19 Burst results for "Andrew Moore"

CNN to take on Apple News+ with its own subscription news aggregation service

Mac OS Ken

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

CNN to take on Apple News+ with its own subscription news aggregation service

"The sea east end for competition an apple insider says the Cable News Network is planning a subscription service to rival apple news plus highlighting a piece from the end mation the report says CNN is working on a news aggregation service of a tone which would follow a similar path to that of Apple News and Apple News plus in order to compete with the dominant facebook as well as Apple's own offering the project known as News Co will offer consumers and other venue to get updates about the world alongside its existing web and broadcast operations the report has CNN digital chief Andrew Moore is telling the information that about a dozen engineers and other executives are working on the project no word in the piece on when news co might go along live nor on how much it will

Cable News Network CNN Apple News Co Andrew Moore
"andrew moore" Discussed on The Final Lap

The Final Lap

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on The Final Lap

"So it's kinda interesting 'cause a lot of money, make these cars, now it does definitely does the rap Salone aren't very cheap. So I don't know crazy that we're going that way, though. Anything else big on Toby Christie dot com, that we should be aware. Well, depending on when you're listening to this, there could be a nugget about Richard petty motorsports. There are some huge huge Chatters going on in the background that something big is happening within the next week or so. At pity, more sports, the rumor the biggest loudest rumor currently is that they'll be going back to the petty enterprises name instead of Richard petty motorsports. And again, part of this rumor the Andrew Moore Stein, the guy who's the big big investor will no longer have a part in this. The petty family buying the team back basically, we'll see how true these rumors end up being. But it looks like that might be the case, and it seems like from what I'm hearing as well that they should have again. This could all go completely wrong on the team could shut down next week, so who knows. But. They're saying that they've got from what I'm hearing they should have some new partners to announce as well. So maybe just maybe there could be some silver lining here from a boss. I hope they stick with them. Yeah. I mean, I think bubbas their guy I really think petty believes in him a lot. I just think that they've got gotta get some funding there to make that thing competitive. And I think that's what they're working on. Gotcha. All right. Well this weekend, this is it. This is huge. This is massive Mondo, nascar's all-star weekend, featuring the sport's, biggest names, not racing points or playoffs or junk like that or stupid clocks. It's it's for a trophy and a big massive pile of cash one million dollars and they call it checkers records. For good reason, the drivers instructed to bring back the steering wheel. I don't care about the rest of the car. Your job is to win. Yeah. That's a simple as it gets. And for guys like you and I carry warrant simple win all the money. That's it. It's just so easy. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. Especially these days when you know rules change by the hour. Yeah, it seems that way. Now, I do know also that even with crazy rule changes we have the, the format for this all star race is actually pretty simple. It's kind of a throwback to the old days. You've got three segments twenty laps twenty laps ten laps. So that's, that's pretty easy for us to get our heads around and fifteen this year is fifteen hundred ten. I think it's fifteen they, they made a point to say that it was five more than last year. I thought it was five less than last year. My wrong. I think I'm right on this one. Okay. Maybe we'll do we need place bets. The open is twenty twenty ten is that what I'm thinking of, maybe you're thinking of yet that's one thing. And, and then it's thirty twenty twenty fifteen oh, I should've taken the bet you should've C C you shouldn't should have taken the better. But you can pay me if you want. Well, no, I'm not gonna pay you. That's not how it works. So I mean you had to shake on it, yet at least agree to it, but we didn't agree. How are we supposed to shake on it? We're not even in the same state. Well, you know, agree to at least so yeah, I'm willing to bet, but you rewind if you like. That's the beauty of audio. That is that's true. But yeah, so the openness twenty twenty ten the all-star racist, self thirty twenty twenty fifteen and no mandatory pitstop. So what are these guys is going to be hanging out? And, you know, hopefully they won't come in. So not only we've gotten rid of the pits pit crew challenge, or whatever it was. But now we've made it where they might not even have to do anything they used to be all about the pit crews. Yeah. Used to be at least showcasing a somewhat..

Richard petty Toby Christie Andrew Moore Stein Chatters Mondo nascar one million dollars
"andrew moore" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"New year with the Brexit deadline foster approaching Andrew Moore asked the prime minister about the upcoming vote on her withdrawal deal, which she memorably spooned back in December. Can we rely on this vote happening later this month? Definitely yes. We all going to hold the vote. You said it was to be next week. Actually, the debate starts next week and the debate will carry on into the into the following week. But we will be holding the vote we're talking about the fifteenth or fourteenth run that that sort of timing if MP's vote this down, I I'm ju- bring it back. I mean, one of your employees in number ten is quoted as saying you who bring back this vote thirty times if necessary to get it through I won't see this deal go through as you. And I want to see it goes through when When you. you when people. Well, if the deal is not voted on as this vote. That's coming out then actually begin to be an unchartered territory. I don't think anybody can say exactly what will happen in terms of the reaction. We'll see because because well what we have in the house of Commons is a labor leadership in labor party that is playing politics with this that is opposing any deal in order to create the most the greatest chaos that they can we've got people who are promoting a second referendum in order to stop Brexit. And we've got people who are want to see that perfect Brexit, and I would say don't let the search for the perfect become the enemy of the good because the danger of the danger there is actually end up with. No, Brexit, all I've asked you. I think three or four times whether you bring back this vote again, and again, and again, and you haven't done to me, which leads me to assume that you would bring it back again. And again, and again, Andrew what I'm doing y'all saying what happens if. Yes, I'm saying, that's actually let's actually removes the I if let's get this vote through the house of Commons may also took the opportunity to reiterate where she stood on a second referendum an option, which parliament may attempt to pursue. If the house of Commons votes for a second referendum would you implement that as prime minister invive you there should not be a second referendum now. Just look good. What you're saying? In terms of parliament, having a second referendum as I said earlier, what we see in parliament is some people who are advocating a second referendum because they want to stop Brexit. Now, we've also got some on the opposition the chairman of the party in navy that said that this would be disrespectful to those people who went out and voted leave. It would divide our country. It would I believe and practically actually you couldn't get a referendum in time before the twenty ninth of March you'd be talking about extending article fifty we're already nearly three years from the vote to leave the European Union. I think we should be leaving the European Union and delivering on that vote all of those of all of. But all Diddy would you actually implemented as Mike wish? You'll prime minister problems said we want to second referendum you're against it. What do you do what do in the first place is trying to ensure and persuade people that actually going for a second referendum is not the way forward for this country? There has been speculation that today deal. Brexit could adversely affect the UK's ability to import vital medical supplies for those who need them the health secretary. Matt Hancock saw to show. So if you ridge that there was no need to panic can as health secretary guarantee. Now that even if there is a deal. No deal can be reached people will be able to get the medicine they need. Yes. We are confident that if everybody does what they need to do..

Brexit prime minister Andrew Moore European Union secretary Matt Hancock chairman Diddy UK navy Mike three years
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Yeah. If you look at the meteor, it's like between learning this and intelligent agents that right, whereas now as a people are going back in the hands to the electrical, computer engineering, this happens at Comey amount on its books in EC primarily helping us solve the sense our. Yeah, that's that's one end. Yeah, there's another end above machine learning. If you go something which can spot patterns or notice that your elbow is in is in an image and stuff like that. You still going to want to put it in its system which makes decisions. Right? And that really is the original dream of official intelligence of the dominant conference these things which can observe think about what they observed and then act. Right. And so making the action decision is really important, and it goes into ways. One of them is a little bit like warrior talking about with. Google. The early days of this is a human has to make a decision and as much too much information around for them to actually really be able to just look at all the source information themselves, how can you support that? And that goes from everyone doing stock trading to helping decide if a medical claim is legitimate through to people. One of our professors for instance, is interim instrumentation classrooms, so that teaches can notice if they've accidentally got some unconscious bias, which means that they're not attending to kinds of students and say full. So that's great. That is human assistance. In my opinion, many folks in the official industry intelligence industry. By the way, I'm a minority. I not speaking for the whole discipline focusing on that because it's so much more palatable less scary than the other thing at the top of the stack, which is autonomy. Right? And. Nope. Meaning to him. Ever ever write us robots, don't care about. That toasters toaster is one of the other. They don't. We don't. They don't care. You know, oddly ahead, it didn't in a good deal on must have been using. I thought he was quitting tells you that they're going to think of is like house cats. Like, why did they want to kill us? It's kind of useless to wanna get like it was really, I was like, oh, yeah, you're right. We're. So we're so obsessed with ourselves into science fiction feeders territory. The reason they don't care about us is then thinking about us, they are simply machines every row books, computer that you can see is just a set of. We only have just a few minutes just two more minutes. I just love to know why we're self-driving is because that's where community you were all involved. Lots of people left Carnegie Mellon. They set up different shops. Where do you see that right now self-driving Thomas vehicles. This is me speak yet myself. Yeah. So my personal understanding is that every year now in the major self-driving experiments, the metric of success to track. Is what fraction of the time do you need a safety driver? In other words, what fraction of the time does the human need to take control? And if we were shooting for the early two thousand twenty s for us to be at the point where you could launch autonomous driving, you'd need to see every year at the moment more than sixty percent reduction every year to get us down to ninety thousand nine point nine, nine, nine, nine, percents safety. I don't believe that things are progressing anyway near that fast, right?

Carnegie Mellon official Comey Google sixty percent
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"So there are many creative things that can be done to reduce the cost of these kinds of of education, Georgia techs, mostly online system. As an example. That's I think that's a place where I can demand has to go now is to actually value engineer. It's expensive master's programs creatively so that people can afford domestically. Take me. Get you have all this demand who people who can pay in. That's where you have. So I'm gonna finish up talking about the concept of where the big trends in academic sir, going around computing. What do you see is important you obviously robotics and. Missing saying that Cardi Mellon was a big player in Uber's Uber, a lot of self driving cars, a lot of robotics, a lot of things like that that had sort of rocky ten years. Let's play mover for that, but talk a little bit of where it's going, Carnegie Mellon where overall, you see the most important areas of computing going. The huge change. Of course, we will seen in the last ten years is being machine learning and the the real push on these convoluted neural networks, ton outs to Bill to solve problems that we haven't been able to solve using most of his super AI in Silicon Valley. Now, whatever the new marketing turn on the radio. But if if we went on the radio, you'd have seen me, I rolling. They have all kinds of names for it. Go ahead, just marketing, I don't mind. So he's, he's the important thing that machine learning component fits in a slot of all the technologies. You need to build an a system. So one of the things we've really been pushing on both in our developments of education and in our recruiting faculty, the other slots adjacent to machine learning. Right? So important one, which I've usually withdraw before machine learning because machine lending depends on it is all the sense work sensing work this necessary to be able to understand the world, right? So that that's an astonishing area, but exactly. So if you're using robots to fight a fire, they absolutely need to understand what's really going on in the building. And so creating devices and robots, which can actually understand what's happening right now is I think if. If I only had one research topic that I could work on, I would regard that as much more important than improving the algorithms which is going to take that sensory data. It's going to be amazing when they figure it. I was talking to someone one of these future. I like to talk to a futurist and they were like at some point. And I think it's actually being created, say there's a nuclear spill or so the chemical spill or something like that that they would have sensors that were small as like grains of sand and they throw them on like from faraway, they'd spray them onto something in these sensors would pull in and the information of what spilled and what to do about it. And it was, I love the concept of it like, I'm sure it's not. Possible at this point, but that's the idea. It's like it's there. So sand is the way I looked at like they're so pervasive. They're almost like in the air without knowing their there. Yes, I do think we're moving in that direction. It actually totally makes your totally making this point. The. The idea of just trying to really focus on machine learning without being able to get hold of the killer one really important part of that turns out to be power and actually having it so that a sensor which is tiny is purchasing high-definition video. You can't have it sitting next to a big GPU of the now putting in. 'cause because that would be all the weight for a mobile platform and so forth. So for me, a lot of the stuff that we mathematicians like me doing in the middle of it movie stalled without that huge growth of book in the which he had our sensing and sensing everywhere going out to space going out inside of people. I mean, I remember that movie where they've traveled inside a human being. I'm like they're going to have sensors all over human beings at some point if we can deal with these things. So a very interesting aspect of that is, in my opinion, electrical and computer engineering departments, which. To some extent of had to watch computer science, getting older blurry that hopefully coming up. Oh, man. With friends, but still wrenches going what the hell if you used to be cool..

Bill Carnegie Mellon Cardi Mellon engineer Georgia Uber Silicon Valley ten years
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And it's and it's a difference at values to the government is quite involved. Every government's going to put its his sticky fingers in technology, no matter what you do. But in that case, it's quite a, it's it's very different values. So that point, if you consider things to be a numbers game, we're doomed think it is just a numbers game, right? If on the other hand, we maintain this role as the place the very top folks want to come to. Then I think that will make sure that this be speaking of my words not. For anyone else. The biggest advances in technology happened in a liberal western society that sort of democratic transparent, valleys, and you did mention you by numbers. We're doomed in terms of graduating people, and of course jobs are very important in this country. How do you look at the current state of sort of the anti immigration stance that this administration the not so lovely science. They don't love science as much as perhaps they should. Does that have an impact or is it just as short term until sanity is Richard science sanity is returned. I think it's short term an I haven't seen any craziness that, of course, I'm, I'm afraid it'll happen on this question of getting really the strongest folks over if we appear to have a society which doesn't welcome folks from elsewhere. And of course any sane brilliant scientists will end up going to Canada will Singapore's uric. They'll be able to get the best of both worlds here. So that is a concern is about perception. And once. You're like living in an academic community or in a software development office for an exciting company usually day to day interactions. This doesn't come up, you'll so focused on some particular mission, but that perception, especially among someone who's maybe sixteen or seventeen in anywhere from Turkey to China, to England is something I'm concerned about numerically schools like Tommy GI melons school of computer science, the very strong technology schools. We have not seen this impacting the interest in folks coming into programs and every year we are having to accept a smaller and smaller fraction of our applicants because there are so many applicants expecting letting people understand per year. Sometimes it feels that way. The way it is that way. So that's going okay for us. There are other disciplines things like law and business suffering, somewhat and university, like the broader set of universities in the United States who are also really important to our economy, maybe not top five part. Yeah, exactly. Those folks are starting to see drop off. So I think that is a leading indicator of a problem in Texas. So immigrant just focused, you know, in terms of who who's come here, you can name you just want one after the other. There's someone who's come from somewhere else. Yes. No one. I do think that some extent we unacademic who brought this upon ourselves blowing reason. All right. As funding in computer sciences remained relatively flat over the last ten or fifteen years. And by the way, I should mention that this administration isn't she very positive towards computer science funding, and s. t. p. of science and technology policy is really in its list of priorities of the country. Most of them are around computer science. So. Nope. We had a CTO, but go ahead. The head of that office, but okay, not whining about that aspect, but it has stayed flat while the number of computer science professors has needed to grow. And so there is less grunt funding to go around. Right? So a a starving dean or department had looks around and says, wet, can I get reading you and must as programs mainly based on bringing in relatively wealthy students from southeast Asia has been a huge money, boom chair they can pay. Yes. And I think again, in the top schools, the value of those students get, it's paid off in a few years of working in their industry, whether they stand, United States will go home. So it's still a positive value proposition, but it's pretty expensive. And so we academics Shaka heads and Sarah, it's too bad that most of the monsters program seem to be filled with international students. We need to increase the number of domestic students. The cost is, but the re- the reality is, yeah, the cost of these programs is high and departments who have got sort of addicted to the money in the research revenue they, they can say me sent..

United States Texas Asia CTO Richard Shaka heads Turkey Tommy GI Singapore Canada England Sarah China fifteen years
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And so this, maybe if the had been some concern, ten or twenty years ago, that would be something else would get broken and even omitting lots of students you'd see a big drop off later on. That's that hypothesis seems to fail. You think is most important of those changes. It really helps to be clear about something which we're lucky countryman already believed that it's about impact. And the real job of computer scientist is to be thinking that things a problem. What can we do about this and how can technology and social systems help? That's my definition of a computer scientist. It's. That's been shown the the goal oriented, the maybe some correlation there, but it I think it's important. Yeah. So I think that that is something which because we talk the talk on that we didn't simply walk the walk that can really help. So where do you imagine when you're thinking about China and other countries? I'm using China just as the proxy, but it's pretty much the most challenging country compared to the US has led the way in computer science. It's led the way in creation of internet companies. It's not the way increasing billionaires and etc. Etc. Startups. How do you look at the situation now? Do you see as a competition with them or do you? Because it only because Mark did Mark Zuckerberg brought this up in a podcast. He's like, it's, you know what they're doing in China. You shouldn't be hindering me because look at China and you sort of this mere g. kind of thing is not really what I not the choice I want to have, but how do you look at? But I do think he's absolutely correct in that that country really is all cylinders on educating creating legions of of computer scientists? Yes. So the. American experience and science and technology in the last fifty years has been very successful. It has maintained and really earned the status is the place in the world that you want to come. Right? And that has meant that you can think of places like MIT and Stanford and CMU is the stuff feed academy of computers. Yeah, I knew we had to get a star check reference later. Was Star Wars or Star Trek person Star Trek. Right. Definitely still, of course, yankus towers is depressing, but go ahead move along. So that strategy which worked so well and development of aerospace technology and the initial development of computation. And in more recent development of the really important principles like multi threatening multiple systems cool and computer vision and things that has worked very well. And I, that aspect where United States really kind of gets and maintains an unfair advantage making show that it gets hold of the best people does work or has what in our interest for a long time. And you can tell by my accent issue revealed as I, I. Parts. Acts funny accent my relatives in West Virginia would say, you talk funny I took, but it would never have occurred to me growing up that I wanted to be anywhere other than United States. I, I wasn't sure whether I would qualify to get in, but it it was the central point. Right? And that still stands despite everything. I think that around the world, one once people thinking primarily about the science and what new technologies to develop, they wanted to be part of this inist length. Thank yes, but, but but but but we the numbers still mean that there's huge numbers of folks who will stay whether they, they came from him because China has had so strong improvements in his educational system. Yes. That means a has got a very large group of folks who are creative and trying to do similar things without being in the United States, right? Not the copying community more. They now creative and doing that, which is really fascinating. People always go China copies and like that so much anymore. Like I think that's an old trope. Yes, I agree..

China scientist United States Mark Zuckerberg yankus towers West Virginia MIT CMU Stanford twenty years fifty years
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Is you obviously it's one of the top programme, so you're not gonna have it, but when you look around or there fewer people in this country going into that, is that a problem or. There's not enough schools or what are you imagine to be the problem because everyone talks about these pipeline issues constantly look at. So there is somewhat of a pipeline generally problem. Generally, one of the things that we're all super concerned about taking action on is specifically the pipeline for women and underrepresented minorities is weaker than the rest of the pipeline. What is your assessment of that? I bang on that drama all the time, but you know, is often used as an excuse. Sometimes I think it's real in part, but at the same time, I don't think companies put it as number one priority is number fourteen, which means it's number fourteen. It's not not in there. It's just not. They have other things they're worried about. So how do you look at that problem and what to do about it? So I've learned a lot while I've been kind of Email and and it's kind of humbling. So when I arrived, I was of a very traditional mindset which I'm embarrassed about now, which is, yes, it's a huge problem. I should do everything I can to encourage and help the people earlier in the pipeline, increase that part of it so that I can then absorb what they produce. And the thing I've learned his, that's not the case all of us in education and in early career management part of that pipeline. Right. So specifically, it's so easy to see ways that you're going to lose women or underrepresented minorities have made it all the way through high school. If you're not giving them a a positive environments in one way, they feel appreciated in an pot of an overall ovation. And then even further than that, if you're saying have a great time at university, but when you're out in the real world, just still going to suffer from. Just bias and so forth, then it's hard to retain them through the program. Part, everyone was focusing so much on recruiting which I think you need to do. But once people get there wherever it is that's worth things seem to the wheels seemed evolve car. As far as I can tell is that there's no management track. It's not managed differently. It's not. It's not imagining that people have different needs in the way they've been managing people, but it's all kinds of things. But it's keeping people there which is always and seeing a track towards promotion that's within the companies. How do you change the university? I know at Harvey Mudd they've tried different things. They've identified issues, social issues, the way they're right doing classes, the way they're conducting classes. What are you doing? What is your so different? There's a suite of things that you have to be doing. So let me run through some of them. I one is to be really, really just welcoming and thorough when you're looking at the match of individuals to the university, this approach which was pioneered over the last two decades. By CMU professes such as a professor Mongolia's and Lenore Blom have really helped make sure that we're not inadvertently dropping excellent students who may maybe don't come from Archer traditional white male that is being spectacularly successful. We have seen not only we now fifty percent women coming into the pergram butts. Their attention through the program is indistinguishable between men and women. The final results in the program are indistinguishable..

Harvey Mudd Lenore Blom Mongolia CMU professor fifty percent two decades
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The main responsibility I believe is to produce that second type, the people who gain to be building what's next there is however serious need for both types of developers. And again, there's no, I'm not saying one is stronger or more important than the other. It's absolutely pointless having folks invent new algorithms if there aren't people to take them and actually look at how to change the world with them. Similarly, someone on the planet should be figuring out how to make software more energy, efficient, more able to. To prevent disasters and each of these things. So two groups can Email emailing school of computer science focus as rightly or wrongly, I think rightly on the second group, the folks designing the next generation of what's going on. And so for that, we still have a dangerous undersupply. What do you mean by dangerous? I agree with you, but we'll be playing to people who don't understand the crisis, were it? Okay. And in fact I wouldn't call it. It's, yeah, it's a crisis. Yes, I think it is a like potentially an economic opportunity lost. So. So the one thing I I'm observing in my current role which I'm really enjoying is there is such a different in the technology levels of different organizations. There are people in companies that doing a fantastic business, but the infrastructure is based on nine hundred ninety s technology others, early two, thousands, and others, two thousand and tens. Two thousand and ten away. You often see parts of a business able to take in sensory data, like for instance, watching to see if anyone's tripped and fell in a factory so that you can quickly get help to them where it involves, like real computer vision and pretty advanced engineering. Other folks definitely wouldn't have anything like that. They may have extra people walking around traits, attract, detect that kind of thing, but it's going to be a long time for the tool up on it and the advice if some, if a company wants to move ahead with something like that is you have to have some internal expertise even when you hire consultants from the big consulting companies to come in and help you implement them, you have to have some internal expertise. Right. And so when you're thinking about what you're doing is, let's see, sort of as opposed to the other schools. How do you do you have a certain focus? How do you differentiate yourself then? And how do you attract people into the area. Yes. All the big schools do have slightly different characters and I'm, I'm, I do think we're different. I'm going to say that we're also Lee better in all lanes. Okay. My British upbringing would never allow all right. Okay. So you're not gonna like rag on Stanford? Exactly. This is awesome. What made me particularly love, kind of Email on sort of ally myself with it? Is it really thinks of the goals of its faculty and students to be around impact famously? One of my predecessors Ginette wing who was head of computer science at at CMU in a famous faculty promotions, meeting listens to some folks comparing bibliometric statistics about, well, this person's had this number of conference publications of this number of oral ports, and she stood up and she said, we don't care about those numbers. Look at what this person has done. That technology has brought like, I don't remember the. Instance specifically, but it is brought a change in the way that certain part of society operates. And we've always had that kind of focus. And it's, I mean, it's my personal belief, and I think it is the the general thing which unites us seem you that you actually get the best science by focusing on impact the field of computer sciences. So rich is so much to explore is completely unexplored at the moment that it is very easy to get lost in all the things you can do, but having a guiding light that that helps pull you to develop the things which aren't you gonna help society. Do you have a a lack of people coming into the system?.

Lee CMU Stanford Ginette
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Taylor, right? I'm many people had direct or indirect friends who are running small retail business and very concerned about how they can make sure that that what they're doing is visit night. So a lot of people in the Amazon sneak up on them that was like they're behind your back. Well, thinking like, oh, they're our friend. I'm like, they're not your friend. Yes. And this is not your friend? My my understanding is that through many of the larger retail companies, this this is being a big looming thing. Different retailers have moved at different speeds with saying, look, we've got to seriously invest in a cloud online offering, and for many retailers, there has been this question. We'll maybe we shouldn't do that preps. Our whole strategy should be about walk-ins and people have any experience doing the physical shopping. Right. So this question of what to do as during a disruptive period and shopping has been sort of raging on people really interesting where we are now. Of course, there's I, I. Again, as I said, I used to say the calls coming from inside the house retailers. You just like you're going to die. You don't be careful. So you left, then you left Google to do go back academia, and why did you do that? Because a lot of people like to stay in the fray and obviously a lot of academics also spent a lot of time in the fray. It was. It was fascinating. What I noticed going on in the world of academia was it's really centrally important role for the economy in for the future. The one of the biggest trends going on among the tech companies in what's going to keep them alive is how much strong software and machine learning AI expertise they can get hold of. And that was turning out to be the limiting factor that limiting factor is actually super serious. The reason it's so serious is the folks with these skill. Nls. If there's not enough of them, they will tend to flock to the places which most sort of welcoming and sets to take them. So when you've got a huge undersupply of a experts in the United States, those that do remain are going to be fought over by very deep pocketed strong internet companies who providing important services. But suddenly you start to see other organizations like even things like NASA war, Veterans, Administration or construction companies. All these other things. Absolutely. Right now need to bring in advanced technology really just being blocked because they come find care. Yeah. So my concern started to be that the biggest problem on need in the future is going to be wet. You get this the supply computer sciences from here with Andrew Moore. He's the dean of Carnegie Mellon's school of computers. Science. So you went there because there is this. It's it's almost a crisis really in terms of like Google. It's essentially Google and Facebook sucking up and others sucking up all the talent, and we'll get into the diversity of the talent in a minute. But so you went there talking about what Carnegie Mellon's doing most people think of Stanford and some other schools in California, polytech and stuff like that. Talk about how you look at computer education now and, and we'll get into the diversity issue in a minute, but how do you look at where we are as a country? Because I just recently read Mark Zuckerberg and he talked about the problem China, obviously, the worrisome nature of what's going on in China is that there's so many people. They're just pushing out a. i. experts everywhere, sort of look at the state of of where we are with graduates in computer science still heavily in demand. So when I look at the whole map of what's needed there. Two distinct populations of folks. We need to train up the both equally important, but they are different. Okay. Number one, the people who can take existing technology the the the great systems, like tends to flow or AWS web services, or at least things integrate them together to make newports. There's the second group which who are the people who are going to be designing the new things, which eventually replace those current. So there's the folks building the technology that the next twenty years will be based on. And then as those taking the existing technology. So a place the the great computer science places MIT Stamford, Georgia Tech, but plea CMU..

Google Carnegie Mellon Andrew Moore Amazon China Taylor Mark Zuckerberg AI NASA Georgia Tech United States California Stamford Stanford Facebook twenty years
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"To help people choose between a bunch of options and present those options to them in a useful way. Right, right. And the correct options? Yes. Incorrectly search results, which is much harder than people realize it is it's and it's also really painfully obvious someone searches for red party dress. I'm one of the results is a toaster even forty nine out of fifty years. Right? That looks really stupid. Absolutely. So one of the things Google did try to get into shopping in a much more significant way and had a lot of stumbles. You know with frugal, do you remember for goal? They're all. Were you involved in frugal frugal was at you the state of play when we're right. Right. And it's an amazing idea at the time frame. Yes, indeed. So this was during a period where the whole internet was learning a lot and one would is to people. They don't know it was giving a frugal was a initially, a cool project which turned out to be very popular when it was sort of displayed on lines and it was this question of, okay, I'm going to break this down in the way that I was thinking as an engineer. Traditionally a web search engine, a good with web search engine worth its salt would look at a query that a user typed in a few words and would then run through a match it against millions and eventually billions of documents to and it scored every single document is to how well it matched the query, right? And then it would show sort of results of summarizing those documents. The brilliant idea about frugal was that it was going to do more work forehands hands than merely sort of capturing the documents and storing an index for them. It was going to understand the components of the pages so that it could quickly see that. Although this this might be a page which is talking about vineyards in Italy is also good explicit mentions of these five types of great and so it can then use this. This page is actually about this type of. Grape right semantically rather than simply looking for string matches feeling right. And so you got there one obviously at the time, Amazon was starting to come on and which has outdone Google in the shopping area. Talk about why that was important. Obviously search was his most important thing, but it moved off into lots of different branches shopping would be an obvious one for them. I come speak for Google the corporation because it never was never will be by opinion as sort of a big a, a sort of very much a command and control center was. But for me, personally thing I was seeing was as time goes on, people don't want to simply use websites to get hold of documents which happened to mention. They wanna use whip such to do stuff. It was realized. Yes, exactly. And so it's about getting verbs if you like any aquariums and rather than just sort of pieces of to. Yes, that's funny. I'd like to buy. Yes, I kind of exactly, yeah. And then be the seller, I guess. Yes. So we'll never really wanted to be the full cellar. The way Amazon did, which I think is probably Amazon's power. That was the big difference and it still is. It's it's two different businesses. One is to sort of try to help make sure that you are. A aggregating information from. Liens of different retailers. So that uses don't have to individually go visit all as retailers. Web pages can still had such over them. Whereas Amazon's model which was has been amazingly professional and successful was to actually be doing the the logistics and transportation and shipping themselves. Right. And so you work there and what do you, what do you do you accomplished in shopping? Because it's gone through so many different iterations at Google continues to shift around and where it is, and they've tried to what they tried to do now, and you're not. There is position themselves as the alternate to Amazon. You know, that's their sale to the big retailers Amazon's now in in competition with a lot of retailers, and in fact in heavy competition with them and now they own retailers, they're going to be buying more stuff like just goes on and on. I have not really been involved right since I left Google the during the time Google we, one of the things that really drove us was this question of what can we do for like regular..

Google Amazon engineer Italy fifty years
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And so we ended up starting up an office in Pittsburgh, and it was also important in my mind that Pittsburgh starts to develop its own ecosystem of developers and such scientists rather than have everyone just migrate. Right? So you worked on shopping? Yes, we the office said she started out doing a lot of work on the machine learning that goes into the advertising systems that Google which is enormous amounts of data that's, you know? Yes, yes. It was really exciting and we had this team of statisticians systems, engineers, machine learning folks algorithms. And the question is. The only way this is still true. The only way appetizers survives on a page like Google homepage is if it's useful, people find it want to click on it. Right. Exactly. So there's many interesting technology problems they're voting, making sure you're showing relevant stuff for the query doing everything. You can to remove malicious stuff, which may have snuck into the system detecting that militia stuff in various ways, and then serving it up in a sort of beautiful useful way. And so people don't realize Google often starts offices and other cities allows people to stay where they are. You don't have to go to the go to the Borg and in Silicon Valley, which is in Mountain View, but they do that so they can avail themselves to universities and things like that. And for Lee people don't realize it has an, we'll talk a little bit about cars and things like that had has become one of the hubs of development and all kinds of really great technologists. That's true. And to that Google was not the first NFL. L. has had a left for a while. And for instance, Caterpillar is an example of a company which is what too long robotics here for couple of decades. All right. So you're at Google doing this and Helen, you Google did your there for many years. Very h. Yeah, yeah, really, really cool. Exciting is. Yeah. And talk about what you did there shopping, especially like what was the concept around shopping? So the interesting thing about when someone is trying to purchase something, there are different patterns. There patterns of people who just say, for instance, I'm building this cabinet on a need, this kind of hinge brace for that. What you want to do is create an experience where the person can is fishing, possible narrow down on what is right. There are other experiences where it's not just about the end goal. It is about getting that opportunity to choose among many different objects and stuff like that. And at that point, the interesting thing is the most value that. At great companies like Google Amazon, Microsoft can bring is.

Google Pittsburgh Mountain View Caterpillar Lee NFL Microsoft Helen Amazon
"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Network today, I'm delighted to have Andrew more on the podcast. He's the dean of Carnegie Mellon's school of computer science, which was ranked number one in the world by US news and World Report, and he was previously vice president of engineering Google, where he was in charge of Google shopping. Andrew, welcome to Rico, decode. Thanks for. Thank you. So let's talk. I wanna I wanna get your background. I have had various computer scientists on the show, and we're teaching and just like that. And I love to get sort of the academic perspective, but you've been in the in the fray also. So let's give your background where you came from and how you got to Carnegie Mellon, and then we'll talk about what's going on there. I grew up in the seaside town called boom in the south of England, and there in the late eighty s I really got into creating video games like kids at the time right? When studied computer science at Cambridge University and then did a PHD on this big question of it's so hard to program robots to do stuff. Even we make them learn to do it instead, which has been the biggest challenge obviously. So that's why I really fell in love with this question of, to what extent can we help machines improve their performance and performance? I, we'll talk about that later a little bit more. So you did that, but you did you go right to robotics? Where'd you go from there? Subsequently, I, I spent some time at the MIT a up which is super fun working for professor Chris Atkinson there, and I'm totally a math statistics guy, where's he builds real robots. So it was a trial. Fan actually build the physical robots, and frankly, I still suck at that mechanical engineer, exactly, huge respect for that the it's the stuff to do with making things decide what they're going to do next. I'm really interested in anyway. Subsequently I joined Connie Email and really enjoyed sort of helping develop the AI classes that got super into using machine learning, not only for robots, but for manufacturing because there's so much I'm do to improve that. I really enjoyed my time that started to get interested in other big questions around computer science to do with things like, can you detect near-earth objects which potentially dangerous using so fancy algorithms or Nathan Myhrvold thing, but go ahead. Can you get an early warning that this being an ABC borne diseases, heck on a city by noticing that the perhaps the uptick in sales of of medications, following stripe along the city in the direction of the f. low for example, that's that was the cool stuff. Right? Helpful is all around this key thing that if you compress a lot of data machines may be able to see stuff that no individual human could see because we can only sort of ingest a certain amount of beta exactly which is the whole idea behind all this. So you were there Carnegie Mellon, and then you went to Google. Is that the only job you've had like that's not academic, or was it? Yes, yes, I did. Do a spectacularly unsuccessful startup for a while. What was it? That was all his spectacularly unsuccessful startup. They're my favorites machine learning consulting services early. Yeah, we in the one thousand nine thousand nine hundred. We had a flashing neon sign on Craig street near CMU which said, data mining mining, fleshing all the time. Right? Which he never got any will can customers, unfortunately. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Today wouldn't go over well, go ahead what we loved doing that, but we just didn't figure out how to make money at it, consulting engagements on a playing machine learning and all kinds of places really do. Do that was now the thing. So you went over to Google. How did you get to Google? I was really impressed by the way that things were scaling so much and I, I made the move relatively late. It was in the mid two, thousands, and the fact is I was very, very interested in this question of what can you do with a billions or in some cases, more than billions of obsessions. That's what I entice me..

Google Carnegie Mellon Andrew US vice president of engineering Nathan Myhrvold MIT England Cambridge University Connie Email Rico ABC Chris Atkinson professor
"andrew moore" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on The MLB Show

"Leverage roles but i think what we're strewed about this is two parts one because of robinson canot suspension that freed up about eleven million dollars for the mariners because they don't have to pay canot for the eighty games while he's out and what that means is column in span or not cheap per se but they have salaries that combined costs about eleven million dollars for the rest of the season tampa's kicking in a little bit of money but essentially they're slotting into canot salary spot that's what made this deal palatable for mariners ownership but also because the mariners have such a poor farm system the fact that andrew moore is one of their better prospects speaks volumes about seattle system is they probably weren't going to be able to get even a decent starting pitcher at the deadline and right now they're otane is still james paxton and a bunch of guys who are hanging on with either poor peripherals or good preferences that we don't really expect to last i don't know if marco gonzales is going to be a number you could say marco gonzalez but yeah he's he's okay but i don't know if that's the rotation he wanted to compete until october with but if you have a bullpen that can give you solid four innings every night that really helps out it prevents your starters from having to go three times through the order it helps your offense in the late innings if they don't have to chase as big a deficit it really like you said has such a big trickle down effect and will matter even before october in this case.

mariners tampa andrew moore marco gonzales marco gonzalez seattle james paxton eleven million dollars
"andrew moore" Discussed on The Ringer MLB Show

The Ringer MLB Show

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on The Ringer MLB Show

"Leverage roles but i think what we're strewed about this is two parts one because of robinson canot suspension that freed up about eleven million dollars for the mariners because they don't have to pay canot for the eighty games while he's out and what that means is column in span or not cheap per se but they have salaries that combined costs about eleven million dollars for the rest of the season tampa's kicking in a little bit of money but essentially they're slotting into canot salary spot that's what made this deal palatable for mariners ownership but also because the mariners have such a poor farm system the fact that andrew moore is one of their better prospects speaks volumes about seattle system is they probably weren't going to be able to get even a decent starting pitcher at the deadline and right now they're otane is still james paxton and a bunch of guys who are hanging on with either poor peripherals or good preferences that we don't really expect to last i don't know if marco gonzales is going to be a number you could say marco gonzalez but yeah he's he's okay but i don't know if that's the rotation he wanted to compete until october with but if you have a bullpen that can give you solid four innings every night that really helps out it prevents your starters from having to go three times through the order it helps your offense in the late innings if they don't have to chase as big a deficit it really like you said has such a big trickle down effect and will matter even before october in this case.

mariners tampa andrew moore marco gonzales marco gonzalez seattle james paxton eleven million dollars
Alexa, Google Assistant and Siri can be fooled by 'silent' commands

Techmeme Ride Home

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Alexa, Google Assistant and Siri can be fooled by 'silent' commands

"Ex experiment and no timeline has been announced for it to roll out for consumer use also as we discussed yesterday duplex currently only works in three very constrained contexts making reservations at restaurants scheduling haircuts and asking businesses for their hours so it's not that i'm defending plex or anything but i do wanna point out that this is still very early days were not at the level of passing turing test yet or even a blade runner style replicant test not yet at least okay here's another similarly concerning story about new technology and fears of a robot dystopia you know all those cool new voice assistance siri alexa google assistant cortana what could go wrong with them well what if i could send audio commands to your digital system that you couldn't hear but could maybe nonetheless commanded to do things like i don't know by things without your permission or unlock your front door if you're smart speaker is connected to your smart home system there's a piece in the new york times outlining how researchers in the us and china have demonstrated techniques to embed audio commands in music or spoken texts that the human ear can't here but a smart assistant can as of yet there's no indication that bad actors are using this sort of technique in the wild but one of the researchers is quoted in the times piece as saying quote my assumption is that the militias people already ploy people to do what i do and quote so yeah buzzfeed's charlie zell tweeted probably once every four months i read something like this and made aware of new threat embedded in some new technology that i have never even considered and then i let out deep guttural mon the only solace that i can offer charlie and you is to maybe end with this story carnegie mellon announced today the first undergraduate degree offered by a us university in the field of artificial intelligence andrew moore dean of carnegie mellon's school of computer science said quote specialists and artificial intelligence have never been more important in short supply or in greater demand by employers and quote so maybe we can just train a whole new generation of scientists to do battle with the robots or at least mitigate the work done by the other scientists who are unleashing these robots on our world.

New York Times United States China Charlie Zell Carnegie Mellon Google Andrew Moore Four Months
"andrew moore" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on talkRADIO

"For joining me let me bring my guests in now we'll get a security specialist richard angel to actual progress david sensitive movement let's return i'm sure we will at some point see more for james k me has had to say i think on any other week i think james kennedy's words would perhaps be leading the news oversee very dominant in the news in america but obviously for us it will be the prime minister comments today to justify the action she took in the morning along with donald trump and emmanuel macron these these strategic air strikes on chemical weapons sites in syria can i ask you a verse richard angel the labels jeremy corbyn has been doing the rounds he was under andrew moore yesterday asking answering questions he's easily very adamant this shouldn't have happened but that parliament she shouldn't have happened without un sanction safe in the knowledge that neither of these would have given a go ahead to trees is he right the labour leader easy right to argue that i feel we setting up expectations that could possibly be met we know russia raw not only acids apologised but the you know the aiding and abetting what they're doing to their own people there in russia so they're not going to let anything go through the un so it's an industrial for this unable to bring peace to the situation in syria and i think it's sets up a straw man the choices justice hurt virtue in the position when actually all it is is an ability to be handwringing about the situation and does nothing for the people of syria all the time other than sort of what you do three things at television when he was being interviewed onto the whole time i was you know you know for a fact that everyone has been trying.

richard angel america donald trump syria jeremy corbyn andrew moore russia un david james kennedy prime minister emmanuel macron abetting
"andrew moore" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"In 2018 and i'm sure with us sixteen do you think sixteen old go ahead with that same thought no i don't think i'll sixteen will get open okay i will you mean to a fixed enclosed yeah no i don't think sixty will close time we'll do that will come back with john a sip of jonathan shag so easy for me to say right here on the modern neater show on iheartradio don't forget the genius out on instagram a hand facebook for all the fun videos and pictures just search the modern itre hi i'm andrew moore brew master at the intrepid sojourner beer project at intrepid sojourner beer tells the story inspired by my ventures as a welltraveled archeologist my recipes drawing inspiration from all over the world from historical styles like socrates great series and class to adjunct fears inspired by flavors from international was cuisines my ears broaden the horizons of what beer can be explore basil ipa and turkish coffee stout enjoy chai brown ale tastes lavender triple and the distinctive porch out a milk stout thoughtfully source spices and herbs enhance flavors inherent to indigenous beer styles my sincere hope is that intrepid sojourner beer project or inspire adventure in wanderlust come visit the taproom and share your tails with friends and plan your next soldier located at nine to five west eighth avenue in the heart of artistric john sound pay for everything intrepid lucas up online at sojourner beers dot com and remember to drink globally locally.

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"andrew moore" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"andrew moore" Discussed on KOMO

"It at the sports desk marriage try to make it fiveinarow seasonhigh the the first time all season above the five hundred mark if they could be detroit rookie pitcher on out try to do that though andrew moore called up yesterday for aaa tacoma where he was three and one will make his bigleague debut as your body guy ardo who's been largely ineffective since being acquired this season has been banished to the bullpen for the timebeing in seattle sixteen and eight over its last twenty four games 2003 at thirteen at home will go for the fourgame sweep of the tigers tonight saudi translate home heartbroken last night after they thought they had a winner wrapped up with a one nil lead the last play of the game scott cetera stoppage time with a free kick headed in orlando city gets a one one tie seattle of much lighter brood about that they'll have to move on to pull them to take on the timbers at a cascadia cut matchup coming up on sunday afternoon which exports of ted at forty past the hour of the home of the huskies traffic and weather on the way bill recently cited ally in oregon allows drivers who crashed into dear at elk on the road to harvest the animal's meat for food oregon is not the first state to pass the law like this in fact washington started allowing the salvaging of deer and nl carcasses a year ago in all about twenty other states also lead people take meat from animals killed by vehicles events will vania people can take dearer turkey's that are killed on the road but they have to report the incidents to the state gained commission within 24 hours oregon lawmakers passed their bill unanimously frank lenzi see komo news police in italy make a rare arrest of a suspect accused of torturing migrants in libya nigerian man nicknamed rambeau has been arrested accused of capturing torturing and killing migrants looking for a better life twenty five year old john gaze was arrested in a reception centre in the southern italian region of calamba that's after fell oh my 'grants identified him as their brutal tormentor when.

andrew moore tacoma seattle tigers orlando city oregon frank lenzi libya rambeau john gaze detroit washington komo italy twenty five year 24 hours