18 Burst results for "Andrew Morton"

"andrew morton" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Fell is only fielder paranoia. That royals wanted to sedate her. He did some of the therapist. Dr alan mcglashan. But diana refuse to see him so charles dr blushing for help and was his was his client for fourteen years. According to charles. Diana was extremely jealous. Like to pick fights his cousin. Pamela hicks reported. Diana would resurrect row with him when he was saying his prayers. Hit him over the head while he knelt very very unhappy from the very beginning and his pro diana book andrew morton agreed about her severe mental illness. She attempted suicide suffer from blame yourself harm. Depression severe anxiety both parties had emotional inadequacies from their upbringings. Dinosaur empty and detached feared abandonment difficulty with lasting relationships with friends at breezy grown. Tired of her temporary moods left her and she had some pretty dramatic things early on in her relationship with charles once in a rage she literally threw herself down the stairs and while she was pregnant. Also cut herself with razors and glass in front of charles and dino did later admit all this. According to prince charles biographers sally medal dine also disliked charles personally and because of his affairs with camilla. Just not a good match. They should have never been married. She hated his hobbies. You know polo painting. Gardening love shakespeare. She allegedly even taunted him. Tell him he'd never never be king She tried put a wedge between him and his friends before the marriage allegedly sheva made him get rid of his beloved dog. Harvey frequently kicked him out of her bedroom. This daily this officer. Or i'm sorry. Sally cl or claims that Charles even slept on a single bed with only teddy bear to keep him company for a while that seems a little bit fabricated to me here but who knows how unbelievably sad. If this dude is early. Thirties really was laying on single bed and some royal estate. You know all all upset hold onto a teddy bear. Just first mommy and daddy.

Dr alan mcglashan charles dr blushing Pamela hicks charles Diana diana Depression severe anxiety andrew morton paranoia royals sally medal dine prince charles dino camilla Sally cl sheva Harvey Charles
"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Sympathy and compassion. She was compassionate person. Diana's sons followed in her footsteps. Carrying on with the work. Their mothers started marking her two sons are still such a living, strong embodiment of everything, she Was trying to do. I think that keeps very much alive in our in our thoughts, particularly when you have big moments like this. Now that we're coming up on this very emotional anniversary. I mean, does that make it even harder for the family and for the brothers that there does seem to be this rift and they're not on the best of terms for Harry and William. Hopefully, it won't overshadow what they're trying to do, which is to honor their mother's legacy with this public statue. Hard to believe. It was only four years ago when the brothers came up with this idea this way of honoring their mother now being brought together again on her birthday, guys. All right, Kelly. Thank you. Of course, we're gonna have a lot more on Princess Diana, and that statue's unveiling. It'll be tomorrow on today. Okay, so it's going to be all eyes. On the moment. That's right. And, um, Andrew Morton had an interesting you know, I forgot that you know, Diana worked with him clandestinely with her book, Diana. Her true story that by autobiography put out 92. And she said in that book. She would and apparently not just Andrew Morton, but she would say to people Harry would make a better king. Because of his temperament. And one of her nicknames for Harry was good King Harry. Her nickname for William was Basher because he was always throwing tantrums and bashing things, and I think she picked up On the fact that Williams temperament was always going to be an issue, and that's why she would always say William needs Harry because he would balance out He doesn't have the responsibility Billy of William But I'm sure she never expected that this would have happened. And in her last years, uh, I guess she and William were growing apart even though he was only 15. He was very aware he was going to be king very much more getting closer to his father, And apparently, he Screamed at her for doing the Martin Bashir interview And just recently, after that thing came out about Martin Bashir and that he tricked her Diana with all this stuff. William called his mother, gullible and a paranoid liar. So my guess is Diana would be upset about her son's risk. But I think she would be mostly frustrated that William is so much like his father, Charles. Well into that point. So tomorrow, the unveiling, you know, Wimbledon is going on. Okay. Large crowds. Are there Lori large crowds in the same area. So all the BS around all the covid restrictions that we have had to scale this back because William's wife, Kate Middleton is not going there. Yep. Henry's wife is not going to be recently. The baby, right? Um their father is not going because he cites too much trauma. To be there for his Children, which is Diana wouldn't have wanted them there. Let's be real. Okay. And then the queen isn't going. Um so 15 total guess right, And so they scaled back Diana's family that would be present. I mean, it just feels very her two sisters and her brother are there right? But they had other people that were going to be there from some of the different charities that she worked for that were important, but they've scaled back all that. And I think it's 100% because it's going to be a stressful situation. No, it isn't gangland is still Wimbledon is only 40% capacity. I watch the crowds like I've seen it. It's it's but I mean, this is a you know, as I don't think this was ever meant to be a big thing, But yeah, maybe they have scaled it back. I think they have reports are that they will be dignified as they reunite at the unveiling of, uh That they have their moms statute. But how does Harry get William to stop being jealous of him? I mean, that is the deal. I've asked everyone that's worked with me and you for years. How do I stop Larry being jealous of me? It's just has never happened. Grant. It's just we all know it in the office place. We just cannot get glory over jealousy, but I will see this So there are all these rumors because we've seen Harry driving around. He's visiting with the Children's place right now. Yesterday we saw Prince William in the darling Oh, George, Baby World, Baby George at the big Soccer game Royal baby anymore. He's seven years old, near to suit and a tie on they were calling them the magic. Um, the luck mascot, the lucky mascot, darling, because England beat Germany for the first time in 55 years in this soccer man football. Well, and William, Apparently, William and Kate have let George know he No. He knows Now he will be king. They've broken the.

Andrew Morton Charles Harry Diana Larry 100% Kate Middleton William Henry Kate Kelly 55 years Billy Lori England two sisters Germany today two sons tomorrow
"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The brothers came up with this idea this way of all Honoring their mother now being brought together again on her birthday, Guys. All right, Kelly. Thank you. Of course, we're gonna have a lot more on Princess Diana, and that statue's unveiling. It'll be tomorrow on today. Okay, so it's going to be all eyes. On the moment. That's right. And, um, Andrew Morton had an interesting you know, I forgot that you know, Diana worked with him clandestinely with her book, Diana. Her true story that by autobiography put out 92. And she said in that book, she would apparently not just to Andrew Morton, but she would say to people Harry would make a better king. Because of his temperament. And one of her nicknames for Harry was good King Harry. Her nickname for William was Basher because he was always throwing tantrums and bashing things, and I think she picked up On the fact that Williams temperament was always going to be an issue, and that's why she would always say William needs Harry because he would balance out He doesn't have the responsibility Billy of William But I'm sure she never expected that this would have happened. And in her last years, uh, I guess she and William were growing apart even though he was only 15. He was very aware he was going to be king very much more getting closer to his father, right? And apparently, he Screamed at her for doing the Martin Bashir interview. And just recently, after that thing came out about Martin Bashir, and then he tricked her Diana with all this stuff. William called his mother, gullible and a paranoid liar. So my guess is Diana would be upset about her son's risk. But I think she would be mostly frustrated that William is so much like his father, Charles. Well into that point. So tomorrow, the unveiling, you know, Wimbledon is going on. Okay. Large crowds. Are there Lori large crowds in the same area. So all the BS around all the covid restrictions that we have had to scale this back because William's wife, Kate Middleton is not going there. Henry's wife is not going. She recently. The baby right there. Father is not going because he cites too much trauma to be there for his Children, which is Diana wouldn't have wanted them there. Let's be real. Okay. Yeah. And then the queen isn't going Um so 15 total guess right, And so they scaled back Diana's family that would be present. I mean, it just feels very her two sisters and her brother are there right? But they had other people that were going to be there from some of the different charities that she worked for that were important, but they scaled back all that. And I think it's 100% because it's going to be a stressful situation. No, it isn't jingling is still Wimbledon is only 40% capacity. I watched the crowd so I've seen it. It's it's but I mean, this is a you know, as I don't think this was ever meant to be a big thing, But yeah, maybe they have scaled it back. I think they have reports are that they will be dignified as they reunite at the unveiling of, uh At the edge of their moms statute. But how does Harry get William to stop being jealous of him? I mean, that is the deal. I've asked everyone that's worked with me and you for years. How do I stop Larry being jealous of me? It's just has never happened. Grant. It's just we all know it in the office place. We just cannot get glory over jealousy, but I will see this So there are all these rumors because we've seen Harry driving around. He's visiting with the Children's place right now. Yesterday we saw Prince William in the darling Oh, George, Baby World, Baby George at the big Soccer game Royal baby anymore. He's seven years old, near to suit and a tie on they were calling them the magic. Um, the luck mascot, the lucky mascot, darling, Because England beat Germany for the first time in 55 years in this sacrament football Well, and William, Apparently, William and Kate have let George know.

Andrew Morton Charles Henry 100% Kate Middleton Larry Billy Diana William Kelly Kate Lori 55 years Harry two sisters Williams tomorrow today England Germany
"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You know the tops where their countries states are, and he was a racy horsey like that. Well, you know what That means? Not really well means there's a lot of outbuildings, and there's a lot of places just bringing up Tom Cruise. You know, there's a lot of places for sexy time read sex happening because of although building with a lot of land, and we saw this in the crowd. Kalapana first Some order to burn right silo in the back formulas husband was called Under poker bowels bulls because he was hooker balls. Yeah, that's not a good No, I know, but he was very handsome, suave, and I guess women dropped their hunting trial for him all the time, and he did the same. So, yes, they didn't have that story in there, but I mean, it has blown their rehab And the more they've pro tested the divorce. They've made it because now all these side stories air coming out about well, did Charles really say to Diana? You know I don't really I'm not in love with you on the night before their wedding to a 20 year old. No. But we do know from Andrew Morton that she did find the CNC cufflinks that he wore on their wedding day. When he was taking you know, she noticed. You imagine, and you marry someone else, and they're wearing a gift from from their mistress. But you don't know that they're still on right? It would be so unkind to Miller Miller. I guess one of the things that made her very witty, which, because I think she kind of comes up the As like. She's more practical, like I can't be with you, you know, But anyway, I even watch this season. Yeah, Anyway, One of the things Camilla and this is for real is her Great grandmother. Was the mistress to Charles Charles. Great, great grandfather. And so she always laughed that they should just be that just be lovers. Yes, just you know, there's history here. There's history here. There's president to be a mistress. And you know, some people might prefer being a mistress. Can I ask a dumb but I mean, I don't follow. Some know if and when you guys have the theory that the queen will step down and Charles becomes looking right then this Camilla also get She is she the queen? Never be the queen. But she will be She gets. Let me tell you. I know what her title can look this up in the past. I looked it up in the past, and it is, um, because this was like They had to make this be known ahead of time before they got married for they got married because people would have been outraged if she would've gotten the title is the Queen? Yes. Oh, she's because she's a diverse say they both are. I mean, there's a lot of the first here with this couple. Yeah. And I mean, really, What does she called? But I can't remember like princes Queen shall be known here. It is Her Royal Highness, the Princess Consort, which is a slightly massage. Title. Apparently Charles dithered about whether they should, in fact, finally get married, but apparently Camilla's father stepped in encouraged him to make it. Official. And Charles secretary just said you have to decide one way or the other mistress or Mrs And so then they took all kinds of Royals, don't we? Yeah. You got married in a civil ceremony, but that's what your HR age. The Princess Consort. Yeah, it sounds a concert. Sounds like a hooker. That's totally sounds because a concert I feel like in all the old books was like your hair. Um, Yeah, there might be something to it, but, um, can I get a princess consort tonight, right? She wears a tiara or something for your memberships. Go there be, I think Should just like they should. Everyone at Clarence House Clarence House still has their Twitter page turned up because there are so many young and so discovering the biggest Celebrity gossip story of the nineties all over again. And so they had to know it was coming for crying out loud. Well, that was a big bird of the royal family of the monarchy. Remember, One of the things we've learned about the crown is they excel most of the time I get sticking their hand and heads up their own royal arses. And pretending nothing else is going on. Yeah, you know, Harry, OK, and they forgot to do that about this about a lot of things like about this. They should have never said a word again. Just let it all hit the ground would have been over people would stop talking about it. It's embarrassing. They've It's embarrassing. And how embarrassing for the minister of whatever to even have to say that, But they were like what? This. Come on. There are emergency meetings about that about this Netflix thing, and I'm sure now the advices Stop, Stop. All right, we'll be right back with random. My talking. 1071 is proud to present a very special radio and podcast version of a Christmas Carol.

Charles Charles Princess Consort Tom Cruise Mrs And Clarence House Clarence House Andrew Morton Miller Miller Netflix president Diana Twitter Official Harry secretary
"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"To him, and he wrote a book that was her way of getting out of the marriage. And then she claimed to not have given the interviews. But she actually did. She started leaking information to Andrew Morton because Andrew Morton wrote of Wonderful Unauthorized Accounts of her and really find upon her, So she's like she picked a journalist who she knew liked her. And then she started leaking those that information to him. So it is in her own words. But yes. Oh, that's he takes that. And then another book from Tina Brown and then a couple of others about Prince Charles and puts it all all together and then I love the host. Sarah Marshall because she really is hearing. She's like us. She plays the role of not knowing the information heat is just telling her the information. She digests it and It's very late back and very conversational to it. Z, you know, you think journalists but you know they throw f bombs in there and they're they're really fun. She likes to point out a lot of ways where you know it's like here we are again expecting a woman to do this, You know, just because she's a woman, so she brings that perspective to it. And so it's called. You are wrong about And I'm interested to even listen to the other ones that aren't about Diana. And like I said, you'll have to sift through on your podcast app to find the five parts about Diana. But I wish I remembered which listener suggested this didn't me but thank you See? Just put a link up on our show Page two to the first episode, so hopefully that will easily Yeah, it's super easy to find once you expand and you know, just I don't know what chap you use, you know, podcast one or whatever. But you just You might just expanded to all so you can see all of them. It's so That's why I love these shows these by history based shows because that's what it does to me. It's spur it. It motivates me to seek out more actual information. You know what I mean to fill in the gaps of the dramatic narrative, So yeah. Find it wherever podcasts are sold. And the Diana in her own words that don't offer also referenced on Netflix is well with the crown 8 17. The dirt alert is coming up next. My talk 171. Are.

Sarah Marshall Andrew Morton Diana Tina Brown Netflix Prince Charles
"andrew morton" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

11:09 min | 2 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on PRI's The World

"From the day. He popped the question she saw me. She was so surprised she never expected. We talked daily Ford Dan while I was on my flight. I was texting her. 'cause I was connected in Flight Wifi. The heat asked me not to use his last name because he's afraid it could hurt his wife's immigration case. He's thirty two. Us citizen and has lived almost half his life in this country. He met his wife as it through family. Back in Nigeria. She's a naval. My aunt and Niger is that Dr Saheed is a pharmacist. They hit it off instantly. Saheed says this is a friendship You know blossom into love and let marriage. They got married a year ago and applied for a visa to join the heat in the US. Their paperwork was an order. All they had to do was wait. It is heartbreaking as well for her Just you know as much as I feel heartbroken. She does feel that way. Because I mean there's nothing more important for newlyweds to together. Many Nigerians were in shock when the US added Nigeria to the list of thirteen countries facing a travel ban. We were somewhat blindsided with the announcement of the visa restrictions by the by the US. That's Nigerian foreign minister. Geoffrey own yama at a news conference with. Us Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Here's pompeo explaining the new policy. President Trump and asa suspension of immigrant visas for Nigerians because Nigeria as room to grow and sharing important national security information. I'm optimistic that's going to happen. Pump comments offers. Some hope says Houston area immigration attorney boost the CD. But even so she says many Nigerians are right to worry. The ban will keep them from being reunited with their family muscle. My clients are trying to bring family members from overseas. Those ones that are trying to bring in their family members will be gravely impacted. She says she's been bombarded with phone calls and messages about the ban people for their elderly parents then also spouses and children for CD. Says she was shocked when she heard about the ban but also thinks the Nigerian government is partially to blame. I think I'm going to lean towards the side of the US government on that point. You know so presently for CD. Says she doesn't see this particular policy as discriminatory she says. Nigeria should improve. Its security measures Nigerian elder and Texas Southern University professor. Chris Lousy has his doubts. I don't buy the reasoning. A country's done normally ban or place on restrictions and the countries that have good relationship with Nigeria is one of the United States top trading partners in Africa exporting millions of barrels of oil each month nearly three hundred thousand. Nigerians live in the. Us and Julia Gelati. The Migration Policy Institute says a lot of them are quite successful. They have pretty high rates of educational attainment. They're more likely to have a bachelors degree or graduate degree the US born people. She says. The trump administration could be justified in its reasoning for the visa ban. But there's good reason to be skeptical. What's interesting about this version is that it doesn't block those temporary visas for tourists or business travellers students or temporary workers And what that suggests that the government doesn't see imminent travel threat from any of these countries. Gillette says blocking permanent visas seems like away the. Us government can pressure other countries to change their policies because these visitors posed no immediate threat while Nigeria and the United States negotiate. Thousands of people's lives are on pause people like Aziz it who is studying to one day validate her medical degree in the US and the heat. Who was saving up for a house. Where hopes they'll someday live together for the world? I'm Elizabeth Trove all in Houston. The Church of England is trying to come to terms with racism the Archbishop of Canterbury. The leader of the church was not pulling any punches. Justin Welby said. He was ashamed and call the church quote deeply. Institutionally racist so this week officials with the Church of England approved a motion to formally apologize for discrimination against the wind rush generation. That's the name given to people who relocated to the UK from Caribbean countries after World War. Two Father Andrew Morton. Mumbi put four that motion to apologize. The best form of apology is changed behavior. And I think that is the spirit in which the Archbishop of Canterbury made his apology. I think there's a real sense that his apology is one which will lead to change. And that's the spirit in which it's authored do you see this? Racism impacting members of your own church community. I do yes and in my congregation. I have black. People who have had their homes raided by the UK borders agency. They've been arrested in front of their children and taken away to detention centers. Only to eventually be released now. That is no humane way to treat people and you look at the people who are being detained and you think this is. Because of the color of their skin we have to represent the people of the wind rush generation as well. I mean what did they face after coming to the UK over the years and what races treatment did they face At the Church of England there are lots and lots of examples but the woman I have chosen to focus on is one which affects the parish where I serve directly some heat of Allworth in in south London. It was in nineteen sixty. One that during Brown's system Murio and her parents and their siblings came along with a white neighbor. Who said to them? Look let me take you along to the local parish church. When they arrived the steps of the Church on Sunday morning then priest literally stood at the top of the steps and as Muriel has said he said. I'm going to have to ask the congregation about this. And he would not let them enter the Church and Ito. Doreen and Muriel told me how that mother was absolutely fuming about this but what could she do? There is a priest who as Muriel set to me. Should have been welcoming people into God's house nor his house not his church but God's church and yet he didn't even let them into the building anecdotally. We know that that happened to a lot of people from the windros generation. There is an acronym That is using the UK obame Ame for Black Asian and minority ethnic. I've seen numbers suggesting that. The number of Church of England priest from obame background has been growing recently doubling to eight percent between two thousand sixteen and twenty eighteen. Are Things in the church changing or does that number not tell the whole story? I think the answer is both and because things are changing. I've been part of a group which has tried to work to increase minority ethnic vocations to ordained ministry in the Church of England recognizing that for many people that have been all sorts of barriers. It has been true and in some way still is true that clergy and others select people after our own image. We select people like us for jobs and roles in the charge including encouraging people to explore a vocation to odeen ministry. So it's a mixed picture. I'm just curious. What is the relationship of the Church of England to the British government? I mean is your apology kind of a standard for British government policy the Church of England as the established church here in England and so there is a relationship with the UK government some of our senior bishops sit in the House of Lords but equally were completely independent religious body so the church cannot speak for the government and in fact what I am saying in my motion is that the church should actually be challenging the government. The church should be speaking prophetically for justice for all people regardless of the color of their skin in our nation today so in some ways I'm encouraging those bishops Who sit in the House of Lords but also ordinary clergy and lay people to really speak out against injustice Father Andrew Morton Mambi as the rector of Saint Peter's Walworth in London. Thank you very much for speaking with us. A pleasure many of the new diseases that humans pickup come from animals think HIV EBOLA SARS and likely this new corona virus. It probably came from an animal at a market in Wuhan China but live animals at city. Markets is only one risk of what scientists call disease spillover. Another risk has to do with changing habitats. The world's environment correspondent Carolyn bieler reports on the link between climate change and infectious diseases. The more we come into contact with wild animals and their new viruses the more we risk catching their diseases. This happens at markets like the one in Wuhan but it also happens when we encroach on wildlife habitats as people move and wildlife move in response to a changing environment humans and wildlife and animals will come in contact more regularly gene fair from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in new says that animal habitats will move due to climate change and that will have a similar impact as deforestation which has been linked to new disease outbreaks. Everything is sort of shifting in will shift into the future as the environment changes through climate change climate scientists and epidemiologists on fares team are studying how changes to the climate will impact the animal carriers of infectious disease. It's early days still but previous research suggests that drought has already contributed to at least one outbreak. It happened when bats moved out of rainforests and into orchards to find food. We're going by the past data to really predict what's going to happen in the future and so anytime you increase that wildlife interface. That's sort of an emerging disease hotspot and so that's just increasing as we go forward into the future. Much of the research linking climate change and infectious disease looks at the expansion of habitats for disease hosts like Bats Gerardo Martin is a disease ecologist out of Warriors University of the.

United States Nigeria England Church of England Muriel Houston Archbishop of Canterbury UK Nigerian government Mike Pompeo London Migration Policy Institute Ford Dr Saheed Andrew Morton Justin Welby
"andrew morton" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on KOMO

"One towards the left side wars going to come home. The. Was not. Yeah, he had already run down. I think and it was gonna be a double play. Now, some fans are wondering if the Mariners catcher is actually named. I don't know like the famous abbot Castillo bit. We have on our team. We have who's on once on second. I don't knows on. That's what I'm gonna find. The guy's name. I want to find out the guy's name, dummy, whose advice what's on second third. And as we all know the shortstop is I don't care care care when I saw that last night, and I was like, where the heck is he I didn't understand well, he needs his like Eric's little heroes. Okay. It's fundamental baseball. Even the manager service said it happened to him one time as a catcher, you're thinking it's going to be a double play, but you have to stand at your base, until the guy throws it there. Hopefully there's a catcher tonight for Andrew Morton throw too. When he takes the mound at seven ten against the Astros after picking a lot of college pitchers. The Mariners drafted a third baseman today, Austin Shenton he's from Bellingham. He had to stop at Bellevue, college, Florida international. And now he's part of the EMS sports updates at ten forty after I know on the home of the huskies. I care, KOMO news. Thanks bill. Four eleven now coamo today they can joke about it. But that wasn't the case Sunday night. When two guys went on a hike on Ranier mother, mountain trail and wound up on the adventure of their lives turned find a trail head.

Austin Shenton Mariners Andrew Morton Eric abbot Castillo Ranier KOMO baseball bill Astros Florida international Bellevue Bellingham
"andrew morton" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Wild baby. Keeping them of a common. Oh, isn't that important the commoner aspect of this? This leads into the whole naming issue. So here's what they do. They wait a couple of days to name the child rights, and it was late. So they had more time to think about it. But like, you know, they're so crazy about the Royal stuff over in the UK. So they have these online, you know, voting contests, and, you know, a nationwide polls some of the names, which is nuts though. So. Bagger? Vance is that when you came up with I think. Let's go with American names. Yeah. Or Monty python? Now. Eddie as art. Yeah. Alexander's going at four two one Arthur or art is five to one. But the one that is the biggest mover Spencer. It was from twenty two one two nine to one. Remember, that's Diana Spencer's last name, wait a minute into Queen didn't like her right now. Did you see the movie the Queen shared more about that elk take defer to you and Jen on this stuff jen's out today? But Karen, thank God. You're here to talk about the Royal stuff. 'cause I just don't understand. I don't understand it. I don't get it. I don't think silly to me. But it's I get that. It's huge understand that actually what happened was the royals were kind of going down the tubes. And then right, they manufactured that wedding with Charles and Diana and events blow. Yes. And then the whole book came out from Andrew Morton that she was throwing herself down the stairs. And and that Charles were shaggy Kamilo the whole time. And it was it had it all. It had some drama dies. I know dates she dates Muhammed's kid. I mean, you know, the the the Queen was not happy with anything that was going on there. So if they decided and do they get the final vote the parents here. Megan Markle, and Harry today to decide their own child's name he seemed to be deciding everything on their own and the queen's going along with it has you noticed anything I like about this though is that the rebels she's a rebel. And this kid is seventh in line doesn't have a shot of being the king. So he's got the life. You don't know that though, I mean anything can happen. Pima. Thrones people are going to get bumped off Lipton's might get involved. Small plane crash anyway, everybody's find according to the royals here. Megan Markle seven pounds three ounces unnamed child. Here's harry..

royals Diana Spencer Charles Megan Markle Andrew Morton UK Pima Jen Vance Lipton Eddie Harry Karen Alexander Arthur Muhammed seven pounds three ounces
"andrew morton" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

15:03 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Keira Robertson has been studying the case of Lizzie Bordon from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of the wider stagers could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she heads which when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzie bordon. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife who is Lizzie Bordon. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters Wednesday were grown that they should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew, Gordon, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And with notorious one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more residential district called the hills. Those kinds of dissatisfactions were thought to be at the heart of the case. Yeah. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is great. Because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said, but even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his estate worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars know north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that Ardy had indoor plumbing and electrical, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. He was there. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flexible water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basement. But it is also true that the that that people use slop pails and. Would carry them down to the basement that said that there was it? There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of that contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a made. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as a woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't. It wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's technically you either actor walk through people's bedrooms upstairs. Or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and I lived east side at least move some furniture in front of it and has happened a few years before the murders. So it seemed to indicate particularly the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something. Particularly strained in the household. Add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters, Emma and Lizzy head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother when another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, Lizzie was quite young still they three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but certainly certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth torture stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that. Her sister, Emma, who was almost ten years older than she was really it was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly. Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just that she referred to her as her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase was at home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings this story. And so she was at risk of the half sister who was married to a man without very good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So abby. Apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put an abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that's really. Enraged his daughters. They said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so she you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rift. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a site of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room at it also meant that when their when their father and stepmother were at callers, they weren't necessarily greedy greedy as well and separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right. Br brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother, hence, their blood uncle but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have, you know. What was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way? I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. She was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie ammo was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house. Dodd already a house of ghosts. It just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Borden bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store as Lizzie Bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I was head of the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever. Founding and were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before. Describe what the effect would have been of this project acid on the human body had been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing. Right. There was a there was something that it could have been food poisoning, the the boards ate leftover fish. And that was something that was kind of colloquially known as the summer complained in Fall River. It was a fairly common for people to have some kind of gastrointestinal upset and everyone in the family was sick Lizzy less. So and the prosecution later argued that. Well, this was basically an illness. That was suggestive of an opportunity is the exact way that the prosecutor put that which is to say that Lizzie Borden might have looked at this..

Lizzie Bordon Lizzie Borden murder Lizzy Lizzy Andrew Lizzy Borden Abby Massachusetts Fall River Lizzie Andrew Gordon Emma Harvard Andrew Morton Keira Robertson Stanford Bordon Borden
"andrew morton" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

13:20 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on WTVN

"Keira Robertson has been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stages could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she heads which when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzie bordon. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife who was Lizzie Borden. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters Wednesday were grown that they should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew Borden, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hill knows kinds of dissatisfactions where thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you're doing? Great. No, no, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his estate worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing electricity, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flushable water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basements. But it is also true that the that that people use slop pails, and you know, would carry them down to the basement said that you know, it was it. There's not A a. glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of the contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as young woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't a it wasn't in the house was hot and. Here. It wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow it was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either have to walk through people's bedrooms upstairs. Or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs. Through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and Lizzie side at least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murders. So it seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something particularly strained in the household add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters in Lizzy head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother. When another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young still three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But but it certainly certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really it was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just the she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's deaths referred to her as mother, then he was quickly corrected noted. But that was that was the interesting part where you said about than the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase was at home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings this story. And so she was at risk of the the half sister who was married to a man without breaking. Good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so she I you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rift. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a site of Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room. And it also meant that when their when their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greeting them as well. Separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right. Br brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother, hence their blood uncool. But significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. She was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie ammo was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house. Dodd already a house of ghosts. It just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything we sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Bordon bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store as Lizzie Bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I was getting ahead of the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever found any and were not themselves poisoned..

Lizzie Borden Abby Lizzy Borden Andrew Lizzy Lizzy Massachusetts Emma Harvard MRs Borden Keira Robertson Stanford Borden Andrew Gordon Andrew Morton Oxford Fall River Abbie
"andrew morton" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

14:18 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Robertson has been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stagers could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she heads which when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzie bordon. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife who is Lizzie Bordon. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that they should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew Morton despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hill. Those kinds of dissatisfactions where thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said that even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his state worth the day that that somebody killed him? The the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing and electrical city, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I should say that there was a there was a flexible water closet. You know, it's kind of rude rudimentary one in the basement. But it is also true that the that that people use slop pails and. Would carry them down to the basement that said that there was it? There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of the contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as young woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't. It wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow it was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either actor walk through people's bedrooms upstairs, or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs. Through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and on live decide at least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murder. So it seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was that. There was something particularly strained in the household add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother. When another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know was quite young still they three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really it was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzie was Lizzie was quick to correct people. So it's not just the she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's deaths referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yes. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings do this story. And so she was at risk of the the half sister who was married to a man without breaking. Good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that's a really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so he I you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rift. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a side of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room an ultimate that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greedy men as well. Separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right. Br brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother, hence, their blood uncle but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have that, you know, what's what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. He was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie ammo was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because of how small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house. Dodd already house of ghosts. It just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to each other the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Borden bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy pressing acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store as Lizzie Bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I was head of the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever. Found any and boards were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before. Describe what the effect would have been of this project acid on the human body. Had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden murder Abby Lizzie Lizzy Borden Andrew Massachusetts Emma Harvard Andrew Morton Borden Stanford Robertson Andrew Gordon Oxford Fall River Abbie
"andrew morton" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

14:17 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on KTRH

"Been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stagers could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she heads which when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife who is Lizzie Borden. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that they should live in a better style and a in a higher style. You might say Andrew, Gordon, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hill. Dissatisfactions where thought to be at the heart of the case. Yeah. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily of afforded it when he died. What was his estate worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing electricity, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I should say that there was a there was a flushable water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basement. But it is also true that the that that people, you know, use slop pails and would carry them down to the basement that said that there was it. There's not. Glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of the contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as young woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't. It wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances. Were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either actor walked through people's bedrooms upstairs. Or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murders. So seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something particularly strained in the household add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother. When another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young still they three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just that she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was done using to purchase was at a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of siblings did this story. And so she was at risk of the the half sister who was married to a man without breaking. Good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that's a really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, centrally what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so she you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rest. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a side of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room. And it also meant that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greedy as well. Separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting hyung-chol that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right Br brother-in-law although the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother, hence, their blood uncle but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. She was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie ammo was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house already a house of ghosts. You know, it's just already almost feels like even before death. Just nobody's talking to each other the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Borden bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store as Lizzie Bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm sorry. I was Takeda the story that was evidence that never went into the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever. Found it and the were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before. Describe what the effect would have been of this project acid on the human body. Had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable, you know, had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Abby Massachusetts Lizzie Andrew Gordon Emma Borden Harvard Andrew Morton Lizzy Lizzy Stanford Fall River Oxford Takeda
"andrew morton" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

14:18 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stagers could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she had when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts, his first wife who had Lizzie Borton and her sister Emma's mother died and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that. They should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew, Gordon, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hills kinds of dissatisfactions thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his estate worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing and electrical, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flushable water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basements. But it is also true that the that that people use slop pails and would carry them down to the basement that said that there, you know, it was it. There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Bordon as as a woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't a it wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either actor watch through people's bedrooms upstairs, or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby at their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the board chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murder. So it seemed to indicate particularly the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something. Particularly strained in the household. Add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother when another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really it was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, even withdrawn from any kind of familial Monica. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just that she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings. Did a story. And so she was at risk of the half sister who was married to a man without very good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put an abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so she I you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rest. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters mostly didn't eat with the with their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room at an ultimate that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greeting them as well. And. As possible in small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right. Br brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother hands their blood uncool. But significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. He was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie Emma was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the how small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her God house Dodd already house of ghosts. It's just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about whether Lizzie Bordon bought poison? And why just before the murders happened? On on August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store ads. Lizzie bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I was getting ahead of the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever. Founding. Were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before. Describe what the effect would have been of this acid on the human body. Had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden Lizzie Emma Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Abby Lizzie Massachusetts Andrew Gordon Harvard Lizzie Borton Lizzy Lizzy MRs Borden Stanford Borden Andrew Morton Oxford Fall River
"andrew morton" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

14:30 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on KTOK

"The where what and wow of Oklahoma NewsRadio one thousand KT. Okay. Keira Robertson has been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book the trial of Lizzie Bordon. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stages could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she had when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife, Lizzie Borden. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that. They should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser and was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hill knows kinds of dissatisfactions were thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his state worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing and electrical, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flexible water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basement. But it is also true that the that that people use flop pails and. Would carry them down to the basement that said that they're you know, it was it? There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of the contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as a woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't a it wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's know, technically, you either actor watch for people's bedrooms upstairs or you'd have to if he were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murder. So it seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something. Particularly strained in the household. Add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother when another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young silly three when her mother died, so she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just the she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase was it a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings this story. And so she was at risk of the the half sister who was married to a man without breaking. Good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that's a really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so he I you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred a property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rift. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a site of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room, and it also meant that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greeting them as well. Separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right there. Brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother hands their blood on call but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. He was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie Emma was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the how small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house. Dodd already house of ghosts. It's just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment the sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Bordon bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store ads. Lizzie bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I had the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever found any. The boards were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before the described the what the effect would have been of this project acid on the human body had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden Lizzie Emma Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Abby Lizzie Massachusetts Oklahoma Harvard MRs Borden Keira Robertson Borden Lizzy Lizzy Stanford Andrew Gordon Andrew Morton Oxford
"andrew morton" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

How Did This Get Made?

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

"Pleads the simple Greek dad bags. Oh, come on, Marcus. Oh my goodness being world. We love Marcus limos. We love you Marcus limits. You know, there is an episode. We talk about markets the motives, we cut out. I would argue twenty minutes of that conversation. We do we cut it out twenty hundred up as an extra. We cut about twenty minutes. You were not there that Nigerian. But we went deep into Marcus watch the show, Jay. So of course, I watch show you watch this show just because he's greet. Of course. I well contractually I have to watch all shows that is part of the deal. And also because you know, that's all my family wants to talk about his any and all Greek shows would you make a version of this movie does like a Greek Centric version of my big fat Greek wedding. Andrea Martin in both Morton is in both Andrew Morton. I was going to mention that at one point. But Andrew Martin is the grandmother is played stereotypical ethnic grandmothers of Greek ended talion dishes Armenian, and she's also from Maine, isn't that amazing? Yeah. And and doing amazing work. I thought this'll Listen, listen. listen. It was a breath of fresh. She was great in this. I I appreciated her a lot. I actually really really did. I actually liked the two brothers to Salvatore Vincenzo. I thought I actually don't think that there are any like, I don't know. I liked all the color around this movie. I do believe I liked the color on this movie. I think that there has issues with some things characters he has a may against my favorite thing about watching bloopers in movies because you can tell the relationship between the actors by watching that gag grill at the end, there's not a single shot of hating christianson marauders enjoying themselves having a laugh someone messing up a line the other one sort of smiling, they there was not a single single piece of footage. I could use to show like, oh, these two people could stand being in a room together, their meet cute, or they're you. But they're falling in love montage. My favorite thing where they clearly got the rights to shoot at like a festival like a like, a San Genero feast or something like that. And. All they do is try on different Attala stereotypes shirts. It's like like, what are you looking at my flags, and there's like little talion flex over both breasts, and it's like on the real Italian stallion is like the my macaroni is always Al dente. Just like real like is. Latte. Like, oh my gosh. These are like they love those shirt. Oh, yeah. And I felt like they almost love those shirts more than they love each other for sure. For sure. Well, he's like get up early in the morning. I'm picking you up. And then he picks her up at like dawn to bring her to a street festival street festival. So they can buy shirts Soleil. And then they go and blow up throught vegetables. Rather again at the old man's leave him a gifts basket, but then they leave him a gift pesky. But then what is? Water and unlike gremlins, they drive right towards it to get wet again on then by to get wet, and then they go so they can go home and take their clothes off ice him like ice in Canada. Maybe this is Canadian actually in Canada, people can only get naked if their clothes have been soaked through. It's more pure, which which may be make sense as to why on a non summer day when they said, it was cold out the fire hydrant was out, and and and going, well, let's have to like get in the bath with their clothes on than take them off to get in the shower who's gonna be such a Reddit thread. Fans of the show..

Marcus Jay Salvatore Vincenzo Canada Andrew Morton Andrea Martin Andrew Martin Reddit Maine San Genero Attala christianson twenty minutes
"andrew morton" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

05:46 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"I feel like there should be alcohol involved in the center of the and and when you walked in you are wearing like a rabbi. Excuse me for years. That's what that look like it did. Yes, that's called a Tullus Atallah Gilbert. Horrible job Talas. And now, it's not a tallish that was a very chic. Schol. Bobrov will he's not Joel. Maybe on you just look much choice. Maybe it's because of fiddler. Yes. You know, Maki cats fiddler, I'm sort of stuck. And now, you're you're tell us about this your production of fiddler on the roof, and who it's a tribute to. Well, I got a call from this gentleman that runs the national theatre. Folks, be which means the stage yet stage, and he's a great. You know, a great figure in the theater world. And he said I'm doing I've always wanted to do on the roof in Yiddish. And there was a production fifty years ago in Israel, and I've gotten the rights to do it would you like to direct it? And I said that's a rather wild Dali idea because I don't speak it. But I know that play very very well. I have loved it from the first preview, which I saw in Washington before it came to New York with euro the s yes, and I've seen every production ever since. And I love that musical. And I think it's a great score. It's just everything. Good. And I also loved Shola Malaysia GMs stories, and that's what this Tabio and his daughters was taken from ad made into traveler and I woke up the next morning, and I said. To myself. I don't know how to do this. I don't know quite what to do. But I'm going to do it. And I decided that then in there. And it just came. We get three wonderful actors. Who did not speak Yiddish ARCE say three quarters of the casted, speak, didn't speak any and YouTube. And so how the obvious question. How does a man who doesn't speak at a direct other actors well to speak it? Thank you so much. I I knew what it was about. So I could tell the actors I see and we rehearsed it in English. And then I once they understood it in English, then they added the language and you honoring your your dad a little bit by doing by doing the show. I sure hope so good. That's nice. That's nice. I know you you don't speak it. But is it true that you learn a little bit from listening to his records is much not much. No. I mean, I know the jokes. Yeah. The jokes. Enough. And he taught you to respect the audience to your father. I heard you say that. Yeah. And interview everything he there was he was a musician, essentially, that's really what he he adored was playing the clarinet and playing with his musician friends just love that the fraternity of it. Yes. And if he played the a gig like a wedding or something if there was one person on the dance floor. He was still there. Well, that's great. Where Gino Conforti on this show, by the way, who is notable because he was the believe he was the original fiddler. He was. Yeah. I knew him a good guy very three at he's in L A still around to this show to Gilbert. Gilbert sang some fiddler use what you sang with Andrew Morton when she was here. Oh, all I think do you love me. There you go. There you go. That's show. That's that that he cares about. And I heard that. When Gino Conforti was the fiddler zero Mastel started. He would start yelling stuff that was not. And he started yelling, you know, get off the roof. You fuck kidding? This is reduction, Gino. That's not my style. But what did you think of zero Mastel thought he was a genius a loved him? But if I were the director, and he was fucking with my show like that. It would not be good. Oh, yeah. He colored outside the lines a lot to me. Oh, yeah. I mean and. You know? Through the play in a way. Although charming. Yeah..

Gino Conforti Tullus Atallah Gilbert Mastel Andrew Morton Yiddish ARCE Bobrov Maki YouTube Washington Israel Tabio New York director three quarters fifty years
"andrew morton" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"andrew morton" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Sherry Preston. Coming up the death sports moments from twenty eighteen but I the Royal wedding of Prince, Harry and Meghan Markle. I got to fly to Windsor Castle this spring to witness the day when an American bride and former actress joined the British Royal family. There's been nearly forty years since millions of us woke up early on Saturday morning to see the original televised tale wedding. And while the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady, Diana may have ended a little bit differently than we envisioned that day July of nineteen Eighty-one. This one truly does feel different in no small part to Harry's mother imaging Lloyd Webber, isn't ABC news royals contributor. She's known those of the Royal family for years. I was a seismic shift. I know family because of Diana. She was all about making the founding more approachable more accessible, keeping it real. But keeping it Royal. If you think about it, the Queen jumping out of a helicopter trying to twelve Olympics, the JAMES BOND theme chain having just done a skit with Daniel Craig would never have happened, but Diana Robert, he is a longtime biographer of the Royal family and serves as an a story on the Netflix series. The crown this is very much the the. Young new wave of the house of Windsor and their friends moving in on the Royal family. So what can we expect from this new wave of royalty? If you're old enough, you'll remember, Diana, and Sarah, Ferguson, Prince Andrew's wife charming about making some noise. Can we expect the same thing from Meghan Markle and her new sister-in-law Kate the duchess of Cambridge author Andrew Morton who wrote that famous book about Princess, Diana doesn't think so we'll Donna and Furby roused about ready when they got together and Dino remember, she told me she she kind of how to draw back in. I mean, there was the famous incident where they poked.

British Royal family Diana Robert Meghan Markle Harry Prince Charles Windsor Castle Sherry Preston Prince Andrew Windsor Andrew Morton Daniel Craig ABC Furby royals Lloyd Webber Netflix Olympics Donna Kate Dino
Tesla shares reel as executives quit and CEO smokes pot on webcast

Networth Radio

01:39 min | 4 years ago

Tesla shares reel as executives quit and CEO smokes pot on webcast

"So he and must tweets he's gonna take company private at four hundred and twenty dollars a share, right? SEC doesn't like it. Because he probably doesn't have the money lined up to do it. And it was through Twitter, of course, and so- tweeting can get you in trouble in any case on Friday. Shares of tesla pounded by over ten percent. You issued I believe the first warning that tesla needed about a billion dollars a quarter just to continue their expansion. Well, Yvonne, musk appears on Joe Rogan apparently Thurs Thursday night. Right. I heard this. Okay. So. Now, he smokes pot on the air. Okay. Legal there, by the way, just saying just saying any Drake whiskey just to make sure that investors got the message. Okay. I I don't know. But if I've lost let's say, I put one hundred million dollars in tesla. And I'm down twenty five million since the peak or near the peak, and I'm a big portfolio manager. I don't think I'm a happy camper. Now, I I I think you're going to see some more declines in the stock price. You know, if there was if there's anything lurking in there. Obviously, going private would've would've covered that come out. I'm not saying that's going to come out. But there's definitely some smoke around that that company. I'd be very

Tesla United States Alex Elon Musk Andrew Morton Twitter CFO SEC Bill Clinton Europe Joe Rogan Director Of Research Yvonne FED Drake Portfolio Manager Raytheon CEO AFC