolutely appalling supermarket tabloid. I worked for an australia many years ago. Who i would quote extensively. But i don't think i can without getting the station closed down. I'm done to give us some frame of reference here and present company excluded. What was the last thing you swore it. Pabst thirty seconds before we came back trying to park. This is not a good thing to do in central london. Now i love effing. And jeff ing. I do all the time. It's like sees sprinkling salt and pepper on your food. It gives your language spice and it's very satisfying. So you can. You can't really tether out with my cold dead hands but i'm going to carry on Swearing like a cheaper. Because the reason. I asked you specifically that question was according to the survey slightly more women than men are reporting swearing. More than they did. Five years ago is there. Is there a particular reason why that would be. I'm schooling and gwendolyn not making assumptions about the age bracket in which you have arrived but it says sixty five percent of over fifty. Five's say they would never swear in public versus twenty five percent for eighteen to twenty four year olds. Now i'm going to go ahead and assume you are slightly near the over fifty five bracket the eighteen to twenty four bracket we would you swear in public and in what circumstances yes undoubtedly a complete live. They would swear in public. I was thinking daniele i. The last time i saw was actually sitting in having a cup of coffee outside the twenty minutes before the program and a motorbike went past made any no racket and i guess very loudly but it was inaudible. 'cause the motorbike made such noise so i think the last thing i swore at in the privacy of my own home was the game this morning between geelong and port adelaide in the australian football league and that was that point when it looked like it wasn't going terribly wilfred jalaun although they did turn it around lost four in public and i think it was quite loudly and similar circumstances to the ones you just listed was it somebody on a knee scooter on the footpath and you know no jury would convict anyway. Then he's all for this edition of the monocle. Daily a big. Thanks to my panelists. Today appealing dunham appellate and to monaco's msl and henry sheridan today show walls produced by carlotta rebelo and research by sofi monaghan coons l. Sound engineer was steph chun-goo. I'm andrew mullet here in london. Daily is back at the same time tomorrow your host for that as well. Thanks for listening..

london eighteen tomorrow wilfred jalaun australia Today Five new york andrew mullet twenty five percent steph chun-goo sixty five percent four central london daniele Five years ago Monaco geelong today twenty four year
"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mullet" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Russia mean just finally then as we look ahead to these elections due in september. And i think it's fair to say that few if any russian mike is taking bets on the result but nonetheless other people in charge concerned about what these elections might portend not necessarily defeat at the polls but yeah outbursts of public anger at the way things are going the very concerned. Yes i mean. This is why they're trying to get their retaliation now. Well well ahead of the elections. They're afraid that could be mass boycotting the elections they will be stuffing the ballot boxes. They've done that all along. But even so if you get more people again on on social media trying to clamp down on social media because they know that people will be sharing things saying well no. We didn't go vote because there's no one vote for that. They are very worried about what even if they stop people from standing as candidates who they never be opposed to them the the the people and particularly the younger generation has still got method. And saying we don't like what's going on stephen. Dl thanks as always for joining us. That was the russia analyst. Stephen deal you're listening to the briefing. Here is monica's us rebelo. With the days of the headlines thanks. Andrew israeli opposition parties have agreed to form a new government. That would end. Benjamin netanyahu's twelve year stint as prime minister on their rotation arrangement right-wing politician naphtali bennett would serve as prime minister before handing over to the centrist yard lopate. Taiwan has called on china to embark upon real political reform rather than avoid facing up to nineteen eighty nine tiananmen square. Crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators. In beijing. tomorrow marks. Thirty two years since chinese troops open fire to win. Student-led led unrest in and around a square tokyo. Two thousand twenty president. Seiko hashimoto. says she is one hundred percent certain the olympics will go ahead but warned. The games must be prepared to proceed without spectators. In the event of coronavirus outbreak. There are fifty days until the delay. Tokyo games begin on the twenty third of july and portugal has announced the completion of a new undersea cable that stretches to north eastern brazil the six thousand kilometer transatlantic cable will reduce latency. Which is time it takes data to get to its destination by around fifty percent in can find out more at monaco. Dot com forward slash. Minute does today's headlines back to you. Andrew thank you. You are listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty four with me andrew mullet now there is much that remains to be understood about the sent to the us presidency of donald trump and which may require understanding all over again. Should he seek to get his old job back in two thousand and twenty four but one of the more baffling questions of this particular. Saga is the one of the barely bridled. Enthusiasm for trump professed by america's lodge noisy and powerful block of conservative christian evangelicals. Who did not seem a natural constituency for a candidate who was among many other apparent to terrence godless. Philanderer compulsive liar and chronic. Materialist joining me now. Is sarah posner. An investigative journalist and expert on the intersection of religion and politics. Her new book is called unholy. Why white evangelicals worship at the altar of donald trump. Sarah of festival. I think we should. We should probably try to establish a baseline here. Which is did the van. Jellicoe is do you think. Regard trump with any more or less enthusiasm enthusiasm than they would have regarded any of the republican candidate. They absolutely dead White evangelicals in the united states are predominantly republican there reliably seventy five to eighty percent of them vote republican and that was true with trump where about eighty percent of them voted for him but they did so far more enthusiastically than they would have or they did For george w bush john mccain or mitt. romney. I mean. I know the question. The answer to this question has literally filled a book. A either one. You've written boot. Why there are so many obvious reasons why you would think serious churchgoing family values conservative would be absolutely repelled by donald trump. Well as it turns out what they liked about. Donald trump is. He spoke to their social and cultural grievances in a way that really appealed to them his anti-democratic small schmaltzy impulses. Were exactly what they were looking for. He came along at a moment when they thought that their political and social issues abortion. Lgbtq rights separation of church and state. They're opposed to that were they. Were fearing that. That was slipping away from them. The demographics were against them that public opinion was against them and here came. Donald trump. He spoke to all of their grievances that political correctness and social justice was overwhelming our society and seizing control of our politics and he was willing to do anything to fight back and that really appealed to them and while he his racial grievances and his nativist grievances also appealed to them. It was these things are not separate from one another. I mean it's understandable. I guess up to a point you can see how people with those concerns would swallow a lot of their other objections and just think well. He's a guy who will get things done that we want to see. Get don we don't necessarily have to lock him. And i think most of us have probably cast a vote along those lines at some point in our lives but it it strikes me from having observed the last few years and also from reading your book that it did go beyond that a lot of these people were fully aboard board members of the donald trump cult of personality. They seem to like and him. Yes absolutely i. I think a lot of people mistakenly believe that weight evanger locals were holding their nose to vote for donald trump that they viewed it as a transactional relationship or vote of expedients to get their issues on the agenda but that is not true. They viewed trump as almost a messianic figure They compared him to king cyrus in the bible they compared him to. They said that god often chooses an unlikely figure to lead a nation at a critical juncture in its history so donald trump may not be a christian like us but he's chosen by god to restore a christian america that has been lost to secularism but buddies. All quite mad isn't it. It absolutely is. But i think that you if you look at it at face value. It seems mad. But if you dig beneath the surface and realize that their agenda has been an anti-democratic project from the start on the religious right got motivated in the nineteen seventies nod about abortion but about school desegregation They've been avid fox. News watchers since the advent of fox. News they swallow all of the fox. News Anti immigrant rhetoric. So the idea that they're only concerned about Family values or abortion or lgbtq rights is mistaken..

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Explainer 140: Floral tributes

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:28 min | 4 years ago

Explainer 140: Floral tributes

"In Flanders fields the poppies blow between the crosses bro on row. Those are the first lines of a poem written by Lifton Colonel John McCrea, a Canadian medic who served with the first brigade of the Canadian field artillery on the western front in the first World War, and who died of pneumonia in France, not long after hostilities ceased after the second battle of IPE in April, and may of nineteen fifteen McRae noticed that the first life to push through the devastated landscape and muddy improvised, cemeteries were scarlet poppies. The flower has since become across the Commonwealth a symbol of remembrance in modern Britain. However, the poppy has become a symbol of something else. A designation of which side you are on in one of the twenty first centuries, deeply tedious culture wars until really quite recently. The Royal British legions annual poppy appeal worked like this sometime in early November you approach to current or former soldier in a train station dropped some change into their bucket. Perhaps parted with a few awkward were. Words in appreciation of this and walked away with a red paper flower into your coat, which you wore until remembrance day, November eleventh or more usually until it fell off sometime beforehand. Money was raised for a fine. 'cause and a gesture of gratitude and solidarity was made it was a humble and dignified ritual. It is now a circus outside novelty poppies appear on the fronts of taxis and tube trains, and with increasing frequency in the lapels of politicians apparently feared that sporting anything list. Ostentatious would be sacrilege the mesmerizing Twitter account of giant puppy watch has this year spotted such monstrosities as poppy face paint, poppy themed pizzas and a poppy. Replacing the kickoff spot on at least one football ground. This has been made worse as has absolutely everything by the toxic combination of tabloid and social media Hughes and cries are raised should some of the public figure fail to sport a poppy last year temple veins, throbbed purple when England cricketer Moeen Ali, not insignificantly to the nine ruckus that ensued. Embiid Muslim will spotted poppy free in eighteen photo by the time Ali explained that his poppy had fallen off. And he just hadn't noticed the horse of confected outrage had long since skate the stable door of truth. It is possibly if I a cly instructive that some of the most interesting reflections on the puppy have come from the few footballers who prefer not to wear. What is now default addition to their kit at this increasingly tiresome time of year stoke city's James McLean is uncomfortable with the poppy ju to his upbringing in Derry Northern Ireland with the British army is not regarded with unequivocal admirations, Manchester United's pneumonia matych has decided he cannot separate the poppy from his memories of his own country Serbia being bombed by Britain among other nations in one thousand nine hundred nine. The annual poppy row like all such four or against Bally Hoos both works and infuriates by refusing to admit ambiguity, this correspondent who is a poppy wear for what that may be worth is personally aware of actual current or former military personnel who prefer not to wear one. And if people who donate generously to the appeal, but believe advertising the fact to be gauche people contain multitudes political discourse. In this cursed age seeks to cleave everything into binary oppositions. This will absolutely not be the last word on the subject, but it should be. It is if you like your cut out and keep poppy route adjudication to be referred to every year when the interim between Halloween and Christmas is consumed by this fact, she was ruckus if the struggles and sacrifices of those who lie in Flanders fields and elsewhere were for any one thing it is surely that you may wear a particular symbol or not wear one for whatever. You choose. And it's absolutely none of anybody else's damn business. Monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew mullet.

Moeen Ali Britain Lifton Colonel John Mccrea France Twitter Bally Hoos Mcrae Andrew Mullet James Mclean Pneumonia Football Flanders Fields British Army England Derry Northern Ireland Hughes Manchester United