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Edition 2225

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:52 min | 1 year ago

Edition 2225

"You're listening to the globalist. First broadcast on the eighth of May two thousand and twenty on Monocle. Twenty four the globalist in association with UBS live from London. This is the globalist. I'm Emma Nelson and a very warm welcome to today's program. Coming up all signs point to a partial lifting of the lockdown in the UK but the country has the second highest desktop with covert nineteen in the world. So why now also ahead Iran to lift its lockdown with still very little really known about the full effects of the pandemic. Plus if you missed a moment at this week's News Andrew Moolah we'll fill in the gaps you would need to believe that President Donald Trump. Donald Trump of all people would indulge a manifestly harebrained scheme presented by obvious Yahoos. And give it to go ahead with that plus the latest Tech News and y when we can't go shopping little treats such as pens and pencils can bring us pleasure. That's all ahead on the globalist live from London. Before we get started with all that quick look at what else is happening in the news. The Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced a three step plan for relaxing Cova lockdown restrictions Iraq. Has it said prime minister since November with the country's parliament approving a new government and leaders across Europe will be marking the seventy fifth anniversary of the day later with much of the continent and the lockdown stay tuned to monocle twenty four throughout the day for more on these stories but I the noise from the road is building the pavements are busier here in the UK. There is a sense that the lockdown is getting all by itself without any instruction from the government. Well no official one anyway and not forgetting this week that the number of people known to have died in the UK with Cova Nineteen passed the thirty thousand mark making it the second highest death toll in the world after the US. Well this weekend. Britain is expected to be told there will be some loosening of the restrictions but other countries citizens taking this is a green light already to get back out there well. I'm joined now by the political analyst and former BBC political correspondent Carol Walker. Welcome back to the globalist count. It's good to have you on the radio with us. What is happening? Will it's fascinating. Isn't it? Because when the prime minister was in the Commons on Wednesday Facing the new opposition leader. Kissed Olmert Prime Minister's Questions. He appeared to give a clear signal that he in his statement that he's due to give to the nation on Sunday that he would be signaling measures to ease the restrictions He said he wanted to get going on Monday. With some changes that would allow people more freedom. This spot a rash of newspaper headlines suggesting it was going to be happy Monday and there was an end to the lockdown inside and then yesterday his deputy Dominic Robb at the daily news conference went out with a clear attempt to try to dampen down all those expectations. He said that any changes that the prime minister set out. When he said he would be a roadmap. We're going to be modest small incremental and very carefully monitored and further more. He said that if any of the changes that they made any of the relaxations resulted in an increase in the rate of infection than those restrictions could be reimposed. Could beat back into the most severe form of lockdown so there have been some slightly confused messages and I think what happened. Was that after. The prime minister raised. Everyone's tapes on Wednesday. There was a key cabinet meeting yesterday. There were also talks with the leaders of the devolved nations and many many senior expressing concern that it was just going to be too risky at this stage to lift the restrictions too soon that could send the infection rate soaring up and then we could be into a second spike. Which of course would be tragic for everyone involved and potentially devastating once again for businesses. You might have thought that they could start to get going. So we have this mixed messaging and the key tone. Now emerging from the British government is one of real caution but with a sunny weekend expected this weekend and real sense that a lot of people are pretty much fed up with the lockdown. The Brits are bored with it now and is there a sense that it's a little bit too late to start sake literally? Try and shut the doors. Will I think what when you look overall at the statistics? Actually the vast majority of the nation has complied with the restrictions. And that is what has brought the rate of infection down yet. There were suggestions that come Monday. We might be allowed to go out and sunbathe will. The Prime Minister spokesman seemed to indicate yesterday that that was not going to be the case. There've been suggestions that we could go out and exercise more than once a day. That is still a possibility given that it seems to be that being out in the fresh air makes it less likely that you'll gain to pass on the disease and there certainly is pressure on the prime minister from some conservative. Mp's you say look. There are a lot of businesses that could be opening up. There are a lot of businesses. That could start work again. While still respecting the social distance was still that people their workers and their customers retain a safe distance between one another. I think what we're going to hear on. Sunday is likely to be a series of stage posts where they make one change at a time monitor how that affects the rest of infection and then move onto the next thing and I think it's more likely to be efforts to get at least some business as back and working because of the enormous damage that this is doing to the economy. We know that the chancellor wants to start easing down on this furlough scheme whereby the government is paying eighty percent of the wages of millions of British workers and he does want to start winding down by at least the end of Jude. That can only happen if businesses are starting to work again. Of course the worry. Is that as soon as you start to reopen some businesses as soon as more people are out in Abou- on moving around risks increasing the rate of infection. It is interesting that all night. We had some rather yet again. Some confusing figures Dominic Robb. The deputy prime minister said that the off the rate at which people pass on the infection was between north point five point nine but some government scientists who were giving evidence to the comments put it at higher than that of course as soon as it gets above one that means the overall number start to spike up again so. I think that there is a little bit of confusion about this partly because of course not everyone is being tested still and I think that what we will see some changes being announced by the prime minister on Sunday. But certainly not as much as some people are certainly hoping for how much of a sense of control is there of the the leader of Boris Johnson. Here of this whole situation given the fact that the countries who have managed the pandemic in a more stable way of those who have issued very straight-forward open. Tell it like it is and Clear messages to people immediately. One thinks of just send are done. Angela Merkel mccomb in Paris. And then you look at United Kingdom and what you have just said. Is this sort of catalogue of well. The Prime Minister says this. And then they raid. You know they ruin on that one and this is seems to have been a pattern throughout the entire corona virus pandemic plus the fact that some have said well. What is it about the prime minister admittedly recovering from Corona virus and new further nonetheless? The day that the The death toll past thirty thousand. He was nowhere to be seen apart from going for a walk in the park with the takeaway coffee the day that the United Kingdom surpassed all other countries in Europe. He was not to be seen there. Sending out deputies and flunkies and many people have said that there has been a a vacuum of leadership in this country. I think Boris Johnson is absolutely very much central and essential to the message that the government is getting. Yes you're right. There have been an awful lot of questions about why? Britain reached this grim. Told thirty thousand. Six hundred fifteen people have now died from corona those those who've been confirmed as dying from the virus and a lot of questions are being asked about whether for example the lockdown restrictions should have been imposed more quickly with a more action should have been taken particularly in Kerr homes where there is still a really really big problem now the response that we get whenever we ask. Those sorts of questions is yes. There will be a time to reflect to inquire to look whether the right decisions were taken at the right time but now let's just focus on getting to the end of this in getting the virus under control and getting to a point where the restrictions can be eased. What happened clearly. Is that the prime minister as many people will know was struck down by the corona virus went into hospital went into the intensive care unit. And we're told that it was touching go as to whether he would pull through now during his there certainly was a vacuum. No significant decisions of any sort were taken since he's come back. I think that he's then had to confront these very difficult. Decisions had to confront the pressure from some businesses from some conservative. Mp's or saying come on. Let's lift some of these restrictions. Let's get some businesses back to work and there is evidence that some businesses are starting to do that am furthermore that there are businesses who could reopen and could do so at the minimum amount of risks while still maintaining the important social distancing. But I think the mixed messages that we've seen over the last day or so in terms of these restrictions reflect that huge debate that there is at the heart of government and I think you can't ignore the fact that for example Nicholas Sturgeon Scotland's very powerful leader had said that she thought it could be potentially a catas- sorry a potentially catastrophic mistake to lift the restrictions. Too soon she sang. She won't be rushed bounced into any changes. The leader whales is making similar comments and Boris Johnson. Does want to try to take the whole of the UK along as much as possible as one nation. Moving out of these very tight restrictions but I think although there are going to be there's going to be a huge focus on exactly what the prime minister says on Sunday evening signals. He get gives the tone but I don't think anyone now should expect any significant relaxed version of the restrictions anytime soon. But it has to be said that. Boris Johnson's instinct is always to try to give a positive message. Tried to lift people's spirits. Try TO SAY COME ON GUYS. We can pull through this. We can get out of this. It's all going to be fine. That is very much his instinct that has been I think curtailed somewhat since he had that ghastly experience of almost dying from the virus himself but he will still want to try to deliver some kind of positive message without undoing the very powerful slogan that we had here stay at home protect the NHTSA live. That's the one slogan that does seem to have been cutting through to the public. Even though people are getting grief frustrated with it there is no doubt however that in the eyes of the rest of the world the United Kingdom does not come out. Well you see reports from Greece from America from France from Germany. All asking questions what it is about the United Kingdom that was arguably in knew it was coming should in theory be well prepared had an excellent infrastructure and yet there is still feeling that there's a sort of muddled and befuddled approach to the whole thing. Where does the United Kingdom now lie in the eyes of the rest of the world? What I think you're absolutely right. The other nations are looking at the UK and indeed on the Daily News conferences. The government has been giving this graph showing where the UK is in relation to other countries while at the same time saying Oh will comparisons are not necessarily that valid because different countries count their deaths count their rates of infections in different ways that is undoubtedly true and for example in the UK The government is now doing much better at counting the numbers of deaths in the amount of infections in care homes where there is still a very very serious problem. Indeed I think that there is some validity in what the government is saying for example. Italy doesn't count deaths in care homes in the same way as this but undoubtedly countries which have done the best at controlling the virus places like South Korea. That's often quoted did have a very early test track and trace system in place. We're only just getting trials that underway on the isle of White Now. There is a lot of evidence that if the lockdown had been put in place a few days earlier quite a few of the hot spots might have been avoided to certainly were instances where there wasn't enough protective equipment the P. P. available particularly in care homes and in some hospitals and indeed the whole testing regime. We simply didn't have the capacity for that to happen quickly at the beginning of the virus although that has been ramped up very swiftly now I think to an extent the government is right that we are going to have to wait to with through this to to be able to take proper assessments of who has made the right decisions at the right time but there is absolutely no doubt when you look at that figure of more than thirty thousand people in this country who have died the largest number in Europe the largest number per head of population allowing those discrepancies. Which I've talked about there is undoubtedly going to be some soul-searching and I think it is going to affect the way that other nations view citizens from the UK as they consider what to do about lifting their own restrictions their own border controls and a lot is going to depend on exactly the path that the prime minister sets out on Sunday. Evening our Walker. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four you were the globalist. It's eight sixteen zero seven. Sixteen if you're listening here in London earlier this week the US president. Donald trump vetoed the so-called Iran war powers resolution. It's a piece of legislation that keeps a check on the president's power to US military action against Iran president trump called it a very insulting resolution which in his words is based on misunderstandings of facts and low. When I'm joined by Holly Digress Nonresident Fellow at the Atlantic Council and editor of Iran sauce. Holly Welcome back to monocle. Twenty Four. Just explain the purpose. In the origins of the war powers resolution well essentially the war powers resolution was a rebuke against us. President Donald Trump after the assassination of goods force. Commander cost some money in early January The trump administration at the time had said that he posed a threat to the United States and that he was planning an imminent attack and that was the reason he was Baghdad and We later heard from the Iraqi government that he was actually there to mediate between Saudi Arabia and Iran and Later on we saw that. Us Secretary of State. Mike Pompeo come out and say that essentially plants to attack US embassies. Later when Congress questioned the trump administration about all this they were not able to provide any substantial evidence or proof of what they were saying. So what happened was that Congress took action Became a bipartisan effort to curb president trump's ability to go to war with Iraq and it was expected that president trump would veto this act. But I think what's raising eyebrows and concern is that they're not entirely trusting of this president. This is the president that has tweeted in the past Before he was president under the Barack Obama Administration repeatedly that if Obama was losing election that he would go to war with Iran or start something with Iran just to gain credibility with ups people so a lot of people on social media have been jokingly in somewhat seriously pointing to such tweets to make arguments of why there should be a this act in place. The why say we're going to lift the restrictions now in terms of the veto powers while I think that a lot of people There's been a lot of concern that things could go very differently and for. Us President Donald Trump when? He said that he was going to be a this war powers. Act FOR HIM. He was saying that it actually tied his hands behind his back. If there was to be an attack by Iran but if you look at the fine print of the actual resolution it says that if there was an imminent attack that he would have that ability so I think there's a lot of A misunderstanding between both sides on this topic or in a moment though when we always when there are moments in the Middle East which could which are where the tension is rising and it is barely few weeks? Iranian ships harassed. Us ships in the Persian Gulf and the president retaliate in threatened retaliation against the Iranian ships. And here we go. Builds up it built up it built up and it is donald trump moving toward something here to to ratchet up the pressure once again or is this just a moment when Donald trump decides the while the rest of the world is trying to do with corona virus. You wants to sort of try. A new tactic aggression. It's really hard to say. I think I think what's happening here. Is that the maximum pressure policy is proving itself to be a maximum failure. Those far it's Come May twenty-first. It'll be two years since this policy has been amounts. Toronto has not come to the table as the administration had hoped and planned and so there are a bit Confused ABOUT WH- way forward and the fact that they're not leading on diplomacy here. I think that in order for tensions to de-escalate and the make sure that these incidents don't lead to something on a pass that leads to war centrally. I think it's important that the international community especially the remaining signatories of the Iran nuclear agreement which the United States withdrew from in May twenty eighteen actually push for diplomacy between these two countries instead of hoping that It works out for the bus. I know that there's a pandemic right now. But the fact that they're continuous Tensions continue to rise such as in the Persian Gulf. As you've mentioned that shows that there's just a big need for diplomacy right now so in the middle of all this The lockdown is being lifted has partially been lifted In Iran at the request of president. Henri Harney how desperate is a wrong in desperate? How desperate to state is Iran in the moment that there is a need to lift the lockdown? When we still don't know how bad depend DEMOC has been there. We'll certainly Iran with badly. It was worst hit country in the Middle East. The official death toll six thousand but a lot of us believe that it was that it's a lot higher in part because they do not have the testing kits and in part because they haven't been entirely oddest about the death toll and they've had a a hundred thousand in the country. Will the problem here is that Iran is under punitive sanctions on and they're unable to tap into their funding and are able to go out and help the Iranian people to the extent they would like to and so for them a quarantine a real hardcore nineteen was not possible so the best they could do was issue the stay at home orders for the past month or so and happy. Ronnie and stay at home now because the number of krona virus cases had peaked. An ad become less and less about two weeks ago. They decided to lift these restrictions. But now it's becoming evident Since Saturday that the numbers had gone from eight hundred to fourteen hundred double and it seems that the second way of Corona virus cases is now hitting the country. And if you look at videos and pictures coming out of Iran you'll notice that Iranians are acting like it never even happened. They're not really maintaining their social distancing continue to shop very closely next to each other. And so it's it's really hard to say where the what the future holds but I it's clear that Iran cannot contain could excuse me commute Continue with this situation at hand. Which is this stay at nationwide. Stay at home order. I think it's right now is that is it more important to keep the country open for the economy or or to protect the people from the corona virus. And I think that's kind of were the Iranian government and specifically president has said Ruhani's at it's Kinda struggling with some saying that covert nineteen has done to Iran. What sanctions have tried to do for years namely bring it to a standstill? An argument there definitely to be made but at the same time I it hasn't collapsed. The government hasn't changed their behavior. As you noted there the Iranian armament Had ships harassed the US Navy in the Persian Gulf. There used to be a presence in Syria They continue to fly to different countries and even Two weeks ago they flew to Venezuela and it's unclear. What kind of cargo? They were taking their so. I think it's That while it economically speaking it's really taken it's toll I think. In terms of curbing Iran's malign behavior that the trump administration likes to always referred to it hasn't done much hollies Agra's many thanks for joining us on the globalist still to come on today's program. We continued to unpack on you title the Monocle Book of Japan and Andrew Moolah recaps what we've learned this week stay with us. Ubs has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries over nine hundred of the sharpest moins and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today find out how we can help you contacted us at UBS DOT com. It's always important to stay focused on the bigger picture. Markle's been doing exactly that since twenty seven subscribed to the magazine today for opportunities powerful stories and courageous journalism. You can get a global perspective and insights into the worlds of current affairs business design and so much more all without leaving your Cypher. As well as tennis shoes of Monaco. You'll receive an annual specials the entrepreneurs the escapist and the forecast. Oh a free limited edition tote bag and for a limited time only this ten percent off. So what are you waiting for? Visit MONOCLE DOT COM now and subscribe today using the Promo Code Radio. Ten Monaco keeping an eye and an ear on the world. It's Friday which means it multiples contributing editor Andrew. Mueller has been hard at work unpacking what we know this week that we didn't seven days ago. His this weekly episode of what we learned. We learned this week to the surprise of many of us that there are worse things than being shot in the head while trying to enjoy an evening at the theatre. One of which it turns out is being roundly and righteously marked by incredulous newspapers for responding to a pandemic killing thousands of your fellow citizens daily by suggesting that they inject disinfectant. Such at least is the view of us. President Benito Cartman who while literally sitting at the actual feet the actual statue in the actual Lincoln actual memorial said the following. I am greeted with a hostile press. The likes of which no president has ever seen the closest would be that gentlemen right up there. They always said. Lincoln nobody'd got treated worse than Lincoln. I believe I am treated worse. We had of course long. Since learned that it is impossible to imagine these statements so crass self-regarding and do a streep that Donald Trump would not utter it. We had even learned by now that the modifier even by trump standards had probably become redundant but it is pretty hard to see how trump tops this unless at the ever-present risk of tempting fate. He waddles across the National Mall to the Martin Luther King Junior memorial and wines that nobody ever asks about his dreams we learned however a possible successor to trump as the Republican party nominee for president. At least if one believes in betting with form step forward Nino vitale presently serving the eighty fifth district of Ohio in the Buckeye States House of Representatives Representative Vitale who has form as antitax head Banger. And General Foil Hata with a sidelining anti Semitic doctor gave his reasons for refusing to wear a mask to halt the spread of Nineteen when we think about the image and likeness of God created in the image likeness of God when think of image. Do we think of chest or legs or arms we think of their face without wishing to give the bloke ideas it is surely the case that representative tally believes that. God made the rest of him as well and he still wears a suit elsewhere. We began to learn something of the scale of the challenge facing any polity which fancies throwing an election this year. Poland was supposed to be holding presidential election on Sunday. What with one thing and another. This was always going to be tricky. Even if all parties could be banked on to behave in impeccable. Good faith this is not a quality for which the ruling Lauren Justice Party and its preferred candidate incumbent president. Andre Duda have developed a reputation on Wednesday. The election was called off postponed at least until a date to be determined his monocle. Wausau correspondent Annabel Chapman on Mondays globalist. It shows sort of the scale of the chaos at the moment and is nine former leaders have come forward and to boycott the election because they say that the elections Actions and they want that. They will be unconstitutional and they will not be free or fair. We learned and bear with on this one that President. Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela may not be entirely delusional. Madero has spent his calamitous office melodramatically insisting that everything going wrong in his country which is more or less everything that could be is the fault not of the administration. He has led for seven years. Nefarious forces plotting to fort the Glorious Revolution. Which has turned to country with the world's largest oil reserves into a bankrupt and shambles? We learned that the proverbial nefarious forces do exist and did have a crack at him an apparent attempt on Monday to run the nineteen sixty one bay of pigs operation in Cuba going badly askew in Venezuela here is Madero gloating subsequently affect to capture would be invaders are US citizens apparent Venezuela Colombia not the group Pakistan International Finance. Seattle's Ya'll put it over here. Another Columbia Duke. E Peruvian needling automatic Maduro claims as he would that the ultimate responsibility for whatever the heck. This walls lies within the White House but to believe that you would need to believe that president. Donald TRUMP DONALD trump of all people would indulge manifestly harebrained scheme presented by obvious Yahoos. And give it to go ahead and does that sound like something that someone who went bankrupt running a casino would do and we learned something off the toll. That lockdown is beginning to take on these sanity of Russians they are apparently takers for an initiative by Katherine Burgh based Caria Ural Airlines which will allow housebound customers to order authentic. In-flight meals served on an airline tray for delivery. Euro. Promise the taste of travel without leaving your home. It is not clear as we go to. Where where those of us with some experience of Russian inflight catering can just send out for a glass of water and a packet of peanuts monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew another thanks to Andrew for that. The time here in London is seven thirty one year the globe list with Emma Nelson and a quick now at the latest World News Headlines. Australia Prime Minister Scott. Morrison has announced a three step plan for lifting restrictions in the country. The first phase will see the reopening of cafes restaurants and shops with public gatherings of up to ten people also allowed and while much of France will see restrictions lifted next week Paris and northeastern France will still be subject to a strict lock down. The country has suffered one of the highest death rates from covert Nineteen in Europe Iraq. Has Its third prime minister since November with the country's parliament approving a new government former intelligence chief Mustapha al-Kadhimi was sworn in as prime minister after Wednesday night's vote? It's hoped? His appointment will end months of political deadlock and deadly protests and leaders across Europe will mark the seventy fifth anniversary vide with much of the continent under lockdown close ceremonies will be held by the leaders of France and Germany. And two minute silence will take place in the UK. The anniversary marks the official surrender if Nazi Germany in the Second World War. This is a globalist stay tuned. We'll be going through the newspapers in just a moment but I all this week. We're celebrating our newest title. The monocle book of Japan and as part of our series. We've asked our to read out some of the highlights of the book which is out. Now you can get it on our website. Monocle DOT COM TODAY MONACO'S BUSINESS EDITOR VENETIA. Rainy tells us more about your gutter design Yarmulke design is on a mission to revitalize northern Europe's of asked shown. I plan this fertile. Sweep of land in Yamagata Prefecture is home to some of the country's best ricefields but also like many other rural areas subject to alarming levels of depopulation thirteen tokyo-born found dice que. Yamanaka was busy climbing the career ladder. One of Japan's largest developers I watched so many big projects he explains but one day it occurred to me. Do we need any more shopping centers in our country. I decided to do something that society more Yamanaka quit his job. In two thousand fourteen and with an initial investment of just eight hundred thirty euros Yamagata design was born. His first project. Sweden Taras he commissioned award-winning architect. She go ban and by summer twenty eighteen one hundred and forty three room. Hotel was open. A low rise complex that seemingly floats above the waterlogged fields surrounding it. The hotel has a farm to Table Restaurant. Spring Library space. I'm a shop selling crafts next door. He's also opened an innovative children center. Kits Dome Sarah also designed by Ban and constructed mainly from natural materials it features a long sloped terrain with a six meter high rope climbing structure as well as a spacious workshop with plenty of materials and tools awesome crofts. The idea is to make the area more attractive for young families. Thinking about relocating although there is no perfect recipe for rural regeneration. Yamanaka shows that it can be done. The company that he started Solo now employs seventy fulltime staff off of the move to return to show Ny. He explains people tend to think the top talent over overqualified to work in places like this that the opposite is true. He says we live in a time where we need. Those people to challenge themselves in rural areas And the thanks to Venetia Room for that. Make sure to tune in Monday to find out more about the Art Pavilion Shinzo End Museum and Gardens you as monocle twenty four. Let's have a look in the newspapers now and to do that joining me. Monica's Louis Harnett o'meara welcome back what's caught your eye so we're just looking at the New York Times they've Released an article reopenings mark new phase global trial and error played out in life. So I suppose what this is looking at is the kind of difficult arithmetic. Lot of us are having to make over. What's the social impact? The economic impact of keeping lockdown and the risks of reopening it. And how come we reopened so obviously in Europe and Asia. We're seeing Places having to reopen now. Obviously our economy's going again and the US is kind of looking at how we're doing now. What what we've got is balanced three games. There's keeping infections low to stop the spread keeping death slow so you want to avoid high risk infections and then you want to keep the social and economic costs low but because we don't know the effects of one on the other balancing these things is difficult so different ways different places at doing that in different ways so you can look at. Germany is partially reopened factories. And the way that that's going to impact infections is playing out the moment we've seen a slight increase but not enough. I have to go down in Germany. While whereas in India they've had like a slight released some restrictions and what sharper increase so the different ways that people are dealing with. This are having different effects. We can see so if you if you want to look say Denmark. For instance. They've they've let the younger students in but fewer often whereas in say somewhere like Germany again. We can see they've taken the oldest students in but because they think they will follow guidance. Better younger kids are more likely to understand the guidance. And they had the masks and they weren't practice proper social distancing. So they're all these different factors to take into account and at the moment we're just experiencing a kind of global stage of trial in everywhere. We just checking whether these things works. Obviously it's a dangerous game and that's what this articles about book at the same time. We need to bring about this level of social cohesion. So for instance in Lithuania. They've closed streets to allow outdoor only service. Now they don't know for certain that being outdoors stops the spread. But that's kind of what people are predicting we're using these small evidence basis to make these decisions and things play out. We'll learn whether they work or not. There is the articles absolutely astonishing. It goes through. It's it's a really good Thoraya assessment of each country's approach from mentioning all the countries that you have just done but also getting in medical ethics ethics experts as well to talk about this terrible difficult balancing act where the cost of getting it. Right is huge. The cost of getting it wrong is catastrophic and one wonders where there is a global voice leading us out of all this because if one country's doing one thing and another during another this system of trial and error perhaps we'll not give us an indication as to what really works or doesn't work so this is one problem as well and even within countries as they bring things out. They often release restrictions on a number of things at once. So you know we open Certain sports parks and things like that at the same time is reopening primary schools now. We don't know whether the primary schools are going to be the major cause of spike in infections. Or whether that's going to be departure happening is impossible for us to so isolating these things. It's very difficult again. Isolating how different countries have responded his again. Like why is Sweden an outlier? In the way it's managed the problem. And why is it? You know Infections and deaths relatively low in comparison to other countries is is very hard to tell these things and it's just an imperfect science that was slowly working go away through at the moment there is also a restructuring of everybody's heads going on and with so many people losing their jobs and with money. Just not around. There's an amazing article in the Guardian. Isn't that about how bartering has become a popular thing to do. A necessary thing to do in the absence of money is yeah well. This is in the Pacific. Islands specifically Fiji. They're talking about in this instance so Is is quite amazing really. We've got this facebook page. That's now got one hundred thousand members and that's in Fiji with a population of just nine hundred thousand so that's Ashleigh. Enormous is more than ten percent of the population around the single facebook page and on the facebook page. They're posting things like We've got to piglets for Kayak or taxi fare in exchange for fresh produce old carpet for photography lessons. All of these things. People are trying to exchange for for different immunities in goods but this is all in response to not the corona virus because well in some senses but the corona viruses actually largely sped these these islands in the in the Pacific. We've only seen two hundred sixty cases and seven deaths across. I think a group of six or seven of these islands and what they're being impacted by is the reduction in tourism tourism makes up thirty four percents of GDP Fiji that's resulted in forty thousand jobs lost since the start of this of this crisis which which is obviously huge cash becomes less prevalent as you as you see less of it in the system. They're looking new ways to trade and to get the things that they need in the things that they want while they can hold onto their cash things that are more essential now. Describe this old tradition. Obviously barrings gone on in lots of different countries everywhere but they describe a specific description of these indigenous people in Fiji they would tribes on the coast with carry. Salt Sea salt up to the highlanders trade it for their wild pigs which they couldn't get down on the. This is something they've done for very long time. But obviously resurfacing In response to in response to the economic turmoil at the moment let's move onto something in the south China morning. Post the idea of something decent coming out of hand for the rest of the world. Yeah exactly so. Yeah I think probably need a bit of good press but this is about a plasma drives that they've developed which has huge implications for green air travel so Plasma drives aren't just kind of sci-fi thing that's been imagined they do a distant. They produced a prototype which lifts one kilogram steel bar. Overcoats jeep of about an inch now okay. That doesn't sound like a lot. But actually is the relative thrusts that's used for. This is the same that's needed to power aircraft and if it can be scaled up then we can provide free engines for the world so essentially the way this works is the heat up air essentially and they transformed the atoms into plasma which checks to produce thrust. I won't say with huge temperature. Now that means that this could spell the end for carbon emissions also air is an unlimited resource now can essentially just take the ends the engine and fire it back out and it will provide propulsion. This actually used in spacecraft's they're not new. Typically as transforming Argonne or hydrogen and it produces much much lower thrust but obviously in space you of fiction or anything get in away so spacecraft's can use that quite comfortably and again is emissions free. It uses very little energy but the one they produced The propulsion engineer produced From this plasma drive is How has the power of eleven eleven of air propulsion which is capable of propelling? The aircraft Eleven meters every second which is obviously huge. And if we could if we could bring that into air travel that would be Incredible finally a really lovely article in the Financial Times bringing the sort of a wistful quality to The situation that we will find ourselves in the moment normally newspaper which many turn to for hard cool-headed financial reporting it really talks about the tiny human side of. We're missing at the moment. It's actually this is something I really empathized with so I. When I was reading this I I I could see myself doing a lot of these things or wanting to do a lot of these things I suppose. But essentially IT'S T. Readers sent him messages to describe these kind of mundane moments of joy that they didn't realize that they loved until they've reflected on them now. So you know one thing that stood out quite often was the morning commute. Who would've thought that? I would miss having an armpit pressed into my face on the chew but I do whether that's going to airports business travel sitting on the New York subway which is famously grotty number reliable but all these things help us to break apart a little bit and to give us different spaces to To recalibrate the way that we're coming into work or going back home and whether we're sitting on the tube with the coffee reading the news and You know gang angry at the news and enjoying the coffee. Which is you know what one person described or whether we're just staring wistfully of an apple window far too early on a Monday morning. These are the things that people really miss. And they're the things you didn't realize you miss until now there's another thing that a lot of people have sat missing which is swimming. I'm so warm. Wrote in about missing kind of daily swims in Zurich swimming pools And they you know. They described how their visited the mall but they're missing them now or in London. There's a there's actually two entries from people who said that they missed the rhythm of going to the swimming pool eating and going to the pub for a pint and you know. I can definitely empathize with that. They mentioned Bronco I've done exactly the same thing with London failed lighter and I suppose just remembering it as you say wistfully now and the side of down although the Armpit. I think you can keep Louis. Harnett Omar thank you very much for joining us on. The globalist is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people. We bring fresh thinking on perspective to our what we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and heart to create lasting value for all clients. It's about having the right ideas of course but also about how the one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivalled network of global experts that's why at. Ubs We pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference tune into the bulletin with UBS every week for the latest insights and opinions from ubs all around the world. Have you heard the Late Edition on Monaco? Twenty full now more than ever. The time is right for a global conversation that cuts through the white noise and brings clarity genuine insight and just the right tone to news and analysis if you owe todd of strident anchors the wearing pace of the news ticker enjoin every Weekday at the Late Edition. A lively friendly and forward-looking kick around the day's main stories hosted each evening by our editors from Zurich London Toronto and New York City the Late Edition premieres at twenty two hundred t twenty one hundred in London sixteen hundred nyc and thirteen hundred in Los Angeles. And if you miss it you can hear it again. Three hours later. Late addition weekdays at Sixteen Hundred Eastern Time on Monaco twenty. It's time to talk tech now. Motorcycles Technology correspondent David and David. Welcome back to the globe Let us begin with the big tech story here in the United Kingdom. At least which is the joining of forces of apple and Google to bring together the sort of covert nineteen APP. The experiments started in on the isle of White. I believe. How's it going well? The government is very bullish about it. They've said that the one hundred forty thousand population of which is just off the south coast of England You probably ninety five thousand people who would actually have a chance of having the APP because they're adults and because I have smartphones fence and within hours thirty three thousand of those ninety five thousand so almost a third or around a third have actually Signed up to the APP. So that's brilliant. What's not so good? Is this APP is not actually using the apple and Google capabilities Which involve one thousand sending a Bluetooth message to enough at anonymously and if later on one the the people have found to have Nineteen then the phone automatically and again anonymously tells the other one. This is a different system although it was still use Bluetooth The NHL wants a centralised system so they can work out where the Disease hotspots are which is fair enough but because of the way it works. It has to be in the foreground in other words. It can't be just in. The background is the apple and Google APPs will be and this maiming. The in quite a few cases it's not going to work we the tech industry. What is the general consensus on this? There's quite a lot of pushback from the general public and quite lot of skepticism. As well as the fact that you have to have what a sixty percent sign up for this thing to work and some people are saying well. If you're in a care home you you know you. You shouldn't be having a phone on and there are so many little niggles in it but if you are someone who is working in this industry is there a general sense that this is a good thing and it is working? I think there's an understanding that people want to know people want cause it to be over. That's for sure. And if there's anything they can do that will hasten that and that's a positive But you're right that there are lots of problems as for the camping. There is actually in the island of White If you are a care worker there's an extra screen once a you answer questions say that you are and it says when you are working you should not have your phone turned on so th that little nickel is is sorted but I think the big question is whether it's really going to work. Australia had a similar APP and that is running into technical difficulties than they are now turning to apple and Google to use the API application programming interface to find how vacuum going to work. And I'm there is a rumor that the NHL has made a u-turn as well in switched to the apple and Google system which from my technical knowledge of it which isn't great Seems to be a clearer. Simpler more effective is is far from perfect system. Let's move onto sonner. They haven't had a bit of a bumpy ride earlier on this year. But they are pushing head despite lockdown. That's right They announced a few months ago that they were going to switch the software from what they're calling one to lead to and it will have more features it will have great capabilities that will be more intuitive. Saana software was absolutely cutting edge when it first arrived and it. It's meant that using speakers which sound great are also very easy to set up in two years however this new software will only work. We new products and there was a lot of complaints from sonus. Uses who really didn't want the speakers to sudden stop working. They might have any bought them three or years ago. So now both systems again to work but separately so you can't quite make them What's gathering the way that you would like? However new products are always on the horizon and yesterday a a new sound bothered Ceuta speaker. That goes underneath your TV to make it sound better. has been announced and I have to say it looks fantastic. It sounds as good as they promised. It has all be out. Mostly what up with finding speakers make a decent fist of a surround sound effects and Th- they look pretty good so that they come out in June and if they are good than maybe the the the controversy about the software will be forgotten finally briefly a little bit of lockdown fund. Us I'm me a picture of a tiger in your bedroom. I think yesterday David Feelin and I replied by sending you a giant giant levitating pantry. My lounge what's going on without Google. Google Three D animals. It's it's it's it's brilliant because you don't need anything special. You need a phone relatively recent phone that does augmented reality so If I'm from the last three or four years will do it. You just go to your browser type Tiger or Cheetah pug or mccaw into the text box and when you get the results you results one of them will be meet a cheater in Three D. You top that and then you'll write a levitating Pandora. A mangy lion will appear in your living room. It's quite tricky. You'll right you have to point the the just the right direction to get the best effect but these are brilliantly. A detailed animated three D animals. That look fantastic and you can walk around them. You can take your picture even video you can. You've seen the efforts at. I haven't quite made it there yet. David Phelan thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on monocle. Twenty four listening with the listening to the globalist. The time here in London seven fifty three now many of us have spent far more time than we ever thought we would try to work from home but whether it's a study a kitchen table or a tiny desk crammed into a corner. There's a certain pleasure to be found in the smaller things in particular stationary barnacles culture editor. Kiara Miller has more on loving pens and pencils much of my life at the moment takes place around the table where I'm recording these words right now it is. I have breakfast lunch and dinner here. I have endless video. Kohl's with my friends over a glass of wine and here. I fire off emails through today calling it. A homeworking. Setup may be a big word for it. I didn't invest in an economic chair or calmly new desk lamp yet. The tables transformation through its daily functions is still punctuated by a few of the signals short of colleagues communal desks and a massive printer. When this space needs to become my writing station I rely on the smallest of workspace essentials to conjure up the atmosphere of office stationery. It's true that much of these activities carried out on a laptop but without my pens pencils and notebooks official. Working Hours. Wouldn't feel the same. I must admit it to managing editor dismay over the years. I have accidents really brought home. A couple of classic pens from the office reserves have been set in my pen pot unused for years yet today gripping the exact final body of a ballpoint Karen Dash Eight hundred and twenty-five our office staple gives a much more authoritative tone to my to do list these black and white pens maybe born Geneva but with their thick soft straight I've always found them somewhat unsweetened design their selling point is not precision utility. That perfect for those. Who like me like to see the paper up underneath a heavy cursive? Those of us on the team who run the side of oddly neatness design editor my beloved desk mate being one of them prefer pending things with an ankle. One of the tens of thousands of office supply items that can be bought on this Japanese suppliers. Website these jaunty judges come with textured rubber band and a commonly parallel line pattern on the side. That makes them beautiful in their minimalism yet. Because of the thin light trait. I've always found them. Quite austere mine is red and using it to correct. Text gives mocking errors. It's usual sense of inescapable gravitas. Then there's a friendly paper Maze Mechanical Pencil. Grabbing it immediately reminds me of our creative director sketching out on a flop plan with its egg yolk yellow barrel and twisty tip. This is the funky. Artie member of this little stationery family. It's loud unlovable. I mean. It is American after also speaking of bold. How about the distributor boss highlighter? These chunky colorful numbers were born in Germany. But they have become a global marcus. Productivity and offices around the World Guinot Cuevas highlighter. It has to be easy to find. Ever since the seventies when it squashed. Cylindrical SHAPE I w the stabilize voss original has become so popular it basically represents the platonic idea of the highlighter itself. Your professional look like one look for US TO BILL O. Boss is for notebooks sounded office procedure usually equips us with recycled paper. Megyn beauties but in this. I've taken a little personal initiative with my lined sugamo notebook. A black spine gives the character and sturdiness. While an ornate frame print on the front provides the set in vintage flare little embossed product number on the side is detailed endows it with an unmistakable high-quality feel but this remains very affordable option. It was one of the cheapest. I could pick up in the stationary heaven inside. Take as Daikin Yama T- site and indeed to Bama started making these books in one thousand nine forty seven so they could be expensive but beautiful. It's ultra-smooth paper is. What does the trick ballpoint pens glide but never smudge? It's practically my satisfying sensation of today. When the days shift is over I pack up my pile of pens and pencils and set it to the side. I missed the chatter the after and the joy of working with other people the WHO knew something as little as stationary could do such heavy lifting in the job on bringing the office into the harm. Thank secure. Remember that that's all. We have time for today's program. Many thanks Sir Producers Marcus. He paid Reynolds Cutter. Abella and Daniel are such as Charlie film mcchord and our Studio Manager. Well there's more music on the way but for now from Yemen Elson Goodbye. Thank you very much listening. Have a good weekend.

Donald TRUMP DONALD trump prime minister Iran president US United Kingdom Europe London official Germany Ubs Donald trump Andrew Moolah Boris Johnson Iraq editor Venezuela Monaco Google Dominic Robb
Explainer 239: Erdogans war on libert

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:01 min | 5 months ago

Explainer 239: Erdogans war on libert

"As a human. As a Muslim. And as an Iranian a stand before you to answer game, express my deepest sympathy with the families of the victims. And all the great American pupil. Express my cosmic says. The off of. Israel people. We have of these government. To the British people. We Mourn George, Floyd, I was pulled and and sickened to see what happened. If you are the head of a given state and you learn of something terrible happening in a country, which is supposedly an ally of yours. Then your response is or should be more or less automatic deepest condolences, etc. Thoughts and prayers Yadda. Yadda shoulder to shoulder and so forth. This option was certainly available to president red chip type Erdogan of Turkey as he. The murder in Paris on October sixteenth of Samuel. Patty. A French middle schoolteacher. It was here thirty kilometers from the center of Paris that suburban school became a stage for a twisted madman. Mr Potty was beheaded in the street to see walked home from school his killer an immigrant from Chechnya was shot dead by police shortly afterwards. The killer had been motivated by rage. What he had heard of Mr. parties lessons on freedom of expression. These were illustrated in part with cartoons of Mohammed of the sort previously published by French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, whose offices were the target of a similar fanatical vengeance in two thousand, fifteen twelve people died the police were quickly on the scene only to come under attack themselves. President Odwan felt he had to say anything could have issued an unequivocal condemnation of the act along with sympathy for the bereaved perhaps accompanied by a brisk reminder that without freedom of speech, there is no freedom of religion. It would have been a powerful and welcome intervention from the leader of NATO's only muslim-majority country and to country that which at least in theory still aspires to membership of the European Union. Instead of Doin' has chosen to take umbrage at statements made in the wake of some, you'll patties murder by French president Emmanuel Macron, macron honored Patty with a posthumous award of France's highest honor the lesion on donor at parties memorial service macron praised the late teacher as an incarnation of French Republican virtues and declared that indeed party had been murdered for upholding them. Samuel Petty does new volatile of D.. Visas. Once again, for one, the option of saying nothing was right there. However, one I cast aspersions on macron's mental health. Disease Lofta. Doing. Then recalling remarks mccomb had made early in October describing Islam as a religion in crisis Dewan cold for a boycott of French goods then Shinde Militia Mississippi. Suchan. Monaco? US La into vow tipping. Lonely. He wasn't the first. They had already been reports of French produce being removed from supermarket shows in Egypt Qatar, and Saudi Arabia and perfectly fair enough the banishment of bree being in its way free expression in action. But wrong with certainly the weightiest figure coaling for such a moratorium it is, of course, a cornerstone of the populists playbook too soon, which way the parade is heading and get out in front of it. As to why one has chosen this bandwagon to ride it's pretty much in keeping with his foreign policy of recent years increasingly remade in other one's own self image not so much the elected president of a modern republic but some divinely ordained Sultan, he wishes to position himself as a defender of his faith the line from his current needling of France to this is repurposing of the highest Safiya as a mosque is a short one. While other ones accelerating vainglory should not be underestimated as motivation. An amount of cynical realpolitik is in play while it's ambitious for Turkey as a Middle Eastern power are unlikely to go. Full Ottoman they are considerable. Witness also turkeys interventions in Libya and Syria and it stayed on the undersea resources of the eastern Mediterranean. Mostly, however, what one is doing here is what culture warriors of all coins in places do, which is to say that he is absolutely reveling in the idea of persecution by a more or less entirely imaginary or. As also invariably the case with such bloviating those being oppressed matter, rather the less than who is seemed to be doing the oppressing it is instructive to compare to ones fury at Francis Stout defensive. It's Traditions of liberty with his response to China's interning of hundreds of thousands of his fellow Muslims injin Jiang Ankara has importantly called on Beijing to close the internment camps for the ethnic weaker Muslims. The Turkey. Is called the camps which supposedly hold on is about a million Viga Muslims a great shame for humanity Turkey wants a haven full fleeing 'cause has recently arrested hundreds and returned many to China. Ferodo on as all such populist melodrama tists stoking similar confected rows. His spot with France is a vexing Lee. Straightforward win resistance is easy when you're not really resisting anything. The trouble is that theatrical disputes can have real life consequences as nobody in France presently requires reminding some you'll patty was effectively another victim of the Charlie Hebdo massacre. France has already felt it necessary to wall knows of its citizens abroad in several Muslim countries to take extra care of this security. As road ones boycott of French produce many of his fellow Turks. Inflicting that, they couldn't afford it anyway given what has happened to the Turkish lira on Erdman's watch. For monocle twenty, four I'm Andrew Moolah.

France Turkey Emmanuel Macron president Charlie Hebdo murder Patty President Odwan Paris Israel Mohammed China Mr Potty Chechnya NATO Samuel Petty US Andrew Moolah Shinde Militia Mississippi
Friday 26 March

Monocle 24: The Globalist

59:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Friday 26 March

"You're listening to the globalist. First broadcast on the twenty sixth of march two thousand and twenty one on monocle twenty four the globalist in association with ubs live from london. This is the globalist with me. Nelson very warm. Welcome to today's program coming up. Joe biden's first press conference places him under pressure when it comes to migration. We'll hear move for still too many americans out of work too many families hurting and i still have a lot of work to do. I can say to you. The american people help is here and hope is on the way. Plus we'll assess the us presidents appearance at the gathering of e. You leaders also ahead. China's ambassador to paris is summoned to explain himself following a stream of insults and threats to french. Lawmakers we'll find out if he went along and we'll hear about some of the more newsworthy stories as andrew moolah recaps what we've learned for the last seven days. We learned that the citizens of the uk may have to adapt to a new regime of compulsory patriotism. Which as we all know is the most meaningful kind of patriotism. That's all coming up on. The globalist live from london before we begin to quick. Look at what else is happening in. Today's news china has imposed sanctions. On nine british citizens following measures taken by the uk over human rights abuses carried out by beijing against the wego muslim minority group. The owner of a giant cargo ship. Which is still blocking. The suez canal has apologized for the disruption caused two world trade and two hundred dutch holiday. Makers let's take part in an experiment to see of tourism is possible and safe during the pandemic twenty five thousand people have expressed an interest in taking part stay tuned to multiple twenty four throughout the day more on these stories but i joe biden made key appearances on both the national and domestic stage yesterday holding his first press conference and then later logging into join the eu leaders summit online. It's taken the. Us president sixty five days to take questions from reporters subjects range from a vaccination program in overdrive and the increase in migrant numbers while for his verdict on joe biden's first appearance. Joined by scott lakers professor emeritus at the university of birmingham and a regular monocle. Twenty four voice. Good morning good to have you on the program. Thank you so your verdict. On joe biden's first outing for press conference. He taken his time getting their solid performance. I mean the question about the time taking get there. Well there have been things like trying to deal with the coronavirus pandemic passing the one point nine trillion dollar american rescue plan dealing with the aftermath of capital attack. So biden waited until he was in a position to get the initial successes there including the american rescue plan and then when he appeared yesterday i thought he was quite solid in first of all his initial announcement including the target of two hundred million vaccines in his first one hundred days in office and then in handling the questions from the reporters which weren't necessarily the sharpest questions but by still delta collectively with issues including the question of immigration across the southern border including questions on foreign policy such as afghanistan in china and i think most important he exuded. What i think has been the hallmark themself and the administration which is that of competence and responsibility after what had been a chaotic for years under his predecessor. Let's pick up on this issue. Not the shopper's questioned from the reporters. I think that the it was universally noticed the absolutely no questions on the pandemic what has happened to the issue of perhaps reporters oversight here unafraid. It's a case of headline driven journalism. And talked is your is still know how serious the pandemic is in the us in this country and the others you told us almost five hundred and fifty thousand but the death rates declining. The number of cases are declining. And how many days in a row do you want to spend on the success of the administration vaccine rollout so instead. You look for another gotcha question. There is an issue about an increase in migration against the southern border A lot of news outlets are trying to whip this up into a crisis so that's where they went There's a lot of interest in trying to drive the idea of a us confrontation. Welcome to cold war. Two point zero so they sort of drove that and then when the questions got onto an important issue because as important as she which is the attempt on the one hand by the administration to expand voting rights versus the attempts of republicans to restrict them. It turns on this very complex. Legal maneuver the filibuster. And how long do you want to spend talking about the filibuster in the senate when you have to put out a news report subsequently where you want to capture like the headlines seconds for your readers or for your viewers tell us a little bit more but what using with a you know you mentioned some of the key issues that migration was pulled up. People have said that actually he was rather put under pressure here The fact that it will take time to improve communications and processes within the immigration system. There's a very measured response or can't guarantee we're going to solve everything but i can guarantee we're going to make it better and basically accused the republicans of posturing saying just gives them some time. They will get this out of their system and they will come round to it. It's not often that you hear that kind of measured approach is it. Is this something that we're going to get from biden when it comes to migration something this essential i mean. Let's deal with the facts here. The reason why this issue is hot now is it for four years. The trump administration ripped up the system to handle migrants. They ripped up. The legal system removed. The right to claim asylum in the united states Pity tens of thousands of people in detention centers separated children from families didn't provide the resources to maintain affected migration system in terms of course and in terms of shelters. Now you inherit that. When you're president in january and in the media is like oh can immediately solve this at the same time there has been a spike in migration because people think they will be able to claim asylum. They will be able to get a fair the courts so we've had more families and unaccompanied minors who have come across the border and you have to put them somewhere now. You don't have enough existing shelters you don't have enough the existing sponsors so you have to use some of these holding centers that were favored by the trump administration. Biden's quite right administration's making efforts to set up output shelters. It's making attempts to handle these cases fairly effectively through the courts. It's trying to support central american countries to prevent the causes of migration but it will take months and perhaps years to rectify the damage which has been done again by his predecessor. Let's move on to an event that happened almost at the same time. Mr biden's press conference. Which is the georgia state legislature approving sweeping restrictions on voting rights. Tell us the described expanded. What happened him. What the significance is please. This is a huge battle lake in the nations in the states on a fundamental issue. Do you have the right to vote. So there is a bill which is passed the democratic controlled house which they hope to get through the senate which expands voting rights that expands the ability. That you can be contacted. You be registered. You can get to the polls on election day. Are you can vote by mail in ballots. joe biden referred to that effort yesterday and even said there may be this attempt to prevent republicans using the filibuster to block it while. Republicans have responded at the state level. They have filed scores of bills in legislatures which restrict voting rights which make it more difficult to vote by mail. Which makes it more difficult to register and georgia was the first state to pass one of those restricted bills. Yesterday it was signed by governor. Brian camp A republican almost immediately. This bill so restrictive that even prevents people from providing food and drink to people standing in voting lines in georgia. Why is that important. Georgia can get awful hot even when you have an election in early november and people have had to wait hours to vote there in the past if you want to try to keep them from voting especially in poor deprived areas tried to deny him. The base said what is what is the potential consequences of this move. You're gonna have consequences. Which are at all levels. I think you will have legal challenges to the state bills which are passed by the republicans trying to restrict voting rights. You're gonna have this huge political contest Where the biden administration's gonna put a lot of capital. Which is we want to enshrine voting rights. We want to prevent the disinformation prevent. The fraud prevent the limits are voting rights. And you're going to see republicans dig their heels in. Because i'm going to be honest with you from a practical point of view. Republicans fear that if you expand the number of people who vote. it doesn't work to their advantage. It works to the advantage of the other party. Let's move on to joe. Biden's other big Public appearance the attending the virtual summit to discuss future cooperation with the european union. Now the last. Us president to attend a meeting of you leaders was barack obama in two thousand nine. He went to a summit in prague. The had clearly been a somewhat of a gap during the trump administration but it it was all smiles and laughs about having another twenty-eighth member state bag. Well lakes two issues. The first is that. Us european relations were damaged to say the least during the trump era while trump didn't meet european union leaders. He did meet european leaders. Say g seven summits which turned into disasters because he crossed his arms shouted at them. Insulted them And of course he questioned even fundamental organizations like nato but the second shock was brexit. It has removed the uk from the european union that has significant consequences not only for economics but for intelligence and security cooperation. And so the attempt to deal with a shocks means. You've got to bring the adults back in the room. Does it solve the issues. The us europeans face whether it be the questions of cooperation on security matters whether it be the question of funding nato whether it be the questions of dealing with russia or dealing with china no but at least you get back to the rules of the game and you don't go off to twitter and say that someone like angela merkel or manual macro or justin trudeau. Canada is an awful person. I think joe biden said that he missed donald trump with rather warm smile on his face during the press conference and one thing that i remember when biden was elected in november. There's a very strong message that was issued by us. Lafond eliah near you commission president. He said he basically said that. The was going to position itself. As a as a grouping which had basically learned to fend for itself a lot more during the trump years will joe biden. The president's had different europe now from the one he will have experienced vice president. Yes but that goes well back before trump look ever since we talk about the disastrous iraq war of two thousand three. You're talking about attention where there have been american administration's not to donald trump. Who took the line. We lead you follow including to europe. You may remember their references to france and germany as the axis of weasels in two thousand three now that us lead did not do well for europe or anyone else in iraq. The us did not do well for anyone at all. During the trump era so for biden to come back into the europeans and say we lead you follow. That's not going to wash well. With the european union or with individual leaders france germany other countries within the alliance. And so i think that's the question which now gives us beyond trump is which is in a twenty first century which has moved beyond the us as the world's only superpower. Can you get an alliance partnership which is truly cooperative. Rather than one member being seen to try to set the course that others have to follow. Got the issue vaccine. Diplomacy was one of the case subjects discussed by the new member states yesterday. stopping short of imposing a ban on exporting outside the blog. What role does the united states have to play in all this. Well the first row the us is playing simply by a as biden highlighted yesterday getting doses to its own people showing competent showing responsibility in a country which has been amongst the leaders in terms of the death toll in fact the number one country in terms of death toll from kobe. Nineteen the second thing is is then to encourage basically a cooperative approach on the vaccinations and on the containment measures now. Us started for providing doses to canada and mexico. But here's the key issue here has to be the uk and the eu getting their own houses in order. Something which started production. Problems with astrazeneca has spiraled into this obscenely dispute. We're rather than working together. The uk and the eu have been slinging mud at each other. Now that's not good for vaccine diplomacy within the european bloc and it doesn't set a good example when other countries like russia and china are saying come get our vaccines. We're the ones who are actually being effective. Being responsible in this crisis scott lakers as ever thank you for joining us on monocle. Twenty four how long do you think it would take you to travel the world to hear from the most perceptive and relevant speakers on the global news agenda to mix that up with a trip to visit the business people benchmarking best practice in media retail and hospitality and to make time to to delve into a rich mix of great design. Stories enrich cultural discoveries. Oh this well. Being entertained and inspired by cost of worldly and witty editors and correspondents. Well you can do all of this in just sixty minutes each week by into the curator a whistle-stop tour of the best of the last seven days monaco tune into the curator subscribe and download the shower. Now listen every weekend all monocle. Twenty four eight fourteen in paris. Seven fourteen here in london now in our relationship with china there is no room for insults or intimidation. We will defend those who embody freedom of expression and democracy. Both here in france and everywhere. The french minister for foreign affairs pulled no punches. This week with that message posted on social media in response to what appears to be a rapidly collapsing relationship between paris and beijing geneva literally on them publicly summoned the chinese ambassador to go and see him ambassador. Lucia tweeted back to say he was too busy to go. Tell us more about this decline. In relations isabel hilton is editor of china dialogue. And a very regular voice here on the globalist. Welcome back to article twenty four isabel. Good morning good morning very well. Thank you would faring. Possibly better than franco chinese relations at the moment just look little tattoos explained. What is this embassador accused of doing that. So enraged the french well lucia. He has form He he made himself unpopular in france last year by using french. Care homes of leaving old people to die so that was his first outing as a as a star wolf warrior in the in the chinese diplomatic core on this occasion he instructed members of the french senate that they were not to go to taiwan and when they expressed concern about this he then degenerated into insults against the Prime scholar of taiwan. In france whom he called the mind hyena and so on so french. Senators don't like being told what to do by a foreign embassy even want from countries largest china and so it's gone it. It is not looking good right now. I mean it follows The imposition of the us european union britain canada placing sanctions on chinese officials. Monday on monday for human rights abuses in xinjiang What is it about france however that is it particularly in the neck is it lucci himself force something about france that enrages beijing vice versa. We'll curiously france and china have had a very good relationship and towards the end of last year she gene. I think commented that he had six phone calls with with president macro which is a lot So and you know there have been you know french. Years of culture in china and i think they regarded themselves as like minded highly cultured countries with a keen interest in gastronomy. So it's it's unusual. They were being cultivated last year as as important members of the european union as china was trying to get over the line the investment treaty which it did get over the line rather controversially in december so this deterioration is quite significant it. I mean lucia. He certainly doesn't help. But i think also. There is a new belligerence in chinese foreign policy. Which is which is puzzling. Because it has actually destroyed the thing that they most wanted last year from european union and that was the investment treaty. Which now has to go to the european parliament and is unlikely to get through an. It's also i think made more likely the other thing that china seem to want to avoid which was pushing the european union into the arms of the united states and of course france was a keen defender of the notion of autonomy for european foreign policy strategic autonomy as the european union tries to devise a new place in the For itself in the world. France was pretty important in that and with and with the german chancellor stepping back from politics very soon macro was you know a pretty important figure i for china so it is a bit of a disaster in my view. A it also reminds seoul's diplomatic rules require elements of diplomacy and wonders. Why china would approach international issues in such a belligerent. Way this comes from the whole wolf warrior thing which i which i think is counterproductive comes really from a domestic demand. So she champion has been out to demonstrate his own people that china stands up in the world that it can't be pushed around any more. It's it's feeding a very aggressive form of nationalism in china and and i think this episode demonstrates that foreign policy is subject to domestic stress and in when when the rubber hits the road it would appear that foreign policy will be sacrificed to domestic agenda. Which is not good for a country that wants to be a global power and what that wants to present itself as a force for good in the world. It's it's not helpful. One thing. I must ask. You is has ambbassador busted. She actually gone to visit geneva. Leo he did go to. He did go to the cato. Say But but he there are two very different versions of this to the cato says the was summoned given addressing down the basseterre says he went and told them lots for hot even there. We don't really have to copy. Let's move on if we may to a story that's broken in the last few hours. The fact that china has now imposed sanctions on nine. British citizens following measures taken by the uk about the human rights abuses carried out against the muslim minority group. And how significant to move this now. Well it's not significant in the sense that it's it freezes assets in china to adopt any of them have and it It restricts the traveled to china. They were all day unlikely to get visas anyway but it is significant in in the sense that this is in. You know again it. It's an example. Look very aggressive. Tit for tat moves that china has decided to take and this is again very much to do with domestic audience. They're very much on the back foot on xinjiang. Right now you will. Baps have noticed. This been huge row for cotton used in xinjiang which is affected several major western brands. Who have been pressured by public opinion in the west not to use cotton from xinjiang and china has retaliated against them Largely at a kind of popular social media level a but that has a way of becoming official too. So there's a very very much a come to push over anything to do with xinjiang. Which is the you know the the topic that it. It's inescapable right now in china's relations with the west The the individuals who've been sanctioned were quite vocal so helena kennedy was a co chair of an inter-parliamentary group which is highly critical of china on human rights. She has has self obviously in a long record of of human rights defence. Tom to john hart is chair off the foreign policy committee in the uk. Parliament and again as highly vocal and that. That's the category of people who've been sanctioned people who have spoken out on on china's human rights abuses isabel hilton. Thank you as ever and still to come in the program. We will return to the issue of china's nike and find themselves stuck in ferocious row over human rights abuses in the cotton factors in xinjiang province. Stay with us on the globalist. Es has a one nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries over nine hundred of the sharpest moins and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. Find out how we can help you. Contact us at. Ubs dot com. It's seven twenty two. Kill in london you with a globalist with me. Emma nelson time now to tend to monaco's contributing editor andrew moolah for this week's installment of what we learned. We learned this week of the frankly overdue arrival of what may be the defining metaphor for these thwarted and bewildered times. Gotta mula namus. How the miles on the wrong canal. Whatever we also learned that steering large container ship along a street tisch. Waterway is maybe more difficult than it looks. Or maybe not given the every body. But the mighty taiwanese owned panama flagged cargo vessel ever given seems to manage it. Okay oh meow on wednesday exactly that four hundred meter two hundred and twenty four thousand ton. Behemoth ran aground pivoted sideways across the suez canal and pranged into whatever the technical term for the side of a canal is blocking a not. Negligible percentage of global shipping. If you're wondering where that thing you ordered has got to we also learned dislodging a two hundred and twenty four thousand township from such a predicament is not the fastest moving him spectacles. So we did a bit of research to pass the time and discovered that is a precedent the so-called yellow fleet of fifteen dust blowing boats which spent eight years stock in the suez canal after it was closed by the six day war of nineteen sixty seven. The community of maroon crews held internships sporting tournaments including life vote races and established a postal service. Blows my radio way below me down yet. Just watch adam. Curtis told that story some oblique of division hsun rather than the obvious madness. One claim somehow explains nine eleven and win another bafta hack in the united states we learn dovan exciting innovation in legal strategy from sydney powell. The trump solicitor who you may recall standing alongside rudy giuliani and propounding the intriguing theory that the two thousand and twenty presidential election had been stolen by hillary clinton the ghost of hugo chavez and thirty to fifty feral hogs or whatever it was powell is presently on the receiving end of a potentially expensive defamation lawsuit from dominion the company which made the voting machines that powell identified as the apparatus of this monstrous deception. She seemed pretty sure of a so at the time. We are not going to be intimidated. We are not going to back down. We are going to clean this mess up now. President trump won by a landslide. We are going to prove it upon sober reflection. Not we learned that. The defense powell is floating is essentially that this was all good clean. First amendment protected knockabout political road. Montwaid come on. We're just having fun here. Here's the key line from powell's motion to dismiss dominions lawsuit as rabbi monaco's desperate climb-downs desk chief komo to rebelo. No reasonable person would conclude that the statements were truly statements of fact so we'd learned what a good thing it was that nobody took any of this stuff seriously enough to smash up the capital and murder a police officer for anything here in the uk. Meanwhile we learned that it is suddenly of utmost importance that absolutely all communication issued by or on behalf of any british. Officialdom is liberally a posted within national flag. A controversy erupted for which rede- bunch of silly and boring people with nothing better to do kicked theatrically off over. Bbc news presenters mildly. Teasing one zooming in mp over his red white and blue background prop rubber generic. Thank you. i think you a flag is not up to standard size government interview measurements. I think it's just a little bit small. That's your department really. But we learned that this would not be an end to it as another. Mp james wild representing the local people of north west norfolk all of whose other problems have presumably been solved pressed the bbc's director general on a desperately crucial issue of which it could very definitely be said that a great many seen people have ever given the matter any thought whatsoever in your lost. Yea agents union flags speak. She didn't any of the brackets in this base of all the briefings. I got these mazing. That was not one of them. I'm afraid i have no idea zero but we learned that the citizens of the uk may have to adapt to a new regime of compulsory. Patriotism as we all know is the most meaningful kind of patriotism. We learned that the. Uk's government has decided that the uk's flag will fly henceforth from every uk government building old day every day though. It's possible that this is less a sinister gesture of nationalist set dressing and more a desire to maximize the use of current flag stocks before scotland takes the saint andrew's cross off it. Let's have a flapping flag sound. Effect is not as you're standing to attention and saluting while you pasted in. We've learned or at least reached the melancholy realization that despite brexit being done the associated culture war nonsenses. Not and we've learned that we are perhaps six months away from the normality in which no british politician will dare appear in public without wearing a union. Jack waistcoat a tie with the queen on it. A remembrance day. Poppy behind each year and a hat shaped like a spitfire monocle. Twenty four i'm andrew o. My thanks to andrew mueller and all the team behind what we learned. The time is coming up to seven thirty here in london still to come. We'll hear about the row of the cotton factories in the chinese province of xinjang and the effect on the likes of h. and m. and nike. But first a quick summary of the latest world news headlines china has imposed sanctions on nine british citizens. It follows measures taken by the uk over human rights abuses carried about by beijing against the muslim minority group among those sanctioned the several british members of parliament one of whom says he'll wear them as a badge of honor china imposed similar measures on the european union. Which is part of the coordinated action by the uk. The us and canada the owner of a giant cargo ship which has been blocking the suez canal has apologized for the disruption cost two world trade. The says canal normally carriers up to twelve percent of global cargo since tuesday the ever given has been wedged across it sherry and keisha said that dislodging the ever given was proving difficult the eu has said the drugs giant astrazeneca must catch up on its promise deliveries to the a you before exports doses of the coronavirus vaccine elsewhere. The european commission president oslo vonda lion was speaking of the twenty seven member. States stopped short of imposing export restrictions on vaccines. But she said astra zeneca has to honor its contract with member states and two hundred dutch holidaymakers to take part in an experiment to see if tourism is possible and safe during the pandemic. A dutch holiday firm will take the tourists on an all expenses paid trip to roads. Although they won't be able to leave the resort we'll have to quarantine for up to ten days and there's the headlines seven thirty one here in london. When reports emerged of cotton factories in the chinese president province of xinjiang being run as forced labor camps for the country's ethnic minority week of population the west and the fashion world acted quickly. Some fabric companies quickly sold off their factories and source that cotton from elsewhere from countries. Such as the us in egypt and diplomatically the us eu britain and canada imposed sanctions on chinese officials for more widespread human rights abuses in xinjiang stuck in the middle of big clothing brands. Such as h. and m. and nike. They have found themselves in the middle of the row after speaking out against the alleged use of force. Week labor dana. Thomas is a paris based author fashion police the price of fashion and the future of clothes and i'm glad to have a back in the program. Good morning dana morning so when this reports emerged that it was occupied at the end of last year of the the cotton factory effectively being little more than forced labor camps for for the for the week of minority. Yeah how did the fashion world react. Well they reacted I a bit at very first when the news broke they sort of said. This isn't us in our problem. We have nothing to do with this. But then the more they dug into their supply chains because they obviously had some internal meeting saying can we are. Should we be making statements. Are we sure about this because the supply chain is so paik a none. Nothing is more opaque than and it's really hard to trace for your cotton comes from. They dug down and they found that in fact yes some of their cotton was coming from there so they immediately switched it up to india the united states there these those are the three big countries that produce cotton. It's china india and the united states and so they were able to change it without disrupting their supply chain and some of them put out some statements last fall like six eight months ago. H m nike among them. Saying you know we're not we're just not okay with this so we're going to pull out and and you know you gotta get your house in order and now the likes of h. and m. r. nike in particular have found themselves. Not just being applauded by the west for their stunts but the serious victims of a social media backlash in china. Yes and no one's really sure why this is hitting now But social media picked up on these statements and has gone bananas in china on it calling for boycotts against h. m. and nike and even you know groups like the communist youth league and micro blogging site called sina way bio and with celebrities like actor. Hongxun and singer victoria song. Who had been lassiter's coming out and saying you know you all are spreading terrible rumors about china and human rights and this is not true. Now it's getting very complicated and it kind of feels like you know the the things that you would read in those books about. Spy era of the ussr like they. The russian the russians the soviets belief in one thing. The americans believe in the other. We're saying this and they're saying that in who knows what is really going on. Getting very murky really quickly. How much can china count on weathering this storm and having the likes of h. and m. and nike going back fabric companies resourcing cotton from them or is this the beginning of a permanent departure from using china's source of cotton very difficult given the amount of cotton that china produces and exports. I think it's a bit of the latter but not completely meaning that you know. They're never going to give up on chinese cotton but they will give up on chinese cotton coming from that region source that way picked by forced labor. And there's other things there's also garment production being you know forced garment factory production by the same ethnic minority of the week. You know it's it's they're gonna the thing that's happened. Most in the pandemic is that fashion companies have had to re think their supply chains. And how they do business. And they've had the time to do so and there are calls for traceability and we're getting the technology where you can even put like a chip in every single bit of your of your garment and trace where it came from from point a. to point z. From the field to form the dirt to dress and and companies really want to do this and customers really want to do this so fearful of having a backlash from their customers which is much bigger around the world than it is china. though china's big the chinese fast fashion market is very domestic driven. And while agent adam has a decent decent amount of stores there compared to someone like gap who is just pulled out or zara very small. They were down seventeen percent in sales last year. And there's a big exodus of ford fast fashion brands from china. So i think they're giving up on that market probably pretty easily and they're gonna there's plenty of places to buy cotton and they need to clean up their supply chain so they're okay with it. Finally dana what do you think is going to happen name. And you mentioned the idea of people putting microchips in cotton but does then now seem to be a direction being taken by fashion houses and fabric manufacturers that they will now actively check the sources of the cotton given the fact that supply chaso opaque or will it still be a case of things. Carry on regardless. No one really knows what's happening until the problem is exposed. I think both most of the time fashion companies big fashion company's global corporations do not react until the light shine on them and then they go getting some bad. Pr deal with this. But they've known it's been a problem for a while. They may not have known about the forced labor in china. But they know that they're caught was coming from some pretty sketchy places or they just didn't bother to know because they say what we don't know won't hurt us and we consume can have deniability. They're really deniability. As we see every time factory catches on fire and collapses or their civil unrest in a place where they're garment workers are being you know are making clothes for these companies. And then they and then they're shot or arrested and they said well. We had no idea that are close. Were still contracted those factories and we had no idea that there was gone. There's a lot of deniability and they liked to have that so but since customers and are calling more and more on traceability and all on just knowing where your clothes come from and how they're made through campaigns launched by fashion revolution which now has started not only were. How were my clothes made. But howard the textiles made you know on the anniversary of rana plaza next month. They they're getting to they're going to have to be more Open and honest about how their clothes closer made. And that's simply because they're being forced to do so tiny thomas on the line from paris. Thank you so much for joining us on monocle. Twenty four april issue is all about smart ideas from smart people so why not join us as we take the pulse of some of the best. Globally minded thinkers his. What's on the agenda. In the first section. We speak with united nations secretary. General antonio gutierrez. I believe we are in a moment of hope for my uk prime minister tony blair makes the case for vaccine passports to kickstart. Travel this in a sensible way you just get it done and estonians. President cast light offers tools to deal with our digital transformation. All that and more is there for the taking in molecules april issue or your copy today or subscribe for instant access to our digital editions. Let's continue today's program with a look at the newspapers joining me as terrorist asked a political journalists north. Welcome back terry good morning. Good morning Right let us begin. With the the fact that the leaders stopped short at imposing controls or delays on the export of vaccines from the e u to elsewhere such as the united kingdom nonetheless was quite a ferocious row had yesterday at the meeting. yes this is this is interesting obviously you normally In the uk presser. You've kind of seen this. I suppose through the prison. All the relationship between the uk and the eu. And whether the you was trying to block exports Of vaccine supplies going out of the but interestingly according to the financial times morning and what they call a marathon videoconference conference sometimes ill-tempered discussions Among the eu leaders It seems to have been almost as much There was obviously a division about whether there should be exporting like these but actually the distribution of vaccines lies within the ease seems to have been A big sticking point as well an tease reporting here that discussions breakdown off the demonstrable austria's challenge listed boston cooks additional vaccine supplies the where rejected by leaders. Including i'm gonna mackel And it suggested that he was all keeping the australia. China republic and croatia should have had the largest level of supplies whereas others such as prime minister roosa- Said well you know. Look australia's vaccine rollout. Nothing bad shape and they had to give priority instead. She bulgaria croatia and latvia which has got in a much lower vaccination rates. It's interesting because we've seen this loss as much about you know is this. Eu us on eu countries. But there's also a huge difference of opinion within the eu itself. It's exposed big problems with the use system that perhaps we we hope there but clearly they are one thing that angela merkel said a few days ago was it. This is the opportunity for the european union to actually start to produce more vaccines itself. It has to learn to be more self. Reliant is there a sense that europe is going to actually be reluctant to fall back on itself as soon as it can. Well i mean. I think you know this is going to be kind of a bit of a theme. Look at the winning. I it one of the things that this story shows you how complex these supply chains are and how internationally linked i mean yes. You see we've seen the you know. Vaccines can be a sort of developed in one country. Parts of the production line or in another country of the weather stored might be in a third country. Obviously the eu is looking at talking to india. Those reports india might now hold back Some of its own supplies You the leading yesterday in brussels heard from Joe biden online oversee. He wants you know. Vaccine supplies for the united states and this is such a complex international Process the whole not only the development of the vaccine but the distribution of it. He's one of the things you know on the one hand. Every country wants to Fuller its own sort of national interest if you let but actually when you look at it what you need to do is have as much international cooperation as you can. I mean it's it's easier to say when you're sitting there in a meeting representing Just one country. Let's move on to another issue involving complex. International problems caused by one simple problem. An enormous ship stuck across the suez canal. The ever given could be there for weeks. We are being told because it is so difficult to move. The papers in the meantime are having a field day in terms of logistics excellent pictures and speculation about the huge effect on global trade. Yes i mean this is you know. It's one of these stories. As journalists you may not know cover the shipping news. But then you suddenly just people suddenly discover that. Actually there are many people who actually do you completely understand how this works and it's fascinating too to some they discover it. I mean as you say the times is reporting that this giant ship could take weeks to remove say salvage experts say. An emergency response team has a dutch company has arrived yesterday. saying that that might involve dredging the canal removing individual containers from the ship Which the suez canal authority had previously said that it did not want to do it again. As the sheer scale of this problem so in nineteen thousand ships went through the canal. Lost year carrying more than one billion tons of cargo and every day that the blockage continues according to various. But this time is up An estimated six point five billion pounds worth of goods and say this has a knock on effect of course not only things no surviving where they should be but on crisis zeenat can affect the prices fuel food. 'cause consumer products you know stuck and then other ships having to go the long way round all the way around the horn of africa in order to to try and get to where they're supposed to be And the guardian is also looking at again saying that you know tacking 'cause carrying liquefied gas with diverted They you know they have to go the other way around and the canal. It's just the figures fascinating they would have to remove between fifteen thousand to twenty thousand cubic meters of sand to a depth of twelve to sixteen meters quite a big hole in the in the side of your canal. I find it stunning. The fact that something as simple as a gust of wind could which effectively blocked the ever given and pushed it on ashore and could cause such an enormous amount of chaos chaos. That no human agent could actually have possibly foreseen. Well yeah that. That's the thing he if somebody hits had done this deliberately it would sound like going to the world kind of unlikely in preposterous thrill applaud. We'll we'll get a ship stuck in the canal and then we will stop billions of billions of pounds of the world's the world trade. I mean it's not something that you can. you know. Maybe somebody could have imagined a persian. You know we should give people is something as say relatively simple A power cut in the ship getting blown into a bank Can cause huge issues. I mean people. You know the guardian points out here that there are other issues you know. The pandemic is caused problems with well. Supply chain so virus related restrictions attract crews on merchant ships containerships of not being able to dock elsewhere in the world and this become shortages of all sorts of things semiconductors recalls and such. Like say you as we say everything. Everything is connected in ways the unless you work at a regular basis. You don't always realize terry's destiny. Thank you as ever for joining us on. Twenty four year with the globalist ups is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of people we bring fresh thinking and perspective into all while we know that it a marriage of intelligence and heart to create lasting value for all clients. It's about having the right. I did of course but also about having one of the most accomplished systems and network of global experts that's why. Ubs we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference tune into the bulletin with ubs every week for the latest insights and opinions from ubs all around the walls. Let's talk climate news and business with roti climate and energy report with bloomberg news. Good morning shaft. Good morning news of an enormous job. That india has to do if it wants to be net zero by twenty fifty. This is a story on my colleagues. A bloomberg broke. Which is that. A government officials are close to prime minister. Narendra modi are discussing whether to set a goal of a net zero by two thousand fifty. Now it'll be an enormous list for india. Because unlike the eu or the us or other rich countries its emissions are currently increasing not decreasing and so it will have to reach a peak. Probably that will have to be very soon. Maybe in the next ten years and then rapidly decreases emissions. I mean just to give a sense of the challenge. India's renewable solar and wind will have to grow fifty. Fold from what they are today within the next twenty years And we should just recognize that even if india is if they're able to achieve this goal it's net contribution to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere would be one fourth of the eu on fifth of the us one-sixth China we wish them the very best of luck with meeting those targets at. Let's move on to another story On bloomberg and which the idea of if is tesla is the apple of electric vehicles. Volkswagen would like to be the sums. The samsung i think for those people who would choose perhaps not to be behind the wheel of a tesla for whatever reason at being behind the wheel of an electric volkswagon is is an entirely different matter. Well be new for awhile. That electric cars are coming. But the legacy automakers Weren't quite sure. The doubted whether companies tesla could make it at the mainstream could deliver half a million cars a year or a million dollars a year And now there is no doubt That's the message you get from the chief executive of volkswagen Dis who says no easy mobility as he calls it has won the race and we are seeing folks Billions of dollars in this transition and the market is responding. Its stock price has been on a tear in the past three months and there is an expectation that even if folks county at compete with. What tesla has it could create a niche itself. That is like samson in a world of apple's owns. How exciting is it to think that actually the idea of what. Vw is calling. Immobility is a is a genuine prospect much sooner rather than later. I think it's great for the planet because you need to cut emissions quickly but also i genuinely. Electric cars are fun to ride. And so we're going to see a drivers and consumer is wanting to get on. These cars much will quickly because they have access to a larger pool Cars which hasn't always been the case and vw for You know it's Passan's is producing cars. That are quite affordable. Actually rati thank you as ever for joining us on monocle. Twenty four you're listening to the globalist where the time here in london is just approaching seven fifty one finally on today's program. The international federation of the phonographic industry release their annual report on the music industry. Overall there is some good news to enjoy twenty twenty marks the sixth consecutive yearly growth. But what are the main music trends. Where is the growth coming from. And if you think it's only from streaming while you may be wrong monaco's page reynolds sat down with our senior correspondent fernanda augusta check to get his take from the report and what the music industry will be focusing on this year. Fernando you are joining us today to have a little bit of a check in about how. The music market fed in twenty twenty now. This is pegged to the ifpi's global news report. The twenty twenty one. St of industry report obviously a difficult year for the music market covid nineteen really hemorrhaging. The live music industry the live aspect of the market but this is more about streaming. This is about records. what's going on. Say give us give us the full one first of all. I'm going to start some positive news. It wasn't obama. In fact the music industry in total increased by seven point four percent and of course as as mentioned streaming you know is the ones the main thing that is pushing this number but paid subscription. Revenues really really climbed in two thousand twenty. Because let's be honest. I mean there were no live concerts for show but if more people you know in newer markets as well they're subscribing to those you know those kind of subscription services as well and i have to be honest i mean will discuss a little bit but even the physical records being vinyl cds cassettes. It did decline overall but not as fast as in previous years. So that's been quite Interesting to observe their in the industry. Because that's been a trend for a long time that kind of decline in the physical market fast declining as well but then of course we look at vines. I mean the numbers are impressive. It's of course the beginning people might consider always just inisia- there's an uptake but the numbers are very low. We have a very solid industry here and this is spreading other countries. Even cassettes. i mean who would imagine. That cassettes have a small resurgence as well Cds fairing less is interesting kind of pre-discussion to this chat. We were talking about vinyls and vinyls the it has been a story that we've seen in the last few years. It's getting a lot more popular that kind of retro comeback. But now it does seem like it's going to the next level where vinyls a kind of being seen as paul of merchandise as a part of the artists that you can buy to make you feel close to the artists. You don't even necessarily need to listen to them. I personally have bought a of vinyls. I didn't have a record player. I now do. But i was buying that to support the artist and also almost as memorabilia which is incredibly important because as you know i mean even when you go to a live concert. There's always the merchandising. They're selling all sorts of things and there was less of that this year so they will have to sell directly online. And you're right. I mean. I'm a big defender. Viner's they are beautiful product in itself and sounds good. I mean i wouldn't say that what we stream is a better quality than vinyl for sure. Actually it isn't So you know. I can totally understand. And and and and me as a big fan of the physical of product and i have to say when you look at countries like japan. Of course we're talking about the demise of the cd. Sure the numbers are going down. Japan's search a solid market for cds still countries like germany as well even though there was a big decrease but the city's not that he added as well it's good it's markets and it where it does well And in times of music trends from the kind of report what. One of the top autism the songs from the posterior. What's really hit the market running. I mean it's not a big story here that the k pop is dominating everywhere in fact is the top artists according to their report here and when you look at the top ten albums in terms of sales and streaming last year seven out of ten come from asia and not only south korea but we have a lot of japanese artists as well. You know that just shows how important of a market is there. But then you're talking about some interesting trends. latin america. The music industry in the region increased by almost sixteen percent. So that's been kind of the highlight there. I mean they have lots to catch up because when you look at the top ten markets in the world there's no country from the region. It's us japan uk. Germany france south korea china canada australia netherlands. But they are catching up and again thanks to streaming and i guess thanks to perhaps. Also this kind of resurgence of latin pop. That's really going kind of cross markets. Now as well as you know be also like nasty peluso from argentina rosalio. She's spanish but really big there as well. So it seems like of things are happening in the mix of genres while because when i lived at the top ten songs as well. They're not just kind of things that you've seen the anglo saxon war like in the us uk so the world is becoming more international even countries like the us in uk. They are more accepting of songs from outside as well which i think is fantastic but page. I mean i'm sure you wanna know the first the number one song of the of the two thousand twenty right. It is of course. The weekend was blinding lights. A some we had a lot in two thousand eight hundred eighty s. Oh we've already heard in two thousand and twenty one but in terms of looking towards the future. How do you see the music market going now. I mean are we going to see some of these trends. That have happened. They going to be kind of you know Adopted into how we appreciate music now as fans and also how as artists how they also live within the industry. I think in two thousand twenty one. There'll be lots of discussions in the music industry about the price of those streaming services. I mean you might know this quite a lot as well page because some artists don't think it's fair the way the revenue goes directly to the artist. In fact there's been many kind of articles and people in the music industry talking about that. So i think there'll be discussion on how to make this a little bit more fair because you know one thing that i feel about the streaming services. They only help the major big artists. You know the they helped the justin bieber's the do a leap of this world. But i think if you're an independent artists especially you know whereas difficult to perform live as well. Where is the money coming from. And i think the industry will look very hard on that. And i have to be changes in the price of which songs are available on those services. You know we all need to be a little bit more fair. And actually if i may out of one final point just to kind of illustrate space. What you're saying about it being quite unequal. It's likely that spotify has around seven million artists on its service only thirteen thousand of those artists generated over fifty thousand dollars of streams last year. And that's pretty much just hitting on kind of a almost a minimum wage over there and you think about the amount of artists who aren't even making that it does feel like really things will change and they'll be a bit more of a movement behind and i know it's already happening but fingers crossed for the future and love music scene as well as cross your thanks so much. Thank you my. Thanks to page reynolds of finance. I guess to protect for that. That's all we have time for today's program. Many thanks to our produces daniel bates collateral bello page. Rentals alexis self our research charlie film mccord and studio manager mealy evans with editing assistance from christie evans after the headlines. There's more music on the way at ten. Am we have the big interviews. This week with doreen. The leading light of cookery an island in the foreign desk at eleven am london time. Andrew mueller will ask who are the boko haram copycats ever. Since boko haram abducted schoolgirls chip book in northeastern nigeria. Other groups have copied the tactics and andrew will be back the microphone once again to bring you up to date with the day's big stories live at midday on the briefing. That's date london time. But for now from me. Emma nelson goodbye. Thank you for listening and have a great weekend. Monocle and ubs a proud to present a nobel course. A book that celebrates more than half a century of the nobel memorial prize in economic sciences and gives an overview of the anti four winning laureates and their influence on global society. It builds excitement around economics by talking to the lorient and unpacking their theories from a pioneer in the field of the economics of climate change to an israeli psychologist changed the way we think about thinking the winner stories. Make for an incredibly diverse. Read as well as real life case. Studies have applications of the prize winning theories. You'll find an illustrated history of global economics alongside a look ahead at what we can expect. Over the next fifty years you can discover the story of alfred nobel himself and the legacy of his awards on sale from october. Twenty two thousand from monaco and ubs purchase the book from our retail stores offer. Monaco dot com and nobel costs asking the questions. That shape our.

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Thursday 30 January

Monocle 24: Midori House

26:51 min | 1 year ago

Thursday 30 January

"You're listening to Monaco's house view. First broadcast on the thirtieth of January two thousand and twenty on monocle twenty four molecules house. Few coming up today today. Many countries drifted away from them. And it's like the energy has gone out of the fight. My guests Carol Walker. Enjoy a deco. We'll discuss the mood around. Brexit and whether Britain has actually set itself up for success as the lone divorce finally knees reality will also discuss how to execute a good political interview as is the outgoing director general of the BBC says journalists too often approach the conversations as if they are speaking to liars and Crooks and we discuss where to get and how to get a good cup of coffee and whether the world of Boutique Coffee has all just gone too far and whether or not. It's all Australia's fault. Plus there are a number of requests being bandied around. Maybe tax breaks some initiatives. That could practically help the color and not just encouraging new customers to come through an attempt to breathe new life into Italy's fabulous newsstands. I'm Andrew Moolah. monocle house view starts now welcome to the show. We begin as usual with our news panel. Which today is Carol Walker the political analyst and former BBC correspondent and join the deco the journalist and broadcaster we'll start in the UK with Brexit and the customary pause for listeners to cy again at the spectacle of hitherto broadly sensible nation torturing during it so fears and proceeded outcome which might if? We're all lucky. Leave the country only slightly worse off than it presently is because a little less than thirty hours from now the U K will who actually leave the EU bound for a limbo of yet to be determined length as a new relationship is fashioned. There is a hard headed policy aspect to this of course but it also a less tangible emotional aspect joy I'll ask you. I did the spectacle. Yesterday of 'EM EP singing all Blang Zayn Stir Anything in you. How are you feeling about this? I think left me with a sense of embarrassment. I think having speak- spoken to friends of mine who are kind of prominent remain as Many of them just feel countries drifted away from them and it's like the energy has gone out of the fight. The fight is over. The fight was lost on December the twelfth and and so I can well. We're looking forward to the next year thinking. Well what are the places that we can actually make a a difference whereas whereas the point at which we can in some way Steve Future the the and some of us. I think it's just GONNA go books. which is my plan and some are going to? I think. Try Law over politics to try and hem in the government but otherwise it's just sensitive is the UK all UK anymore. Carol thing I was struck by especially after the referendum Kim vote In Two thousand sixteen which was a surprise I think to most people whether they would leave or remain and it was something that didn't really touch me deeply because I remain an Australian in citizen. I live here entirely legally before anybody gets any ideas but I'm not British Food Not European but I was struck talking to a lot of my British friends that it it hadn't occurred to them before just then they had grown up thinking themselves as Europeans. That it was part of their identity and ironically the the Brexit exit thing having been largely about English identity had caused them to think about their own identity and a whole new way. Did you get a sense of that. Feeling all of a sudden. Someone's trying to take something something away from me well. I think that in a lot of people didn't really wake up to that until after the referendum result. Because I think a lot of those those people that you have talked about feeling as they have a European identity assumed that the Brexit vote would go the other way I think the thing that I am really struck by is that after more than three years of incredibly passionate heated debate h on all sides when everyone has somehow been expected to have a positional one side or the other of the great divide side. There is now this strange sense of of resignation that is going to happen. the the UK is going to be outside of the European Union By later on tomorrow night An almost a strange sense of anticlimax in that of course immediately north very much is going to change because McCain be into this period when a very much will remain the same into the transition period. I think the other thing is that what this debate has done is to force people to take sides. I actually know quite a lot of people who in the run up to that referendum were. We're quite divided thought. Actually you don't like all those eurocrats putting down on lots of pesky rules but on the other hand I know that for the sake of my business business and my mates who European as quite nice to have that multi European Identity and I think what the brexit decision it did was it forced people to move to one side or the other. Well it did exactly that joy did create an entire new political identity in a very fervently felt one in in this country. I mean if if four years ago you went around identifying yourself as an ardent remainder above and beyond all else people would have reached certain conclusions about about you. You were talking earlier about that sense of resignation. Carol mentioned anti-climax. Do you think that energy matt identity. Remain ISM if you like. He's going to go anywhere because there is now an argument to be had about which actually might be the more interesting one about okay. Brexit has happened but we don't no yet. We don't even know what the Prime Minister thinks what. Brexit is actually going to look like we upset nervous idea about that one remember people at the People's rights and various other they second referendum campaigns now have huge mailing lists. Nothing will happen for a little while but providing the they keep those live and taking over you have the a mailing list and potentially one of the biggest pro European movements inside the EU sadly but that that can always be reactivated late date. We actually don't this is meant to be the implementation period we're going into the idea is we'd already sorted out our future. We already got our vision for the future and this was the time we were going to be working out the detail. We still have absolutely no idea what's going to happen. Saw Old enough to remember when trade deals. We're going to be signed a matter of minutes. Yeah okay all going so in fact the next nine the next September that it's all going to be sorted out it's been incredibly rocky ride so although we've got a total lull energy at the moment and very we are all kind of Londoners who are therefore largely in the remain camps. Anyway all. That's the general feeling around here. That's a good start picking up again as we begin to realize various things that have been promised are becoming possible or we look at Boris Johnson. Saying we've had a huge triumph when in fact anybody the any serious analyst says as she does a huge disaster of a trade deal. But Carl do you think that energy vote can be whipped up even by mailing lists of that size because the thing is that remain much like Brexit is an extremely simple binary proposition whereas what the country now faces is a much more when you won't document and one might hope possibly in vain for a more sensible one. You're going to see people getting as excited about the idea of taking to the streets in support of I. Oh I don't know why Norway or Switzerland Variety version of brexit. She'll answers you are. I think the overwhelming feeling amongst many people in the country is that they just want. This argument settled and they are actually tired of it. Of course there will always be a halt cool a very passionate former remain a campaign China's. Who would want to try to do this? And it may will be some at some future date. They may be able to revive their mailing lists. But I think in the short term Anyone with a strategic. Look at this will think that this is not the time to do that because I think that there is a huge feeling amongst people who are outside of the Westminster bubble in the political world. WHO's who are simply tired of the argument There will be an incredibly really difficult process of trying to reach a trade deal with the European Union the EU is making very very clear. That if we WANNA just with trade deal will then we've got to stick to what they call this level playing field. So we sign up tool those you rules and regulations Boris Johnson Michael Gov and so on a making it very clear that they're absolutely not GonNa do that. The whole point of Brexit was that we don't have our rules dictated in Brussels so that is going to be very difficult and the UK at the same time as an. Oh and by the we're GONNA do a great trade deal with the United States and hold of these other nations with whom we currently have a trade deal through the EU and all of that is going to be wrapped up in the next few hours that is simply not going to happen. And I think that does spell huge difficulties for Boris Johnson. But I still suspect. Act that the the confusion the difficulties over those trading Arrangements will not grip the country in the way that the brexit divide and the brexit arguments have done Simply because we've got a government with a huge majority. They will battle their way through it at the last minute. They'll call something together. And there are still only a comparatively small number the businesses who will in the short term be directly affected or of course the longer term economic fallout is potentially very serious at once more to that which is just wait for the. I told you so moment because all the people who are being quiet now will be saying I told you so in about six months time Jolla Deco and Carol Walker back with more from you both in just a moment first monocle. Daniel H has some of the other stories. We're following today. Thank you Andrew. Chinese officials have confirmed. The Corona virus has now spread to every region in mainland China. Health authorities have reported a sharp rise in the number of cases in recent days and the World Health Organization is now considering whether the virus ariss constitutes a global health emergency. The Australian State of New South Wales has announced an independent inquiry into the ongoing bushfires. The six month inquiry will examined the causes of the fires. And how the state prepared and responded to them it will also report on whether climate change and human factors have played a part and finally it's it's been revealed that two satellites have narrowly missed colliding over the US state of Pennsylvania. The objects are travelling at a speed of fifty thousand kilometers an hour but fortunately US base command has said that they crossed paths without incident. Those are some of the news headlines. We're following now back to you Andrew. Thank you done. You'll this monocle house view. Boundary Remillard here with Carol Walker. Enjoy Deco. Well let's look now at the craft of the political interview. A thing at which all of us here gathered have some experience. Lord hold all the outgoing director general of the BBC has taken a swipe at the fashion for approaching all political interviews on the assumption that all politicians are liars bungalows or frauds woods and in search of enlightenment but opportunities to embarrass or infuriate the interviewee journalists as Lord whole sees it have a case to answer for contributing to a toxic political discourse. Carol does he perhaps have half a point. Well I think the first thing I would say is that I think our democracy crecy absolutely requires politicians to put them themselves up for scrutiny. Answer some tough questions and in a world where all politicians very well schooled in the art of the sound bite. You need to have an interview. WHO'S GONNA stand up to them and prevent them from simply spouting the lines to take where? I think that Tony Hall. My former boss does have a point. Is that some of the longer form more discursive conversational national style interviews can be quite revealing about politicians am can engage the audiences in a different way. I think that in this day and age when we've got not just one or two flagship programmes on the BBC but a whole multiplicity of radio stations like this of podcast and so on there is room for those Longer more conversational less combative interviews. But you've got to have opportunities still led to try to put politicians on the spot. Make them come up with some answers and defend their politics in their behavior but joy do journalists too often proceed from A place of assuming bad faith on the person they're talking to you because the the the belligerent Gotcha interview has become if not necessarily the default certainly the thing that journalists and broadcasters knows going to attract the most attention well Louis holy slightly out to step out of step with the Times if he thinks politically interviews with bunglers unglued liars and Crooks out say that this was the exact point in time in which to do that. I think what has changed is it's very difficult to politicians titians really understand the media now in a way that you know under Brian Walden under Robin Day they would sit down for the hour long interview. They might get caught out by the question. elegantly framed now. You know it sound by. Do you know it's clipped you know you've got to get one message out. You know how to just keep repeating your message. Nicky Morgan fifty thousand nurses over and over again. So that that's what the view is so in a sense that if you regard politicians and broadcasters as the enemy the ones understood the tactics six of their opponent of the politicians At this point the media probably starts needing to change how it does those interviews having said that does do wonderfully long interviews. The Andrew Neil's interviews are not on the presumption of lying there and fight very heavily federally based interviews and those are the best interviews. Carol occasionally one myself quite bleakly in this. This conversation comes up a lot. In reference to the BBC's I guess flagship current affairs panel show question in time which does generally descend and is indeed encouraged to descend into in basically into a bear. Pit that if they instead spent that our broadcasting thoughtful thoughtful nuanced political discussion focused on the minutiae of policy which allowed room for doubt and questioning an argument. Would anybody actually actually watered. Well I think that the great value of Question Time is that the questions are coming not from schooled political interviews but for members. This is the public and I actually think that is hugely valuable that you can have for example a nurse or a teacher who can stand up to a politician. He's trotting out a sound bite about some extra money. Some extra stopping some extra investment saying well hang on. I'm a nurse and these are the problems that I'm facing acing it facing. Yes in a long form interview as joy is saying you can approach things from a different way my point is that when you have I mean even the BBC itself how so many different programs. I'm platforms radio. TV Online facebook conversations podcasts. And so on there is room for all of these things and I think there's there's room for some shouted arguments and there's room was well for some perhaps more reflective conversational interviews as well just a final thought on this one joy isn't isn't the fetish is Asian and I think the media's court guilty of as guilty of fetish izing it as as the audiences are of the shouting confrontational interview. Does it contribute to a general lowering of the tone. I speak personally. I get quite bored by them. I don't really feel like learning anything to be honest. I think well I think. Do we want to argue against the death of difference in modern culture is the kind of broad question there in some senses. I think yes. The difference was a very good thing But I do think in the end. You don't end up with a political political class. That can explain what they're doing in the deep emotions behind it. But I would also say that. It's a second stream going on while you've got these very confrontational tation. Bliss confused in places like they'll be occasion. BBC You have this slow stream now which is podcasts. And they don't require that sound soundbite. They are deliberately sort of slow radio. And so let's see how these two things balance out as they both develop in political terms. And if I could just say very very quickly I think the bigger problem at the moment is a scenario where you've got government with a big majority which is boycotting many of those much tofte Hoffa interview style programs But where the prime minister's happy to have his own cameramen to film him taking questions from school children in Downing Street need. I realized now. I've done that automobile wrong. I should've talked straight over the top of both of you and exactly Carol if that is even your real name Finally on today's news panel the Tate Museum here in London has attracted a measure of online com twombly for advertising for a head of coffee. The position comes with a salary of thirty nine thousand five hundred pounds which is as angry people who only read the headlines have noted more than debate. Pay Some of the people who curate. It's it's actual exhibitions. The outrage walls is outrage of this sort of news. Misplaced head of coffee is a management position overseeing the cafes at four galleries but it did serve as an illustration of the onrushing in Super Bowl. Hegemony of coffee a commodity which almost no enterprise feels now able to offer a reminder that manacles excellent cafe is just around the corner from where we are broadcasting. Carol have you noted yourself idiot especially we'd purveyors of coffee in your travels well having just come from the most ludicrously overpriced. Okay Confession here. Oat Milk Cappuccino in a trendy coffee. She literally every year where I was shocked at the price of My four pounds fifty for a cab for a Cappuccino. My dear your mother rest her soul would be turning her grave. She knew what spent but one of the best ones I had was at the end of a walk. Luke threesome mountains in Georgia Georgia next door to Russia. Not The one in America and we arrived at a tiny little village which which had unmade streets and goats walking down the streets and beautiful medieval towers and I wasn't it's the most epic of walks but it had been three or four hours through the mountains and There was a guy shattered as please come to my cafe. Please come mm to my caffeine in the garden of his house He had got his own little coffee cart and he made the most superb Cup of coffee which was entirely unexpected an absolutely delicious and did not cause four pounds fifty two at this point. I feel obliged to confess that I have witnessed a in the far north shore of Sydney somebody with an espresso machine on a small motorboat sailing between yachts moored while the occupants cheapens thereof took a swear. I did have a profound moment of thinking. Yeah we will all be first against the whirlwind. The revolution comes joy. Is this basically Australia's fault. I wonder if it is because at some point in the last ten or fifteen years Australia. My people seem to decide. That coffee is something we're really going to care about. Don't she. Grew coffee beans out there or are you reporting the more I think. We're importing time when your homes or something in Italian cafes you just get you coffee on the ball nice and quick five minutes of Hugo indeed. I have a lot of sympathy for about mobile. Yeah looking here I was just from. My grandmother insists least make a lovely bowl all of milky coffee from my grandfather which bred into before going off to the farm in the mornings and it was just a kind of other casualty of the of the of the routine sunny it will become you know incredibly high flight when I was a kid. My father runs around the cafe. London and I operated the coffee machine if I used to sleep with an old guiger coffee machine sheen at the end of my bed with the kind of food precious of so is a high octane. Tees and I was very very good at it and I now feel that I have somewhat Mr Trick in knock staying in the Barista the profession then. Journalism in fact is now the kind of cul-de-sac profession. You you could be making nothing under forty grand a year during the DECO and Carol Walker. Thank she both. In a moment. We will hear a little bit more about the importance of Italy's newsstands. You're listening to Molecules House view. Do Stay tuned. This is Monica House view. I'm Andrew Muller Italy's new stones were once a fixture of urban life not me retailers of the morning papers offers end the months magazines but community hubs which the events of the day would be vigorously discussed. Sadly the numbers have dwindled from over thirty. Six thousand in two thousand thousand one to less than half of that today. A step has been taken to remind Italians of the value however joining me now to explain what is molecules culture took Kiara first of all what is special or different about Italian. Newsstands well I think that differ a main difference lies in the fact that Italians will probably always take a good occasion to have a good old neighborhood Chai around politics specifically and I think the news agent agent is obviously a fixture of many cities but in Italy It's often kiosk. It's often in the middle of square. It's often a focal point. The square S Not only in big cities but in towns specifically and it's often felt like the place where people would gather to discuss the events of today So the fact that that the numbers are decreasing I find is is quite a start occurrence in terms of the privacy neighborhoods of a place where people can come together gather and normally you know the person who does manage to newsagent is always the same old faces every day of your life and I was watching a report about this initiative last night and and the data took part from Rome is managed by this man who's been behind accounts for forty years that keeps the community together seeing the same face every day. Day having a friend in a retailer near you so this initiative that has taken place to remind Italians of what Marvel's institutions they are. What did it consist stove? It consisted of Eddie across the country in forty cities to be exact Staying Open until later than usual. Some state up until eleven PM. I'm for example Many offered toast at nine pm because why not but mainly just keeping their lights on into the evening to to show in quite a literal metaphorical sense how much they are a beacon of kind of culture and Democracy for for US squares and the fact that they shouldn't really go off does the fact though that an initiative like that is necessary suggests that everybody does kind of understand that trying to sweep tied back here that now that we have reached that blessed state in which people can just stay home in yellow to each other via their computers. They don't need to get dressed up and go into the town square yell at each other in person. It's obviously it's a sad distinctive profess but I think what's also very important to consider in this whole discussion is that and the aren't surviving because newspapers spatial imprint are selling less than they used to but the more addicted die the more. The publishing industry will suffer as well because obviously without an appropriate in Houston and without something at entice new readers into publishing than the overall sales numbers will definitely decrease as well so it's in the public interest says as well to try and help the three situation because they kind of support each other in this microcosm of of of publishing washing so one of the things that was also organized was a petition to try in a request of public funding for for the there are a a number of requests being bandied around. Maybe tax breaks some initiatives that could like practically help the color and not just encouraging new customers to come three. Do you have a favorite decorator of your own. You would like to direct our listeners to well obviously I'm personally attached to the Edeka the I I used to go to as a child in cheering. It's unviable Zona close to my home. It's nothing special. I in fact it's not even a kiosk which might deter some people but it's it's beautiful number all the same and they used to stock a lot of music magazines But they'd always just have the one copy Theo Real Maura which was my favorite music magazine and I just get the one for the month every month and it was just a lovely tradition. And I'm sad that I don't buy everyone. was that part of the appeal of as well that the proprietors news news. The local community in new which magazines hold for which people of course I mean. It's it's like doc. The ball is like the cafe. They they already know what paper you're GONNA pick up in the morning you're either going to be at a public reader or somebody there our career there and you walk through the door and they've already got your paper ready for you because they know what you read and you always get the same every day. It's the usual for the customer. So final message message to our listeners wherever they are in the world. Go out to your local news standby something from it. Perhaps argue with one of the customers. Don't push it too far though you never quite know who you're dealing with that was Kiara Ramallah and that is all for today's show Monaco's house view was produced by Daniel studio managers were stronger and Christie Evans. Coming up at twenty hundred the brand new edition of the urbanized with Andrew. Talk Monaco's House fee returns at eighteen hundred London time tomorrow. I'm Andrea Mullah. Thanks for listening.

Carol Walker BBC Times Brexit EU Brexit United States Andrew London Boris Johnson UK Australia Italy China Monaco director general Prime Minister Kiara Ramallah Andrew Moolah.
Explainer 255: Sentencing Sarkozy

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:36 min | Last month

Explainer 255: Sentencing Sarkozy

"If we are able to take as read the propriety of the charge the correctness of the judicial process and the righteousness of the conviction. There is always something heartening about seeing a former head of government and state ending up in mc link it demonstrates whichever jurisdiction has locked up. Its leader still rigorously. Observes that most fundamental principle of a civilized democracy that no citizen is above the law not even the citizens who make the law on monday. France's former president nicolas sarkozy will sentenced to three years for trying to bribe. The court decided that sarkozy had hinted the magistrate in question guilt as he might be in line for an agreeable promotion to a cushy gig on the cote deserter if he coughed up information on a different investigation into sarkozy examining allegedly trouser during the two thousand and seven election campaign which ones are cozy the presidency as he bay also got three years. Ditto sarkozy's lawyer terrier sog. Who had been party to the offer the fall. We get properly into the ramifications. We do need to consider that there is both less and more to the story than this less. In the far from certain that sarkozy will consume a single helping of prison bisque. Two years of his three year stretch was suspended. The remaining one could be deferred interminably or rescinded altogether by appeals. And at any rate anytime he does end up doing might be served under house arrest. Considering the likely expansive pleasantness of shea sarkozy and the fact that many people in francaise elsewhere presently feel like they've all just served two years house arrest themselves. This might not seem that much of a punishment. More however in that this is far from a conclusion to sarkozy's present legal travails. He is doing the dark again next month. On charges of overspending during his unsuccessful bid for a second presidential term in two thousand and twelve and prosecutors are also looking into picturesque claims. That he's two thousand and seven campaign was funded in part by the unlamented libyan dictator moammar gadhafi. Firstly sarkozy must repay libya the money he took for his election campaign. We helped him become president so that he would help the libyan people but he has disappointed us. The immediate political implications of sarkozy sentencing our domestic whatever the ultimate result of etc. This conviction seems to rule him. Out of serious contention in. Next year's presidential election in which sarkozy had appeared to fancy his chances france has elected obvious scoundrels to the top job before when president. Jacques chirac won reelection against marine le pen in two thousand and two even some of his own supporters were chanting the slogan vote for the crook not the fascist but by the time sure act was actually convicted of anything embezzling public funds. Back when he served as mayor of paris he had retired from politics. Bailey relevant but nevertheless amusing side note. Sherack hated sarkozy. His nominal fellow conservative. Going out of his way insurex memoirs released sarkozy sought re election in two thousand twelve to describe sarkozy as irritable rash. Fill desbois overconfident and allowing for no doubt least vol- regarding himself in the oakham on one sitcom v men but a moment like this can have a global resonance. This is not one of your penny ante. Jahns of some book cooking counselor expenses fiddling. Mpr griffin governor getting rumbled taking liberties with the powers of their office. This is the government coming down on the former president of france. The world's seventh biggest economy a nuclear armed military heavyweight a permanent member of the united nations security council a keystone of the e u n nato and the owner of soft power footprint of barely calculable. Dimensions it would be preferable of course. If the example france it was one of not sending scofflaws to the palace in the first place but the example of trying and convicting a former president is nevertheless valuable. It's the kind of thing that can get people in less rulli and orderly places round nor recently run by even more. Flagrant criminals wondering. Why can't we do that. In the current general context it might even usefully stiffen the result of one of the few countries more wealthy and powerful than france as these confirmed by the united states many monuments to the revolutionary war hero the marquis de lafayette. It wouldn't be the first time that the french had encouraged americans to deal appropriately with a dishonorable and unscrupulous tyrant. Twenty four. i'm andrew moolah.

sarkozy Ditto sarkozy shea sarkozy moammar gadhafi nicolas sarkozy desbois france Jacques chirac Mpr griffin libya Bailey paris united nations security counci nato marquis de lafayette united states andrew moolah
Explainer 234: Italys parliamentary shake-up

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:13 min | 7 months ago

Explainer 234: Italys parliamentary shake-up

"At the next general election in Italy, you blame me two thousand and twenty three at the latest Italian voters will find themselves electing a much smaller parliament. They will have few grounds for complaint, it was their own decision. At a referendum held earlier, this week Italians voted by a hefty majority to endorse plans to make third of their parliament. Redone. Don't of the six hundred and thirty four. MP's who currently sit in the lower house the Chamber of Deputies only four hundred will be returned. The Senate will be similarly pruned it. Redo. Pittsburgh. International missile being able to decrease the amount of people the Item d like because I think they earn too much. I. Personally would have cut down on salaries rather than getting rid of a group of people. I think the anything that can help country to save money is always a good idea. Or you only four. Sparked me. But say. This cold was one of the headline promises of five star an outside of movement founded by comedian green in two, thousand nine. Which morphed into a political party and which is now and Bhai some distance the largest block in Italy's parliament. Italy's current Prime Minister Giuseppi. Kante is an independent star ministers hold several key portfolios in his cabinet, Foreign Affairs, Justice Labor and education among others. Among Europe's populist insurrections of recent years. Five stars has been arguably the most electorally successful although more recent elections and much polling suggests that at least some of the novelty is fighting. The reduction of Italy's national parliament was a typical five-star and typical populist promise grand dramatic sweeping eye-catching rabble-rousing and. Totally. Pointless. Pressed for a rationale beyond pandering to the anti-establishment grouch ing voters five star claimed that axing impedes would save money even five star assessed that this might run to roughly a billion euros of the next decade, which in the context of the outgoings of the government of the world's eighth largest economy is a wretchedly poultry hillock of beans. Granted that Italy's parliament was by Global Standards Lodge among the world's democracies only the United Kingdom and Germany seat more impedes in their lower house but the UK has roughly the same number of people living in it as Italy and Germany more. Granted. Also that a quantity of Italian MP's will have been inept crooked, lazy silly insane and or drunk but the proportions are unlikely to have differed significantly from those of other elected assemblies and at any rate five stars initiative seems more focused on quantity than quality. Nevertheless, the idea was also backed by most of Italy's political parties who decided that being accessories to a massacre of themselves was politically more sensible than defending the status quo. When anti-establishment sentiment reaches a critical mass, it requires ran nerve to tell cranky voters that may be governing is more complicated than they might think. But possibly more interesting and perhaps even more encouraging results of local and municipal elections held in seven regions across Italy the same day as the referendum. These, conversely did not go brilliantly for Italy's recently triumphant populists league the right wing Tub Thumpers who at one point ran the country with five star in a coalition as unlikely as their eventual falling out was inevitable had made promises. If not assumptions of sweeping the board, they did not obey we lost. That's clear. I'm happy because I'm sure that many of the forty percent of people who voted for us to back that acceleration audition east. Regrettably the elections were not a total bust later, they held onto Veneta and lagoon area and will probably form a government invalid Diaz to. Even more regrettably the brothers of Italy a gruesome sack of ultra-nationalist won the regional presidency in McKay. But results elsewhere looked like a vote of confidence in at least current national government, the Democratic Party who replaced later as five styles. Coalition Partners surprised many by keeping Campania, Puglia and Tuscany. As these votes have been counted, everyone has claimed victory the labor force slightly expanding their reach the brothers of Italy, for eating into his share of flag flapping head banging sentiment the Democratic Party for resisting the populous surge five star for winning their referendum. But may be and two thousand and twenty s clearly in which all optimism demand asterix the real winner is the recently fashionable contention that governing is difficult and best done by people who know what they're doing as opposed to Yahoos and grand dieters who enjoy being on television. Italy's governments like everyone's have been brutally tested this year the relationship between general diligence and effectiveness in dealing with covid nineteen has been difficult to miss competent representatives of the people have demonstrated the value and in some places there scarcity. As, a consequence of five stars referendum, Italians will now have fewer representatives trying to answer to more people. It seems reasonably likely that this will prove a hollow victory but as more folk are hopefully realizing in Italy and elsewhere, that's the only victory that populists ever win. For monocle twenty four, I'm Andrew Moolah.

Italy Democratic Party Pittsburgh Europe Chamber of Deputies Veneta and lagoon Senate Andrew Moolah Bhai Prime Minister Kante United Kingdom covid Germany Foreign Affairs Global Standards Lodge Campania Diaz Justice Labor McKay
Has populism been found out?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

31:48 min | 10 months ago

Has populism been found out?

"Earlier this week Brazil recorded its fifty thousand, th known death from covid nineteen. The country now has more than a million recorded cases and the world health. Organization believes the real numbers are much much higher. But Brazil's populist President Shire Bolsonaro has consistently refused to take the pandemic seriously. He has dismissed the virus as a little flew personally participated in anti lockdown protests sacked one health minister who disagreed with him and seen another resign in frustration by way of demonstration of the populists horror of expertise both were. Medical Doctors. Brazil and Bolsonaro are not unique, regrettably other countries with populist governments, notably the United States and the United. Kingdom have handled covid nineteen noticeably badly. Bolsonaro Donald Trump and Boris Johnson all one office, blaming an elite establishment for everything that was wrong and positioning themselves as decisive saviors. Global pandemic is short of all out war about the stiffest possible test. Any government can face. It is proving however an especially stiff test for the world's populist governments. There isn't really anyone they can blame for covid nineteen, though some are trying, there are certainly no simple solutions. Is this then the moment at which populism has been rumbled is a widespread re embrace of reason too much to hope for, or should we be braced for populism to lash out further and harder. This is the foreign desk. The Milk Party started. Cover fourth one time you now the bills, no preside em, your broker, PA, not Judea all city a- while the wing to. XENIA. Chris free. For the first time now we have been in global experiment in crisis management of government. We can really watch each other, and we can judge who does what and who has it well in who doesn't so much more difficult to hide and to boast of your successes if you are in a global experiment. Feta Garage. Vichy Grogan. Pick? On. A few okay. My concern is that as he plummets in the polls, the real danger in the United States is over the next four or five months, because as the polls get worse and worse, the temptation to make some kind of grandiose crisis, generating gesture is going to become very tempting. Welcome to the foreign desk I'm Andrew Moolah. We're joined first of all by Monaco's Fernando Augusta. Check Oh for a reflection on why his fellow Brazilians elected giant Bolsonaro. And what Bolsonaro response to Covid nineteen has revealed. About you. Sonar is perhaps one of our oldest MP's known in terms of age, but he's being parliament for quite a while and to be honest. Most people knew him for his quite exotic in Weird appearances on TV saying ebbs, erred things we'll throw. In, favor of torture, and you know that the people are in favor to. Win Your son starts getting a bit gay. Him To be changes behavior. As we know him, so in fact, his character didn't change very much. And then you wonder, but how come a man like this one last presidential election in Brazil. Well, you have to remember that Brazilians were very disillusioned. At the time there were disillusioned with the main political parties including the worker party, which has been involved in some corruption scandals. They had a president, which in fact was impeached, but not only the Workers Party The D. which is the Center Party the PM. And suddenly come this guy with an anti-corruption type of speech, and like it or not, he has charisma for a certain segment of Brazilian society. And let's remember. He was also stabbed in a rally that also helped him in a way, a little bit portraying himself as a victim. The Milk Partrick what in my case, given my athletic history, if I was to be infected it to not necessarily concern me. Feel anything then atom, most little cold all under the weather. Group is. All free ideas you. Both so Nado always doubted science, and yes, I mean it's not a surprise at all that both scenario is very much doubting science. Just saying the Cova nineteen is just like a flu, and he's also showing very little empathy with the people. The families affected by so many deaths that are happening in Brazil at the moment. I think both are not always have someone to blame. And yes, the numbers are catastrophic in Brazil the moment where the country the second highest. Number of deaths in the world just behind the United States, I think we're approaching. Fifty. Three thousand and the number of new cases are still going up, but we have to be very careful, because even with those numbers. If our can still play the game, say you know what proportionally Brazil's to has a lower number than most European countries, which at the moment is true, so we can go against that Brazilian population of two hundred seven million people, but we have to wait and see the numbers. The numbers are definitely not going down, and in the virus, affecting the poorest in Brazil now. Now as well we had the support now of some of the poorest in Brazil I wonder if that's going to continue with, people will be affected personally, because at the beginning in Brazil by saying we're all in this together. Well, not really a full at some. Powell, again they did. Another research was published this week that saying the FA Varela's important communities, they have the vast majority of cases. It all started as kind of a middle class of people coming back from Europe with the virus. Now it's spreading to the countryside as well so not only in the big Brazilian cities as well. Both have been losing support in the last few weeks. There's no doubt of that full. It some Paul remain newspaper. They publish those kind of pose every month or so, and he used to have like a forty percent approval, but now definitely went lower to thirty percent to be honest, still quite high in my opinion, and even the government gave some sort of help to special to the poorest in society, very small son of six hundred is which is about a hundred. Hundred pounds per month. I just mentioned that he's having more support among the poorest, which is an interesting change. Because when he was elected, he had the support of the slightly welfare, middle classes and the poorest communities they were voting for the workers. Party was changing. A bit is getting a little more support from the poorest in Brazil and the middle class actually is running away from scenario Fini became a little bit too embarrassing for some of them too stupid supporting him. The interesting thing about covid nineteen Latin. America, that is proving what we kind of knew. The populist leaders are not very good during a pandemic. If you look at the number of deaths, in cases besides Brazil of course, Mexico's not doing that great, either they also have a poppy seed they're. Completely different characters blowing scenario, but still and then you see some other Latin American countries we've quite. Moderate leaders like Argentina Paraguay Uruguay Colombia of course there are also being affected by covid nineteen, but not as near as Mexico Brazil. Did Democracy and freedom only exist. They're respecting. A. Both scenario loves the military. That's not a secret. In fact, are entering Health Minister general so as you can imagine not very useful, unlimited pandemic. But I do believe that Brazil we are in a difficult situation, but I do believe still in our democratic institutions are fingers Supreme Court. They're being very good in kind of battling both scenario, not only because of covid nineteen, but there's quite a lot of other scandals AIDS government, so I think I would love to go full fascist, but I think there will be of people resisting that and I doubt that would happen, but as you know, the world is changing at a fast pace and anything can happen. But walls monarchos Fernando Pacheco. Brazil is not the only country to be experiencing the twin misfortunes, a very complicated problem and too simplistic government, the last few years of seen many countries, especially in the wealthy developed world embrace populism to various degrees. The government elected during this craze have proved unsurprisingly. To deal with crisis, which demands attention to detail and difference to expertise. For more on this, I'm joined now by Tessa Shishkov. It's and Tom Nichols TESCO. Ovitz is a historian. UK correspondent for the Australian magazine. Profile and author of Real Englishman Britain and Brexit Tom Nichols is a professor at the US. Naval War College, and the author of the death of expertise, the campaign against established knowledge, and why it matters well Tom. By asking you the possibly fight tempting wishful thinking premise of this episode. Is this idea that populism has been comprehensively found out by the COVID nineteen pandemic to you? Does this feel like it's any kind of reckoning while it is reckoning, because populist governments are performing visibly in markedly. Than more competent governments by that I don't mean democratic. Necessarily Democratic governments, but just more effective government, whether it's Singapore or Germany or Korea the question is whether people in places like the United States or the UK recognize, and here within the United States within the the states that have taken a hard line position about not wearing masks and things like that, whether the people in those areas recognized that that's failure populism, because I think one of the things that's also happening. Is that everybody involved is evading responsibility for what's happening and trying to write it off to you know more testing or scientific error, but yeah. I think it is a reckoning for populism but I just wonder if anybody's going to understand it that way. We will come back to that thought later in the show, but if we look at how populist governments have responded to this particular crisis in Tom Correctly points out. They've mostly responded. Pretty. Netflix. Is there something in the populist creed that just makes it incapable of coping with a genuine crisis as opposed to the largely imagine re. Populism generally trades in. Popular than is usually good weather promises and a pandemic crises. The shots down the entire. On the globe and in different countries, that's not. Good weather politicians. It's quite hard to sustain days conditions for populous. That's one point. The other thing is though also that for the first time now we have been in the global experiment in crisis management of governments. We can really watch each other and we can judge who does what Newt, So it's much more difficult for a populist leader to sit in a country like trump in America or fortune in here and say like we are doing so way for our country, and it's great. Every time Boris Johnson says is in these briefings now. People thinking yacht. Really we know that Germany. Sort of has had a fracture of the death toll then the UK ahead, so it's much more difficult to hide and to. To boast of your successes, if you are in a in a global experiment, Well Tom, if we look at other I guess inbuilt problems with the populist idea, and this is one very much in your wheelhouse. You literally wrote. The book is a disdain for expertise. A necessary part of populism is it a condition of populism that the populist has to say nobody else knows anything I'm the one who knows everything. Trust me. Rejection of expertise and sciences essential to populism, because by its nature expertise is exclusionary. It's elitist. It's not so much that the leader. You know you're GONNA leader like President Trump, who says only I can fix it, but in the end populist governments functioned by saying. Look you the people. You're the real elite. You're the smart ones. Are The people who really understand and so I would argue that that kind of anti expertise rejection of science that's essential to populism, and it's essential to populous leaders, being able to make that argument to the public, because that's part of how they make their pitch, and make people feel important and empowered. I will lead that you against these shadowy experts whose Mumbo jumbo you don't really understand. Is there also another I guess if we're looking at the essential difficulties with populism and applying it to an actual crisis. Does populism by definition run into trouble the moment it gets into government because it is at heart, essentially an anti-establishment creed once you make the populist the establishment. They don't really have any room to move to the well. You can see this very well here. With sports government, which was brought to power by Brexit ideology, and is being kept together by Brexit ideology, so as long as Brexit has actually happened in the real sense. They didn't have to show if they can actually manage it now. Cove it over them. Unfortunately, because that was really something that. Nobody could have foreseen, but you could see that as a lack of competence in the boss. Johnston government because these does have not had long experience often in government functions, because all the classic conservatives have been eradicated by the brexit process, and only the Brexit is have been left, so you see that they are progams that populism brings wants people coming to government, and then they have to prove what they. They actually can do a cannot do, and especially of course in a situation like covert where people didn't know what it wasn't. We all didn't know what it wasn't needed. Governments to trust as populations, and then you see what total chaos breaks out in the country like the UK, which doesn't help for of course the next month when the economic crisis will hit, but one thing to the question that. That Tom Discuss on expertise I. think is quite important to see the differences of course between populist leaders Donald Trump outspokenly rejects the experts and the expertise in this pandemic while Boris Johnson scholar. I think they actually tried to follow the advice of their virologists and their experts, and it was just so difficult for them to implement it because that's another problem that populism brings that you need to have not. Not only the trust of the population, you also need to have the trust of the regions, so in the UK you had Scotland Wales and northern island who started to implement different rules from England because they just couldn't follow this chaotic government in London anymore in Westminster to all these aspects I think, play a role, so it's not just one populist playbook for all, but they're great differences between them. Tom You were saying earlier, and obviously quite rightly that the key to determining whether we have reached some sort of peak populism will lie with voters who will ultimately have to decide whether they continue with these experiments or not looking at the United States in particular, which is where expressions of this seemed to be most extreme and most voluble. Why do you think so many voters do seem happy to buy into the populace narratives about covid nineteen. Can they seriously believe that. This is all a hoax or do they just understand that? These slogans in these rituals are things that attend to they a particular in group. Well, let's not overestimate the size of that group in the United. States because I think even now the the states and we have the same problem that the UK has another parts of Europe, which is that we've had a different response here by region I live in New England, which has actually done pretty well I live in Rhode. Island, where rates of new hospitalizations and infections are actually quite low, but even the states that took this more populous stand They're beginning to get swamped with COVID cases, and it may be starting to occur to them that. Making a political point out of this pandemic was a bad idea. I think that. There are still a fair number of people who think that following the directions of the Centers for Disease Control some sort of statement of independence or some kind of personal empowerment, and I've said this many times that Americans have treated this pandemic with notions of freedom that are really almost like a toddler's understanding of freedom, which is that I can do anything I want rather than the responsible adult approach to freedom, which is that my freedom involves certain responsibilities to other people in my community. I think at some of its typically American, but I think some vets typically populist, which is you know the the rallying cry populism is you're not the boss of me and I can do I want to do so here. We are unfortunately. Is there anything that politicians? Especially those in opposition to populists can do to I guess Wean voters off populism, not all to borrow tons conceit further to to get voters, perhaps to embrace the idea that they are actual grownups, and with that status comes in amount of responsibility as well as an amount of rights. You can see it here in this country the UK that the key star since he became Labour leader at the beginning of April has re established an opposition in parliament to the government, which hasn't been the really the case before with Jeremy Corbyn and star who has been rising in the opinion polls. has now become sort of a good alternative prime minister in waiting is putting Boris Johnson on the spot, and that of course is very good to reestablish some type of trust and Karm. In population that has been terrified better response of the government, which you can also see in opinion polls because Boris Johnson's popularity has been sliding into the cellar in the last weeks. It has really become apparent that he's not in charge of what he's doing. And the government ministers and their advisers are just issuing mashes for people to follow that they don't want to follow themselves as we've seen in the Dominic Cummings affair, which I mean people that of course erodes also the further idea that you. You want to behave well. According to what you have to do in terms of protecting others. If you can see the government, ministers do not follow their own rules so I. Think it. It is one other aspect in this whole populist debate that if you are concerned like the chief advisor of Boris, Johnson is about slogans that in three words explain to you what how you manage your life and how you win elections, and then you don't follow them. Then people will start losing trust in turn to people who have maybe eight more credibility like star seems to have at the moment, but of course this is just you know moment to moment. Everything can change within a few weeks. coast tongue where you are in the United States. We're going to see this year. Probably the most dramatic electoral tests that populism as a creed has ever been put to. Somebody running for the presidency of the United States as an incumbent. What role can the opposition to this usefully play if you are Joe Biden and the Democratic Party? Is it just a case of? Don't interrupt an enemy while they're making a mistake, or can you try to advance rational reasonable argument in the face of the irrational end the unreasonable? Well I I think. That earlier populism is great for expressing anger, but it's really bad things like keeping the lights on, and just as Johnson's numbers have been hitting the basement. The president's numbers have been sliding dramatically here in the United States as well and I think Biden strategy which is I think the smart strategy is that as you said Andrew? Don't interrupt your opponent when he's busy hurting himself this election. I think presidential elections are always a referendum on the incumbent. When there is an incumbent, they are a referendum on the incumbent, and I don't think that this I may be something of a minority here in the united. States but I don't think this election is about policy at all. And I think it would be a fool's errand for Biden to come out. You know with a fifteen point program about how to fight Cova did but I just don't think there's a place for that right now. I think what's happening in the United States is Americans are going on their gut about who they think would handle this crisis better and so I think to somehow get out there and make this. This about an argument, you know to make as much as it would warmed my heart to hear someone. Make the argument for Science and rationality. My instinct says a former political staffer, and as an observer politics tells me that's a pointless. That's a fool's errand pointless thing to do right now. I have said as somebody WHO's not a big fan of the President I hope the president gets on TV every day. I hope the president holds rallies every ten minutes because every time he does just brutal on his bolt because I think people actually see when thousands and thousands of people are dying, and the president's big concern is that someone made fun of him for the way he drinks water. That really tells you something about the ineffectiveness of the response here in the United States and the more the public sees of that the patients and less trust. They have in the president. Tested, we should contemplate I guess the pessimistic analysis. Do you think there's a concern that not necessarily the pandemic itself, but the economic consequences of which I don't think we've even begin to fully understand yet. Is it possible that they will just present further opportunities for opportunists if you will? Crisis is never good for rational sinking, and it usually helps people who accelerate or look for outside enemies are pick inside enemies and sort of accelerate. You know dangerous in order to distract from their responsibility for crisis indicates of covert I. Mean we really see a very special crisis? One thing is that it's not the responsibility of the governments of populist governments or any government. It broke out. That's number one, so there's a question of the responsibility sort of deferred, but the second thing is that it's a health crisis, and I think usually populous get elected despite the relatives of something because they promised something that they want to achieve, but indicates of. Minute concerns, your health concerns the the life of your parents. For example, people become really touchy, and they will have a good look also at their leaders in order to see how they've handled it. Andy Economic Crisis that will follow which we'd be severe, and which we may become at the same time like a second wave in autumn late autumn, government funding runs out, and people are more indoors again because the weather will be cooler, so we will see a double crisis emerging end at that point. will be really pushed to their existential needs and will be quite angry at the people who have been in power so far the question is as we said if you'll, pollution can really bank on disseminating America. There are elections here in the UK. They are no elections in the next five years. If everything goes away, and then it might be a distant memory, so it depends very much on the tour if you look at the example in Brazil. This it's really very hard to make any predictions. How economic crisis and continued to Covid nineteen pandemic disaster will affect scenario as long as the military backs him. It will be very difficult to get rid of him on the other hand. You have also problem there because he doesn't have a grip on the region. Who knows who is coming up? There would be really not responsible to call this out now. We have to see what happens. Just finally then Tom. Because time is regrettably against us if this is some sort of watershed moment for populism. which way do you think it is likely to see the shift going? Will we see a widespread re? Embrace of reason or do you have a genuine concern that a tilt towards authoritarianism in some cases could be the next stage of this evolution. Well I think the United States is always an odd case because of our extreme individualism and our federal system and so Americans. I think it's interesting to note that while the president, trump's ratings have plummeted the ratings of individual governors based on their responses to the Cova crisis of actually skyrocketed. And so I don't worry about a slide toward authoritarianism over the long term I think worry about that in general, just because of Americans and they're kind of obsession with celebrity politics and their general ignorance about how their own government works, I'm much more worried that the president will keep trying to create rally around the flag moments out of this crisis, interestingly enough, he has not been succeeding at it now. Some of that is because this administration is on a political level so majestically incompetent because the president just keep stepping on his own message. Tessa point that you had a great moment. Right to say look. This virus isn't my fault. It came from another place I'm doing the best that I can. The president trump has not been able to really exploit that message very well. My concern is that as he plummets in the polls, the real danger in the United States is over the next four or five months, because as the polls get worse and worse, the temptation to make some kind of grandiose crisis, generating gesture is going to become very tempting, but I think. It's been reassuring to me at least and again. I I live in a region of the country. That's been really quite rational about lockdown that a lot of governors have actually tried to deal with this in a more rational way. I will put a variation on that question to you if you look away from the United States towards other countries, do you think there is a concern about any of them? Pursuing populism all the way down the authoritarian rabbit hole, which is not the most elegant metaphor I've ever conjured, but let's run with. Certainly we have seen that. Authoritarian leaders now have used this crisis for them means we had with? Benjamin Netanyahu in Israel with Victoria. Von in Hungary with leading me Putin in Russia. There's plenty of opportunities to sleep in few laws that enlarge powers in emergencies in then you just try to keep them and stay in power under the longer. Maybe another kid, but so we will see how this goes, but let me also say one tiny little bit. optimism injected into this debate. The crisis has made obvious that countries that have strong state structures that can handle a crisis like this from the whole population is affected countries that have strong hints. CARE systems. Dealing better with this crisis than those that don't and thirdly also countries where people can show solidarity, because it's happens to beef democracies and free societies and free expression off, your opinion is allowed will fare better in a situation like this, because you need free information also to tackle a pandemic like this, otherwise like in Russia people just didn't know what was happening and woke up to full hospitals with coaches, and so all these things I think we'll also play a role where we look back at this crisis to analyze it. For governments petitions, even maybe populace to think what actually the things that you need to survive in the twenty, th century and one of them could be a state that can intervene a health system that is being propped up. I mean all these things we'd be so important. I think that could also be one of the responses to the crisis, not only that authoritarian leaders large their powers, but it also Democrats come back and solidarities back to show and Tom Nichols. Thank you both for joining us. That's it for this episode of the Foreign Desk. We'll be back next week and look out for the foreign desk explainer available every Wednesday. The foreign desk was produced by Yolene Goffin edited by Jack, Jewish for me under. Andrew thanks very much for listening until next time goodbye.

United States Brazil president Boris Johnson Brexit Tom Nichols UK President Trump Covid Foreign Desk Andrew Moolah America Shire Bolsonaro Europe XENIA England Tessa Shishkov Vichy Grogan Milk Party Cova
Explainer 201: Who was Mad Mike Hoare?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:22 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 201: Who was Mad Mike Hoare?

"The story of might hose life which ended peacefully early this week after one. Hundred Turbulent years reads like these synopsis of an absurd overcooked movie. Indeed one episode of Mike. 'cause life was the Synopsis Foreign Absurd overcooked action movie. Nineteen seventy eight. The Wild Geese in which Richard Burton plays a swashbuckling soldier of fortune called Colonel Allen Faulkner a character who similarities to Mike hough stretched to breaking point the traditional cinematic disclaimer about resemblance blogs to persons living or dead. Being purely coincidental. I get across the railway. Not Answerable Choice. I mean the real McCoy and I love being in the presence of all hardman necessarily Ruffians but men men who can live hard core walls to an almost cartoonish degree what we think of when we think of mercenaries the buccaneering rogue in Berry fatigues cravat overthrowing or undermining governments in generally poor countries at the behest of generally rich people equal parts. It's guerilla commander and showman. Most people would have bristled at the nickname mad. Mike Mad Mike hough understood it as the calling card and the sales pitch which would help him to more or less invent the modern idea of the mercenary as an effective but handily deniable instrument of foreign policy. Mike Hall was born in Calcutta to Irish parents on March seventeenth some Patrick's day nine thousand nine hundred. Nineteen he volunteered for the British army at the outbreak of World War Two joined the London Irish rifles and later the Royal Armed Corps. He fought in the famously. Brutal campaigns leans against the Imperial Japanese army in Burma and India and reached the rank of major. He served with the Chin dates the British special operations units which specialized sized in behind the lines raids. That's the name for the Guardian Statue. Is that standard the steps of his pagoda. A name from legend that's become flesh and blood living guardians of Shakti after the war took himself to South Africa where he appeared set on a blameless life as an accountant and safari guide but neither occupation proved sufficiently adventuresome. It was his association with Moise Shabby which Louis back into uniform Sean Bay was a Congolese businessman who with the backing of a Belgian mining concern had declared himself president of the breakaway away region of Katanga. He Hired Mad Mike to Furnish Catania with a small army of European veterans. Contemporary accounts of CA- Tangas Wall with Congo Congo paint an unflattering portrait of hose militia as opportunists at best racist war criminals at worst the the African generally surrealist. He's life is spent in raising justice. Efficient food to feed himself and nights are spending dancing literally and drinking a beer which has been brewed by his his womenfolk. A these people know how to live with this. The the reduction of thousands of years then there with the problems that we have is civilization. Sean became Prime Minister of Congo entire in nineteen sixty four and hired hall once more more this time to fight off Cuban and Chinese sponsored communist insurgency again whore executed his mission effectively without concerning himself self overmuch with the conduct of the men. He commanded all the civilian casualties which resulted in my command knowingly fabricated he wrote a memoir of these events entitled Congo Mercenary Depiction on the silver screen by Richard Burton followed Andy Day. Legend was duly founded. The wild geese fighting is business. Killing is that trade mission to save the life of the president of a new African nation all self promoters tempt Hubris however and mad. Mike was no exception in. Nineteen Nineteen eighty-one whore transformed himself from Thula Janis Shadowy Eminence to punch line he was enticed out of retirement. By a plot to overthrow the government amount of the Seychelles he recruited a few dozen similarly superannuated adventures and they flew to the Seychelles disguised as a Johannesburg drinking club the the ancient order of froth blowers on Jolly Boys' outing it went about as writers. It was ever likely to and about as wrong as it could. Whole ended up spending spending nearly three years in prison released at around the time? The global LOFTA abated. I assure you MR chip into the show. Coup was was neither disgust notably by the South African cabinet or the state security. Go so mad. Mike was in many respects a creature of his times in a modern world. In which secrets are harder to keep in the military's of even the poorest countries countries are better organized it is difficult to imagine the Mad Mike Model of mercenary prospering in two thousand four. A coup d'etat was attempted against Katori Guinea by a group of South African Yahoos who seem to have regarded the Seychelles affair not a cautionary fable but an instruction manual. It was a humiliating disaster. It was now -rageous plot that ended in humiliating capture Simon Man of the privileged English background which spent five five years. Some of Africa's is notorious prisons but mad. Mike's is are still with us. In the nineteen nineties the private military outfits Executive Outcomes comes and sand line operated in Sierra Leone Lebron area and Angola private military contractors worry feature of the United States intervention's in Iraq and Afganistan in Ukraine Syria and the Central African Republic. Russian operations have been outsourced to the privatization of the Wagner group in Libya Assyrian mercenaries paid by Turkey. Defend the official government from the Sudanese mercenaries. Helping to besiege. It then may not be another mad mike but they will still be people doing mad. Mike's job as long as someone somewhere wants the results of military operations with none of the responsibility for them. The monocle twenty four I'm Andrew Moolah.

Mike Mad Mike hough Seychelles Richard Burton Mike Hall president Sean Bay Imperial Japanese army British army Colonel Allen Faulkner Central African Republic Congo Furnish Catania Africa Calcutta commander CA- Tangas Wall Andrew Moolah South Africa Moise
Explainer 222: Why did Iran issue an arrest warrant for Trump?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:06 min | 10 months ago

Explainer 222: Why did Iran issue an arrest warrant for Trump?

"He's been called a monster and he was a monster. and. He's no longer a monster. He's dead. And that's a good thing for a lot of countries, and he was planning a very big attack in a very bad attack for US and other people and we stopped him. Such. Has Been The giddying lunacy of two thousand and twenty new cycle that the assassination of the Iranian General Qasim Salamone by the United. States seems an event densely shrouded by times missed. A half remembered fable of a long bygone era. It happened just six months ago. Insufficient time it now turns out for Iran to have gotten over it. The Islamic Republic has issued a warrant for the arrest of US President Donald, trump among a few dozen of American officials that Iran wishes to charge with murder and terrorism. If you don't mind Iran has earnestly impugned Interpol for its assistance in detaining president trump at the earliest convenience. Before we examine the chances of trump ending up in the dark, and they are slender. At least for this recap is probably in order for thunderstruck listeners. Who is still thinking? What was that this year? How is that even possible? Hello in a dramatic escalation of tensions in the Middle East. US strike has killed Iran's most important military commander Major General Qasim Salamone was the commander of Iran's coulds force the foreign covert operatives wing of the Islamic Revolution regards core. He was the architect of Iran's frequently bloody and brutal interventions abroad Iraq, Syria Lebanon and still further afield and by some. The second most powerful figure in the Iranian regime, deferring only to supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei just after midnight on January third salamone was leaving Baghdad International Airport when his convoy was hit by missiles launched from an American drone Sulejmani was killed instantly on with several others. Enrique. American Zionists. Father's martyrdom has led to a greater awakening of the People's consciousness on the resistance front, and it will bring about dark days for dam and flattened their homes on hot off photocall. Aw. Iran which saw this much? As the US might have seen around whacking, it's vice president swore revenge a few days after Sulejmani vast funeral in Tehran which at least fifty six people were trampled to death, Iran rocketed to US bases in Iraq. Enough of a racket was released that several dozen American troops suffered concussion injuries, but that was the extent of the casualties. It seemed clear enough that Iran's retaliation had been carefully choreographed in advance, so as not to escalate matters beyond anyone's control, but it was also apparent that Tehran was not ready to call it a draw. Then! American clowns who have lies utter evil, said they stand by Iranian people. They should see who the Raynham people are really not Iran kiosks that. which brings us to the question of way? Iran thinks that he's going with this latest stunt. It is difficult to imagine that we will be treated to the spectacle of deputies from the US Marshall Service empowered by an Interpol red notice, kicking down the doors of the White House to serve Iran's warrant into poll, indeed with an old, but audible sigh has already stated that. that it wants nothing to do with this Interpol's constitution, it reminded in a statement forbids any intervention or activities of a political military religious racial character. This endeavour by Iran appears to take at least two of those boxes into pole continued therefore, if or when any such requests were to be sent to the general secretary at into pulled, would not consider requests of this nature. This is probably as close as Interpol will ever get to threatening to itself arrested complainant for wasting police time it has also been an active heroic restraint on the part of Interpol to rise above referring to the length of the crimes against humanity rap sheet that could have been assembled under Solomon's name. Iran's purpose in flying. This particular kite appears to fold first and foremost. It is to remind the world that Iran does not consider these salamone account settled Iran may still hope to leverage this grievance for concessions or deploy it justice occasion for some future attack on US interests. Secondly Iran hopes to discombobulated president trump. It is significant that Iran's demand for his arrest specified that this is something that they intend to pursue, even after trump leaves office. These SPEC to Iran is summoning here is perhaps that of Augusto Pinochet, the Chilean tyrant who was arrested in London by British police, bearing a warrant issued by Spanish judge in nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, nearly a decade after the end of his presidency closer to home, trump may be uncomfortably reminded of the travails of former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. He's globe-trotting now. Cocktail not merely by his advanced age, but by the possibility of a foreign judge, wanting a word with him about the consequences of certain of his policies. What Iran is not doing really is making any kind of serious point about international law and accountability and the Geneva Conventions and similar niceties. If they were the last person may be presenting a test, case would be Qassam Salamone who was never known for his own interest in such things. Monocle Twenty, four I'm Andrew Moolah.

Iran US trump Major General Qasim Salamone Interpol Qasim Salamone President Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Iraq Middle East Augusto Pinochet Baghdad International Airport Andrew Moolah Henry Kissinger Islamic Republic Enrique vice president commander Tehran
Monday 4 January

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:59 min | 3 months ago

Monday 4 January

"You're listening to the globalist first broadcast on the fourth of january. Two thousand and twenty won't on multiple twenty four the globalist in association with ubs live from. London this is globalist on monocle. Twenty four i'm nelson and a very warm welcome to today's program coming up. Iran pushes ahead with its uranium enrichment program as tensions rise in the final days of donald trump's presidency speaking of which it emerges that donald trump pressured officials in georgia to find an extra eleven thousand votes to help him win. I just wanna find Eleven thousand seven hundred eighty loves which is one more that we have because we want to say we'll also hear from our hong kong bureau. Chief is the media. Mogul jimmy lyons taken back to jail and good news for everyone who isn't a virologist or epidemiologist i e the only people who will ever refer to two thousand twenty as the good old days a weekly dose of good news from andrew moolah plus how fashioned fed over the holidays expect cozy jumpers and lots of leisure wear plus newspapers to. That's all ahead on. The globalist live from london. I look what else is happening in the news this monday. The us president. Donald trump has been recorded telling georgia's top election official to find in a folks to turn the election results. The australian state of new south wales is recorded. No new cases of covid nineteen for the first time in nearly three weeks and south korea has recorded more deaths than births for the first time in its history. The country already has the world's lowest birth rate. It reported a ten percent drop in the number of babies being born last year. Stay tuned to monocle twenty four throughout the day for more on these stories but first iran's uranium enrichment program is edging ever closer towards its pre nuclear deal levels. The country has announced it will enrich uranium up to twenty percent purity. That's one step below weapons grade. Although we don't know when this will happen. The timing of the announcement comes a year of the us drone strike. That killed the top general qasem soleimani a few weeks before donald trump. We leaves the white house as well. So let's hear now from holly. Dagger is a nonresident fellow at the atlantic council and editor of iran source the blog. Welcome back colleague. good morning. Good morning so what do we know about the rain in richmond the iranian you re the iran's uranium enrichment program where it's up to well. The news began actually earlier this year. When iran's top nuclear scientists was at sas at the end of november twenty twenty and it was in response to that. Iran's parliament voted on a bill that was passed that would and The country to enrich its uranium up to twenty percent and so this was news that we actually anticipated but what happened here was that they were letting the international atomic energy agency now that this was their intention. I think it's worth noting that iran's president has some has been vehemently against this bill that was passed and hopes to actually renegotiate or sit down or return to the deal. Once a biden administration takes and of course on the assumption that they would return to the deal if there is an intention to return to the dale and to pacify things. Why announced that. You're going to enrich uranium to twenty percent purity. That's a very important question and the thing is that. There's a lot of domestic iranian politics. At play this is a kind of tug of war between hardliners. That are trying to essentially saber rattle or make a statement on the anniversary of what's force command awesome. Sono money's death and who are actually the heat against the jc sawyer. Iran nuclear deal. And so dave was against it against any negotiations with the west and they see that the fact that they had taken out. Iran's top general. Who's barry was very revered in iran as a sign that the united states should not be trusted whereas you have people like hassan rohani who are more of the moderate faction in iran. Who believed that Trade and relations with some western countries would actually be any ron's benefit and so he put a lot of his political clout on this deal and he hoped that it would Somewhat improved iran's economy. And so this is kind of what's at play right now. Is this little more than taking a final opportunity to throw the to throw the nuclear brickbats at the united states just before donald trump leaves just as slight reminded to the rest of the world as to what can be done. If you don't toe the line with what. Iran want certainly and and. That's the thing when you look at the details of the bill that was passed they actually had also included that they would deny access to international atomic energy agency inspectors and they had said that they were going to give a window of two months. Basically that was their way of telling biden when he takes office. You don't have much time to deal with this. You need to actually return the united states to the deal and remove sanctions so that we can also return to strict compliance. And so this is very much along those lines. I listen a little bit more about what the united states has been doing because the pentagon has withdrawn the aircraft carrier nimitz from the region. And many saying that. Actually this is a. This is an attempt to deescalate things that that's the thing we we've been seeing a lot of tension in the past week or so in the persian gulf area and What's been happening was that some rockets were shot at the baghdad's green zone and us president. Donald trump said that it on twitter that if any americans were hurt in iraq that they would retaliate and so we saw b fifty two bombers in the region. Of course the announcement of the the gulf carrier in the region being turned around to de-escalate tension the now just before we got the call. I was reading that. They've decided that they're actually going to send it back and It seems that they're saying that. Iran has been making threats against trump. And so they've decided to reverse that decision so it seems that the tensions are not done. It seems that this is just another episode. That's continuing and it's really hard to say where this might go because all it takes one wrong. Move on one side for the other two reacts so let's talk a little bit more about the future. Oh the the the nuclear deal. The iran nuclear deal The german foreign minister heiko maas said that there is a a last window here that mustn't be wasted given the fact that there is an imminent change of administration in the united states. And this is the chance everybody to get back around the table. Certainly and it's not just another administration changing the united states also in iran. Come june and we're expecting a hard-line president to take office. In as i've mentioned earlier it something that hardliners do not want they do not want a nuclear court so there's really a window of about five months that really we could maybe see a. Us return to the deal and in iran. Returning to strict compliance. So what really needs to happen is diplomacy on the to take further action. What not just making statements that they would like to see the united states in iran Return to the steel. So that's really where go what will happen in the next five months. Us really telling. What do the europeans need to do. It's different from what they're doing now. I mean many have seen. The the expressions of intentions have been made by the by france. Germany the united kingdom and in china As little more than biting time given the fact that there is going to be no return or the never was going to be any return to the iran. Deal under the trump administration so just by sitting back and letting time play out Was the only thing to do until president-elect joe biden actually arrived the white house. Yes i think that making statements that they would like to see them return. The deal is nice but if they were to hold bilateral meetings with both sides in both parties and then eventually a have a slow return because right. Now what's happening. Is these two mirror arguments from the united states in the us saying well. Why don't you return to strict pines. And then we'll return to the deal and give you sanctions if iran saying well. No actually. why don't you return to the deal. Then we will return to sick strict compliance. So it's like two people trying to get into the door at once. And i think that really what what really needs to happen as to some side talks just to get both to the same goal. How does this play out. Given the fact that you've mentioned the fact that we only have a five month window in which a deal can be return to reestablish. We have seen how quickly a deal can undone. It is much more quick Than it is the the huge number of years that it took to actually establish that the nuclear deal how much faith and indeed confidences there now on both sides that those five months will actually produce something and indeed something that will endure. It's a very important valid point The iranians and the americans. I think both recognized that this is not entirely. What should be This paper or this joint. Comprehensive plan of action is not going to hold solid and i've heard them iranian officials including how central hani talk about. Will this needs to be a treaty and the so that the next. Us president can't actually remove. Remove the united states from the deal. And so we've heard that kind of conversation as well but if the the problem lies and if they're not even going to sit down and talk i don't see them even sitting down and talking for a new deal if they're not even able to fix the current one and i think that's where the problem is going to be is. Are they going to trust each other. Because the iran nuclear deal was a confidence building measure. The aim was that yes it would focus on iran's nuclear program but that a hillary clinton administration would come in and actually sit down and negotiate on other aspects iran's proxies it's human rights but trump came to office and killed a deal merely because he wanted to have a better deal than barack obama. And here we are right now. Talking about tensions in the persian gulf once again highly. Decorous thank you as ever for joining his own monocle twenty four. You're listening to the globe list. Be entrepreneurs is monocle twenty four thirty minute weekly conversation with inspiring business leaders from around the world. Uncovering the secrets of resiliency and growing a company and the many definitions of success. How many times have you had a great idea for brian. The economy and then you sit down and monthly he. That would really actually. And then you ask yourself that very simple question. Do i wanna spend every day owning a brand new innovative pink lancair prime. I don't wanna do that. I've had to learn how to adjust my management style. And frankly learned to seal. I think in your standard entrepreneurial journey. There's a lot of times when you might wanna throw in the towel. But if impact is really at the heart of what you do you don't have that option. You have to stick to your guns. Join me daniel. H for new episode of the entrepreneurs wednesday at twenty hundred london. Time right here on monocle. Twenty four eight twelve para seven two of here in london with the globalist now the us president. Donald trump has been recorded telling georgia's top election official to find enough votes to overturn the election result in recording released by the washington post. Mr trump is heard telling republican secretary state. Brad referenced burger. I just want to find eleven thousand seven hundred and eighteen votes. Meanwhile who controls america's political decision making for the next four years. We'll be decided this week. And in georgia to electoral runoffs in the state will decide which party controls the senate and as a result how far president elect joe biden. We'll be able to release realize his political ambitions well to find out more on two big stories. I'm joined by scott liquor. Us affairs specialists and professor emeritus at the university of birmingham here in the uk. Welcome back good morning. Good morning to you. Let's begin with this recording obtained by the washington post for those of us who haven't heard at tell us what's in it and what it means. It's a shakedown all if we were to draw stories of organized crime and that is donald trump demands to speak to the georgia secretary state. Brad ravensburger who is a republican and alongside trump is as white house chief of staff mark meadows and in an hour. Hour-long phone call trump just puts out this litany of unsupported and false conspiracy theories about Hundreds of thousands of forged about voting machines being moved out of the state about thousands of dead people voting and he says well joe biden. Didn't win georgia by almost twelve thousand votes after a full recount by the way by state officials. He says i want half a million votes. You need to change this. And he says and this is a direct quote. Find me the votes flying me. Eleven thousand seven hundred and eighty votes. So i went by one to their credit Seventy state ravensburger and his chief lawyer ryan germany. They hold the line and indeed they push back on trump's conspiracy theories and when they do so trump threatened them with prosecution. He's you know what you're doing is a criminal offence. You know supposedly covering up you know this electoral fraud. It never happened. So it shows the lengths to which donald trump will go to try to overturn this election because remember is not just georgia that would have to switch suddenly for trump to retain the presidency. He'd have to pull off the same trick with pennsylvania with nevada arizona. It's an astonishing Piece of news to break just at the beginning of a year. When i think in about three or four weeks time. We're going to have a brand new president in in in the in the white house. Cnn have described as anti-democratic plotting and many others have said actually time has run out for donald trump. But this isn't beyond an impeachment. If i don't think the impeachment will happen just because you know in just over two weeks time. Despite trump's attempts despite his allies in the congress here will talk about. Joe biden will be confirmed on wednesday as the forty six president united states. And we'll take office and it's not astonishing to me that trump would do this. What is troubling to me. I'm a and look at the inauguration. As is on wednesday. You're going to have twelve. Republican senators one hundred and forty republican representatives about two thirds of the republican members of the house who are going to enable trump's disinformation his lies his conspiracy theories by refusing to accept joe biden as president. They will not accept the votes from the electoral college. Now that will fail because the senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell and other republican leaders are not going to go along with it and because the democrats control the house but what we now have is to republican parties a republican party of the as it were the establishment the does play by the rules. Even when they challenge and sometimes obstruct the biden administration. And we have another party within the republicans which were the trust and the trump is do not know rules. they do not abide by the system. They are willing as we've seen in the last forty eight hours to do anything. They want to to try to get their way. How much will this cement the false beliefs at trump won and set the tone for the next few years but we it further. There's a cycle that goes on here because white you saw from these republican senators and from the republican representatives. We have to object to joe biden president because millions of americans think the election was fraudulent. Will join us. Americans think the election was fraudulent in large part because donald trump tells them that on a daily basis. So what you have is arsenal's to such the fire and then we'll guess what we've got a problem here to carry this on after joe biden is inaugurated spreads the fire I do think it's not all doom and gloom. I think we a competent administration coming in i think. Us agencies will finally get respect. They will finally get effective action to deal with. Remember the big issue corona virus. But let's be very honest here. Donald trump's angle to run for president in two thousand twenty four if he does not go to prison and that means that we're looking not just weeks for months but years of this type of attempted corrosion of the us system. So how much will this type actually change anything. I'm waiting to see because as soon as it broke last night. I listened to it on the washington post and then when i woke up this morning other major outlets both broadcast and prentice picked it up. I think for those people who are entrenched with donald trump of and that includes my parents. They'll brush it away. But i think we're looking at a majority of americans who were not entrenched with donald trump. And i think the question is now not only. How seriously do they take a threat. I think you have to look at a lead from those republican. Legislators at state level. They've pushed back against trump credit to those republican state officials. Who would not overturn the election. You now need the republicans in washington to say enough is enough. Let's move onto the electoral runoffs in georgia. They will effectively decide which party controls the senate. This week whitney. Yes the situation. Is that right now. It's fifty to forty eight in favor. The republicans we've got these two very close too close to call runoffs if the democrats did when both of them the senate is fifty fifty and so the new vice president khama harris's the deciding vote. I think even if that happens you're not talking about a sweeping biden program of legislation We're not going to get immediately medicare for all the sweeping national health care system. We're not going to get sweeping climate. Change the three trillion dollar program. That wants but i think what you get is were the Senate where you have narrow democratic control by executive orders to preserve what you have preserve obamacare preserve those immigrants who've been threatened with deportation by trump Come back you to the paris accords. Or at least commit yourself to action alongside. The paris accord to do something about the environment about global warming. What's interesting give. It seems that joe biden is already being tested on his record here in georgia and he hasn't even taken office here. Yeah that's true because we've got two parallel systems and and and he wants system this new system we have of the trump is You don't have checks and balances you don't have agencies you don't even care about. How effective government is you. Just want sound bytes. people to respond a dog whistle politics but remember emma. The other system is having to deal with the immediate crises the pandemic the economic effects of that pandemic The social and racial issues that have been raised over the past year by mass protests. And what matters here is competence and responsibility so rather than deal with this alternative system by engaging in the sound bites by engaging in the division If the biden administration and state local governments can show. Look we can deal with this crisis. Even as the death toll passes three hundred fifty thousand americans. I think that makes a difference. Scott lakers thank you as ever for joining us on monocle. Twenty four still to come on today's program weekly dose of good news. Courtesy of andrew miller more good news for those of us grimly determined to ring what amusement we still can from the ebbing rule of. Us president benito hartmann. You're listening to the globalist. Es has over nine hundred investment analysts over one hundred different countries over nine hundred of the sharp moins freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. Find out how we can help you contacted us at. Ubs dot com funny. How many people get these things wrong. Go into a lot of jazz clubs and got you build it like this. Everyone's got an opinion about design these days but join us on a journey to cut through the noise as we sit down with some design greats. It's just bloody minded inquisitiveness. Really we also have you covered on everything from architecture. Product design to fonts and fashion to. There's so many collections being designed. Actually there may be is a lifespan on a designers role at the helm of a brand. If you haven't already guessed it monocle on design is monaco's weekly design. Show tune in every tuesday at twenty one hundred london time or find it wherever you get your podcasts. The hong kong media mogul and pro democracy activists. Jimmy lai has been taken back to prison. The territory's highest court accepted prosecutors demands to revoke his bail. Mr lyons charge with colluding with foreign elements to endanger national security will james jane. Pose is monaco's hong kong bureau chief and he joins us from there now. Welcome back james. Good morning good afternoon. Good morning just tell us what happened to jimmy lai this weekend. Please parole jim. Eli is being in and out of Prison over the christmas period He was arrested last year under the national security. Bill and that bill. It's pretty hard to get bail. The judge has to be happy that the person won't go and commit any other offenses that could endanger national security. So the presumption is that They won't be granted bail anyway. Initially jimmy i wasn't And then just before christmas He was let out By the judge and the prosecutors and the government kind of appeal that decision and now he is back in jail awaiting another appeal So his his trial won't be for another few months But as it stands Jimmy lai is back behind bonds now. These charges that relate to tweet team maiden interviews that he gave to to foreign media they now fall under the security load. And what does he actually accused of doing. What were these tweets actually saying one of the offenses under the under the act. Is you know kind of colluding with foreigners and essentially trying to get overseas governments to interfere in hong kong affairs now. Jimmy lai has been very vocal in his opposition to the beijing government and to this new security law and before it came into force last summer. Obviously he was. He was doing a lot both personally and through his newspapers that came to an end When the security bill came into into force he. He's not stupid enough to be deliberately offending but he has been arrested under that act he does. He does could face up to a lifetime in prison and trying to Get other outside. Forces governments to to interfere in hong kong. What is the likelihood that he will face a lengthy prison sentence. Well if you know. If beijing and the hong kong government were to draw up their most wanted list. I'm sure jimmy lai would be up there. Among the top five. He originates from mainland china. He came to hong kong and made his fortune here And had to basically leave his business behind because he became too critical of china to essentially forced to sell his his business than he went into media and since then he has been one of the biggest phones in in beijing side so he is very much. Someone who eat imagine The beijing government and hong kong government want to make an example of So a few of us would be surprised here if he wasn't found guilty. I guess the question is whether he is found guilty under the security law or under any of the existing laws in hong kong. He's facing a number of charges under number different Laws and many ways which the government can put him behind bars. If not for the security law we know one thing. I one thing i would say is that it's it's it's one thing being arrested It's another thing Being prosecuted Successfully prosecuted and fat being found guilty. Hong kong still has for now a very robust and independent judiciary You know the judges That we have in hong kong some of the best in the in the world so I guess a lot of people here will be putting some faith in them But they're they're coming under enormous amount of pressure from not just the authorities but also the general public in in the mainland when jimmy lai was allowed out on bail know all hell broke loose on the mainland and there's a lot of You know people Disagreeing with that so even before any sense of a conviction. How much has his arrest and rearrest had in terms of a chilling effect on the way that the media print. Now i think so. It's it's been six months now. Since the security bill came into force And so there's been a lot of reflection of over christmas on the impact it's had on the government side The chief executive carrie lam in her new year's day address was lording the impact of the bill and saying how it's how effective it had been in bringing harmony back to to hong kong I mean you can't argue with that is very very quiet on the streets But it has in a sense kind of crippled the The opposition and it has forced the media to uh to ask themselves questions. About what what they can and can't say I think you know with with jimmy lai. He's he's one of those people who would have been a target. They will be on the list of people that beijing was going to go after besides him and besides some of the activists we still haven't seen them the authorities go after you know general media there's been no attempts to impinge on freedom of speech has yet But the biggest danger right now is is self censorship. people really don't know what you can and can't say and so perhaps a lot of people in the on asking the The tough questions and answering what they really think. James chambers many thanks for joining us from hong kong of slovenia in a moment but first at the time just nudging seven twenty nine here in london a quick summary of some of the day's news headlines. The us president. Donald trump has been recorded telling georgia's top election official to find in the votes to overturn the election result in a recording released by the washington. Post mr trump has had telling republican secretary of state. Brad robbins burger. I just want to find eleven thousand seven hundred eighteen votes. Mr ravnsborg replies. At george's results were correct. The australian state of new south wales is recorded. No new cases of covid nineteen for the first time in nearly three weeks. The authorities have made it mandatory from today to wear masks in indoor spaces such as offices and on public transport. South korea has recorded more deaths and births to the first time in its history. The country already has the world's lowest birthrate routes reported a ten percent drop in the number of babies being born here is prompted the interior ministry to call for fundamental changes to its policies to address the issues of a rising demand for healthcare and pensions and the decline in the labor market and german police have been filmed chasing hundreds of daytrippers of the slopes of closed ski resort. Dozens of families had flocked to vintage berg east of desseldorf defying appeals from authorities to stay at home. Germany is likely to extend its national lockdown beyond the end of january. This is a globalist. Stay tuned the medina galleria in the slovene capital louisiana has developed and enjoyed a strong reputation for being one of the region's most dynamic and interesting arts venues. This is thanks for the most part to its director. Dunkin donuts his held the position since nineteen ninety-three until now ms. Beethoven -at's appears to have been forced from her job by slovenia's new rightwing government. Well to tell us more. I'm joined by monocle. Spoken correspondent guide alone guy. Good morning. good morning anna. What's happened well as new Sort of seems to have been about it really amer. She has been forced out by the government of yanez jansher. Is you say Right wing at least. He has in his current incarnation. Because he's the one of the longest surviving members of slovenia's political class. Going right back to the independence of slovenia and nineteen ninety-one and after twenty seven years of service. She was not quite summarily dismissed. But it was clear that she wasn't going to have a mandate as the director of the moderna galleria renewed and out goes as thank about overnights after a really gaining reputation not just domestically but internationally. She's curated shows that having just been seen in slovenia on this part of the world but also been shown in new york for example and taking off from this region Internationally and also you know talking about what's gone on in this region not just since the nineteen nineties but before as well and that's really part of the problem that's why the right-wing government of yonge has dispatched with her and because they feel uncomfortable about anything which acknowledges life that existed before the independence of slovenia para uncomfortable. Was she really making inhale. This is we talk about cultural way. And we hit the this this idea of cultural and the united states in particular. You hear bandied about in the united kingdom as well but for janas jansher that the the prime minister. This really is a big deal. It feels like he's still fighting the independence war of the one thousand nine hundred one which only lasted a few days in slovenia but Yanzhou was defense minister. At the time he'd spent years railing against the socialist slash communist. One of you want to call it government of yugoslavia in the as before that he'd spent time in jail because of his opposition to the government and he still takes it very very personally indeed. He's one person intervening who seems to think that communism is still alive. Well and flourishing here despite all the evidence to the contrary so anything which acknowledges the existence of all work that was developed during the socialist period of yugoslavia anything which acknowledges that the might have been some good things which happened during the socialist period of yugoslavia is like a personal of frontier uninsured and it does seem that. He's quite keen to eliminate all traces of it. Percents bevan madonna. That has has said that her removal is absolutely political. And she's now comparing the slovenian government's attempts and those of janka as similar to those of the hungarian and polish governments to countries which have already come up against a lot of resistance on the european union rather got the attention of the european union for anti-democratic moves. I mean are we looking at a situation where slovenia will or could potentially be lumped in with those up to other countries. It's certainly something that people here are concerned about The she government is an interesting one. It wasn't exactly elected. I'm an election here in twenty eighteen which produced very inconclusive result. Young as part of the sds gutter about twenty three twenty four percent of the vote so was in terms of votes at gain the most not nearly enough to form a government and we had a government here. A minority government rarely were the that existed here a center-left government for several years until january. Last year that didn't include young showed the other parties wouldn't have anything to do with him because of the way which in which he campaigned in the two thousand eighteen election he'd made really fought a xenophobic campaign. And people didn't want to have any truck with that but then the centre-left government collapsed early last year and yang. She was able to cobble together. A coalition involving members of smaller parties really didn't want to wave goodbye to their ministerial cars. So since march of last year we've had this Yonge led government which wasn't really directly elected by anybody. It's not an democratic but it wasn't ready voted for by anybody and he's just set about doing everything that people feared he might do it. A constant try raid on twitter. He takes donald trump model. He acclaimed donald trump as the victor of the of the us election in really making a lot of civilian people very embarrassed date in the process and he attacks the media in particular on twitter and he calls a members of the media particularly female members of the media prostitutes. He calls everybody else. Prostitutes and he accuses the state broadcaster. Rt of being communist. It's quite extraordinary stuff. However yang should doesn't represent the majority in slovenia and he doesn't represent it by a long way and the raw moves afoot in parliament at the moment to couple together yet another coalition may see a vote of no confidence coming in yonkers government within a matter of days. Frankly so it's possibly not going to be the longest lived of governments but jansher houses. I said earlier. Being a remarkably resilient figure and slovenian politics has already managed to do some pretty serious damage to slovenian cultural life. And we need you've described what it's like being a journalist We have the One of the leading cultural figures being thrown out of job. How much damage is also being done. Well let's think about governance. Is you know as we said the doyenne of slovenia's cultural scene and and it's quite something for a country of just two million people. That's never had any tradition of independence to develop a museum and havoc to his taken. Seriously internationally That's that's really quite something to achieve and the same went for the museum of architecture and design mateos chelsea at that museum had set up a program that the the design biennial lubiana designed by neil which existed before i'm he took over but the dots again made great a great impact internationally. The future architecture platform also made a great impact particularly in this part of europe. It it's quite something to have those things representing you'll very small country on the international cultural stage said to be removing the people who've developed those links who've raised the profile culturally am is a big risk especially when people from the outside looking at this and seeing the new people who are being appointed as being if to be unkind Puppets of of of the right wing regime and then don't take kindly to that. And there is a risk that damage will be caused and we've seen an international academics and cultural figures writing to the government here expressing their concerns. And then the government giving them short shrift basically in letters which patronize them. And say they know nothing about the situation in slovenia and please total off bologna. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the line from louisiana. You're listening to the globalist live on medical twenty four weighing in almost four hundred pages the mongol guide cozy homes is packed with everything. You need to know about making a great place to live. The book is filled with handsome residences contacts. You need to make a home. That will last. A lifetime and is above celebrates. The people know homes should be to cope with kids. Dogs nephew scuff marks to is a book. That knows a home. Tony as good community. It's in and book takes you through the front doors of everything from mountain hideaways to modernise times. So because by okapi today monocle dot com. Let's continue with. Monday's newspapers joining me to look at what's making headlines in the middle east and north africa is cairo correspondent. Riff michelson has speaking to us from london today. Good morning with morning emma. Where would you like to head to. I I think that we should talk about the gulf because the gulf cooperation council due to meet in riyadh on tuesday to discuss a potential end to the blockade of qatar. That has been going on since twenty seventeen And obviously this is provoked Quite a bit of coverage about whether we will finally see a deal and see an end to this blockade So if for example you look and you have to look pretty hard but you will find coverage in the saudi daily arab news Which started with statements from the kuwaiti ambassador to saudi arabia. Says there is a for tunnel and positive atmosphere ahead of the talks. And how credible is the report of fraternal positive atmosphere Extremely good question. A lot of the coverage that we see so for example if you look At some of the coverage online at fronts. Twenty four Aljazeera tells aljazeera which is Very much the focus of some of the irritation from Blockading countries for that coverage They help they also covered this story. it took me a while to find that story to interestingly enough But they both they give different reasons for how close or how far this this group of countries might be to a resolution so if you look at france twenty. Four they mentioned A coach an analyst is saying that bahrain hasn't signed but the other blockading states have They quote The abu dhabi minister for foreign affairs on walker gash a big figure saying that political and social atmospheres in the gulf are looking to end the koto crisis. If you consider that to be a meaningful statement But if you look at what. Al jazeera is doing They kind of casually mentioned that you know any deal. won't be a comprehensive agreement it will be a set of principles and they say the pressure is on saudi from from the us To come to an agreement But the the uae has. It's own agenda so quite different versions of the same situation. What will break this. Because there's no way surely that kosovo will say we supported terrorism. Yes we're too close to run. That's very true. I mean previously. There was a list of i believe it was about twelve points that The blockading states for trying to get caught up to agree to that. Included things like shutting down Their state broadcaster aljazeera And qatar essentially said well. We're we're going to wait it out and did nothing as far as we can tell At least from the outside And so i think that what the customers have shown is that they can outlast this. So i mean i think it will really start with the idea that any agreement has to be a negotiated on more reasonable lines Looks like it will be about things like use of saudi airspace for example And so things you know if they start negotiating along things that where you might be able to reach agreement then an agreement perhaps could be on the horizon. Let's move onto a story. Dominating the press all over the world but let's at least focus on it which is a vaccination rowlatt to against covid nineteen Criticisms in in the likes of germany and the united kingdom things happening quickly enough but The seems to be very targeted distributions of of obsession vaccines in certain parts of the world. that's true so obviously starting with some of my own coverage which i love to do. This is a piece in the guardian which looks at the use of a vaccine. Actually made by a chinese company could sign a form and the idea that this company is part of a kind of vaccine diplomacy effort across the middle east. So this is a vaccine. That has a lot of advantages to countries Middle income countries like egypt or morocco. But we've also seen huge take cup in the uae and bahrain And this is because it's a very cheap and widely available alternative to vaccines that need more. A vaccine need cold storage And so there's a kind of Alliance has been formed for china. You know the spread of these vaccines Is an opportunity to fight against covid. Nineteen but it's also an opportunity to strengthen relations used the manufacturing capabilities in the middle east and improve relations with those countries and Al jazeera also covered The same story but mentions now that egypt has said it will buy forty million doses of the sign of vaccination which gives you some idea of just how popular it is As a kind of result offer states looking to vaccinate large numbers of their population and a very strong spotlight is being shown on israel at the moment is being country which is vaccinated. What twelve percent of its population ready yet. Twelve point five five nine percent of the population. Excuse me twelve point. Five nine doses per hundred people according to I believe to the israeli government and also subtracting sites And so there you know. Benjamin netanyahu the israeli prime minister who said the country could emerge from the pandemic as early as february because they plan to give a hundred and fifty thousand doses per day And there's been quite a lot of discussion about whether israel would give palestinians in the west bank and gaza surplus vaccines that they don't use So there's some coverage in the guardian which basically talks about unequal distribution an equal access to vaccines so while israel has this record-setting vaccination drive at the same time. The palestinian authority Is rushing to try and get vaccines Including from the who said That it could be you know early to mid twenty twenty one Before any vaccines make it to the palestinian territories and so there's been some criticism from Is ready rights groups. They quote a prominent. Israeli rights. group could kisha Saying that essentially although palestinian the palestinians have tried to look elsewhere for vaccines. This does not absolve israel from its ultimate responsibility towards the palestinians intensive vaccinations ruth michaels as ever. Thank you for joining us. On the globalist ups is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people. We bring fresh thinking and perspective to all what we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and heart to create lasting value for all clients. It's about having the right ideas of course but also about having one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivalled network of global experts that's why at. Ubs we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference tune into the bulletin with ubs every week for the latest insights and opinions from ubs all around the world and it's time to retail with the fashioned analyst and author dana thomas hitting twenty twenty one with the eternal question how to do fashion shows how to do retail and how to resist the leader of the elasticated track. Pant welcome back dana and happy new year to you. Happy new year to you. Tell us what has been hitting the headlines when it comes to How the fashion world has coped with the last couple of months. At least the last couple of months there was lots of big changes. Of course you know their manifestos by designers such as gucci and and And even just a whole group of designers led by greece van. Noten saying they to do less shows. They want to do less collections. They want to work on an abnormal pace again and they want to sell their clothes during the right season that we buy winter coats in the winter and swimsuits in the summer and not the opposite has it has been the last fifteen years and those are already big changes in the business which sound like they should make sense. You know like working at a normal pace and buying things in the right season but it actually revolution. And how is this shaped the way that Men's fashion week in paris will be Held i mean that's happening in in a couple of weeks time But they have the also the the big logistical issues to what format. These fashion shows should take and what priorities people should know. Have exactly well. One of the big changes was of course. Because of social distancing fashion shows were moved online. And there's been really interesting interpretations of this films and installation like projections and and really cool. Ideas did classical shows that they just film but other people made short films with film directors. So now they're trying to figure out what to do next and some designers are saying well. You know what we're going to have a real show. Because a few designers did do that in the summer and in the fall they had real shows and space it out. There was a very famous one in. Somebody's backyard where he had somebody. Just every every ten feet. Chanel had just one guest. Kristen stewart the actress but it was kind of fun So they've announced that men's fashion week will go on and that it will go for six days and starting january nineteenth and that at least two brands louis vuitton and christian dior are planning to stage Physical fashion shows with small audiences if the government allows them to now. It's going to be interesting because the french government is we hear through. The grapevine is about to lock down even more stringently. The french we have curfew we are half. Half of our things are closed. You know museums cinemas. New theaters were not really allowed to travel. Some towns have curfews at six o'clock in the evening how they construct lock it down more. I'm not sure. But they're talking about it and so maybe this fashion show idea won't even get off the ground but there are a couple of houses that are thinking let's just go back to the old model but in a limited way but welcome sign that people actually must think. Well let's go back to the to the old model because given the uncertainty surrounding everything else. I'm thinking particularly about reto Seventy something. that's that's really crave for isn't it absolutely and mixing with other people again. I mean i'm talking to more than one person. The last two weeks during the holidays. Or saying i'm feeling really isolated that the low ceiling of of the winter the continental winter are starting to get to folks and you know it was one thing when we could get out and go around and go to museums and go to the theater and go to the cinema but now i go to restaurants but now we're so locked in that we really need to try to find some semblance of what is normal. I mean normal. The new normal is a different normal but in fashion. I think it's there's differences that were now ordering on much more online than we used to. As we saw the poor guys running around during the holidays with the amazon deliveries are and here in paris are call. Sierra gedeon. having boxes piled up in front of their doors but But there's also you know the the normal that we can just be out doing things again and dressing well and and and meeting people so guess lots of stores have closed and will stay closed chain stores of clothes more than a thousand locations in new york alone because of the pandemic but were once the starts loosening up a bit come spring we will see some reopened things and we will see people out shopping again dana. Thomas thank you as ever for joining us on monocle. Twenty four finally today. Andrew moolah brings us some good news as we kick off 2021. Welcome to the fortieth of these weekly castings of the baited hook of indefatigable optimism into the roiling river of the covid nineteen news cycle in the hope of landing the gleaming salmon of good news. Anyway will first and foremost isn't two thousand and twenty anymore. So that's probably good news for everyone who isn't a viral adjust or epidemiologist. I e the only people who will ever refer to two thousand and twenty as the good old days beyond that more good news for those of us grimly determined to ring what amusement we still can from the ebbing rule of. Us president benito cartman. His legal team staged another consummate. Pratfall fall over the weekend. This time laughed out of a texas court room by splendidly. A trump appointed judge after attempting to sue apparent recent recruit to the deep state conspiracy. Mike pence to prevent the vice president certifying the result of november's presidential election when congress meets to ratify the electoral college vote on wednesday further valuable contributions to the general gaiety. Were made by good. The excitable lawyer who has in recent weeks positioned himself as a key figure in donald trump's elite force legal team in an intriguing sequence of online outbursts. Over the weekend. Mr would who has been invited to the white house at least once claimed among much else that the arrests for treason if not actually imminent were certainly merited forefingers and including vice president. Pence senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell and supreme court chief justice. John roberts mr would also claimed that the late and largely on lamented sex offender. Jeffrey epstein is in fact not dead and that counts as good news for donald trump. at least as the pair were famously. Good friends sticking with the theme of people. One might be surprised to discover. Were still alive. I stop collaborate and was good news for bad in the ninety s. Rapper vanilla ice. Who discovered that he remains in extremely limited and specific circumstances employable and good or at least consoling news for those who condemned by the president. General circumstances to have spent new year's eve at home and all alone in that could have been much worse. We could have been invited to. The new year's eve was saying let donald trump's ghastly florida fastness mar-a-lago being subjected not only to vanilla ice but what remains of the beach boys whose relationship to the actual beach boys is approximately that of the current republican party to the gop of abraham lincoln. Only pitiful undignified caricature taken seriously exclusively by lunatics and also reprehensible soundtrack of top gun alumnis. Berlin whose only known hit seems perhaps fate tempting choice for a crowd of defiantly mouse. Plus in perhaps the first clear-headed decision office presidency. Getting just under the wire trump did not attend though he's two adult sons. Who knows as junior and the other one did finally. Let's have some fanatically and geographically appropriate music because from abbas homeland of sweden. There is good news or perhaps we should say as it does. Concern a cloven hoofed ruminant. Good good news from the swedish burg of aware for the fourth consecutive year. The enormous store goat which the locals erect to celebrate. Christmas has survived the festive season without being burnt. Down run over kicked bits or meeting any of the other richard. If richly amusing fights which have frequently been the lot of the vast hey monument now four year run of remaining intact is indeed unprecedented in the league. Goats fifty four year history. Although we for one. Roy sidelong look at the news. Monologue believed that the two thousand and twenty trump should be heavily astor ext covid nineteen having assisted the usual security measures in deterring putative cameras and of the varieties of vandal and wild we would never as a responsible and diligent wry sidelong look at the news monologue well aware of the influence we exert over many impressionable fans do anything to encourage lawbreaking. We cannot help but notice. The goats stretch of survival has coincided almost precisely with this benighted park of trump brexit covid nineteen and the disagreeable nece. An opportunity for a great comic reset is there to be seized this time next year which is good news for some civic minded pyromaniac monocle twenty four i'm andrew miller and my thanks to andrew an all the team who worked very hard to put that together. That was a little bit of good news. That's what we have today's program. Many thanks to produces page reynolds for our research. Charlie phil mccord and osu manager mainly evans of editing assistance from nora hurrell off to the headlines. More music on the way. The briefing is live at midday in london. Your haste with that is andrew moolah and a globalist is back at the same time tomorrow. I you can join me for that if you can. But for now from me. Emma nelson goodbye. Thank you very much for listening. Monocle newbie ass appealed to present a nobel calls a book that celebrates more than half a century of the nobel memorial prize in economic sciences. A nobel caused gave an overview of the anti four winning laureates and their influence on global society. It builds excitement around economics by talking to the laureates unpacking. Their theories from a pioneer in the field of the economics of climate change is rarely psychologist changed the way we think about thinking the win stories make for an incredibly diverse read as well as real life case studies have applications of prize winning theories. You'll find illustrated history of global economics alongside a look ahead at what we can expect over the next fifty years you can discover the story of alfred nobel himself and the legacy of his awards on sale from october. Twenty two twenty from monaco and purchase the book from our retail stores over monaco dot com a nobel course asking the questions that shape our.

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Monday 27 January

Monocle 24: Midori House

25:34 min | 1 year ago

Monday 27 January

"You're listening to Monaco's house view first broadcast on the twenty seventh of January twenty twenty on multiple twenty four. This is Nichols has fee with me. Emma Nelson very warm. Welcome to today's program coming up. You need to know what has happened when he sorry also need to know why you are saying sorry that means edification from school college understanding the gravity of it. My guests I'm not better. Bail into martial will discuss the marking of seventy five years since the liberation of our Schmitz grits and whether historical apologies hold any weight plus the looming deadline Brexit in the UK Monaco's contributing editor. Andrew Moolah looks ahead to the end of an important week get brexit done will be recalled forever as a masterpiece of political copyrighting a brisk straightforward pledge of decisive SUV action locals. House view starts now and welcome to today's program program. I'm joined by some last battle whose electorate the School of Oriental and African Studies University of London. And also by Tim Marshall Editor of the. What and the why Dot Com and author shadow play behind the lines and under fire among other books? Welcome both gentlemen to the studio now. They're getting fewer and fewer in number. But several of those who survived the Nazi extermination camp of Auschwitz have gathered to mark the seventy fifth anniversary of its liberation this weekend. The Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutta Issued his country's first apology for the Netherlands failure to stop the deportation of thousands of Jews. Some noth- let me begin with you. What do we think of this apology? Energy an apology is always good. and I mean I think I'm desert. Psychological need an assuaging hurt and and this goes beyond head but there but behind every apology there is also other political things which might when we talk in such huge in the calamity which of the nineteen thirties and forties What must go along with it education? you need to know what has happened when he says sorry also need to know why you are saying sorry that means education from school college understanding the gravity of it and second thing which is as important is never again once you know then you say that this cannot happen again and again world over the kind of turns we are seeing this huge leap by making the one thousand nine hundred eighty s return in many ways so this is an important moment to understand and work through and especially as an Indian living in Britain. I mean the stories is that I have of people not knowing is just intense. You know Just the other day I give you a quick example of the Penang Bridge the bridge on the River Kwai Thirteen thousand. Englishmen died in it. Nine hundred thousand Indians and Burmese. The full made men mentioned snuffing. Six million Jews is under Hitler. Same time nineteen forty one three million in Bengal famine. No one talks about it. The biggest manmade famine ever under Churchill. So we just don't know British schools. Don't don't ditch about the colonial history We'll come to the idea of how you make sure that young people are made aware of of news. And how we make sure that stop the things like Auschwitz can never ever be revisited. But I Tim I'd like to ask you a little bit more about the idea of you've when you have Dutch. Prime Minister standing up and saying we did not do enough to stop the Jews from being deported. One of the questions that you bound to US skits. In what circumstances could the Dutch at that time have actually stood up to the occupies said. We're not going to help you. There's the issue of being in court in an in an agonizing moment that you have no control of Denmark was occupied and not immediately But eventually the Danish government and Various bodies within told right is the list of all the Jews in your country going round on them up before it was made official the Dutch government which was occupied got word out to everybody. An overnight got the vast majority of the Danish Dutch Jewish population to the coastlines and Gotten Kosta Sweden. They save nearly all of them now. It's harder for the Dutch. Because of their geographic location. Nevertheless the Dutch train system worked perfectly to deport everybody. The Dutch Government Civil Civil Service which chose to seven to the Nazis. You could have resigned you position in driven a taxi not easy. I'm not saying I don't know how to done. But that's that's why you can make the argument that the Dutch did not do enough. Their civil service willingly it would appear oversaw the deportations nations and consequently Ritter has apologized. The Dutch from forty five to I would say the beginning of this century was something in denial about all that but this center. They've been they've had a much closer. Look because the founding myth of the postwar years was that You you know the the the the heroic Dutch resistance who were heroic but there was no consideration that actually the government corporate just as the French government which was occupied under great pressure geographically. Different but they could have done more. I'll stay with you. Tim If you recall real you have reported from conflict zones is were terrible atrocities have been committed and there is a feeling when you all there. Is there any sense that it is not necessarily a normal thing but it is it is is a natural consequence of his other situation that a a society or whatever can become more more brutal without actually having a sense of self awareness. Yes because he also end up thinking you might even be on the right side in doing your things because you believe in your car so much also. The is absolutely a cycle title. You did that so I'm going to do that. Well therefore I'm going to do this and round and round round around we go and yeah people do get caught up with it. I mean I was with soldiers in Syria. Who would laugh and joke about killing people including civilians from the other side because he was the right thing to do so there yes? People are quarter to me. That doesn't excuse it an inordinate. Excuse looking for justice. So doesn't apology. Help US keep things at the front of our thoughts. What's I mean? You mentioned the idea of so many Events that have taken place within the last century. Some nasty which no one really talks about now one of the things. I just wanted to mention to Tim. Most of these events were legally sanctioned. This is the problem in India. This the brutality of the government at the moment on Muslims is an enormous what's happening in Kashmir but they're all legal within India the proper for for what better free. Yeah Yeah yeah absolutely so one must learn that the law is not always right and there has to be a resistance. In in what happened to the Jews was sanctioned by the German government in it was legal in that sense So yes you of course coming back to your question. What does an apology do It refocuses it brings into brings it back in our minds and again tells us that this has happened. The enormity of it has happened at you accept it you learn from it and you learn how the should not have again from though I mean. I'm I'm just thinking of a couple of of Apologies from the from recent history Davey cameras. David Cameron's apology for the bloody Sunday. The events of bloody Sunday it was a recognition of past events but it. I don't know how much it's contributed to any sense of healing or reconciliation and given the fact that I think there's going to be Revisiting of divisions that say when Brexit happened does help I'm trying to think Tony Blair Follow is I don't. It was on behalf of the U. K.. or whether he just happened to be PM at the time. I don't know how efficiently was for the Irish potato famine. I mean I certainly think there is very which room at the very least to teach in the schools. All the events that you've just come up with that many more in that part of the world reparations is a much more complicated issue because it's much more mixed up with with many other things but the actual apology now. The Australians apologized for the stolen generations. That's all the aboriginal children that were lifted put with other families. They made a formal apology. And I think if if if the aboriginal Australian citizens want to feel part of Modern Australia in twenty twenty I think that is one of many things that puts them in as equals New Zealand is apologized to some of the Maoris the USA apologize to the American Japanese. That were interned. I mean there's lots of other things that haven't happened. Japan apologize for World War Two. It's conduct in China but you can get much more complicated. Let me quick examples. Should Turkey apologize for the Union genocide. A they don't admit it took place be and this is the more important point. It was under the Ottoman Empire. Well that's not modern Turkey which was formed in one thousand nine after the genocide and another one should Nigeria. Apologize For four hundred thousand people at murdered Think it was the Igbo the people in Africa in the in the war in the mid sixties. When they wouldn't let these people go should? They apologizes within their own country. It gets complicated complicated. But also the apologies. He's in some respects solve one problem but don't help us to learn to avoid repeating history today. Some nothing is happening now in Myanmar true with as I said I've been an apology by itself will go this far. It's a psychological thing but without education. Educating children from one of the things Germany has done very well is an enormous amount of educating what happened through the First World War Bismarck enforced that in the schools. So that it doesn't happen again. We haven't we do not have this. In most of the early colonial countries England has failed tremendously. America has failed tremendously I am not very sure of how the Dutch government's of hundred but generally the lack of education is one of the worst things. And that's why it happens again and again is that what is playing into this idea that you mentioned a moment ago about how we are revisiting in one thousand nine hundred thirty s mentality see. I mean just looking at the New York Times. This morning there are issues on one page. Says the you know the idea of Auschwitz never again despite the fact that the Auschwitz survivors as saying. We're not quite sure that never again look at what we have done. In our one of our main parties in England. What's going on in the questions about antisemitism Look at what. America's how the reflect on migrants at this point of time and what the president's rhetoric on people who come from us who are not American American citizen. So never again. I don't think has as part of general psyche now and the idea of how these things start when you you when you decide that this generally comes from economic crises doesn't it and you can start blaming your neighbor or the person down the road and then suddenly you get divisions and the other and we've seen an awful lot of it recently. Haven't we him the idea that politicians play on populism no perhaps fully believing it themselves but knowing that they'll get a vote economics has a role. I'm not sh- I often culture and religion flow into it but yeah times of division When we divide politicians are tempted to also divide and say well? That's my biggest base vote. So I'll just go fair and I think there is an element of that but it's not just politicians. I mean the the migration flow into Europe is fueling a division and and resentment and I think is directly behind the rise of the extreme right. I mean places like France you go to thirty four percent in the presidential election for the National Front candidate. I don't think they would have got. What is highest if the migration issues? I don't know making a case for or against them. They just simply are a fact and I think they are the direct relation quickly. Going going back to this thing about education the British still have a and I'm far from a bleeding liberal far from it but I'm also educated educated. You know from the read enough to realize. Hey the British still have this. We wouldn't behave like that. You know you know we. That was the Germans Japanese. Someone what else is for right now. It's awful it's different to our troops and our civil service but yeah we behaved appallingly in many parts of the world and I think the education forty one Bengal famine different manmade story from Churchill's war. Cabinet ye yeah and then we. I don't know if they set out to kill five million didn't yeah but but the fact is it happened and no one stopped it. I'm we don't know about about short time. which which brings us back to the education and the one of the reasons? Why after seventy years? I think antisemite just coming back is also. There's a historical memory fades as well which is why things like today and the anniversaries are so important to actually getting people to understand understand. What and why things happened and prolonging the understanding Tim Marshall and some Nice batmobile there? Thank you very much indeed gentlemen. We'll we'll be back in just a moment but first Monaco's -bility with some of the other news stories. We've been following today. Eighty people are now known to have been killed by corona virus in in China. Senior members of the country's government have been visiting the city of Wuhan at the center of the outbreak and officials of also extended the New Year holiday by three days and attempt to contain tain the virus. US Democrats have renewed calls with trump's former national security adviser. John Bolton to be called to testify the president's impeachment trial it follows his claims from Bolton that his old boss wanted to freeze development aid to Ukraine and less investigate his political rival. Joe Biden one of the front runners to become the next leader. The UK's Labor Party kissed has called for the country to redistribute wealth and opportunity and an end to the monopoly of power in Westminster. stom- has also promise to address the underlying causes of Brexit. And finally Billy Irish has triumphed at. This year's grammys the eighteen year old won five awards in total including best new artist and and some of the year her album. When we all sleep? Where do we go was recorded in her childhood home in l. a. and she became the youngest person to win the award back to you Emma? Thank you bill. This is motorcycles house. You I'm Emma Nelson and joining me in the studio today. Some nut butter by AL and Tim Marshall that one of the greatest challenges is knowing Akao and where to mark world events while ensuring that what we record now is right. The accent and filmmaker Angelina Jolie has teamed up with the BBC to to create a current affairs program. The young people to help them master the news and to spot fake news. Some not we are in a world now where yet history has always always been subject to interpretation in your idea of what happened is may well be entirely different from from from how I remembered it Nonetheless we are in a completely legally new. Well now we're recording. What's happened is such a difficult area ended up? I mean I think there's a generational shift from our parents generation and even Generation Emma that printed was Gospel in that you could get away by saying anything I read it somewhere. Even if you can't put that has completely don't see As I said our generation the younger one your son wouldn't So again. I'm sorry to hop on an indication so whatever whatever engine and agility does I hope she does a good job of it. They're going to do things to do. One is of course the technical education which is immense and huge and ongoing. And it's a better than the other is moral education. What is right? What is wrong? In a human rights globalism climate change global justice absolute justice these are all areas which people have to know to be able to fight this onslaught of artificial fake news and a movie star. The right person to do it Tim. They play a role no pun intended. They are one of many right people because I do believe you need a bit of publicity and a bit of PR and Magic Sprinkler. Yeah because a bit dull but behind them And I'm not saying she's stupid but I'm saying she may not have the expertise in education So it is it is is very important I think what happened after the written word is that oh well. The website looks good. It must be all right. The there's a bit of that but I think critical thinking. Teaching kids is extremely important. Forget them to think okay. WHO said this? Where is it reported? Reported is it reported elsewhere. Does it look a bit odd. And if anything any alarm bells start checking and also Repeating the things which aren't sources a recent example little Palestinian kid very sad that went missing found drowned out went on social media. Either he's really settlers. It killed him and drowning which is false but howling Ashwari of the. PA tweeted it and then apologize for treating it. But some of the American and People then re tweeted and haven't apologize and you've got to have these critical thinking about how you know and then the deep fakes how to even understand understand that this might be a fake. We need teaching about it. Yeah Technical Education comes in. Well how do you deal with the idea of putting the brakes. What's right and what's wrong when We are living in world where the mainstream media is isn't actually relevant to young people in so few young people are now engaging directly with the BBC. The they prefer to get their news. He's from elsewhere and it doesn't say anything to I've been elsewhere. The operative word. Where did they get the news from estimates saying that source from where is is it produced? Who is saying it becomes important but in just a quick one on a Just the other day Young colleague of mine who is into digital media fed my PhD DTCC's and all my scholarly articles into a whatever machine. He calls it and out. It's spun scholarly articles which all seem to make sense but actually is is nonsense. It's it looks like a journal paper but is not a journal it when you read it closely. There's no way of knowing. Only thing has happened is twenty articles of Mine Renton and and it just viewed it right back so that is the kind of deep fakes. We're talking about so therefore technical education on how to spot is also becomes very important. How do you make it relevant young people though I mean I'm just taking two examples? The my son goes to a school where there are thirty kids. He's eight years old and he's one of three British kids in that happy 'cause he goes to school in central London so he has a cultural and international awareness bar. None go up the road two hundred miles to my stepdaughter's school she. It's all white all local. Not many people travel and they're not interested in what happens twenty miles out of their area simply because they they just doesn't say anything to it's not relevant partly the national curriculum and also the quality of teaching and I'm not denigrating the quality teaching that is part of the national curriculum. And I think we should teach civics and I also think we should teach a AH Bengal famine as as as well as for the relevancy of the mainstream media. I think they need to have more confidence and the message needs to go out that for all its many many faults. Actually it is far more reliable it is check and I think it will take years and years but eventually generation will come up realizing a lot of this stuff over here is total rubbish. A lot of stuff over here is actually sleep farmer factually based but he's going to take a long time. I mean we need a media studies curriculum in school. Which tells you why certain things look off? Ah seemed to be much more rigorously produced than other and without that in today's world you will otherwise kids will be at a disadvantage own massive one and you oh you teach PhD student so hopefully there's a sort of SIS. A pretty high level of critical awareness to any of your students have before for stuff regularly fall for stuff amino we know now now. Robots read news in on Chinese media artificial. You really don't know and I was shown stuff so the the point being that technically will we're always at as advantage and continuous technical education has to be the way forward and none of us know enough and we'll never know enough but this is all circle right back to the beginning. Is this part of the divide and the splitting in the tribalism of thinking in politics. Now but I give talks and sometimes undergraduates. Actually say you shouldn't shouldn't say that because it challenges our worldview they they need there is this generation growing doesn't want to be challenged. That's wrong people have said to me. Oh yeah even. If it's true true you shouldn't say it th- We've gotta get past that but it's because we're in this revolution retirement information. I th I think and hope will come out of it. with trusted hosted large sources and as a final side the Gutenberg press. What a wonderful invention do you know that the amount of books on witchcraft? Saying it was all true that came out once the good book dress so no tolerable Bonnet to marshland some nice better. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us in the studio in moment will weigh in on the looming brexit deadline headline. You're listening to Monaco's house view with Emma Nelson Stay tuned. This is Monaco's house else. Few finally today. The latest opinion from editorial flow Monaco's Andrew Miller has something to say about the impending Brexit deadline By this time next week the United Kingdom Kingdom will have formerly excused itself from the European Union. This feet will be trumpeted by UK. Prime Minister Boris Johnson. As delivery on the promise which got him. Reelected in December to get brexit don get brexit done will be recalled forever as a masterpiece of political copy be writing a brisk straightforward pledge of decisive action. It is also however an illustration of H. L. Mankins immortal dictum that there there is always a well known solution to every human problem neat plausible and wrong as the next weeks and months and possibly years and in decades are about to demonstrate. Boris Johnson has not got brexit anywhere. Actually close to done ahead lies the infernally complex task of negotiating. Britain's new trading relationship with the world and with it perhaps the dawning of a realize ation among brexit cheerleaders and voters. Oh to who trusted Johnson to get it done that. The anticipated serene assent to the sunlit. UPLANDS might be more. Akin to climbing the matterhorn. It's Cuba outfit. Since the referendum of June two thousand and sixteen brexit advocates have seized bristled at those who they accused of faulting them. mm-hmm as of right now. They are out of excuses for whatever difficulties and drawbacks await. They no longer have reason to blame anybody. But themselves roles value will though of course for monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Mullebeck thank you Andrew. And that's all we have time for today's show Monaco's house view was produced by Daniel. H and Reese James Stadium managers were Louis Allen and David Steven's coming up at twenty hundred a brand new edition of monocle culture stay tuned for that monocled house. He was back at the same time. Tomorrow that's eighteen hundred here in London Fanego from me Emma the Nelson Goodbye. Thank you very much for listening.

Tim Marshall Emma Nelson Monaco UK US Brexit Prime Minister Bengal Britain Prime Minister Boris Johnson China Churchill School of Oriental and African BBC Dutch Government Civil Civil S president Andrew Moolah England
Highlights from Monocle 24

Monocle 24: The Curator

58:08 min | Last month

Highlights from Monocle 24

"Hello and welcome to the curator on monocle. Twenty four with me more hippie over the next sixty minutes we've been bringing you the very best interviews and reports from the past week of coverage on monocle twenty four with highlights from our studios. Here's midori house and from around the world this week with eurovision scheduled to go ahead. We scour eurovision correspondent water. We can expect from this year's event. I think for a fan the most important things to know that there will be a winner. I mean imagine. I mean you are a football fan. Can you imagine arsenault playing saying there'd been a winner. We're just playing for fun. We kind of the one that in a way. Plus we meet the founder of the world's first african and caribbean rum rainy a year into the market and we already pledged five percent of global profit and so two pounds and two dollars. Every bottle sold drove website to global ground level freedom and equality organisations. I think we're trying really hard to ensure that we pay some respect you to the name not all that much. Much more than hour. Urine in the curiouser with me markus safety first of all. It's about time of the week again. Where monaco's contributing editor andrew moolah recaps all of us. We know now that we didn't win. The week began. We learned this week that the legal team of former us president benito man had been holding out on us as donald trump's second impeachment trial began in the. Us senate conveniently this time the scene of the alleged crime. The elite strikeforce legal team turned out the cleanup hitter former pennsylvania district attorney bruce kosta recall for such brilliant decisions as declining to charge. Bill cosby back. In two thousand and five we learned from kosta speech which went on for forty eight minutes but seemed a great deal longer. Not much when. I was growing up in suburban philadelphia. My parents were big. Fans of senator everett dirksen from illinois and senator dirksen recorded a series of lectures that my parents had on a record and we still know what records are right on the thing. You put the needle down on the play and but we learned from a speech which will surely pass into history as some would set out loud that donald trump must be supremely confident of ultimate acquittal. As cost just didn't seem like the guy you send out if you think the jury Still on the fence. We did however learn something about nebraska nebraska. You're going to hear is quite a judicial thinking place nebraska quite a judicial thinking place. Maybe can't quite see it fitting on the license plates. We learned that crypto currency and twenty-first-century chula mania. Bitcoin consumes more than just the will to live of anybody who has ever had. It explained to them at a party by a young man. Breathing cafe latte vape fumes through an should bid. We learned that. Bitcoin also consumes via the global network of computers which maintain the currency a considerable voltage of electricity so much electricity. We learned this week. That have bitcoin was a country and that does somehow seem like something bound to happen. Sooner or later it would be among the top thirty in the uses worldwide. Having just overhauled argentina. You all think. There's a gag coming about the people's republic of bitcoin at least having a more reliable currency than argentina. Don't you way better than that and you should be as well. Let's have the general muttered agreement clip again. Yeah yeah this is bruce springsteen reference which will become clear shortly hanging there seriously. It's extremely clever. We learned that new zealand's parliament is shortly to become any less formal establishment. A standoff occurred between house speaker. Trevor mallard and row weary. Ytm co leader of the maori party. Over the fullness determination to uphold the dress code which the latter had infringed at issue was. Ytd's disdaining of a necktie in favor of a traditional mary hey tiki a handsome greenstone pendant. After reminding waititi of the rules mala directed him towards the door. No the member cannot take a point of order. The mean but cannot take a point of order. I do not recognize me but he will. Now leave the chime up. We learned because we did actually all the to read past the headlines. Honestly it's amazing what you can find out like that. Things are often more nuanced and complex than li initially appear that speak mallard personally favored scrapping the necktie requirement but was implementing. The rules agreed by members as his job and that when the rules had lost come up for discussion. The maori party did not make a submission. But we learned that this was nothing. That couldn't be sorted out by grownups. Being reasonable and the necktie requirement has now been shelved. And it's all fine. Everyone's friends again. So the toys you might say have binded toys. The blind see wasted on new people. This is we learned a valuable lesson in perspective. Likely to come in handy next time. Almost any of us feel like we're under any kind of pressure at work. on tuesday. The united arab emirates martian probe hope was due to reach the end of its seven month journey. This culmination being a complicated twenty-seven minute maneuver to slow the spacecraft from it's one hundred and twenty thousand kilometers per hour hurtful to the speed which would ease it precisely into orbit around mars with just a few hours to go. We learned on tuesday's briefing from sarah mary. The as minister for advanced technology and chair of its space agency. Something of what taking responsibility for such an endeavor feels like quite quite a lot of emotions at the same time. I don't think any of us slept for more than two or three or four hours last night. It's pretty nerve wracking. I don't want experience this feeling again. A culmination of years of my life resting on the melons off. Twenty seven minutes of a very precise maneuvers Brought that day we learn something of the wisdom of the adage which reminds us that nothing ventured nothing gained the hope. Probe got where it was going and is right now. Diligently collecting data on the weather patterns of another world one hundred and ninety four million kilometers from ours man. There isn't a punchline here. it's just really cool. Monocle twenty four. i'm andrew thanks andrew up next look back to thursday's edition of the globalist and to something else. We learned this week in new zealand. The parliamentary dress code has been changed and thais are no longer to be required us. Parts of appropriate business attire for male employees. They shoe came to head. Off to the coder off. The maori party was expelled from the house of wearing a traditional neck piece. Instead new zealand's new parliament is the most diverse and inclusive ever and one percent of members are maori on thursday's edition of the globalist to monaco suggestion. Georgina gordon was joined on the line by laura wolters new zealand correspondent here in the uk. Laura previously subjected to these stress coats herself as a parliamentary report in wilmington began by explaining what they formally stated as part of that are all of the journalists as well head to we our conform to the rules and procedures. That seat that you have to. We have proper business attire and inside the may is a woman at the time that mean covering my shoulders which of course i quite clearly stated i thought was ridiculous while it was usually. I'm to- chilly up in the pace gallery too to be wearing a slave list. Stray says it just shows how outdated some of these these rules. I also how unclear i ask saw the standing orders which sits tight a whole lot of the the processes and procedures about how parliament runs am his his better near about dress code. Which is quite vacancies that it just has to be appropriate business attire and of course that spain discuss starve the time the the standing orders committee every so often will review that and decide what is appropriate business attire. The time and you know the many many decades of talent that has changed but recently this debate over with a we ties his really. Come to a heat. It's come up a few times over the past few years but this the first time that it's it's really hit national and international media. Tell us how it unfolded the. There's a bit of history. It's probably worth noting in bit of context between the speaker tree milad in-between the mall. Repassy impacted our t. And have come to hit a couple of times. Robert heads challenged the speak his authority hayes. Push the boat out a bit in challenged his ruling. So you know it's it's important to be aware of that when you're talking about this debate you know these early some history between the two of them but already wise to take was told by the speaker that he needed to be wearing a tie that under parliamentary rules. That was what he needed to be wearing to be able to speak in the chamber and hey decided not to instead hayseeds. Nah i shouldn't have to wear what he calls a colonial knows. I should be able to in steed. You know quote moldy business attire. I should be able to wear my hey key. Which is you know. An ornamental am piece of poonam. Oh that's around unique. And why should. I have to conform to what's considered a part preached by wisden culture. Why can't i express my cultural identity. So hey he really dug in the end The the speaker just see no you basically not challenge my will thirty in the house. If you're not follow the rules you can get out and the interesting thing. There is true for mela. the speak had doesn't even support the wearing of ties with the. You know the the fact that mean have to wear ties but in that moment. He didn't want his authority. Questioned had already told the pay that he needed to follow the rules. I guess in hindsight he you can say that it was pretty poor judgment by the speaker because this moved from being you know what could have been quite trivial to buy about address code to something much larger about cultural identity about colonialism in about eurocentrism but of course now it has been reversed so ties are abandoned. Is that for everyone geese. Absolutely sorry after this blow up. The speaker decided to bring together a committee to review these. These standing orders these procedures again after the mall. Repassy put in a submission saying that. The rose absolutely need to be changed so the committee got together. They discussed it. They didn't form a consensus but the majority did say. We think these roles are outdated. We think that they should be more freedom. If the people to be able to express the cultural identity through the address and the personal identity through the address saw me mccain story ties in parliament of course if they would like to but they don't have to anymore and you know those roles like i was saying earlier to apply to other people in parliament as well like like reporters. So will you be able to wear a sleeveless dress if you go back and walnut. If i hope so i'm but yeah i mean it's quite a nice change. It's at samed like a lot of unnecessary debate. End battle over something that you know what was already about unnecessary. Wars early a outdated. But it's good to say this pro grace. The speaker has been trying to make parliament more progressive. More family friendly more accessible. He was the person that changed the rules to allow babies to be in the debating chamber so these changes or kind of set with at the modernization of parliament moral walters in new zealand correspondent based in london. Speaking to monaco's georgina godwin earlier. This week staying with our live news. Show now for our next highlight. The eurovision song contest did not take place last year because of the pandemic. But the good news. Is that the competition. We'll go ahead this year. And some countries have already chosen the performers who will represent their nations in rotterdam in may for monday's edition of the briefing tomato. Words was joined by monaco's eurovision correspondent to our gustavus sicko to horon some of his favourite directs to begin by asking. If the song contest will go ahead as normal this year. I think they realized that it was quite said a year without eurovision last year even though there was a special show on tv and whatever but they decided quite early on actually they have four scenarios to work on the first one was like to go ahead as normal but that has been decided in recent days that it's not happening so they have to choose from the other scenarios they're working on plan being now which means socially distance events but the artists was to go when performing rotterdam. But they don't know that yet and that's why they have c. n. d. c. The artists will perform actually in their own countries. So they'll have some sort of kind of virtual show but those still have some events in the city and it's going to be completely virtual in a way which. I'm hoping that he doesn't happen. But you never know so. We don't know for sure but there's clearly a they're gonna make every possible effort to have some sort of rotterdam based event or events even if not all forms can physically get a think for a fan the most important things to know that there will be a winner. I mean imagine i mean. You're a football fan. Can you imagine arsenal and tottenham playing saying there'd been a winner. We're just playing for fun. We kind of the one that in a way but less year was kind of such a unique thing that they never had to deal with So in that sense very happy for and we should say of course the final is what is late. May and we know with the pace of vaccine programs and so forth you know. Europe could look a little brighter by. And we're certainly hoping that's the case given. This is all now in train oversee the different countries. We'll be talking about process now. Some obviously picked acts from last year. They're going to take the same acts so people who lost their opportunity others have picked for this year. some haven't at all because they were just hedging their bets. What do we know about the process rule. Different potential competitors. I think fans will be happy to know the many of the artists from last year. They are coming back into the. The majority of countries decided on that but they have to pick a different song. Of course any might not be as catches the ones last year. You know for example. I can think of the icelandic act which had fun tastic so last year. We're gonna find out their new song thirteen for march but also at the same time we have countries that take your vision very seriously like for example sweden you know they will never pick the same artist at the moment. We have melody festival. Which is you know a big music festival. There were depict their eurovision entry. That's kind of their tradition. They will never cancer that in a way and it kind of admire that because if you sorry for the artists french thousand twenty but at the same time you know we kind of have to move on. We can't keep the same but we have a few songs actually already has been released from five countries overall. I was going to ask you about this. Because there's always this sort of drip feed of bites of tracks or the whole songs. That are going to be competing. What have you heard so far in anything that you think could be a bit of a slow burn hit. I've come big day in may well. I chose to very different tracks. The first one i have to say tones. Not one of my favorites. But he's also a return. Yeah no i have to. Immediately makes me for number in my opinion is a little bit too dark for your vision this year. In fact in the video is ukraine. Banned the wearing p kind of masks. And i felt a depressed after seeing the video. But but it's very decent ukrainian electric. You think we should have a little listen to her. Absolutely this is go with shun. Marshall do you see what i mean. It's a vibe to it. It's a vibe. I wouldn't see for example in the monocle. Twenty four playlist based kind of ood. But i admire danny's kind of ukraine folk with some modern beads. There they had some fans. Hey behind the glovebox evans was enjoying that one. Fernando i guess this is one of the thing i was going to ask you about do you. Refer to an acknowledge. The pandemic as clearly. This is the case here. It's a bit. Broody p in the video accompaniment or do you say look. That's the last thing anybody wants to go sunshine. Only i would imagine the latter but clearly some people think it's sensible to ground in the reality to be honest. That's my approach. How i would kind of forget. But i'm sure they would have to kind of mention something we might be kind of emotional track usually. I'm sure they interact. There will be something about the pandemic because it's very difficult to ignore. Even though my opinion they should and my opinion actually should have more tracks like this which is a little bit more scape them and was one of my favorite bands from last year. they also returned for twain. It's the rupe with discotheque. My eyes are blinking. He's been in control. Don't want this no one here night. Don't care i feel it said daniel danton moon. I find his creepy. Actually i say somebody did mention dancing alone. So maybe he's reflecting as well the dark times we're living in. He sounds like he may be daunting olympic for some time. Just by the turn with voice but the beatles. Oh good ferdinando. August of sugar in conversation with too worse spurrier from the eurovision song contest. Tweeter next to our show the power of sound for our next highlights brothers. Ben and max. Ringer are known for their three d. Sound design for theatre shows such as blindness at the donmar warehouse last year and anna at the national theatre for this week's show they tell us about the power of by norah jones. How is controls port an audience through different scenes and how they use everyday objects to build up. Sony atmospheres here is highlight was placed set in east germany in nineteen sixty eight and it was utilizing by sound to experience the story from the single perspective of anna as she moved through her apartment. Waller party was taking place. Bilateral sound is a way of recording in which you use a microphone. Where you have to microphones in the approximate position of your ears. And when it's played back through headphones it gives quite a startling effect of hearing three d landscape around you and as is are in that situation knowing that twenty hundred terrible kisser. Working on anna for the national we were. We were a long time in development on that show and the thing that we went to the national fits with was to use this technology and we want to use it to tell a story. Something was very narrative driven. We thought we would try. Planting microphones on the lead character. One for each year and creating latte way and that was quite transformative thing for us in that process because with by neural generally you'll put in the perspective of someone and it's generally a passive character and we wanted to see what happened if you in the perspective of an active character. So anna was very active character. Who who had a lot of agency and in the pace and would respond to other characters and was the driving force behind the narrative. And we put you her perspective on stress q. Didn't think really care when i go. I think you only care about win. Get out of it. Shave sure relate your colleagues organized the show we actually created in the end with anna was was this warm one. Half of the set was unseen so it was. It was a flat and the performance is behind glass. And you can see you can see the lounge and you can see part of the kitchen. But you can't see into the bedroom you can't see. You can see a bit of the hallway and you can't see into the bathroom and these are all spaces within which action happened and once you audience. Got the idea that you're in this person's perspective. We then take her and put her in the bathroom and listen to brush their teeth or will be sick and she was at one point or Or you know she can go into the bedroom and you can hear her. Tell a story to her partner. In the meantime you're watching what's going on in the lounge which which is completely in congress with what you're hearing but yet somehow able to sustain that and you're able to split your focus like that and you're able to to split the the reality between what you're seeing what you're hearing and be able to hold both those things in your head and also to have one contextualized. The other one of the things. I think sound can do really successfully in theatre. It can transport you in ways. The other mediums concept's sound can fill space hugely. And then you can flip that in an instant and be somewhere else completely so in terms of kind of creating environments sectors can be extraordinarily can be amazing but the financial limitations of theater mean. There are limits to what you can do that we sound. You can be a forest one minute and the beach the next and then in the middle of busy city always when we walking around where we're listening and i think i think there is a kind of active listening That might sound design as you speak to probably so of recognize that you are suddenly much more aware of the the sounds that ranji and we will carry record is with us now because even if even if we don't have a actual sand recruiters you'll have phones and and then i tend to record choir lot when we just out and about. There's a there's a recording of broken fan from a chinese restaurant has has featured in law shows. And you know you'll be looking around streets of new york and that's the home from the subway coming through the great. Maybe you recall it that owner these things end up being shows absolutely last year and i banged my head on a a light shade and it was meant to brang time and so i recorded that made that into an instrument. It was a particular screechy guidance. The are recruiting domovoi fighting which made its way into about fifteen shows selected the following two years to the point where i had stopped using it because i was getting some place. Oh yeah and that's that's the other thing been annoyed do with these things. Is that when we record. Sounds if we find sounds that particularly interesting. We tend to make them into instruments using software and a new law event. We have a library of these instruments that we've created that there's a tendency amongst not fair to composers to use same tools in terms of you know software instruments think one thing that ben in live weights really town it sounds of individual and unique and we have a library of these and we tend to use them quiet lot which is often were you why we're unsure about who scored work because we were frequently using the saint sounds Brothers band max ring. Therefore this week's issue of the power of sound still to come here on the curator. We hit to hong kong to hear about the city's strike in gates. We clink glasses as we hear the story of the world's first african and caribbean rum and we meet the architects who are world leaders in designing for extreme conditions st jude ubs as over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries over. Nine hundred of the sharpe's moins and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. Find out how we can help you contact us at. Ubs dot com you the curator our weekly highlight show here on monocle. Twenty four antibiotic marcos hugh burleson architects are world leaders in designing for extreme conditions. They have completed numerous buildings in car as well as the world's most remote inhabited island at three eastern dakota nia company following around director. Hugh broughton recently sat down with us. Do shed some light on the challenges of designing for such harsh environments as well to discuss a new otherworldly project. I think you could necessarily pinpoint one thing and say if you get that wrong. It's going to be a disaster. Unfortunately you get caught a lot of things wrong. It's going to be a disaster. There are certain things that we know now. Each time we start. We know how important it is to orientate the buildings correctly to minimize the amount of snowdrift. That they'll create. We know how important is to get really good well. Sealed and thermally resistant building envelopes to keep the heat in and keep the cold out. We also know how important it is to come up with really resilient strategies for building services so that you know if one generates stops working. You've always got two or three others that you can full back on. I think resilience probably is one of the most important things. Make sure that there's absolutely no risk created by the building environment on the people who are going to live and what that maybe robustness. That the to sort of adjectives that you'd want to use to describe your buildings. They all very functional buildings but then on the other hand they will go home for the people who worked there home for at least a year. Say you need to think carefully. About what devices within the architecture can be employed to make their lives as easy as possible as comfortable not just physically but also psychologically so there's a big pressure guess on the interior design to work hard to create spaces which are supportive cocoon you against the environment outside and also to a degree inspiring. i think externally. There's a large part of the architecture which is a product of circumstance. So you need to be able to have buildings which resist very high wind so they naturally take fairly aerodynamic form. We've discovered the elevating buildings above the ice. Surface allows the winter underneath and therefore clear away snowdrifts major buildings so then you naturally elevate these aerodynamic buildings the reforms well needs to respond to the strong prevailing winds that you tend to get in the antarctic so that you don't get snow forming on a kind of with pitched roof or something like that and then the window forms tend to be quite small to reduce the amount of of heat loss so there are a number of responses to the environment which lead to a so relatively space age. I suppose type of architecture but of course there's lots of things that can go wrong in that process architecturally speaking and you could end up with something. That doesn't look too elegant. There are long periods of looking at proportion and all the time old devices of architects trimbe deliver a degree of harmony in the elevations. And we go through that on these projects just as you would if you were designing a housing office or art gallery in the uk. Great deal of thought does go into the interior to manipulate natural. Light create communal spaces spaces for the individual. And then of course you have to think of the working side. Laboratories offices areas for people to expeditions. Ready to go out in the field and then there's an industrial side of of heavy workshops for looking after things like bulldozes. All piston believes which used pushing snow around the site. And and so on. So there's a large array of different building functions that you have to accommodate within building form. Halley success is located on the brunt shelf and the brunt ice shelf is flowing away from the main antarctic continent at a rate of around four hundred meters per annum. And then every now and then and it's an understood feature of the anti shelf it does carve off as these giant icebergs so if the location that you adopt the side of the building is on the wrong side of the crack. Obviously you want to. You want to know that in advance and you want to be able to move the building inland. So that was the halley. Probably one of the biggest challenges and one of the kind of stop points for the design process and it was. How would you move the building. And so our first thought was well. You'd break it down into a series of small buildings that you'd connect together and you'd make them small enough light enough so that you could pull them on skis to a new location using the kinds of vehicles that they maintain on site in two thousand seventeen. They did start seeing cracks in the brunt tie shelf coming quite close to site of highly six and so the decision was taken to relocate the base and so they did that over the summer of twenty seventeen really successfully and moved to inland and then once they moved inland they then discovered another crack in the brunton. Shelf developing perpendicular to the one that they had been basically escaping from and it was realized that the whole site of halley just become just too dynamic les sealey speaking and therefore the decision was taken that the station which had been occupied constantly since i established in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven that they would actually have to vacate over the winter. It does sort of demonstrate quite how difficult the existence in antarctica can be once the ice starts breaking up and so so the house. The mars is actually a wonderful idea that was developed by two artists from bristol. Ella and nikki their idea. Was that all the projects for building. Mas or exploring. Mars were being led by large governmental organizations. Whether that's nassar of the european space agency or whoever and their thought was well surely. If we're going to colonize mars it should be a sort of global decision on the kind of way we people should be living there so they contacted us to sort of work in partnership with them and i must say it's been an absolutely fantastic process and some of the workshops that they've managed. We've taken ideas from that. And then apply them to some of our antarctic work and i guess it was out of a combination of the consultation with people in bristol then research into the available materials that you might find on mars and also talking to scientists who are involved in research i guess on the mood and miles about what sort of environments you might find yourself in and then at the same time applying some thinking from the antarctic projects which led to the design. Solution that we now have a building this house and it's going to be on the dockside in bristol when it's up running and people can go inside and imagine themselves on the red planet. Unfortunately because of the pandemic the program has slowed down working towards opening it to the public in the summer of twenty twenty two You brought in speaking to monaco jolie fuel of course for the lead steady of monocle on design staying in the world of architecture and design now as we turn to the latest installment off tool stories. This week we look into. Or should i say luke through strange feature that characterizes many of hong kong's tool buildings here to tell us more about the city's dragon gate's is a researcher in hong kong nina milad hong kong skyline. You'll notice trees feature which the years has become iconic of the city's architecture from the island. Southern repulse bay in appalachia out the northern pok fu lam and admiralty multiple highrise building complexes across the city feature gaping holes in their structure. A couple of theories provide an explanation for this trend. According to popular belief these holes were designed in alignment with funkaway a traditional practice from incheon china which uses from natural elements to harmonize individuals with their environment known as dragon. Gate's the gaps in buildings are claimed to serve as crossing points for dragons that flight from hong kong's mountains to the ocean day allowing the proper circulation of energy flow one of hong kong's most emblematic buildings displaying. This kind of cut out is the repulse bay eighteen nine thousand square foot residential complex facing the southwestern coast of the island with a sixteen meter wide and twenty four meter high gap in. Its missed the although the design is commonly associated with the building's distinctive layout was apparently chosen for its dramatic aesthetic rather than to yield to superstition function experts have even dispelled the belief calling the hose gimmicks according to the anchin theory the energy of the land passes through from the underground rather than through holes in buildings. So why would architects shape. These puzzling cutouts in the city's buildings the young aesthetics another much more practical explanation is tied to cost saving measures back in the nineteen eighties. Developers began to build rows of high rise blocks known as wall effect buildings which aimed to squeeze as many units as possible vertically to make higher profit margins. One famous example is a city garden. Private housing complex in hong kong northpoint district completed in nineteen eighty six. The buildings are now one of the earliest with properties. As more of these properties were built people in surrounding buildings started to complain. They were blocking the views and ventilation. Prompting hong kong's planning department to demand that a gap should be left between newly built structures yet because of the lack of space creating a hole in the middle of buildings emerged as a compromise to get around the regulation carving out of you and increasing ventilation between the towers another building complex in west kowloon which displays unexplained gaps in its structure was designed to pay homage to paris's out to you although many of the city's structures have been designed according to functionally principles gaping holes in buildings doesn't seem to be one of them. This putting the myth might disappoint them but if that can provide reassurance hong kong still has according to experts one of the best in the world monaco sydney millard for this week's episode of tall stories. You with the curator. Our weekly highlight show here on monocle. Twenty four these week on our business show the entrepreneurs deal beach looked into the world of rum. We the host of new brands on the market. He caught up with the phone of spirits named after a prominent rights around abolitionist. Who was able to buy his freedom from slavery in part by selling rum in the sensory to tell the story through spirit. The founders have blended african and caribbean drum hero. Phoned us ian borough a renounce from experts and eissa drill who helped launch the brunt from her creative agency crave. He resigned is off. That discussion will wanna reasons why. We don't really hear much about african from this series is because ninety percent of whole rum's maybe the oval room sold in. Let's say the the western world in america's wherever it's us where he's canada. Wherever central and south america would come from the caribbean basin. So we don't really see. Oh hear about much. Rum's coming from other parts of the world bike asia and australia and of course africa now ev- africa to make a rumps going back to where may how romney's made room has to be made from a biproduct. Sugar cane An asshole all international law so africa as a continent has a love. She can grow in but he's not used local spirits as opposed to what we see as rum and none of these spirits already crossed the border going international seconds. It doesn't really get recognized as rom on the international markets especially to competing products coming out of like bedrocks of the rubber industry. Which like jamaica. And bob eight awesome cuba. The mini republican places like that african rooms really get left on the wayside but are a few islands that are part of the african continent and of course african mainland that will country that will colonized by european countries such as france such as england and the netherlands. And they'd drinking coaches drink and knowledge of making alcohol to these Colonized countries three hundred four hundred years ago so slowly but surely you had a drinking culture alcohol making culture in places like mauritius which was discovered by the dutch and they only found buds on those they all of those and then The french came and found is really good. Strategic point full they socal world domination so they took over and then the island in english took over and especially nicole a time. When the french and english the island they cultivated sugarcane that was growing there an intern at interference. Antonetti jumped tonight to sugar. Islands like marissa's madagascar seychelles places. That will colonize why european powers have a rum making culture. Those local because of the rise of the ministry around the world these rumson now starting to hit international markets and slowly but surely being seen in the same type of lights as rum's from traditional jamaica barbados and cuba. So that's the reason why we re here much about rooms. And another reason why. I wanted to use an africa in this blend to really promote rum's coming from the continent and hold them in the same type of light of some of the best selling spirits as we see from and jamaica. That's absolutely fascinating and so much to unpack there but I would love to bring you in here and just talk a little bit about the brand. Your background specifically is in the music industry and having worked with island def jam but you are the founder of your own creative studio crave talk to me a little bit about how. The founders here came together worked with ian knowledge about rahman the industry to build this product. The interesting blend is between africa and the caribbean and that's a big part of the storytelling to isn't it. Yeah absolutely right. it's funny. I forget that shed backgrounds actually a very much in the entertainment industry. I started in music industry. And then as you say. Foster number of years started crave to branch studio really existing culture and actually i think four co-founders we will very much inhabit that space and have done throughout a careers. By the time we came to this conversation about equiano. I think all four of us were in a place where we were ready to do something ready to challenge a different space altogether and of course the incoming to the party as i think we came together with various different schools between us as he said. I came with the brand building. Marketing only comes with a similar background. Amanda is commercially very sharp and also influence celebrity partnerships background. And of course in is mr wrong. And i think in those early conversations. We kind of sat down all agreed a doing things. Differently is something that we all shed inaugurated. Dockery's a facet of all of our careers to date so finding this opportunity to create something. Totally different was really important to all of us. In those early conversations dense stumbling on this idea of being the world's first african caribbean rum felt like a real moment. And i'll tell you for nothing then tasting the early plans to indeed found like another very nice moment and you're right. The idea of being african and caribbean relevant to on name also plays a massive popovich realize. I'm jumping ahead and question yet. No please we have to dig in there obviously Ian pointed out the tradition. And how the sort of the industry grew on on making spirits in africa. Obviously we know about the big giants of caribbean rum making the strong history there but the other obvious link beyond the growth of sugar cane and exports is the slave trade and i think that plays a big role in the brand but also name to. It definitely doesn't think incan. Speak move to enslavement and relationship to rome and plantations in the history of rob but certainly in terms of on even relevant to their. The name. equiano comes from nigerian. Board right abolitionist. Freedom fighter allowed equiano. He was born in africa asia eleven. He was enslaved and through transatlantic trade. Taken to the caribbean he was aboard. Various naval ships traveled ahead of a lot and managed to teach himself to read write count and trade unlike very many people in doing so. He also managed to save some money on the side. He saved money incidentally through selling rum amongst other things which is a really nice. not for us to what. We're trying to do here. So he saved his money for forty pound people. He's freedom eventually settled in the uk and when he settled here he was encouraged by lots of people to try and find publishing for his memoirs his memoirs within published by a major publishing house. He was one of the first african authors to have his work published. That autobiography went on to be printed. I think eight or nine times in multiple different languages and phospholipid a number of years through his lecturing through speaking through his writing through continued travel. He and his autobiography went on to impact the slave trade act of eighteen hundred seven which impacted the freedom of people everywhere. It's obviously a hand to glove name for a brand like we start in africa we to the carribean we end up in the uk. And in the meantime we've got very shared values with the story of allowed equiano his fight for freedom and equality something that we are very committed to and as such we have a philanthropic aspect to the company only a year into the market and we already pledged five percent of global prophet and so two pound and two dollars of every bottle. Sold draw website to global ground level freedom and equality organisations. I think we're trying really hard to ensure that we pay some respect you to to the name the bottle equiano co-founders ian barrel and isha drawl in conversation with monocle stonier beach barrier this week staying in the world food entering now for highlights from this week's edition of the menu in celebration of chinese new year. I met the join expert historian and broad constitutional thin clements who has released. He's new book the emperor's feast in the book clements map maps the history of chinese food and some of the best known dishes. Making it clear what we think is food from. China is actually something that has been influenced by a number of other cultures for this week's edition of the menu. I spoke to jonathan toews. Much he can tell about the history of joint based on what he gets on his place in a chinese restaurant out. Start right away with you. Just said that. If something's on a plate chinese not really plates. It's very difficult chasing something around a plate with a chopstick if you're gonna try and someone says you chopsticks on a plate. Trolling you they with bowls and chopsticks and the plates are used to keep the big dishes in the center of the table in terms of the actual foodstuffs that go into it. The chinese themselves often unaware of the history of the kind of food that they have they tend to assume that everything is local and they can get everything locally. But you know when you take a very long historical view. There's all kinds of things that New arrivals so if you're in a chinese restaurant now and you A sophisticated. Monica rita likes that jintao. Beer jintao is a german beer. Brewed in china. Because the germans had a colony in shandong and say planted grapevines to make wine and they set up a brewery one of the things that they did and so when you have jintao beer from china actually sampling some of the last vestiges of german colonialism in eastern china. And if you are having anything maybe chile you all. In fact part of the columbian exchange because chile is native to america. There's no such thing. As chilly in china on chinese food until the fifteen hundreds and so if you houghton south soup and it comes with jillian it you're getting something that has been adapted that is not the original recipe for houghton south soup which cooled for white pepper but white pepe itself came from india. So it's possible to draw. A of when certain foods arrived in china and when certain processes arrived in china as well so the original chinese meals. We're looking several thousand years ago at the bronze age we're talking about roast meat meat roasted over fire. And then we're talking about the arrival of the colder in which you can boil something in so you get all of these stews and then as time goes by you have a period. Maybe the first thousand years of the christian era. When there's this long line of food coming in from central asia or these foodstuffs arriving from india and central asia and they're arriving in china and the chinese hate them and they say this is foreign mac. We don't want it. And then a couple of generations they growing them locally as crop so there there were enjoying them and they think of them as being local and chinese and then after the fifteen hundreds you get older. This foreign staff turning up as well. Suffering america as well as european foodstuffs arriving in china as well so there's this incredibly rich and diverse background to the food that we call chinese. And of course when you say chinese restaurant you're talking about a restaurant that serves a history of a place is the size of europe. So there's no such thing as a european restaurant you don't walk into a european restaurant and something from sweden and something from spain. So china itself contains multitudes. There are dozens of different varieties of food. That we might go chinese and one of the things that i find really interesting about foreign chinatowns overseas chinatowns. Is that very often. You'll find a restaurant. Has one name in english which is quite big like peach garden dragon or something and another naming chinese which is much more specific about the kind of food that it serves. And it says oh. This is a restaurant roses. A union restaurant overseas a beijing restaurant cantonese or something. So there is a kind of hidden language to even the signing on chinese restaurants. Jonathan clements there and his new book is called the emperor's feast time for just one more culinary highlights now for reason passing understanding one of the major hold-ups in the uk negotiations with the eu over a post brick. Citrate arrangement was fishing tiny component of the british economy. This is rendered even weirder by the fact that the deal that was finally struck seem so far at least to have been somewhere between inconvenient and disastrous for british fisherfolk. Some british fish producers however are trying to figure out new ways to sell their catch locally for friday's addition of the briefing andrew. Minnows was joined by monaco stipulated. That just finish. Who began by explaining why this was a necessary. Step to take seventy percent of the fish that the uk eats his imported at about eighty percent of what it catches is sent off out to europe. Which shows the sort of interdependence that would render the move to arbitrarily amputate yourself from your biggest trading partner as perhaps unwise but as you say there's has been disruption. There's extra paperwork. there's extra border checks. And while the government was very noisy on this very emotive issue it seems to strike to the heart of british trade in some circles of the conservative party. Perhaps it it was discussed very heavily is being addressed as the conservative party would probably like it by the private sector who are introducing an initiative to try and stir a bit of an appetite for british fish here in britain and part of that is going to be an amount of rebranding. Yeah i mean. Branding is a little bit important and tell you in a minute. A case where it did actually work quite well. But basically what's happening is two species of fish which broadly exported to spain. The megrim which already doesn't sound good does not encouraging also known as the whiff again a helpful and spider crab respectively ninety five percent of the fall now is sent to spain and eighty five percent of the latter. So they're being given fairly unimaginative. Names would you like to hear them. I would just like to dwell first of all on a bit of you. Call it right and say no one's going to water the whiff but also spider crab. It's like somebody took the idea of crab and thought that's just obnoxious enough. What i tell you about the rebrand have prints out a picture of each of them rather extraterrestrials. We have some visual aids. So i have now. A picture of a whiff and spider crab doubtless nine because it doesn't affect appear to have eight legs actually nine. It's something that the extra terrestrial iraq need ten upped. Well actually you could say eight legs to pincers berry. It could be. It could be a tough sell but the megrim is being revived. The cornish soul and the spider crab is being upgraded to the cornish king. Crab this move by the. If you can believe it cornish official organization to get rid of the grim associations that these names and i personally am inclined to believe a man. The ceo named paul trebilcock on the importance of a strong name. Well exactly exactly what virtues either we will perceive the active cornish. Well it's it's a very funny thing. It would seem a bit lazy just to stick cornwall in front of an ailing brand. I'm looking forward to Cornish andrew mullah hosting the rebranded foreign desk only cornish foreign desk. Foreign desk is now best assault. But you could say cynical to rebrand these things but in the early nineteen nineties. The common pilcher much-maligned fish often served in a an oil source with a couple of stray splattered. Tomatoes on top was was was rebranded as if you can imagine it. The cornish sardine and customers flocked to it. Andrew famished seagulls so actually. There is precedent for both the cornish addition. The addition of the word cornwall to a product and its success. And i think there is actually some optimism. Here it's obviously a drop in the ocean. Excuse the pun when it comes to withdraw deal to try and just help british fishman to be self sufficient to serve it at home. But i think you know cutting supply lines a little bit buying local encouraging people to enjoy what is caught here is actually quite a good idea and you realize across cultures. Certain food travels in certain. Food doesn't in south africa ins. Those fish are treated as bates. You wouldn't eat them here. Obviously they could be a delicacy. You might get a cheeky east. London restaurant serving tinned sardines is a starter. Is a luxury likewise. Oysters and lobsters have a long history of being a very working class food in areas where they redundant so giving something. A new name can give a new lease of life and unprepared just one or two examples. If you'll permit me the time. Joe on a very popular ingredient at the minute particularly in italian restaurants that have opinion delicacy is called Chima did rapper. Which in the uk you just call turnip tops and just doesn't sound quite. Suddenly you put in pesto and it sounds great. Monocle stipulated spinners speaking to enter. Muna friday sedition off the briefing. And that's all we've got time for on this week's edition of curator. The show is produced by sempione presented by me markle's hippie. Join us again. Next week to hear some of the very best of the broke. Rhames here on monocle. Twenty four and thanks for staying motor and ubs a proud to present a nobel cause a book that celebrates more than half a century of the nobel memorial prize in economic sciences a nobel course gave an overview of the anti four winning laureates and their influence on global society. It builds excitement around economics by talking to the laureates and unpacking their theories from a pioneer in the field of the economics of climate change to an israeli psychologist who changed the way we think about thinking the winners stories. Make for an incredibly diverse. Read as well as real life case. Studies have applications of the prize winning theories. You'll find an illustrated history of global economics alongside look ahead at what we can expect over the next fifty years you can discover the story of alfred nobel himself and the legacy of his awards on sale from october. Twenty twenty from monaco and ubs purchased the book from retail stores offer. Monaco dot com a nobel. Kohl's asking the questions that shape our.

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Explainer 176: Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:42 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 176: Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

"In addressing inequality quality it seems a straightforward indeed elegant policy. Take stuff off people who have a lot of it and give it to people who don't have any of it however anybody certainly any government proposing such a measure would do well to heed the immortal wisdom of H L Mencken who wants observed that there is is always a well known solution to every human problem needs plausible and wrong nevertheless the idea of land expropriation has returned to the public discourse in South Africa a panel assembled by President Cyril Ramaphosa to look into the idea has returned a proposal recommending in limited circumstances the seizure of land without compensating the owners. We should no longer be afraid of this process of having to change the land ownership architecture in our country. It is here and it is here to stay. It is going to happen land. Land ownership has been a persistent issue in post-apartheid South Africa and not without reason a quarter of a century after the racist monstrosity of apartheid was formerly dismantled white South Africans who comprise roughly nine percent of the population still own seventy two percent of the farmland possessed possessed by individuals as an illustration of the lingering effects of systemic injustice. It's hard to beat this by lament is rare opportunity unity to redress on this past wrongs to allow the natives who have lost so much to reclaim the dignity. <MUSIC> BIC by kitching our land back no law shall. We be treated as life in our own land. Never Ramaphosa's panel has proposed seizing land which is held for speculative purposes land which is occupied and worked by tenants and land that has has been abandoned it has also suggested taking inner city buildings owned by absentee landlords for obvious and understandable reasons these these measures will go over well with a significant proportion of South African voters especially those who have lately been tempted away from President Obama poses his African National Congress now very much the Party of South Africa's establishment and towards the radical firebreathers of the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters Party not who nearly doubled the parliamentary presence in last May's election the F. F. led by Julius Malima who might be charitably described as uncompromising uncompromising in his general approach favors wholesale nationalization of South Africa's land. You'll say I thought what colonialism we wanted decolonisation yet yourself party or Lord Boorda's in Africa what is being proposed by President Obama poses panel is significantly less than that but it is nevertheless significant as it stands under section twenty five of South Africa's Constitution and the government may expropriate land but is required to cough up just and equitable compensation there has long been chat about amending this his clothes and or concocting some legal argument that in certain circumstances just and equitable compensation might amount to nothing they is also a growing body of opinion in our country that the constitution as it stands does not impede. beat expropriation of land without compensation that expropriation will be popular in some electorally important demographics is beyond doubt and that is very usually the clinching argument in matters of politics. Although some polling in South Africa suggests widespread unease with the idea of no compensation factor less often subject to rigorous scrutiny is whether or not a given policy will actually work and where expropriation nation of land is concerned. The are some discouraging precedents and if you WANNA see the inroad of what you want to do today most infamously in the early years of the twenty th century Zimbabwe's then President Robert Mugabe ordered the seizure of white-owned farms and they're transferred to black ownership good have looked at what happened in Zimbabwe. Remember signor Robert Mugabe went down the same road was he also did in so doing was effectively <unk> demolish. Zimbabwe's agricultural infrastructure femme production plummeted by two thirds in less than a decade and Zimbabwe's economy collapsed alongside to the point where the country had to abandon its hyper inflation stricken currency in two thousand nine. Zimbabwe issued a one hundred trillion dollar banknote note which wouldn't buy a phosphate. They're actually doing the opposite non Zimbabwe. 'cause they realize the folly of their ways. South Africa is not Zimbabwe's and Cyril Ramaphosa Hosa is not Robert Mugabe but the <hes> some similarities many years after the end of white minority rule things remain extremely tough for many among long South Africa's black majority the unemployment rate in South Africa is a staggering scandalous twenty seven point six percent even higher among youth who. Who are increasingly drawn to the E. F F and South Africa is as Zimbabwe was an apparently attornal one party Democracy Ramaphosa a post has big problems and the means always tempting of making big gestures in response. If this Kevin was serious about restitution and redistribution we would speed up the hundreds of thousands of land claims that tremaine unprocessed in South Africa that is what it serious party would do if it was kid about land performer land redistribution the trouble is that property rights matter they are along with free and fair elections a free press judicial independence and the rule of law one of the crucial differences between functional society and a shambles property rights are also in this specific instance crucial to the foreign investment which South Africa urgently requires. Nobody is going to buy something if they're not sure they will be allowed to keep it and in fact we have said to those who are investing in no country that they shouldn't have no fear that the land property is going to be expropriated while the proposals of the presidential panel panel commendably constrained they will prompt concerns about these slipperiness of this particular slope they are of the ways to redress economic imbalance and historical injustice. The President Ramaphosa will be wearily aware that they are often more complex and long term than understandably impatient poor people would prefer he could of course set a personal example his own farm. The in Taba Neo near state in Malaga Province is reckoned at five thousand one hundred Hector's plenty to go around for monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Moolah <music>.

South Africa Zimbabwe South Africa President Cyril Ramaphosa signor Robert Mugabe President Party of South Africa President Obama Africa H L Mencken Cyril Ramaphosa Hosa Freedom Fighters Party Andrew Moolah African National Congress Taba Neo Lord Boorda E. F F Julius Malima
Friday 3 July

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:46 min | 10 months ago

Friday 3 July

"You're listening to the globalist first broadcast on the third of July two thousand and twenty on Monocle, twenty, four, the globalist in association with UBS. Live from London. This is the globalist I'm Emma Nelson and very warm. Welcome to today's program. Coming up, we'll be in Hong. Kong as of Beijing's strict new security laws are being felt on the ground. We'll exorb- also examine the swift reaction from right across the West. Also had be profiler star of the Ethiopian, music scene, whose death has led to widespread violent protests in the country plus the latest chapter in one of Istanbul's most famous. Famous buildings and Andrew Moolah brings us the week in review. US President Benito Cartman found himself this week having to send his current letter Turner Kayla. mcnerney into the White House briefing room to announce that the president of the United States does in fact read, thank you Andrew will also flick through the day's newspapers and find out why Finland's air force. That's quietly abandoned the swastika. That's all coming up on a globalist live from London. I A quick look at what else is happening in the news. The Texas Governor Greg Abbott has ordered face coverings to be worn in public arising corona virus cases in the state trade insecurity negotiations between the European Union and the UK of ended early over serious disagreements between negotiators and Taiwan has announced it will reopen its de facto consulate on the Pacific island of Guam. The move is likely to irritate Beijing. Stay tuned to Monaco Twenty four throughout the day for more on these stories, but I one of the leading voices in the pro democracy protests Nathan Law has fled. Hong, Kong the student, leader and former. Former local legislator says he will continue his campaign from overseas well, it's three days since new security laws came into effect in the territory. Critics warn they spell the end of the one. Nation Two Systems idea in Hong Kong itself have been hundreds of arrests, and around the world, some nations such as the US and the UK have taken swift and firm action in protest at Beijing's moves. Let's hear more now from our Hong Kong Bureau chief. James Chambers so late last night. he announced that he had left Hong Kong and he wouldn't say where he is, and this comes hours after he was testifying. Remotely, over over the Internet to the US Congress on its hearing on Hong Kong so. Nathan law was a prominent is a prominent pro democracy advocate in Hong Kong is a closely aligned with Joshua one. They're both. Belong to the same party Dempsey Stove. They're both heavily involved in occupy central back in two thousand and fourteen, and he actually won election to the local parliaments back in two thousand seventeen. He's actually three years ago to about this day that I went to his office in the legislature to interview him. A Nice little corner office with loads of young stopped running around. And I guess that was the pinnacle of his career, and since then he got kicked out. Because of the oath-taking Saga where a lot of pro democracy legislators got removed because they didn't take the oath properly a now. He finds himself living life as a political exile. Some saying that this is a big risk that he is taking both personally, but also it is a very strong sinus to what life is like for pro democracy protests in Hong Kong now. Well the thing, no one. Three days after we've. We've seen the text of this Law means the first time we storage. was on Wednesday. And, we're still ever still. Wondering and waiting and for. What Freud actually means. On during the marches on July first. People who were arrested under this law under this bill with the ones who are advocating independence so I guess we need to be clear going forward the difference between advocating for for democracy and advocating for independence. It's definitely. It's definitely clear that there will be no that won't tolerate any any calls for for Hong. Kong. have any kind of self-determination away from China. But and that's no surprise to anyone here. The big question now is how much they will tolerate. The more traditional and the more peaceful calls for for Democracy in Hong Kong to be able to choose. The chief executive here now. Nathan Law and Joshua Wong did come up in that kind of pro democracy movement. They weren't at the they went figureheads. Radical side of it, which pushed for independence, but they have both felt that they are themselves at risk under this law, because we just don't know how it's going to be applied, explain to me just a little bit more about what the atmosphere is like in Hong. Kong. It is only three days. This new law came into force, but The pictures that we're seeing from outside Hong Kong. Is that if you are in any way expressing any kind of dissent, the retaliation from the authorities is swift. Was Yes on Wednesday when there was a few thousand people on the streets, the police did come down hard and they whisked anybody off. Who was promoting independence and I guess the strategy. There was to make some examples and to scare everyone else into submission But you know for the for the vast majority of of the city it is, it is weirdly normal here and has been since there's been came in on on Wednesday It does seem like you know for for the activists in Hong Kong. It's B. It's going to become even more uncomfortable. But for now for the rest of Hong Kong I guess this piece on the streets. It's a very very sunny, very very warm time of year and everyone seems to be out on the streets doing what they normally do, so you know what you can't see. I you know at the moment is what's happening Foot for the activists in some of fleeing some. A some will no doubt go underground, and it'll probably end up being a bit like the occupy movement you know. When the police came and cleared that off the streets after seventy-nine days, it went very quiet here. Feel for five years, and then suddenly it sprung up again in two thousand and one thousand nine so I imagine we'll be looking at a similar scenario. What about the number of people who may now leave I mean? We're seeing Nathan Law. Quitting the territory, we've also seen offers by the United Kingdom to allow up to three million. Residents to actually come, and in the UK. Yes I mean. I guess we should see that as a bit of a insurance policy. I don't see you know. Vast numbers of of Hong Kong as fleeing right now and get on the next plane. To London three hundred thousand people apparently have be no possible right now on a further. Two point seven million could be entitled to them. but. It's not like It was. You know pre nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, seven, when. Thousand hundred thousands, people left Hong Kong because they didn't know what was going to happen, we might see this. Turn into into a bit of a trickle, but I think everyone's waiting right now to see what this security bill actually means I mean for your average Hong Kong, last year was very disruptive time. This year if you're you, know your family and just. Go about your. And you might find that Your quality of life improved somewhat. I I have some friends who were thinking about moving to Singapore because they didn't want their young kids to get. Sucked into the the protest movement, so you know there are. Pros and cons on both sides and it's. It's definitely the kind of. The politically motivated ones the engage ones. The the the activists anyone who's interested in politics, anyone who has political view. It's very uncomfortable. Place to be right now, and it's those kinds of people who be thinking about leaving, but not everybody's going. Everyone is following Nathan. Laws lead at the moment. You know his his buddy Joshua. Wong is staying here. He's going to run. Plans to run for election in September and some of the the main activists I spoke to last a few weeks ago. Like Adrian and Jimmy Sham they you know they sit. There stay here even though. The facing up to the reality of. Spending that time in prison. If people were to go, you sent you talk about people who intending to leave. Where could they go because the Chinese authorities have said that they will pursue to descend anywhere in the globe. Yes that's true this the scary thing about this law applies everywhere and to everyone I mean applies to the conversation. We're having right now as so there's. There's no way no way you can kind of go to to to escape the application of this law but there are places that Hong Kong people have gone in the possum and might like to go now. Like you know. Canada has a large population. People in Vancouver me. Australia is a is a place where Hong Kong people like to go and of course you K has opened the doors to anybody who would like to come an and is entitled to be no passport, but as you said there's no. There's no getting away from from this law. So if if you if you plan light Nathan Nathan, law to continue our activities. Overseas you have to be extremely careful, and that's exactly why. He's not been broadcasting where he's gone to because I mentioned, he is on a list of of people that the Chinese would like to get hold of. And I'm sure they'll be. Trying to to track down where he is. What Business When we spoke at the beginning of the week, James You. You talked about sort of the the the anticipation of how the rest of the world would react to to what's happening in Hong Kong has there been any more decisive action taken by businesses in the knowledge that the place that they were once working may not be the same from now. I think we spoke earlier in the week about that being a bit of A. Between. The political activists, and and perhaps the rest of Hong, and in particular the the business community I mean they. They've been very quiet or have come out in support of this This bill. and. You know when you when you consider what every business is interested in. It's you know kind of safety and stability and the opportunity to make money. And, that's what Hong Kong. Always was and I guess the. Everyone's waiting to see if that's what Hong Kong will become again. Everyone's. Everyone at the end of the day is acting in their own best interests. And for you, know the thousands of foreign businesses here and local businesses. They're here to to do business with with China and so there's been very quiet from from the business community. Even even some outspoken. The American Chamber of Commerce have kind of taken A. Wait and see approach. To See what this bill actually means so you know at the moment I think we're all in the same boat role just trying to understand what this bill actually means, and we won't know until you know. you've for months I guess until the first cases go through the courts and we. We actually find out how. How the authorities from the Hong Kong Police to this new agency that the Chinese government is setting up will enforce it. James Chambers on the line from Hong Kong. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the Global St with multiple twenty, four. I think. That, is it? Music had data the Ethiopian singer and champion of ethnic rights. He was murdered on Monday in a suburb of Addis Ababa. His death has led to widespread political tumult in the country. Many credits Endesa within sparring the protest movement, which lead to the appointment of matters, prime minister two years ago well to find out more joining us on the line from is Carter One Jerry? She's a journalist for F. S. N. agency joins me on the line. Welcome to monocle twenty four Coletta for those of us who don't know who was challenge Tessa Yeah John this someone was regarded as an icon, if especially for the over MIA ethnic group which is. A group Groupie and He's dead picking people talk of. The Nation is has been confirmed as good a little ethnic nation. We get a little more ethnic groups coming into because they believe that is above Lonzo. Romo and that's where we had a lot of protests and the. To get it a having been the voice of the voiceless in the past between two thousand, fifteen and two thousand eighteen, when the more led a force. That's made that that'd be a transition the country, so he he's a possible will compete at a big box when she was bone through the coaches. It's astonishing to think that one person is. Has Been credited with giving a voice to Ethiopia ethnic majority the aroma. How is that come? About I think he's one of the naming. Because we all more organizational people who bold enough to get to the streets and push for this change, there are those who could not an assembly remember. The previous regime tried to stifle some of the forecast by enhancing a federal. Agencies making, read them all that so not so many companies that treats and particulars. They wanted, but so many then people could do that because people also need that motivation through phone, which are more. kind of song. He encouraged people and many people that changing come, so he's he's recognized, is one of many who who used a nonviolent means. If we may use, those words, to try and bring the song and dance with Gregg Morale's protesters who would want to shoot him in the suburb of Addis Ababa charity of this week. That's the question that and that's the speculation, and that's why we've got so many. A lot of nations came up with more people even pointed fingers at the pride themselves on the government thing because her channel had appeared in. About almost a week. We'll criticize the current administration, probably the top something to do with. Those who say he'd probably has something to do with eating because currently. How issues regarding the feeling of the. If, you gonNA write a dumb has been conflicts, so they're pointing fingers at easy. I've never say probably consists some private conflict between human friends or a he and his own personal foles. Speculation about the police. It's even dating originally arranged some suspect in. But they're still asking for fourteen days of investigation. We never. Had any, what's it like what the purchase will really strong? If you've got strong on cheesy in two Wednesday while we had people coming into fishing, people, young people and people from the region. Let you remember the movie can borders the Baba even before for people from the could come into the city whenever their divisions in protest here so we had people in the streets on Tuesday. Of Wednesday buck of the city, but with time than we saw the security pushing the streets government into warnings that he could muster it that now we're not seeing people. Greenwich Peaks, or like doing boxing attention because the fact that we got military directly in the streets of. Officials in the states, we've got residents within the BUBBA coming out with six from time to time to look around and the patient to I mean to chip away. People who are coming in that shows extension, so we don't have. The protesters were coming around singing and all that, but you can still feel the tension, so the authorities have a very difficult job here don't. Don't they? Because people need to express their right to protest, but is there any fear that this actually could go further? Yes, there is a right to protest, but what? The government is saying that the chin, if only the participants stick by the end of their purchase investment to seen not even now, even in previous times is that people looted? People participate these advantage. And especially, since the goods coming from the Malaysian they come clean for some odd. Baba thing that. They need some of these things they're don't because assets, vehicles and beauty, and some of them, even talking other people, so that's kind of the. The main agenda, of Perkins, which would reach legal and also the Fox the having even a shutdown you choose the other than. If? He's supposed to be like say she just economic. The the government argues that. They'd because for justice are using it to communicate and tell them how should move, and that's like making hud for people to from. To put this down, so if you time, but I remember. Be Seen the moments, and the government is using logistical emergency to do. What con- ensure that especially makes. Is. He appears moving very quickly. Economically socially it's it's embracing multi democracy the way. That any country tries to. What does this say about the tensions that were bubbling under before he? was killed. When extended. Period Freeman Frieden. Look even had an injection yet to officially making the findings we see. Period and a little things have gone on to eighteen. When he came to power we still. We still people from even on region. I think he's biggest challenge opposing changing because people though the function of people wanted change wanted it took little change meaning the transition of power from the previous ethnic group them so that they would have. There's GonNa each time, right? Him where he said, let's to be more nationalized. People talk. About that, but also got some people saying that he's dying of a gives me. There's no really. What people folks, people, but those are the biggest China. He got the previous region, which was the not predominantly, but it's great. Regain good husband giving him. From onto saying that he is imperialistic so the oldest. A mixture of so many positions that he's getting well. When ended up that now he's the say. They love the election. In others that's created more tension. Because let's say there are countries depend. Maybe should have here, but the Prime Minister Save Mill. Elections between nine and twelve months up to the funding. declared. Anyone so all that is is is creating conflict, but he's biggest challenge. That where he comes from, he doesn't have that one hundred percent support for each. Coletta one Jerry. Thank you very much for joining us on the line from Alibaba and as Coletta explained, there is no Internet in a theater at the moment, which is why we've had to do the interview on the telephone. Apologies for the quality, but we do what we can still to come on today's globalist, Andrew. Mueller fills in the knowledge gaps and we go through the newspapers to stay with us. UBS has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries. Over nine hundred of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance, today. Find out how we can help you. CONTACT US AT UBS DOT COM. Eight twenty one in Paris seven, twenty one here in London. This globalist and it's time for weekly reflection on the things. We know today that we didn't know seven days ago. Here's our contributing editor. Andrew Mueller with what we learned. We learned this week that we will need to get used to president. Vladimir Putin, of Russia. Russians voted on Wednesday on constitutional reforms, which will theoretically extend Putin's lease on the Kremlin from two thousand and twenty, four, two, thousand and thirty six, there were few, if any reports of Russian staying up all night to watch the results come in, and fewer still of bookmakers, offering odds on whether or not a grateful people would respond positively to the noble offer of this awfullest president to sacrifice his retirement to ensure the continuity of their immune deficient government. He's Luke. Luke harding author of shadows state on Wednesday's briefing. He's going out style in style in. He will be in the Crimin- until his seventy s possibly even as early eighties I'm well clearly see off Donald trump whatever happens in November. He'll see Boris Johnson and he's actually a dictator. I mean that really is the word for it. Because political opposition in Russia's being squashed rail opposition over the last two decades quite systematically first of all, it affects new generation of Russians who want change wants something different in who are fed up with the kind of Putin system. Said they will suffer first and foremost, but also it means some of the crazy things. The Kremlin has been doing with its spies in recent years, trying to hearken sabotage in subvert the West. All of that will continue of the many reasons to be concerned about Putin. Breaking himself in high among them is the prospect that he might have given his American counterpart ideas, and it wouldn't be the first time. Am I right? There that's the kind of edgy settle. That keeps you coming back US President Benito Cartman, who long ago voyage, valiantly beyond the boundaries, which wants to find the limits of self parody found himself this week, having to send his current letter turn Kaley mcenaney into the White House briefing room to announce that the president of the United States does in fact read not a doubt that was ever raised about any of his predecessors. Does read any also consumes intelligence verbally. We also learned earlier this week. The rolling stones the threatening to sue president trump for the unsanctioned use of their songs at his Yoku Rodeos. We learned subsequent to that that the stones may have an unlikely partner in any future class action, the Islamic Republic of ihram and indifference to their pious sensibilities. We should probably Yank The music roundabout here. Iran issued a warrant for trump's arrest. In the case of the assassination of former hoods force commander, General Qasim Sulejmani killed by US drone strike in Baghdad. In January, prosecutors intent on safe trump along with more than thirty others involved in the January two three attack, and assessing that lieutenant general for Simpson money and his companions for the same reason they say all these individuals face murder and terrorism charges. On has requested Eric Notice people out for trump and the others, the highest level not issued by Interpol that seeks location and at of the individuals named relearned however that the chances of us. Marshals marching trump out of the White House in cuffs at Tehran's behest uh, slender ish at best into poll swiftly intimated that they intended to regard this as the approximate equivalent of someone dialing nine, nine, nine about a missing snowman in March. Trump almost disappointingly has not responded directly to Iran's threat possibly because it was written down. Do you see how skillfully we stitch this all together? And if trump has said something in the. Between the recording and broadcast of this live with her. Elsewhere we learned that we have not yet seen the end of the redecoration which have been a feature of the recent worldwide black lives. Matter Protests I'll. Mid. Some of these have been in the circumstances, probably unsurprising, if nevertheless powerful in Richmond, Virginia, one time capital of the confederate states male Lavar Stony ordered the removal of several rebel monuments, including a statue of confederate general stonewall Jackson not to be confused, obviously with the stonewall Jackson the Honky tonk singer, most popular circuit, early, nine, hundred and sixty s. you can hear in the background in which we are pointing out, so you can fully appreciate. How very clever this is! But we learned that some aesthetic adjustments were. Further Afield and what seems kind of like maybe a few decades overdue? Well sort of while we did learn this week. That Finland's airforce had dropped the swastika from its insignia and we will come back to that. We also learned if we read past this week's headlines. That Finland's Air Force actually did this about three years ago, but very quietly it is an open question whether the very quietly part was Kenny, public relations, or just standard finished tasks eternity. These people generally reluctant to speak up even if the trouser on fire. Here is Monaco's resident Fin Marcucci before being an impression of a Finnish person, noticing that their trials are on fire. Excuse me anyway. We learned once we'd burrow down to about paragraph six in this week. Stories that in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighteen, Finland was given a two plane by Eric von, Rosen an eccentric Swedish count who had adopted the in offensive swastika? Teeth and had planted one on the fuselage, the essence finish air force kept design. They scrubbed at from their aircraft after World War Two, but not from some badges and flags, which is weird, but in terms of persistently embracing embarrassing cultural artifacts, with which no decent person should any longer wished to be associated, not as we as. We learned that in spite of medical and indeed all other common sense bad in the ninety s rapper vanilla ice intends to proceed with an Independence Day weekend concert in the COVID, nineteen hot zone of Texas. So, we learned that this is how if all tickets are sold? Perhaps two and a half thousand Americans will acknowledge the birth of their republic. We may only hope that Isis base is all, but drowned out by the Rumble of George Washington Thomas Jefferson John Adams and Thomas Paine turning in their tombs. For monocle, twenty four I'm Andrew Mullah. Thank you very much indeed to Andrew Gill listening to the globe list. We'll be in Berlin a moment for more on the row over the future of one of its most important buildings, plus there'll be more on the finish swastika story that we heard about just then, but I the time seven, hundred, thousand nine here in London, a quick summary, now the latest world news headlines. Hong Kong's pro democracy, campaigners and activists reporting discussing a plan that would see the creation of parliament in exile. Texas governor Greg has ordered face coverings to be worn in public follows a rising corona virus cases in this state trade insecurity negotiations between the European Union. And the UK have ended early over serious disagreements between negotiators and Taiwan has announced that it will reopen its day factor concert on the Pacific island of. The move is likely to irritate Beijing. This is a globalist. Stay tuned. When it was built in a D, five, hundred, thirty, seven, Istanbul's Higher Safia was the biggest building on earth. It's lodged dome still towers over the historic district of Turkey's biggest city, and it's time it has served many purposes. It's been a Catholic cathedral, a mosque and its current. A museum once again finds itself the subject of another battle for its identity, Turkey's president register type Ataman wants to change it back to a mosque, so let's cross over now to Istanbul where we're joined by Hanan. Lucinda Smith she's a correspondent for the Times in the city. Everyone. Welcome back to the program Hannah. Just tell us more about how this rows come about. Well actually, this is a rabbit kind of comes around once every few years I mean I've been in Turkey for seven years now. Nothing is third time that I've reported on discussions to change the highest off your back into a mosque actually dates back. More than two decades too late nineties when. Prime Minister Netanyahu in Erbakan's who was ones I, Guess Political Mentor Edwin was a member of Erbakan's party. When he started his political career, he was the first person I lied to suggest this, but really it's an idea that's kind of gained more more traction. In recent years, edmonds brought up again and again and really it's a kind of very very useful way for someone to show his credentials. As a leader of the conservative half of Turkey, the part of taking that would be really really happy to see the high self you turn back into a place of worship for Muslims voted. The argument is got to the stage now where the Council of state the Turkish. Administrative Body is is having to make a ruling on what to do with it. Yeah exactly so they started concerts. Started discussing this yesterday. They've said they'll make their decision within fifteen days, but it's a decision on whether it would be legally possible for for the conversion to a moss to happen, so be A. Decision if they rule. If, they ruled that to kind of open the way, but as she is not the first time either that they have considered this back in twenty twelve. They also considered that they made the decision then that it should be a political decision, not legal decision. And the discussion was kind of quietly dropped, but I think the difference this time is owens really differently to the leader. The was in twenty twelve. He's oversee far more authoritarian. He's for more nakedly Islamist and also his relations with. Outside powers places like Greece, which causes incredibly concerned about this, and also with the US far more. Toxic and damage than they were. Eight years ago, so I think, should the court rule this time? The is possible for the confessions. Go ahead this far more likelihood that actually will tell us a little bit more about this dispute with Greece about what should happen to the herself here. Yeah well of course. Greece. If anyone's ever taken a flight with a Greek. Hairline noticed if he's coming into London Istanbul, they still refer to it as constant snipe or The city has a really huge. Historical and religious important for the Greek government, and all the holy of the kind of high religious body in. The host off your of Z when it was, it was the seat of east in Crescenzi Docs Christians. Say as a church for nearly a millennia. Before consonant, plus it will send was captured by the Ottomans in fourteen three now the seat of the Greek Orthodox Church is actually still in Istanbul of the Patriarch of Greek Orthodox is still based here although of in the highest Safia Anita for for the Greek government, and for the Greek church. They see this move as it happens, is a kind of triumphalist move is a kind of sign of conquest as something really symbolic nuts why they're not happy about asset. Tell us a little bit more about the international involvement as well because. Understandably the highest software is a is a protected UNESCO World Heritage. Site and UNESCO has had to wade into this argument, hasn't it? Yeah well I. It's as UNESCO World Heritage, site it's been a museum since nine hundred thirty five so at the start of the modern Turkish republic. When when Anatolia stopping the contrast of the Ottoman Empire and instead became a modern country as secular country. It was, it was changed into museums deconsecrated. And thus the state to had ever since Oh, if it was turned back into a mosque, obviously, it would become primarily. A Muslim place of worship. That doesn't mean that people can't visits it obviously the Blue Mosque, which is very near the highest fear in Istanbul, which is was built as Moscow. Still a functioning mosque is open to visitors. The visitors have sleep five times a day when when Muslims come in to perform their prayers. But then there are also questions you know. If if the highest off was turn back into a mosque, what would happen for example to the absolutely amazing mosaics? The Christian mosaics inside overseen an Islamic vaulters is supposed to that culture. Wall the highest software was being used mosque. They were covered up and it's only in the past century that they've been on and restored so there are all these kind of questions about what would happen if it was turned back into a functioning Muslim place of worship finally. Do you think that Edwin will get his way? Highest Safia will become a mosque once again. I mean at this point in Turkey. Everyone has such control over so many parts of the state including the legal system I mean the the judicial system is non-independent, but what we've seen from a whole host of other cases, especially over the past kind of four years, since the failed coup attempt against on his most courtesans tend to go in the way that he wants to go on the rare occasions that they don't. He tends to make statements expressing his displeasure, and then and then the revoked changed. So I think, it's very very unlikely that he won't get the decision he wants, but I think the big question. Is You know if you get that decision? Willy than push ahead. Over the years, the issue of highest fair, and what states should be has been really really useful for him. It's a really useful way to kind of get his base energized. Campaigning point for him, and obviously you know if the if the highest office was converted back into a mosque. Okay, that would be good campaigning point for him for a few months, but then his kind of over so the question is you know. Would it really be useful for him to do that? Or is it useful just to stir up this kind of debate and? It's and social polarization for a little bit, and then put it to bed again this as this happened again for the past couple of decades, and it is in this myth Istanbul correspondent, for the times, thank you very much for joining us on monocle twenty four. You're listening to the globe list and we have a look at the newspapers in just a moment. Stay with us. UPS is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people. We bring fresh thinking and perspective to are Wa. We know that it takes marriage of intelligence and heart to create. Value for all clients. It's about having the right ideas of course, but also about having one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivalled network of global experts. That's why at UBS we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. To named the bulletin with UBS every week for the latest insights and opinions from ubs all around the world. It's time now to have a look at what's making the newspaper headlines today with a distinctly French theme. Let's hear now from Oracle senior correspondent in London Sophie grew, welcome back Sophie. Let us begin with Limo and We moment spoke a moment ago about the fate of the highest, Safia in stumble in Turkey techies in the headlines. International, isn't it because of what's happening in the Mediterranean to anger the French. Exact. He will tech in France having a rather. But a friction, the Mediterranean there was an incident on June the tents off the coast of Libya when a French frigate. Patrolling part of the NATO operation was trying to. Intercept about in search that vote and actually the Turks who were shepherding that boat talk? It's alleged that they targeted that the French weapons systems so. The. Florence polydor defense trenched minister has taken this to NATO to to be investigated and then this week. They've actually withdrawn from the NATO maritime taskforce, so it's it's it's a bit of a fallout is suspect within the NATO alliance, but it's also. Reflections underlying tensions to tell us a little bit more about these these tensions, not just between France and. Turkey. Not, naturally, but what are they fighting over? Well really supporting. Opposite sides of the conflict in Libya. And Communist Adwan is supporting. Sarraj the Prime Minister in Tripoli and and the French supporting. Field Mazda. The very complex issue, but it's actually goes deeper than that in the French in the tax who've been falling out of quite a few issues as recognition of Armenian genocide and the tax role in in in Syria, the question of the Kurds, so they really come to blows on quite a few issues internationally. And some of these things are just being. Almost! The manifested in this. Mediterranean Forum so actually you, can you? You can really take it down to absence of ideological issues and actually starting to fray, the NATO sort of vision in many ways is tell us a little bit more about this, because it's not good to have to NATO ally, NATO allies actually having an internal dispute. What does it say about NATO stability and its ability to to solve its own problems? When exact game in this piece in the morning is very much from the French perspective nicely Green Bay. Correspondent looking at sort of what this means for NATO and saying that Europe needs to have a bit more solidarity on this issue, but it quotes the the Turkish Ambassador in Paris thing look without Turkey you won't be able to deal with issues if Iran Iraq and Syria, you won't be able to access the caucus and Libyan Egypt. You're you're going to be sort of crippling your your. NATO. The moment when NATO is really on the back foot, you're calling this alliance and you need strategically so actually. This piece is really looking at kind of on. The future of NATO and how this didn't zero is affecting its power. Let's move to the French newspaper. Liberal Aseel, they are examining a voted where in the municipal elections this weekend and the suggestion is that there's this sort of good diagram tension emerging between politics, climate, change and the city. Will exactly it's actually wonderful. Philosophical Rumination by Pierre Show Baena in. You're talking about how? In Sunday's elections. Leon, Strasbourg Bordeaux at all chose green candidates, but it's looking at. How actually. Amazingly. We have this sort of vision in metropolitan centers and Metropolitan Dream, he's calling it. A Green Society but ringed by. Deeply, skeptical kind of belt of the suburbs, a often Franz, much more right wing, actually much more keen to get in cars and there's actually of psychological. Barrier coming in and it's it's very interesting. He's talking about the paradox of the green. City, where social solidarity which was created by the Labor Movements and industry has been used to flush out industry so he's talking about this ghost. Referring that accompanies each city shadow, so it's actually very poetic, if is to go, but also just looking at how the city is starting to realize. Realize its potential, but there was the sacrifices has to make, and there's some dangers of this green gentrification that us us a bit more about these green dangers I do I spotted that line about talking about each city is surrounded by ghostly periphery, which accompanies it like a shadow. It's astonishing, and the fact is you end up with too strongly delineated areas as a result those who? As charbonnier says are in the living the Metropolitan Dream, and those who are effectively shut out from all the phone. And Insane there the city is Darren in south parks and limiting transport and landscaping Creighton, this kind of really stooge utopia, and then on the. Outside of that these other people being blocked, but from my experience living in Paris I mean there. Is that Steve Been? Utopia? Utopia that's been I mean. In that guy is is now in an alliance with with the Greens as a socialist and you'll see seeing. Amazing push towards agreeing life, which is incredibly. And for the people who want to drive in their car in central Paris. and. You can see I. Mean the amount of times you'd come up with the in Paris. You have this compensation exactly The article is talking about an and people really coming to blows from really not very far away from each other, but just because of the the. Sense of being a modern metropolitan in front is very is very progressive and fairly left wing, and it's just so different to to the bone. Yeah, it is absolutely. Will you need his cross a certain road in Paris, and before you know it that green? It'll that you've been walking through. Suddenly becomes an enormous traffic traffic jam. Let's move on to brilliant article in Lamont talking about the impact that covert has had on French culture, and is a very very scathing about the video game. Yes It says only the video game has been spared from this absolutes of plunging in revenue in in coach sector, twenty five percent lunch, but this article by Likud VCR's just incredibly. Is it's. Like said in just. Just impressive to my is from coming from London perspective because there's just so much money going into the French coach was sector. And Emmanuel macron himself is actually. Darren teed performance sector will be covered until August. Thirty, first twenty, twenty, one, the tune of nine hundred and fifty million euros said this week this article details two billion euro been granted to various sectors coach French coat to set today. I. It just looks like. Michael is really intending to fund. The theaters the museums. And Music National Music Center has been given fifty million euros and just keep going. Does this oxygen of money? This article is talking about antenna can get back on its feet. It's also been talking about the importance of French. Regional newspapers hasn't. Rather, there's an article in west pulse which talks about. In a manual macron's. Trying to get everybody out of the of the Cova crisis together on pace. Exactly I mean it's very interesting. He did an. He didn't into yesterday. invited. Regional Newspapers Daily Palace. And I was just reading one souht-west, which need enormous at readership, in France one of the highest, and it just shows you the importance of the regional newspapers and France that the president would go to these people rather absently, bypassing the nationals in Paris. And talking about the Hong Trae and difficult, it's going to be trying to get that sense. A French solidarity from all the regions with this interview. Sophie Grove very much indeed for bringing the newspaper review. You're listening to the globalist monocle twenty four. Let's talk business now. The financial analyst and Brookhurst Louise's Kufa joins me on the line now. Louise Welcome back tennis us about the US economy moves to reopen it and get it moving. Despite the news that more lockdowns are being announced, didn't the Texas governor selling every musk's in public? So the big question globally is how quickly we bounce back. Do we bounce back fully? We partly bounce back or industries. Some certain industries damaged forever. This is this is the big question and America didn't go the whole furlough route. It decided typically American to just let businesses let. Millions of workers go so pre covid nineteen. The unemployment rate was exceptionally low at three point five percent at its worst. It got up to sixteen percent unemployment rate in May I mean truly astonishing. Twenty three million Americans didn't have jobs in April so know it's a very American thing to do what we're now seeing what we got yesterday. Today is Independence Day so markets and everything's closed in America's Day but. But the the the the dates came yesterday. What we had was the monthly June. Jobs report were almost five million jobs were added added that brings the American unemployment rate down to eleven to twelve percent, now of course trump and his supporters say oh, how quickly this is bouncing back! HOW FANTASTIC! The sees these signs? We did the right thing one I would say. There are still eighteen million Americans without work. Yes, it's down from twenty three million, but there were still eighteen million Americans that work and the unemployment rate is eleven percent. But as you said we've got, you know, it's not like we even have a second spike in America. We never really got rid of the first spike. We are seeing acceleration of cases in the country, and so what we also had yesterday was weekly jobless numbers. Indicating that maybe some of the people who are newly rehired may get newly fired. So this is the thing, so it's just extraordinary. The speed at which jobs were lost the speed at which jobs were covered, and potentially the speed at which jobs are being lost again because states are having to re lockdown on lockdown again. Because America hasn't got on top of this, it can tony to wear rule. These jobs are being able to create it from from. Everyone else is struggling with that bit well a lot of them are. Leisure and hospitality and retail as America reopened on various states reopened, but of course if they close again and lockdown again, they get lost, and this is the key point. Don't get too carried away with how quickly America has rebounded. If those newly rehired, get fired again. Let's move onto. The United Kingdom large numbers of warnings. For people not to go to bananas this weekend. Because the pubs rope and again Oh yes, isn't that the? Saturday you can get your hair cut. You can get drunk at a pub you. Can you book a holiday at? You can even go to Bingo. Rank big big company is set this morning. That bingo halls every opening tomorrow, so they should make Brits very happy. They could have a drink like a go at all. I can finally get the head on, and if there's a lovely BBC piece online that some headdresses are so keen to look after that customers that opening from midnight and one. One in north. London has got bookings all the way through the night till seven o'clock tomorrow morning. I'm pretty desperate to have my head. Give Him my husband and my daughter has been doing it for me, but I'm not sure on that desperate, so all of this looks good in terms of the economy bounding back as long as we don't mention Brexit, that's just not mentioned that okay I won't ask you then anything about the EU and UK negotiators falling apart yesterday, should i? Just move onto the fact that everybody can go get drink over. You know what? The Sunday newspapers are GONNA look like they're going to have photos. Splattered splashed across the front page of drunken revellers. He finally able to visit POB tomorrow morning. HOW ELEGANT WE ARE! Finally tells about twitter dropping its language. So this is really really interesting. In the aftermath of George the death of George Floyd and the global protests, many companies tech companies that are looking at that language of the programming coats, and it's very common well. Basically, they have Mazda. Refers to the main version of code. They have slaves which replicas blacklist used to describe items that are deleted or forbidden websites, white lists and this. This is language. Slave based language. It's been around for decades. A lot of these programming languages have been around for very long time, and it's not just twitter J. P. Morgan get up. There's a whole load of of companies are looking at this language and thinking this is probably inappropriate, and so twitter says we all going to look at the language and our programming code, and we are going to change it now. You might think Oh this bunch of. Of Californians, it's no big deal, so I can't tell you what it's like to experience racism I'm I'm white, but I can tell you what it's like to experience. Sexism and I can say women don't blame. Don't do maths blame the women. This eats artfully endemic and the little things I feel. Do make a difference. Most of this now is unconscious bias, not conscious bias but I firmly believe it's things like this that do slowly change. The endemic. I'm fairness in our society. Louise? Cooper many thanks as ever for joining us. You're listening to the globalist. Live on local twenty four. Finally go back to a story. This Andrew Miller was talking about a little earlier on. It may be hard to think about the sticker as an emblem of good luck, but when Finland's air force was given a plane with one painted in blue on it in nineteen eighteen, it was at that time seen as a charmed symbol, but Nazism in the second world, where notwithstanding the swastika state, a key visual symbol of Finland's air force. Until now tell me more I'm joined by Monaco Helsinki correspondent. PECI butts of patchy very warm. Welcome to the program, and it was mentioned earlier on the rather eccentric. Swedish count started. This story will off. That is correct so Finland gained independence in one, thousand, nine, hundred seventy, and started building its armies, airports and everything from scratch, so we didn't have any. Place any fire fighters at that time, so the Swedish noblemen, Rosen and gifted us a sort of a fighter plane at that time. War The IT board the Blue Swastika and he considered it a good luck symbol, and and and it's basically was adopted then symbol of the Finnish Air Force, and remained so actually until the Second World War when Finland having first four alongside the Germans against the Soviet, union, then actually. had a very brief war against the Nazi Germany and then he was dropped as a symbol on the plane. So you haven't seen the swastika in the Finnish Air Force planes since the what what to, but it's been used in the scenes on kind of. Unique decorations and BLIMPS, and and so on and and Finns have never really considered it. A bad thing for say. Since we had two decades before the Nazis nuts almost, but it has had to explain this to my foreign friends, quite of quite a few times, and the decision has been made to remove the swastika from what from from all parts of the Air Force. One is why actually taken them until now? Oh, comparatively recently to do it. In Yeah not all not over units. They're always still some unit, so it was removed quietly, which I thought was very surprising two years ago, actually almost three years ago. As the symbol off the air force command, it is still used by some units in the air. Force and actually if you look very carefully so so used on the Finnish, presidential flag the. Cross of freedom. Symbol on the presidential flack, but he's very inconspicuous. Who can't really tell if you don't if you don't know? But! Yeah, it was. He was dropped because. This is a quote from the air. Force chief of staff. Cost so many understanding so they basically. Are Stubborn, but after a some indicates just gave in yes I can. I can see why there might be some misunderstanding. You mentioned that it was removed a little while ago Y. has it taken so long I? Think it's about three years for us to find out about this move. That's a very good question. I, you know there are so many different emblems and logos. In the Air Force this was the logo of the Air Force Command. I didn't even know Air Force Command had its own logo. You don't see these things really and as a boost for. PHOENIX. Just going to presume that on any given air force emblem there will be. This was to go so the fact that he was now removed from the air for Air Force commands emblem. Nobody just really noticed it until a professor in the Housing University by the name of David, and actually my former professor also. Who is researching the use of Swastika? Noticed I think it was actually on twitter. He noticed that the air. Force Command tweeted something they had a. they had a different kind of logo finally briefly. Does this now mean that? In the absence of the swastika, Young Finns will be clamoring to join the airforce. That's a very good question. You know. I have to remind the listener is that Finland currently has mandatory military service? So you know it's not like we've had a choice, but. You know joking aside. I believe that actually in some ways some people might have been put off by this symbol and its connections with the Nazi Germany, so so who knows maybe young Finns will be flicking the airforce after this snow that it's being. So to speak cleaned. Bets in Helsinki. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the program. That's all we have for today's globalist. Many thanks to our producers freese James Page Reynolds Color Avella and Daniel. Page, our Research Charlie Phil mccord in our studio manager, Louis Allen off the headlines as more music on the way, and the briefing is live at Madeira in London the globalist returns at the same time on Monday, but for now from me Emma Nelson, goodbye, thank you very much for listening and have a great weekend.

Hong Kong London United States president United Kingdom Hong Kong Finland UBS Air Force Istanbul Texas Turkey Beijing Hong European Union Nathan Law prime minister NATO Brookhurst Louise Joshua Wong
Saudi Arabia vs the world

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

33:41 min | 2 years ago

Saudi Arabia vs the world

"Even before Jamal Khashoggi walked into Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul. Never to be seen. Again. It was not difficult to assemble a long list of reasons to dislike v Saudi regime, even without delving too far into history, the charge sheet includes but is not limited to an ongoing rampage in Yemen which has killed and door starved, thousands of civilians, the treatment of Saudi women as distant second class citizens, the ruthless persecution of dissident activists, the suppression of free media and civil society. All things considered then the Saudis may be genuinely surprised by the global outrage, attending the apparent murder of one mildly critical Washington Post columnist. Few of Riyadh's previous transgressions have attracted meaningful protests, and the world has obligingly applauded, whatever decades overdue reforms have so far occurred on the watch of crown prince Mohammad bin Salman. So what would occur if it did turn out. That Saudi Arabia had this time and at lost actually overstepped the overgenerous limits of the indulgence of its allies. What would it mean for the world and for Saudi Arabia? If the world said to Saudi Arabia enough, this is the foreign desk. The key thing here shouldn't be a total isolation of Saudi Arabia, which could very well be counterproductive in a number of ways and not actually lead to the results that we want, what we want us to see Saudi Arabia changing its behavior, and that's where I think leverage and pressure become very important. That's the mid range solution will not solution because there isn't really a solution to Saudi Arabia, but mid range set of options if you will, in some of the reputation of the British and American governments with that people how much they can be seen to forgive this just because of the secret relations with the Saudis. This was so odious that major players. Corporations, the World Bank, the IMF politicians withdrew in droves. So it's gain a kind of mental of its own that is different from anything that the Saudis have experienced in the past. And quite frankly, they have no idea how to deal with it. They're in a state of near complete panic. Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm Andrew Miller on today's show. We'll be asking how much the will need Saudi Arabia and by how much that is exceeded by the amount that Saudi Arabia needs the world. But we start with the story that has got us here the apparent premeditated murder of a Saudi citizen inside one of his own country's diplomatic missions. Bill law is a Middle East analyst. He joins me in the studio Bill, first of all, given everything else, and there is no shortage of everything else. I use surprised. This has been the thing that has prompted such extraordinary international outrage. Well, yes and no, Andrew, I think that as you say, the Saudis have committed egregious human rights abuses, and I suppose most particularly, the war in Yemen is the one blunder that Mohammed bin Salman amongst many that that he is carried out that that really causes some serious opprobrium. And yet that war is gone on for now into entering its fourth year and with very little damage to mob and minds reputation. This however did cross a line and across the line, I think because of who gemology was it cost a line of because of where he was, which he was. He was in Washington DC. He was writing for an influential liberal newspaper, the Washington Post and across the line because of the details, the manner of the killing and the shocking nature of it. And I think that Donald Trump initially played it down. He didn't really want him gay. With it, but the longer it went on the more became clear that he was going to have to engage with it. Why is that is because Jared Kushner, his son-in-law and Mohammed bin Salman a very close. They talk frequently, they advise each other, and I think Donald Trump felt, you know, my son in law is is really at some riskier of being dragged into this situation. So we threw out the rogue elements narrative and and the Saudis after initially, denying, denying, denying, and remember that Mahama been so long on the third of October, that is the day after mental has usually went into the consulate in Istanbul. He told Bloomberg interview that you're Malaysia had left the consulate within a few minutes or perhaps an hour if he left. Why did you not then immediately go to his. His fiancee, he's Turkish translate was waiting outside. They have never answered that question if he left. Why is the footage of him leaving? And why has he not been heard from since indeed, indeed. So so this story as it. Develops, it gains a kind of impetus, and it happens just ahead of this major investment conference that last year was a huge successful Muhammed bin Salman the the Davos in the desert the future investments initiative which is designed to bring foreign investment into the country. What happened was this was so odious that major players corporations, the World Bank, the IMF politicians withdrew in droves. So it's gained a kind of momentum of its own that is different from anything that the Saudis have experienced in the past. And quite frankly, they have no idea how to deal with it. They are in a state of of near complete panic of the mini aspects of this that might know sense. The panicked reaction which you correctly described as one of them because you would have thought that if you were going to undertake an operation such as this, you would give at least some thought to managing the often math. But even before we get to that, there is the act itself. If you. Looking at this from the point of view of crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, and you're trying to position yourself. Obviously, these things are all relative as modernizing liberal reformer. Then why would you do this? If there is a citizen of your kingdom, who is making really fairly mild criticisms of you? Infecting on many occasions, constructive, mild criticisms of you in an American newspaper. Why not just only the ignore it completely or if you're asked about it, say, well, fine. I mean, I'm a big guy. I can stand it. You know, Jamal has usually his very first column that he wrote for the Washington Post when he left Saudi Arabia because he was on the on the cusp of being arrested himself, friends and colleagues that are already been arrested in in a major sweep back in September of last year. He wrote, I support vision, twenty thirty, which is mama's bin, Salman greater remake the Saudi economy. I support the government is Saudi Arabia. What is it? I'll tell you what it is about a fundamental character flaw of Mohammed bin Sal. Mon- he is extremely arrogant. He can take no criticism whatsoever. The fact that Jamal hash Aji who was in the inner circle really and and a position in a position of of some respect within the ruling family. The fact that he would dare to go to Washington and criticize him triggered a kind of rage. And and I think that that was part of of why he behaved the way he did. The other thing is if you have to look at the way this guy operates, he has had a series of strategic blunders that began. You could say with the Yemen war he was going to go in and that war is going to be over two or three weeks, and he would win his street cred as a as a great warrior, like his grandfather Misao the founder of the modern kingdom. That war still goes on. He'd together with mom bin Zayid launched this ridiculous feud against cathode, expecting the cutters cutter would fold in a in a in a few days. What happened? The cut through is called on the. Turks, Iranians, they use the huge hydrocarbon wealth and they got the Americans on side. So that's still goes on the GCC the Gulf Cooperation Council fractured. He decided that he was going to allow him to drive. You got great press. What did he do? He rounded up though the women activists because he was afraid of them. He feared them. He didn't want in any way to be beholden to them or that it'd be seen that somehow they were the cause of his decision to allow women to drive along just ridiculous attack against Canada because the foreign secretary had the temerity to criticize Saudi human rights record which you know western governments have been doing for years. Why? How dare Canada? How dare Canada, this minor country. Question me. So you see this combination of era Gance and rash behavior and fuelled by the Trump administration encouraging him in this behavior. When this attack on Canada happened, you estate depart. And was asked, what is your response? And they said, basically, we have no response to make. So an ally, a great friend of the United States compared to this authoritarian dictatorship. And they had nothing to say been some on, looked at that and said, hey, you know what? That's a green light. He has been allowed and enable to pave with impunity. So this these series of follies you series of catastrophic errors in judgment, have been encouraged by Trump encouraged by Kirshner and yes, you can see a line. I can certainly see a line that takes you right up to this appalling murder of dramatic Astros you you knew has Shoji slightly. What was your sense of what was motivating him and did he did he fully comprehend the risks? He was running. Israel has jersey was a person that I met. I met in two thousand and two in in Jeddah, and he's struck me then as he was, he was kind. He was funny. He was very thoughtful and he was someone who was a pragmatist. He worked within this very authoritarian. Repressive regime says, one of the terrible ironies of this is that he was nobody's idea of a revolution redesigned at all, not at all, and he worked within the constraints and every once in a while it got into trouble. He was. He was editor of Al Wahdan which is very close to the government. He got sacked because he allowed an article that criticized the religious elite. He got sacked again, but he was always arguing that the way forward for Saudi was to push for a freer media was to push for a society that was moving towards building a structure of civil society. That would include a freer media. That's what he and he was. He loved his country. He was a great patriot. He was a great. Great. Patriot love this country and for Mohammed bin seldom on to orchestrate this terrible crime yet again, shows is inability to understand that you need to use people. You need to create alliances. He could've used the women activists to push forward vision, twenty thirty, which engages where are us that it's going to engage women. What did he do? He put them in jail. He could've used your malheur Shoji to forward his message of vision, twenty thirty. He could've used some allowed who is a moderate cleric with fourteen million Twitter followers. What does he do? He imprisoned him and now allowed is facing the death penalty. So all of these people who could have actually moved forward vision, twenty thirty. He is incarcerated and Jamal's case overseeing the murder of just finally, then the general theme of this week's edition of the foreign desk is to ponder the potential. Consequences for both the world and for Saudi Arabia, if the world decided about Saudi Arabia. Okay, that's it enough is enough. You are now a pariah rogue state. We will no longer deal with you in any meaningful sense obviously that he's not going to happen, but given that we are where we are, what do you think are the potential consequences of this for? Not necessarily for Saudi Arabia in the long term, but especially for a prince Mohammad bin Salman because this is past the point I think at which it seems like something that's going to blow over reasonably rapidly. No, I think he has been signally damaged and weakened by this Willie, be able to hang on. There are people suggesting that in fact, he may not be able to hang on. I think he's on a very, very short lead. I could see and being dispatched there certainly elements within the ruling founded. There'd be more than happy to carry out such an act. It's happened before in Saudi Arabia in the broader context. I think Israel is very, very concerned because. A weakened. Mohammed bin Salman means that it's going to be now virtually impossible to to deliver on this. It's called a peace deal that Christner and Mohammed bin Salman the Israelis have have banged up that essentially see the Palestinians utterly sold down the river that now is in extreme jeopardy. I think the Turks or the one has has is is playing a very slick and clever game in the drip drip approach to the release the media. He's improved his power position. I think from the Americans point of view that Trump is looking for somehow making this a rogue elements things dick. So they're going to hang it off a very senior guy. It looks like this is augment ala. Siri, who is a Brigadier General very close to Mohammed bin. So Mina a loyal spear carrier from been so man. He was the man. I've been in meetings with him where he said that the the Saudis never never ever went after civilians in Yemen. That I if it happened, it was purely an accident and we investigate very thoroughly, which was a complete barefaced lie. We know that's a seri- looks like he's going to be the senior fall guy. I think they'll be other ones and Saudi being Saudi could well be. These guys are dispatched very quickly if that narrative implausible, deniability, if you will, narrative is allowed to hold them, Mohammed bin Salman will hang on and Trump will will some maneuver this, the this difficult and trying time, which is his most serious threat is president, but both of them I think will be damaged below. Thank you for joining us. So far at least international reaction to the mode of Jamal. Khashoggi has been mostly rhetorical, give or take a number of facedly, Tada risk VP's to an upcoming investment conference in Saudi Arabia, but what might have own Saudi Arabia, domestically, if the disgust at the killing of kashogi translated into more lasting and more meaningful isolation, if Saudi Arabia, having identified itself as a rogue state began to be treated like one to discuss this, I'm joined by Rosemary Hollas professor of Middle East policy studies at City University London. How would it play with people in Saudi Arabia, the subjects over the house of Saudi. If international outrage at this was to be expressed in say, I guess what you could call the full move. We will deal with you as if you like a necessary evil, but you are excluded from the community of nations. It's going to be interesting to see if the. Can be sort of halfway house in dealing with the Saudis coming from Washington and London. They're the key ones. I mean, if the, if the French and the Germans, for example, state on booed, this Audis could resort to the threat to turn to the Chinese and the Russians, but so embedded. The Americans in the British in the home Saudi system, the intelligence system, and in particular, the military system, they not just sell on. They train the Saudis. They work alongside the Saudis. They're helping the Saudis, do a slightly better job of targeting the power in the horrendous war in Yemen. The British government has twice colon of Serious Fraud Office investigations into how epn sales take place to the Saudis, full fear of Saudi retaliation. If some of their senior figures were embarrassed, that's how serious relationship is and how embedded in intelligence sharing and minitry industrial production in the UK the Saudis of the savior for the British independent defy. Pence industry. Otherwise, the British would be buying from the Americans all the time was maybe the French Germans, but they wouldn't have their own in defense industrial base. And that means that the Saudis in effect are intrinsic to the credibility of Britain as a medium sized power with a seat on the UN Security Council. All of this good stuff. And at the moment, the Americans are in hock to the Saudis in terms of the president, having named them as the source of will leagues jobs that he wants to preserve in the United States. I could see a previous US administration being prepared to tough it out with the Saudis, but it's it's a lot for Donald Trump and particularly us. So it'll be interesting to see how either the British all the Americans can demonstrate to the Saudis, why this was serious. It's a matter of trust between the two. It's a matter of the reputation of the British in. American governments with that people how much they can be seen to forgive this just because of the secret relations with the Saudis, everything you lay out the especially those relationships between Riyadh London and Washington, d. c. how important of a to shoring up the domestic legitimacy of the house of sowed by which I guess I'm asking to what extent does the or do the events of the last few weeks have any effect within the kingdom? Well, the most Facific critics of the Saudis unto among them the Islamic state group and applied and so on over the years claim that without that American western support, the house of Saudi is done full in terms of internal security. But again, we're into new territory here with the current Saudi power structure because with this. Old powerful crown prince whose accrued to himself responsibility for intelligence for defense for the national guard for the economy for Saudi, Aramco concentration in power like that. In one young prince is new now, therefore, rather than saying, how fragile how stable is the house of sound. One perhaps needs to say, how stable with Saddam Hussein, how dependent on the use of fear with the population to keep them instep. Traditionally in Saudi Arabia, the population has become on side with a lot of largesse from the government and a sense that the government understood the to deprive them of democracy to deprive them of a say in their own government. There must be lots of logic. It's to provide for their housing needs to provide them with jobs that didn't really need doing and to control the media, which was one of the concerns that Jamal kashogi had that Saudi citizens are not free to make up their own minds because of the way the media is handled. Do you think it is if not necessarily likely than at least pulsa Bill that this event might be something the the proverbial flap of the butterfly wing, if you will, that causes rather the unanticipated typhoon and changes Saudi Arabia from within, if not necessarily in the way that moment bin Salman would have hoped or an -ticipant. It could even produce a change in the Trump administration in what kind of way? Well, it's been fascinating to watch the way Trump has handled this and he's veered backwards and forwards between saying it's a terrible thing, and there's going to have to be terrible consequences too. Maybe it didn't happen. And after we do have all these weapons sales and we will have all these jobs at stake, and we'll have to calibrate our response. And that will depend on the Saudis response. And so on indicating repeatedly that he was looking to cook something up with the tacit complicity of the Turks to. And I think some of the fact that it's become more difficult for trunk to handle it that way is because the talks want sufficiently a p is too by the way he was going to deal with them in this and the tux. Don't wanna be full guys for this because they know and they clearly handled it in such a way they were attempting to get the Americans behind them, not against. They know that if this kind of behavior for a person who was tolerated and trusted as an insider until the rise, if this one potato. Kayalar man about whom there are concerns of his judgment. There are concerns of his responsibility in the concerns about his concentration of power, especially in intelligence, Kohl's, even if not in business circles and given that situation, it's going to be a very interesting test for Donald Trump to understand exactly where the balance of forces lies and that he has to play with Rosemary Hollis. Thank you for joining us. Finally, today a look at the protection racket than Saudi regimes have long been operating in the global context. The idea that the will doesn't have to like them just to recognize that the world can't live without them without Saudi oil, Saudi arms purchases, Saudi intelligence resources, what would happen if this bluff was cold? I'm joined now by shoddy Hamad senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the oath of Islamic exceptionalism, how the struggle of Islam is reshaping the world. He joins us from Washington DC shoddy welcome to the program. The western world in particular has been doing a remarkably good job of looking away now for many decades and looking away with those transgressions which should seem to signify that Saudi Arabia's enthusiasm for the old ideals of of liberal democracies lukewarm at best. If it was decided by a plurality of the world's other nations. The apparent mode of Jamal kashogi wolves, the absolute last straw. What would it actually costs us just to say to Saudi Arabia, we are done with you? Well, I don't think we could realistically do that. So I'm someone who very much stands for a principled approach to foreign policy and that we have to put human rights democracy front and center that said, I mean, Saudi Arabia is not a country that you can just break ties entirely with because there is a dependence when it comes to counter terrorism cooperation and isolating Iran, and even under a democratic administration. I think it's unlikely that there would be a total break. What I think is possible is something something in between where you know, we put pressure on an ally and we use the tremendous leverage we have and by we here, I mean the US, but that could also include Britain and other European countries that have a military relationship with Saudi Arabia. So, I mean, one example is to. To suspend arm sales. And that doesn't mean you suspend them permanently, but use it as a point of leverage and say, hey, we need an accounting for what happened to Jamaica Shoji. And there has to be a full thorough and independent investigation that the Saudis have to accept. And then we have to get to the bottom of what happened. Then we can have a conversation subsequently about what the investigation discovers and what the ties were between m b. s. and the actual act of killing. So that's one way of looking at it. But also I think there can be pressure withdrawing from conferences that the Saudis are sponsoring and this this wouldn't have to be forever. And it depends how the Saudis are, whether the Saudis improved their behavior going forward. And I think there's also a difference even though they're quite intertwined at this point between Saudi Arabia as a country NBS as an individual, and it still it's still very likely that he will become the next king. But who knows? I mean, this is the Middle East and it certainly. Possible that there could be a rethinking about that going forward. So I think that the key thing here shouldn't be a total isolation of Saudi Arabia, which could very well be counterproductive in a number of ways and not actually lead to the results that we want. What we want is to see Saudi Arabia changing its behavior, and that's where I think leverage and pressure become very important. So that's that's the mid range solut- well, not solution because there isn't really a solution to Saudi Arabia, but mid range set of options. If you will this a couple of things that you mentioned that I will come back to the idea that they're important because of counter-terrorism cooperation, constraining Iran, and so forth. There is, of course, the big one, which, and this is the conventional wisdom for why the world, especially the western world does not take a hard line on Saudi Arabia which is oil. Saudi Arabia does of course supply twelve point percent thereabouts over the global supply. They are a major oil supplier, but does the west really have to. To be dependent on Saudi oil. Couldn't it be bought from somewhere else? And would the west be able to stand any retaliatory measures? The Saudis might undertake such as ramping the price to make the transportation of other goods more expensive. So the Saudis can talk a big game about this and they have they have implicitly threatened to mess with the oil market, but we should call their bluff because it this is not the nineteen seventies the world economy, but in the US in particular, the users probably less dependent on Saudi oil than it's ever been. So there has been a real shift over the last ten or fifteen years with growing US domestic oil production, this shale revolution, Saudi Arabia just doesn't have the kind of leverage does. And that's why here in Washington, there's been actually very little discussion about oil is barely coming up because it just would be dishonest to see that as a major issue for the US economy. Now it might. It would affect the global economy and specific countries that are more dependent on Saudi oil. But I mean, that's not really what we're talking about. We're not talking about, you know whether Japan is going to sever relations with Saudi Arabia or or hungry or God knows who else. So we're, we're talking about the countries that have influenced the US Britain. Perhaps France in these are countries that who have very large economies that aren't going to be significantly affected by the retaliatory measures that the Saudis are likely to take. And even if they were likely to take them, do the Saudis really want to shoot themselves in the foot because they also depend on trade and and economic relationships with with western countries. And they're actually they're the ones who need us more than we need them, and let's not forget this and this entire debate, the direction of leverage is very much against their favor, not in their favor. If there was retaliatory measures that did hurt the US, then the US could basically if it wanted to ground Saudi Arabia's air force in short order. I mean, Saudi Arabia's army cannot run without US support, you know? So, and we're not just talking about arm sales here. We're talking about logistical support, refueling support, spare parts. I mean, you name it now the Saudis can threaten all they want to move towards China and Russia, but it's very difficult to shift your arms and weapons dependence quickly. Two completely different sources because the Saudi army is very much integrated into the US weapon system and you US military support more generally and who really wants to move towards China or Russia. That would be a huge hit to Saudi Arabia's prestige. And also Saudi Arabia depends on the US in its confrontation with Iran the Russians and Chinese can do that or won't do that to the same extent. So the basic, the short answer here is the Saudi claims and the Saudi threats are empty to go back to the equation. You saw the, the Saudis need the west more than the west. And the the Saudis on on all sorts of fronts. Dunn's that apply to the other thing you mentioned earlier, which is cooperation intelligence sharing, vis-a-vis counter-terrorism is that the hold that the Saudis still have on us? And if that is the case, does that count a balance? Let's say the reasons why they might know so much about it. So it's, it's certainly. I think the argument could be made that our reliance on them for counter-terrorism is is sometimes overstated. I mean, none of this existential for the US that said, you know, one terrorist attack can be a problem. And you know if there are Saudi nationals who are under terrorism, watch lists or are of concern and the Saudis have information on them and that's where the cooperation can become important. We might say, well, one terrorist attack is not existential for the US, but that is that is something you want to prevent to the extent that you can. So I do think that's important that. I mean, are the Saudis really going to withhold counterterrorism cooperation when they again, they also depend on us for cooperation with our intelligence services and so on. So this is a mutually, it's a mutually beneficial relationship when it comes to some shared interests. So again, the Saudis would have to be very careful about trying to mess with that, but it's Saudi support the and or the lack there of the end of the world. No. But you know, if you're a US politician, you're not really willing to take those kinds of risks. You don't wanna risk an all out confrontation with the Saudis. So at some point, you know, we as analysts, I suppose have to be realistic about what's possible when it comes to real politique and US politicians don't have a great record when it comes to prioritizing principle and making that matter more. And that was a problem quite frankly, under the Obama administration as well. Does it strike you that what we're witnessing is something seismic in the way that the world. Not necessarily regard Saudi Arabia, but interacts with Saudi Arabia. Is this something just so viscerally repulsive about what appears to have happened to Jamaica shell g which has just caused people to think differently about reacted to make those compromises a little bit more difficult to swallow? Yes, I didn't. That's right. I mean, if you have even shred of moral sensibility, I think that any kind of interaction with the Saudi government or a regime, you have to think twice about it and be a little bit more careful about what you do or that said there are people who don't have a moral sensibility. So I can't hardly again really speak for them. But when it comes to private companies like ready UC, we see some signs of this where Google and endeavor the the big US entertainment agency have taken steps to withdraw from certain relationships or deals with with the Saudis. So I think that is a sign of things to come that it's going to be more differ. To justify it to either your constituents or your or your shareholders, or even to yourself when you go to sleep at night. So that is a shift that said, people move on, they forget about things. So I think we'll see some reversion to the norm over time, but I don't think that Saudi Arabia can ever completely undo the damage that's been done. This is one of those things that really Sears itself in your memory. We're not gonna forget this even for people who wanna forget it. I don't think they will be able to this is one of the most brazen reckless acts that any of us can imagine there have been more more brutal exit of cost, obviously more lives and have an have a bigger humanitarian impact, for example, in Yemen. But when it comes to seeing one event, that just seems. So that seems so Morley a hornet because of its brazenness and in broad daylight and and kinda shoving it in our faces. I think that there hasn't been event quite like this in quite some time from an ally shoddy. Mid, thank you very much for joining us. That's it for today's episode of the foreign desk where back next week and look out for the foreign desk, explain it available every Wednesday. The foreign desk is produced by yelling, Goffin and Baluchi Bill also edits the program. My name's Andrew moolah. Thanks very much for listening until next time. Could.

Saudi Arabia Saudi Salman United States Donald Trump Saudi government Yemen Mohammed Jamal Washington DC Washington Post Saudi army murder prince Mohammad bin Salman Jamal Khashoggi World Bank crown prince Mohammad bin Salm Middle East Canada
Explainer 205: Israel: third time lucky?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 205: Israel: third time lucky?

"Hello and welcome to I. Twenty Four News David Matlin near live in Tel Aviv. Thanks for joining us here. Is We opened the day after? Israel's third elections which in a year now the party's until now unable to form a government Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declared eight quote unquote gigantic victory for his Likud party. There is possibly good news. At least four Israeli voters wearied of the regular trudge to the polling stations. They might not be obliged to vote for the fourth time in a year or so. This week's general election the third in eleven months appears to have been slightly more decisive than its two predecessors while nobody has an outright majority in the Knesset Prime Minister. Benjamin Netanyahu's conservative block on not far short of one failure to assemble a governing. Coalition from here would require rancor and chaos remarkable even by the standards of Israeli politics. This is also obviously provisionally. Good news for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu inasmuch as it looks like Benjamin Netanyahu will get to carry on being Israel's prime minister a job. He has already done longer than anyone else. In the country's history Netanyahu's Likud party won more votes than in September or in April last year. And turnout was actually up on the last couple of elections as for the bad news. There's a fair bit to go round breaking news to bring to Israel's attorney. General has indicted the prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu on multiple corruption charges varies the extremely imminent potential political and legal complication of a serving prime minister standing trial as things stand. Netanyahu is due before the beak in Jerusalem on March seventeenth to begin answering charges of fraud. Bribery and breach of trust go tonight. We are witnessing an attempted. Coup against a serving prime minister based on fabrications and a tainted biased investigative process in this tainted process. They weren't after the truth. They were after me. The investigators didn't pressure the witnesses. To tell the truth they crush them with threatening extortion to tell a lie above sutan biscuit. W meme Sheku. He may apply for a delay citing the imperative of forming a new government. But even if he gets one it likely won't be for long. Israel's judiciary is not known for its difference to politicians within the last decade one former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and one former president Mashi Katzav have served prison sentences after being convicted of various offenses. There appears to be also the further recession of any possibility anytime soon of a meaningful peace agreement with Israel Palestinian neighbors notwithstanding the diligent labours of US president. Donald Trump's son-in-law for a moment imagine a new reality in the Middle East imagine a bustling commercial and tourist centre in Gaza in the West Bank for international businesses. Come together and thrive whose vision for the region unveiled earlier. This year seems already to be regarded by all concerned as a sort of high-spirited indiscretion which everyone has agreed. It is best to discreetly. Forget the name of the Momma Nittany Univer me and my whole name but flew up naming the name today. I am announcing to apply with the formation of the next government Israeli sovereignty on the Jordan Valley and the northern dancy. Manila Netanyahu's latest election campaign. Bet Big on further Israeli expansion into the West Bank days before polls opened. He announced his intention to assume a plan. Long buried by international condemnation for three and a half thousand new settlers homes which would effectively connect the West Bank settlement of Malaya Dem- with Jerusalem. He may now also feel emboldened to act on previous threats to formally annex portions of Palestinian land and it is obviously a grim result for Israeli opposition to Benjamin Netanyahu and its present principal figurehead retired general and foam Israel. Defense Forces. Chief. Bennigan's is I told you one year ago I into politics because I feel for our internal unit reach prevail over every enemy time and time again by sticking together was being torn apart if an opposition cannot in three quick fire attempts finish off a tired belligerent and entitled Prime Minister Facing Serious Criminal charges a long and unflinching look in the mirror is probably overdue ahead of Netanyahu now lies the horse. Trading arm twisting and carrot dangling necessary to get his block from the fifty eight Knesset seats. It has to the sixty one. It needs to govern. He will probably find this possible. Even Benny Ganz has conceded that neither he nor anyone else in Israel fancies yet another trip to the polls indeed. It's not altogether impossible. That members of Gansters Liberal Cavan alliance or even Gansu himself may perceive long-term mileage in being seen to prioritize ability and agree to Netanyahu up in the short term in the immediate aftermath of this latest election defeat dance failed to reiterate his previous ironclad objection to serving a prime minister under indictment. However vidor Lieberman leader of the nationalist Yisrael Beiteinu party remains the potentially crucial kingmaker. And though he also says he doesn't want another election he doesn't want Netanyahu either Another possibly significant Straw in the wind a strong showing for the joint list an alliance principally representing Israel's Arab citizens the joint list. One Fifteen Knesset seats on Monday up to from September more than half a million Israelis voted for them including according to Joint Lewis Chairman. I'm an odor many Jews depressed. By Netanyahu's bellicose and nationalistic conservatism. Demagogues and populists often accidentally contrived to energize their opponents and catalyze new kinds of opposition. It's a long way off and may indeed never happen. But it would be something. If Benjamin Netanyahu's real legacy turned out to be a strengthened Israeli left united across sectarian lines for Monocle twenty four I'm Andrew Moolah.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netany prime minister Israel Prime Minister Prime Minister Ehud Olmert Knesset Likud party Jerusalem Tel Aviv David Matlin president Joint Lewis Chairman Donald Trump Bribery US extortion Jordan Valley Middle East General
Explainer 244: Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:28 min | 4 months ago

Explainer 244: Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

"We start with breaking news. And iran's defense ministry has confirmed that one of the country's top nuclear scientists has been assassinated two diff- of muslim fucker. Saudi is very much proving to be one of those stories in which people will see whatever confirmations of their own prejudices and suspicions they wished to it might reasonably be argued that this description applies in the online epoch in particular to pretty much every story but it is especially the case with stories set in the middle east and which may would depending wh one prefers to believe may not involve israel. So it's best to start with what we know for certain. We know that molson fucker. Zodda was a renowned nuclear physicist a senior engineering of iran's nuclear program and a brigadier general in iran's islamic revolution regard core. He is believed to have been deleted of what was known as project amid the program. Iran established in the late nineteen eighty s to explore the prospects of iranian nuclear weapon and closed in two thousand three according to the international atomic energy agency. We know that he was killed. Last friday near absorbed a small town seventy kilometers east of tehran. And that he was buried with full state on. Who's on sunday law. Main hobby lobby. No optic not that big van owen ruling to the questions of precisely how he was killed by whom there is a bewildering smorgasbord of answers. While it seems clear enough that Was shot dead as the car in which he was. Travelling was the object of an ambush. There are conflicting reports of this assassination being conducted by a posse of live operators. Some of whom may or may not have died at the scene and or by some species of remote controlled weapon monotony iran bit who we bid and me. The enemies of iran have to know that the iranian nation and the country's officials a brave and intrepid enough to respond to this criminal action. As on a has dan in dommage in our yet caught on era by-pass off pigs around as to who might have done it. Iranian officialdom and iranian media have been quick to blame either israel or the mujahedeen e. Cock a curious cultish iranian rebel group which has been a persistent irritant to the islamic republic. And who currently appear to be based between iraq. France and albania. The has also been an amount of copy pasted umbrage directed at the united states or as president hassan rohani of iran prefers to address it the global arrogance on record. Israeli sources have feigned bafflement though the new york times has quoted an unnamed senior. Israeli official is suggesting that the world should thank israel. Four reside is demise. The mujahideen have been reticent. As of this broadcast the iran has yet to present any concrete evidence of their assertions. And if and when they do it will likely be impossible for any independent observers to verify them and iran does reflexively blame israel for pretty much anything it is only a couple of years since former head of iran's military major general signed fear is a body accused of running a network of spy lizards. But it's not like there isn't something of a circumstantial case to answer this year. Several sites in iran which might or might not have been related to iran's nuclear program was struck by explosions which did not appear coincidental and at least four other iranian. Nuclear scientists have met violent ends since two thousand ten to killed by car bombs one by a motorcycle. Bomb one shot dead. In most instances iran blamed israel and israel denied involvement while also making it as clear as it could be regarded even the faintest prospect of a nuclear armed iran as intolerable almost ziff inviting tehran to take the hint and a is at least arguable. Most infact saudis college was marked in two thousand eighteen when israeli intelligence highsted from a warehouse in tehran thousands of files pertaining to iran's nuclear program when israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu announced his feet. He mentioned zadeh by name. A key. part of the plan was to form new organizations to continue the work. This is how dr moosa farkas the of project about put remember that name a day so along with the questions of who and how there is another why in particular wine now whoever killed most fuck resolve will have known that iran would feel obliged to retaliate or at least threatened to retaliate. And that this would make any kind of diplomacy with tehran difficult. Whoever killed muslims will also have understood that a window to such engagement might have been about to open interior. Vashon sean medicare dishman salvage assassination shows. The enemies are experiencing anxious weeks feeling. That the pressure's fading away. And the world circumstances a change a heart. The camby share shadow. It's johnny you're gonna with the swearing in of a new american president who has sounded keen on returning the us to the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with iran out of which the current president flounced of the possible consequences. All fockers ought is death to seem reasonably certain one that iran's nuclear ambitions whatever they may actually be will have been hinted at least some ought to that. Compromise with iran will be less likely someone somewhere will be considering this a win win for monocle. Twenty four i'm andrew moolah

iran israel defense ministry Zodda seventy kilometers van owen tehran president hassan rohani international atomic energy ag middle east israeli intelligence albania prime minister benjamin netany zadeh dr moosa farkas new york times iraq France ziff sean medicare
Thursday 7 February

Monocle 24: The Briefing

29:49 min | 2 years ago

Thursday 7 February

"You're listening to the briefing. First broadcast on the seventh of February twenty nineteen on Monaco twenty four. Live from London. This is the briefing on monocle twenty four. I'm Ben Ryland coming up Brazil's. Former president Louis it nausea, Lula da Silva will spend an additional thirteen years in jail. But is the move purely motivated by politics also ahead, even a relatively soft Brexit in which the UK leaves the EU under the terms of the deal agreed by UK Prime Minister Theresa may with the EU though, not as yet with the UK's. Parliament is bad news for Ireland at the very least it will be an immense and expensive hassle oil assess the impact of Brexit on the Republic of Ireland. Plus, how do nations decide where to hold a summit and will find out about the revamp of Helsinki's able to all that ahead on the briefing with me, Ben Ryland? A Brazilian court has sentenced the country's former president Louis in nausea, Lula da Silva to an additional thirteen years in prison. Let's get more on this now with Natalia sobre Vila Pereira who is a professor of Latin American history at the university of Kent Natoli was this expected. It was kind of expected. There's been a lot of retribution decided by both narrow regime, and it's not exactly a surprise Luther. Of course is already in prison. What prompted the fresh charges. Well us in prison because he allegedly received a beach front apartment from the or the bridge the investigation into corruption. But now his being sentenced for having accepted repairs in a farm that wasn't actually his, but he used and the outside outskirts of Sao Paulo. So in a sense. These are the second charges are bit more far fetched than the first. Well, looking at this from afar, it's not hard to detect a faint with of political motivation. Is there any evidence to back up the claims by some that all of this is down to the the current regime of politics, not wanting Lulu to have any Patel. Angel- for comeback at all. Well, that's definitely it. Because with his previous sentence he could have been released in four years. So he could have potentially been candidate in the next presidential election. And that was really a possibility. But with the second sentence he would have to serve many more years before he comes out for any pros puzzle parole or early release will despite the prison sentence many had predicted that Lulu could still stage a comeback his supporters hadn't deserted him before. Is that hope now lost? Well, I mean, he he's not out. The hope is lost. The thing is I think that one of the reasons why the Bozon are g wants to keep him in is because there is a very high likelihood that he will come out. And again commend a lot of support. Also, he will be seen. He is being seen as a scapegoat. So that is also working on Lula's favor. Because a lot of people are saying, well, maybe there was corruption during. His regime, but this is completely over excessive. Well, what's your take on his popularity then and what these legal troubles having? What effect the having on his popularity because on one hand we can look at this and say, well, it's politically motivated he didn't do any of this. But then on the other hand some of his supporters do concede that. Yes, there is corruption, but we like him. Anyway, what's your take on? How it affects his popularity would he possibly be able to walk out of prison admit to everyone. Yes. I did things wrong. But I'm back anyway and still come on that support. Well, that is very puzzle. I mean, he ran the last presidential. Campaign in jail, and he nearly one and his designated candidate nearly one. And this was someone that nobody knew so not only Lula could have won the last election if he had been allowed to run, but even the person that he designated that nobody really knew or cared much for was able to nearly defeat Bolsonaro. So there is a huge level of support for Lula, particularly in certain regions of Brazil, and it is so an open question of what will happen after two or three years of Bozon are in power, and how people will feel about that. With the memories of a lot of these legacies of the Lula administration that actually provided a lot of support for poor disadvantage groups in society that say, well, you know, maybe he was a little bit corrupt. But who isn't? So that's kind of the the thing that can have supported him to what degree do you think he's fade is now resting? On president both narrow eve as some predict they will be in eventual backlash to both narrows hard line positions on many, many things do you think that will raise the possibility of another comeback full Lula, depending, of course, on what happens with these prison sentence. Well, it all really depends now on the judicial process and the current Justice minister model was the person the judge in charge of the investigation under the new judge hearts. They're really pressing this very very hard. But it's still a question of what will happen if this goes into a peel, and what will the higher courts say how much of this case is really substantiated. I mean, the fact that as again, this was known actually his property. I mean, how how much will that actually pay in the judicial process is an open question. But if he doesn't go out of jail, he really doesn't have much of a chance of a comeback. If he does. Come out of jail. I think he certainly does have a chance of coming back in databa- continued a Natalia supper Vila Pereira. Thank you for joining us here on the briefing. Six minutes past twelve here in London. And we'll get the latest business news now on the line is a bastion Selleck from Bloomberg Sebastian it's a big day in Austria, some news broke earlier this morning. I believe London time that the Royal commission into a stray is banking sector has claimed its biggest to victims yet. Yes is a sweeping car has been going on for ages incumbent litany of wrongdoing across the industry that being charging dead people fees to advise as pushing customers into bad investments. So they can meet their own bonus targets all sorts of wrongdoings being uncovered, but it was National Australia Bank. That really felt the brunt today the CEO and champion have both resigned. The report found the best off and accepted cash bribes to approve fraudulent mortgages and also misled the regulator over a fees for no service scandal and the report targeted these two individuals in person questioning whether they were capable of leading the response to all of this. So that is driven the resignations. And it comes a tough time for Australian bangs the landscape is one of falling earnings sinking housing market, a rising funding and compliance cost. So it's a tricky cocktail if you're operating in the sector in Australia national trailer, Bengals they're saying it's going to delay the plant IPO of its embassy wealth management unit. Happy hoping to say that public, but fee income commissions command to pressure on the bad PR landscape is well have all sort of created this environment weather that decided it's best to pick up later date. But it was initially a soft blow. It wasn't it. When it was initially handed down the report, it seemed as if a lot of people looked at it and thought, oh, well everyone's going to get off scot-free. I it seems it's no in near as bad as we thought with those predictions perhaps a little bit overstated. I mean, it depends on the individual lenders. But that very much was the reaction on Friday when we had this because the key thing was stopped short of demanding structural overhaul. That's what investors have been concerned about it didn't happen. So you saw Hsieh's surging in what you might call a relief rally you so about fourteen and a half billion US dollars added to the market volley of the big full buyings pushed an index a financial Stoxx to its highest since March of two thousand and nine I said, it was seventy six recommendations in the Commission's final report, and they had been sort of Bassett as the probe sort of unearthed a string of scandals. But at this juncture, we did see them rise a commission lambasting senior Bank executives. He said that the fees for no service scandals could lead to criminal charges instead urging the regulator to get tough and start considering prosecutions instead of negotiation as its first steps are really taking a hardline pro that as well. But they just stay clear recommending financial funds before the split off financial device with management units. Breaking them up essentially, that's really what investors and the banks themselves. Don't want to see to be forced to split up. We didn't get that. And therefore. Are we saw that rally on Friday? No doubt will be hearing much much more about that story in the days ahead Sebastian sell. It could Bloomberg thanks for joining us on the briefing. It's just about to hit him minutes past twelve here on the briefing. The UK's Prime Minister Theresa may is in Brussels now as she attempts to renegotiate the E U withdrawal agreement of it. You've heard that news before but as Monaco's contributing editor Andrew moolah explains any decision on the UK's Bodos will also had a huge impact on the Republic of Ireland. Maximum traded among Irish nationalists since the middle of the nineteenth century holds. That England's crisis is Ireland's opportunity. As Brexit looms. This saying may have to be updated along with Britain's long treasured reputation, full sensible, governance and commonsense compromise Brexit substantially tantrum by non London England as opposed to the United Kingdom's of constituent nations. Looks not so much like islands opportunity as also islands crisis. Indeed, one of the few redeeming ironies of the entire Brexit fiasco has been these spectacle of Britain's quest for self determination. At least as Brexit has preferred to see it being faltered by island the boat of between the Republika violent a Northern Ireland therefore the border to be between the EU and the known. You is still the biggest obstacle. Brexit has to overcome. No matter. What happens them out of what kind of a future relationship that we have that we never returned to board as the pants trouble along the border between Northern Ireland Irish Republic this box off. So this vitally important box faxed stole the backstop backstop. Why do we need the Batstone the wider effect of Brexit upon the Republika violent depends to a large extent on what kind of Brexit occurs. And as we go to where roughly fifty days until the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, nobody knows and the kind of Brexit that occurs on March twenty ninth hole. Whenever is. Lingerie down to where the some agreement between the UK and the EU can be reached on precisely how the border between the UK and Ireland will operate after Brexit as things stand. The UK government is suggesting alternative arrangements to the so-called backstop, which is at least in keeping with the entire Brexit ethos of being loan airy reassurance and short on practical details. Should the Irish border issued prove intractable the likeliest consequence is a no deal Brexit while this would likely be bad news for the UK, it might at least be argued that Britain would be lying in the rickety bed made for itself. Having voted for Brexit in the first place. Island. However did not vote for it. Indeed. Recent polls put Irish support for you membership at north of eighty five percent, but this will not prevent island collecting shrapnel from the UK's self-inflicted wound the IMF predicts a four percent reduction in Ireland's economic output, and the loss of perhaps fifty thousand jobs the economic and social research institute an Irish think tank estimates the average annual cost per household at fourteen hundred euros due to price rises around. Eighty percent of Ireland's exports go to or through the UK forty percent of Ireland's food imports and fifty five percent of its fuel imports travel in the opposite direction and fifty old days out. Nobody knows how this will work. Even a relatively soft Brexit in which the UK leaves the EU under the terms of the deal agreed by K Prime Minister, Theresa may with the EU the not as yet with the UK's. Parliament is bad news for Ireland Irish companies will still need to reorganize this supply chains and adjust their administration at the very least it will be an immense and expensive hassle. But it is possible not that this was ever won't indifferent and ignorant Brexit as intended that Brexit might offer island some benefits at least thirty companies have relocated at least some of their operations from the UK to island, including hilariously Somerset capital. The investment management firm. Partly owned by pro Brexit cheerleader and conservative MP jacomb REEs mug. More may will follow. Another unintended consequence of Brexit has been and will continue to be an abrupt expansion of the Irish nation. Since the referendum in June two thousand sixteen tens of thousands of British citizens anxious to maintain their rights as citizens have brandished, parental or grand parental birth certificates at the nearest Irish embassy. London's alone has issued more than one hundred seventy six thousand Irish passports since the vote I think one of the biggest challenges facing I'll say see in my lifetime as Brexit. How he make sure that even though we've even e- you. We remain open open to to trade open to people London voted remained by nearly sixty percent to forty and the remain. Share climbs a stool. If one's definition of London trims off a few grouchy Alto. Burroughs the idea that London might happily adjust to life as announced a suburb of Dublin is no weirdly anywhere near the top ten silliest Brexit solutions, which have been suggested these last few years. Twenty four. I'm Andrew Malone. Thanks to Andrew moolah full of that addition of the foreign desk. Explain ah. You're listening to the briefing hill on Monaco twenty full. He is what else is making us today. As we've been hearing a Brazilian court has sentenced the country's former president Louis in knows your Lula da Silva to an additional thirteen years in prison. Lula who is seventy three has been found guilty of taking renovation work from a company implicated in a large scale corruptions game. The monocle minute reports on France's anti rioting Bill which will enable police to ban violent individuals from taking part in demonstrations without the oversight of judge those who violate the ban could face a prison sentence. Critics say that the Bill is at odds with an individual's right to protest. And finally, the British Council has apologized to George Orwell for rejecting an essay he wrote in defense of his country's cuisine in nineteen forty six. The council told all well, it would be unwise to publish it. Full the continental Reto all well who died. Four years later is best known for writing animal farm and nineteen eighty. Four. This is the briefing on twenty four. Full big events is a tricky business, especially when the guests from different slices of the political spectrum this month will likely see to a high stakes summits. Take place in the lapping waves of the South China Sea. Vietnam will host a meeting between the United States and North Korea. While the US is also due to sit down with officials from China. I'm joined in the studio by the journalist married to Jeff ski Mary has worked as a foreign correspondent in Paris, Washington and Moscow now Mary for those who haven't taken part in a summit or perhaps haven't been to one. What's it actually like who? It's if you're on the sidelines. It's a very very forbidding experience. Because over the years, these occasions have got more and more security conscious, and they've also got more globalized. So where in the past say, you might have had just the journalists and backup t. Teams from the two talking partners for a new summit. So in this case, he would only have the Americans and the Chinese or the Americans and the North Koreans. These are now global events. So you get not only the journalists from all over the world converging on these places, which are often not really very well engineered to cope with such an influx. Also, you have all the people that the sort of support teams, and the upper cheeks and the organizational people, so this this fleets of people that are involved in these occasions now, no on the face of it. Of course summit is supposed to be all about political discussions. But as you suggest there are a lot of details that go on behind the scenes as well to make sure that those discussions take place without any hiccups. What what sorts of details, and we not necessarily immediately expect I mean, I can earn. The imagine the sole tiv- caught wheels at a going on behind the scenes. To to get Kim Jong UN Donald Trump in the same room. No, absolutely. And I think in some ways we saw a bit of that the first meeting in Singapore because the choreography of that was so meticulously organized. It was expected simply to watch it visually as to what efforts has been made presumably by the diplomats on both sides to try and give the impression that actually it was a meeting of equals the two wasn't Trump deigning to receive as it were a petitioner from poor little North Korea. It was designed that the flags were equal. The seating was equal. The the whole thing that they came into the room together. All those things are incredibly important. And sometimes you see you understand that really only after you've seen something go wrong. And one of the things we did see go wrong. It was when Donald Trump came to the u k and there was extremely or of mishandled choreography. Very unusually when the Queen and Donald Trump were meeting Windsor Castle, and they had those guard of honor the the Queen Donald Trump sort of didn't position themselves correctly. Now, if ever you go to any of these occasions, one of the one of the things that you notice is that it is usually arranged. So that nobody can get wrong. Neither of the two starring partners, nor any of the other people who are involved on this case, you know, you look as sort of the Queen tried to position her in different places, and Donald Trump served didn't quite know where to put himself. That's should not happen. Dear nobody except Donald Trump. Of course. No. A lot of this has comes down to symbolism. And I mean pe- as you suggest we can take. A lot of cues a lot of ideas can come out of seemingly accidental details that no one really considered speaking of the Queen? Of course, there was the time that the Queen will that hat that looked like Mike beat recalling the European Union's flag, something that no one had considered until it was all over the internet. But one of the things that can get across a bit of a symbol can be the choice of location. How do you think one goes about choosing a location for one of these high stakes summons, what do you think of the issues that are likely to be front of mind? Those are also incredibly difficult issues, and Singapore was very interesting choice for the first North Korea Trump meeting because in some ways, although it identifies so much with the western world with sort of with the system, and it's capitalism and its free-marketism geographically and the sense of sort of discipline and order and therefore security that prevails in Singapore. Made it a good candidate for that meeting. But it's also interesting to me, at least that Singapore that the choice of Singapore. The first time around seems to be balanced almost by an equal and opposite choice of Vietnam for this meeting because this is somewhere where you could probably think that an American president was considerably less at ease. Given the all the history of the US in Vietnam that an American would be would find that more difficult location than somebody like North Korean leader? Because even though Vietnam has now embraced free-market economy. Nonetheless, there is a sort of legacy communism, the communist system has never been completely overturned like it wasn't so much of the world. So I think that that made it to me a very interesting choice. Geographically, it's similar. It's sort of equivalent. But it also balances rather? Nicely. So I think, you know, simple case to the diplomats involved just quickly. We're out of time on this better. It we do criticise a lot of these summits as being excessive or unnecessary. But you could argue that in today's politics with everything so polarized. We need more discussions not less essentially are some. It's a good thing. Well, I think in some ways, they're increasingly a good thing. Because so much is done at distant so much is done on new media old media so much is done at arm's length that we saw how important that first meeting between Trump and Kim was and I think that if there's some sort of report can be established, then that's a huge benefit especially in these sort of times married to jetski. Thank you for joining us on the briefing. Twenty three minutes past twelve here on the briefing time now for the lightning round of newspapers with Monaco's Mark was hippy, Marcus. Where are we starting? We're starting with today's edition of financial times. There's a lot of frustration within the UK community today after the British government told businesses can't guarantee the British economy would be covered by most of the EU global network of trade agreements immediately after Brexit, even if parliament approves Theresa May's divorce deal with Brussels does one Brexit development, obviously must have headlines in all papers today view about water. Don't altuve said yesterday what he what he said to be revised is the financial times close on the front page. There is a special place in hell for those who promoted Brexit without even a skit off a plan. It's going unfortunate. That main newspapers are reporting it slightly differently and claiming that to blame to all people who voted for Brexit as on the front page of the day. Early. Telegraph for common misquote that's cross almost well almost majority of British press this morning, quite a quite a worry. So let's continue to Germany Pendolino Morgenpost is reporting on the optimal off the collapse off Germany ah the budget airline this quite a big number of German airlines now need to national airlines that are actually now offering discounted prices for passengers were struck abroad so into get back to Germany and also interesting enough. There's one air force particularly worried its food volume airport it total of seventy percent of the flights from that airport were operated by Jamaica. So there's a concern over there. People's jobs. Let's go to Finland really really briefly. Interesting numbers last year, the legislation about opening times of bars, nightlife economy, and so forth was relaxed and now the number of restaurants and bars that are allowed to stay open till four grown by six hundred good number when you look at the most time economy, for example in the capitol Hill's and. Hills in a huge amount of snow this year. Helsinki. Just two quick home. Many truckloads of snow have been cleared from the hills and gets tweets so far not reckon all of the streets all of the streets put together and giving them like goodness one hundred thousand forty thousand five hundred and what's is that's more than the total for last year last year, the total number was forty thousand. It's good to keep track of these things Marcus Marcus EP there with today's newspapers you are listening to the briefing finally today at monocle worth fan of Helsinki airport, and while appropriately enough, and it's coming along nicely. Let's get more on that. Now from Helsinki correspondent Petrie bbut solve bed tree. Tell me more about this because it is the fastest growing airport in well at least in northern Europe. What's behind all that growth? Yeah. Ben. That's correct. I think the main point behind this growth is fear the national carrier and some years ago, they they changed their strategy. Now, they're focused really heavily on Asia. Goes you can kind of fly with FinnAir you fly the short north and route route you fly over north and Siberia, and it's actually I think about two hours faster than any other routes. So there's been a large increase in Asian passengers coming to Europe via Finland and the airport. Also has I think something like twenty direct connections to to Asian cities. So it's been growing about ten percent year on year, which is a lot to you know, two million passengers more every every year. So, you know, needs to expand now at the brand new terminal yesterday, tell us how did it look? Looked really amazing. I have to say I mean, they've extended their known Shang and terminal. By the capacity by something like forty five percents or a big increase. They've they built this new extension where you have lots of natural light coming in this, really, large windows, basically, all the walls are windows, and you have lots of. Of. Wooden elements there you really have a relaxed feeling especially at the at the security checks, which are by the Fayed, by the way, the state of the art technology. They they claim to be able to process about four passengers every minute per lane at the security on us as we all know, that's one of the most nerve trucking places airports going through security. They're also playing quite heavily on the theme of finished nature. They have this seventy five meter long digital display different finish natural landscapes trying to create this feeling that you're immersed in a Finnish nature, even though you're at the airport. Well, as any of the loyal readers will probably know monocle awarded Helsinki airport. Al favorite airport? Many many times tell me how important is the airport to the people of inland is it really a point of pride apps. It is it is it's actually economically really important because eat has fostered a strong growth in tourism in Finland. Not only. Only housing, but also Lapland you have a lot of Asian tourists coming in now. And and and that's that's key to the Finnish Finnish economy. Of course. The fact that heels gear poor this has been awarded by the likes of Monaco. So many times it's good for brand Finland because brand Finland is all about efficiency, and and you know, things working and life being easy going, and that's what the airport also aims to be. So they're supporting one another Patry built of in Helsinki will let you get back to all of that snow that indeed is full today's edition of the briefing. It was produced by Reese, James and researched by your lean go phone and may Lee Evans L studio manager was Kenya. Scarlet the briefing is back at the same time tomorrow. So do join us then and June to Madari house today that's live at eighteen hundred here in London thirteen hundred if you're listening in New York Juliette foster will be at the helm for today's show. We've also got a full wrap of the day in using current affairs. Coming up live at. Twenty two hundred with the monocle daily. So do stay tuned for that as well. The globalist is back live at seven AM tomorrow. That's with tiger and ride in the money's Ben roiling. That's the briefing. Thanks for joining us. Goodbye.

United Kingdom Brexit European Union Brexit London Helsinki Theresa May Ireland Donald Trump president Lula Lula da Silva United States North Korea Republic of Ireland Prime Minister Finland Brazil Monaco Britain
Sunday 1 September

Monocle 24: Midori House

22:19 min | 1 year ago

Sunday 1 September

"You're listening to a special edition of monaco's house view first broadcast on the first off september twenty-ninth on monocle twenty four. You're listening to a special edition of monaco's house view coming to you from dory house in london. The novelist thomas kenny lee is one of the world's most celebrated russia's. He's most famous work. The booker prize winning schindler's ark was later adapted into the steven spielberg film schindler's list. He's penned novels does that take readers into the grip of the u._s. Civil war the russian revolution wall to yugoslavia among many many others not to mention an extensive extensive library of non fiction including an epic three pot history of cannolis native will stralia. Thomas galea's new book is the book of science and he joined andrew moolah for this special sunday edition of monaco's house view. Let's stop with the title of which i want to start with because it has of course two titles here in the u._k. It's the book science antiquities but it was published in l. native australia and what i like to think of as a great example of that <hes> antipathy and culture of plain-speaking two old men dying titles. Do you prefer i like them. Both in fact one off the alarm notice being diplomatic but the largest segment of the book is called the book of science antiquity <hes> so was the title out already so they're three sections of the book and one of them. The largest is cold that so i'd already thought up the title in a sense the two old men dying a two parallel all sorts of parallel characters living extremely longtime apart we have shelby who is a more or less contemporary documentary filmmaker and we we have a character you call shade or learned man who lived in australia some forty two thousand years ago. I want to start by talking about shade because because you mentioned in the introduction to the book eighty certain self consciousness about articulating what is clearly australian indigenous person from the point of view of being a walk straight win and that's something you've done before of course most notably on the chattahoochee blacksmith back in about. I guess not in seventy one seventy two shrank. How what was your approach to questions like that changed in that time because australian attitudes. I think towards indigenous peoples have changed a lot in that time i would prefer to think for the better <hes> drastically so <hes>. I don't think we have to be doctrinaire about cultural attribution of stealing any other people's stories <hes> as long as you got their permission all stories in a sense belong to all humans <hes>. I don't think it was an issue that much delight highmore oh shakespeare any but it is appropriate given their send many good average writers given that we took a whole continent from the aboriginals that we should not also still their stories however however i make the case in my introduction that it's okay to write about early. Humans relatively early humans shopping's <hes> because at that time <hes> my ancestors in yours. We're living a similar life. I didn't think as comfortable actually in central asia <hes> warding off the sabertooth tiger trying to keep warm and <hes> i felt that mungo man and i hope this proves to be true. Manga manage the prototype for lamented man <hes> that he will become the center of an australian shrine in the desert which we will visit which will reconcile us to this giant fact how long the average of being there because this is a very gradual and somewhat grudging admission by white australia hasn't it yes indeed but even bob hawke the the greatest show in <hes> prime minister who recently died even haughey is to say listen you gotta wake up to the fact that they've been here for two two thousand five hundred bloody generations and web in half of five you know who wins that contest and he's right slowly holy west beginning to see the antiquity of that occupation and i think mungo man society was very advanced compared to <hes> what we know vow <hes> ancestors peregrinations pilgrimages at that time because first of all the lake leonard man lennon manage the fictional version among man who was found by friend of us forty two thousand years old he skeleton was found was only gradually we learned he was forty two thousand years old he was also ritually buried buried with great honors and he's the oldest ritual burial that humans have that have the have discovered so far on earth and that gives a very human dimension to he's burial. He was caked with ohka which came from two hundred miles away said there was another community of sappy out there beyond the dialing river river which is two blazes like everything in destroying your way it's huge if if web driven out it extensively through that country a number of times and it's nearly two days drive from you south wales from from sydney kidney rather and it still in new south wales and was out in that area that mungo man's oak came from some the knives he used came from the upper the glacier glaciation country as it then was to ice ages ago <hes> gracie country <hes> in the australian alps and so we know from his existence and what is found around in the shores of that lake by palaeontologists now that there were other communities of hamma sappy aunts with whom mm-hmm manga man was trading but he and his fellow men and women <hes> lived in communities by the light to which came the giant fauna of the tongue there was two and a half ton. <hes> creature called the depart on and it was a vegetarian was easy to hunt. You just had to be careful. It didn't fall fall on when you brought it down. <hes> there were giant kangaroos which have since become extinct. There were giant <hes> amy's he's. There were five or six foot high koalas. There was a mass line related to the go. Allah <hes> that was is a very savage creature but a very clues of one and there were giant lizards and as you know aboriginal regional people like nothing like a good go on a good a good listen and therefore manga man didn't have to travel forty two thousand years ago except for the things we all travel fo- still <hes> romance education pilgrimage and <hes> trade and so <hes> <hes> i i try to sing of his life of these fortune agent life in this book a lot of what you're describing that history and that culture even that environment is of course still insufficiently understood or acknowledged the strategy which i i. It's one of the reasons why i think it's been heartening to the book like bruce. Pasco's documents has been such a hit that should be great but it's a great book and i had a small all hand in persuading a jury in australia myself and <hes> aboriginal russian coal melissa lukashenko we were on the jury and we formed a phalanx to get it named the book of the year and it it it is groundbreaking because it talks about the fact that the aboriginals originals were not this <hes> totally vagrant hunter-gatherer which is of course what we were always telling growing up that they we were shown pictures of them living their normal lives <hes> in kangaroo country tree in winter and still wearing loincloths they weren't dumb to the benefits of kangaroos shoes kangaroo skin choosen season kangaroo skin clicks and but they were depicted as being too dumb to to bring down a kangaroo that i d you were talking about <hes> as mungo man the actual learned man as he appears in your book as being kind of a focus of reconciliation shen or as he put it in the book that reconciling phenomenon between australia's geological antiquity and social juvenille <hes> those are the two great contradictions at the heart aww australia d._c. The relationship between those changing though or perhaps even improving greatly <hes> first i will there's a big move to get the aboriginals recognized aboriginal occupation recognizing on it in the constitution and and via what the aboriginals want is an advisory board elective advisory council which advise the government on all native legislation until now white guys have decided what's good for the aboriginals. This has changed to the point. Now an indigenous indigenous man is the minister for aboriginal affairs and so <hes> we hope that with through his persuasion will get bay recognition <hes> <hes> of aboriginal antiquity aboriginal ownership never seated and above all <hes> <hes> aboriginal <hes> <hes> an aboriginal count advisory council. <hes> conservative immediately condemned the ideas of third house upon upon their all whites gotta reason those guys always got a reason to be nakae two perot things and he the the the proposition for an aboriginal council. <hes> is gaining ground now. The key ways his relationship than museum is relationship with their indigenous was through a treaty that was made with queen victoria on on the average <hes> the the aboriginal. If you like of new zealand the mary have been protected that they draw their rights now that they lawyers and parliamentarians tehran's they draw the basis of mary rights and stewardship rights out of the the treaty why tangy <hes> but <hes> no such treaty or compact exists between the two hundred and fifty language groups of australia and the bulk of the estranged people. Let's talk a bit about the other protagonist audiobook shelby who is a documentary filmmaker a a man of advancing years <hes>. He has a certain number. I think it's fair to say of overlapping interests and experiences and indeed acquaintances ince's pilgrim leonard mac but but he's he also or at least i you fairly relaxed about people assuming that he's also you due to a large extent. He is me and part except <hes> <hes> he sexual encounters in. There's always more sex in the north atlantic. Thank you and say for example. He puzzles a lot about might akon relieve. He's admiration for <hes> mongo man or learned man and he knows that hand mongo hey and learned <hes> the children of mighty andrea leave as well. Are we all so he attends a <hes> he goes to award film a war in east africa and he is aware that stage that wars being waged might akon conroe eve lived <hes> he's questing trying to get a meaning all the time but he also takes she's fascination with manga man and pre european stralia to the octa where he studying the the you know the question and for him is why do they have the same rights as the aboriginal stu <hes> when this so removed and the other question and what does he do about he's all go friend on the cruise with these. Why are we thought that was on necessarily cruel of you really. Yes said i'd say to beat because it's not me i <hes> the cruising girlfriend isn't ah watson donald ship <hes> and <hes> so <hes> i said that to judy. My wife is very forgiving bechir. I said this a fake go on this cruise and she wasn't on when we did it when we were researching the <hes> the bering strait and the u._p._k. Inuit so judy has been with me me looking. She's interested in all that stuff too so light cats. Judy is rather light kath kath <hes> the the wife and the book she's upfront. She's after all descendant of <hes> <hes> of <hes> door breaking down landlord's door breaking down convicts from me school way and so she's a forthright woman as many stray and women are are as yeah i've noticed though which has what like <hes> manga man's like me he nosy couldn't have got through life without strong women <hes> and therefore their the a naturally exist in their own right but they they i take the fate of partially good <hes> uncertain men into their hands they often and put the final spin on the pilgrimage that men undertake and that's the other thing. We think we want a quite life yet. London's full of fifty year olds who erasing off with another girl upsetting the household tipping the household raising issues of of income rising issues of housing and that's a rather graphic example that we always wanted to be on the move we want to i've got a friend who was a very middle class biologist and she uncounted an australian plant. It was one the empress josephine light that fringe explorer bow don sent it back to josephine and she loved it too beautiful trae call the perfume tree and she has extracted over the years a compound pound from it patented it and has tried in vitro and in vivo and is now has now synthesized it but the expensive offensive all this as reggie lives like a backpacker. She's the captive of this plant and what she would have had an easy life if he'd never encountered it but her defining journey and the in this book there are defining journeys on that school what's important to you to have your protagonist visit <hes> east africa specifically try a which was a war you visited in person when it was happening and you became quite i think enthused by the train coles at the time. Was it important to you to do this. As kind of a settling accounts with settling settling of accounts throughout the train regime became because as is often the way when starry eyed revolutions get into palo the does often become something think of a case of meet the new boss same as the old not only was i betting on the <hes> era trains but fred holidays very hard nose doctor who does <hes> and a genuine hero. I think he does appear in your book in slightly disguised. Yes and he talked me into going first time so he said if you manaf enough you know you order bloody. Fred was an extraordinary eye doctor. He worked with aboriginals and he dressed he always i stressed in frank. Hoti the the novelist said in five dollars worth of clothing fred so i dressed like a plumber and he talked like a plumber and i i remember a aboriginal woman telling me she was sent down from buck to make this great eye doctor and this blake comes in and he's he's probably dressed and he says give us a look at your. I love. Let's not bloody. Good is it and she thought the great eye doctor will be in after this plumbing but it was fred and fred started auto world movement to attack cataract blindness in pole in vietnam in east africa and he bullied bullied dow government into putting up the money for an ink intraocular lens facility in asmara which is still working at still manufacturing on you factoring when i lost look for seven dollars eye cataract lenses and it was based on the technology the the era trains already had going joining the revolution as i explained in the book so later in the book shelby <hes> guys back as as i went back in two thousand when war breaks out again i went back to witness the destruction of this. It looked tosoh asmara woodfold in the benami. I wanted to be there to to ridiculously protect this. I facility of fred fred died hide. It was a crazy idea but if they're going to destroy it with hand grenades which was they destroyed a lot of equipment in the country. I wonder woman today though a destroying st- australian stuff and visionary stuff and in in at least two senses mrs visionary stuff was a mad impulse but my daughter went with me and so i write about <hes> <hes> shelby going back for the same reason <hes> but <hes> poor old shelby dies of a safa jio cancer and the operation associated with it. After i finished the book i found out about three months. After i found out i had to say have have the same operation but thank the gods be. I'm i survived it to this point. I had last year yeah exactly a year ago and well things are good so far which is all in eighty three year old can say <music> enormously pleased to hear thomas neely. Thank you very much for joining us. Look thanks for being here. It's a great honor. The legendary ortho thomas nearly there in conversation in with monaco's andrew malone kelly's new book the book of science and antiquities. He's out now published by. This has been a special condition of monaco's house view. You'll regular program returns at eighteen hundred london time on monday. I'm ben ryan. Thank you for tuning in <music>.

australia shelby monaco fred fred london andrew malone kelly Judy thomas kenny lee russia steven spielberg dory house Thomas galea east africa schindler thomas neely schindler cannolis ben ryan yugoslavia
Wednesday 7 November

Monocle 24: Midori House

29:53 min | 2 years ago

Wednesday 7 November

"You're listening to Midori house. First broadcast on the seventh of November two thousand eighteen on monocle twenty four. Hello and welcome to Madari house coming to you live from studio one here in London. I'm Andrew moolah on today show, what CNN should be ashamed of itself having you work in for them. You are a rude. Terrible person. You shouldn't be working for CNN. Go ahead. President Donald Trump reacts to yesterday's midterm elections with his customary grace and self awareness. My guests Michael Goldfarb and Jacob power killers will be taking an extended look at what we learned yesterday. And what it might tell us about the second half of Trump's first term. That's coming up on the Dory. House on monocle twenty four. Welcome to Midori house. My guest today are Jacob para killers deputy head of the US and America's program Chatham house, and Michael Goldfarb, the journalists and broadcast welcome both. And as promised an extended look tonight at the first US midterm elections that anybody bother candidates unusually punk tilles citizens and friendless cranks has ever cared about. Not for the first or last time president Donald Trump's in addressing effect on politics has not had quite the outcome. He might have desired. The Trump has failed the vote as a big victory. This is a little like hailing Eric Trump as a future Nobel prize winning physicist. I e an active heroin optimism, though, Trump's Republicans consolidated their grip on the Senate. They did lose the house of representatives that press conference from which we played a clip at the top of the show is ongoing as far as it's possible to tell Trump has not yet started hurling the actual furniture at the assembled journalists. It does seem to be only a matter of time. Jacob does Donald Trump actually have any reason to celebrate. I think the the Senate is I mean, he has reason celebrate it's not unpredictable reason celebrate the Democrats did pretty well in the Senate relative to the number of races that were actually up for election. Relative to where those elections were being held many of them being in states that went for Trump just two years ago that said the looks like depending on the outcome in Montana. Arizona it looks as though Mitch McConnell will be commanding at least fifty two and possibly fifty three or at a stretch fifty four votes, which means that he will have an even freer hand to pass through nominees from Trump, whether those are future cabinet officials federal judicial appointments even potential next supreme court Justice. So that is a reason celebrate and if he's thinking in longer term since the twenty twenty and twenty twenty two cycles quite as rosy for the Republicans. It gives them a little bit more leeway. It means that the Democrats have to work that much. Harder to take back the Senate and potentially face a second term, President Trump with a unified Democratic Congress. But the house is a disaster for him. There's no sugar coating that on which subject Michael that is the one thing we do definitely know for sure is that the Republican party no longer control the house of representatives. How constrained does? I mean, obviously constrains any president. But this particular president how constrained is he likely to be by Democratic Congress. Well, it depends first of all let me put a caveat in on any outsor- here. It depends on if if the Democrats can get themselves together and had some big if. And and behave in a you know, like they have a backbone, and it's not clear, you know, what? I mean, Nancy Pelosi is the speaker of the house in coming in in theory. But she may face the challenge, she's seventy eight she knows more about where everybody's skeletons are hanging, and that's very useful. But you know, there has to be a changing of the guard. Sometimes having said that let me answer your question. Andrew the house, oh has become the battleground going back twenty five years to nineteen ninety four when Newt Gingrich and led the Republican charge on the contract with America congress. Most people listening to this probably still in grade school when that happened, but it has more than set the tone for the following quarter-century. They have accumulated power in the house to do two things in a really important one is subpoena. Power. And I can I can envision a sequence where Robert Mueller who who's been. You're not related. We are not no he has been decorous point during this election because he's a decorous kinda guy. He's a Republican of the old school Mueller will eventually produce his report the Democrats control the house now, they control all the committees. If there's a question about banking. You will see subpoenas about banking? If there's a question about Trump's relationship with the Russians you will see the foreign relations committee subpoena hang him about that. They will tie her up in more paper than Donald Trump's lawyers used to tie up people trying to get paid by Donald Trump back in the days when he was just a real estate developer. And that will be the story. I do believe if the next twenty four months, there is also another thing which has to be considered which is the Democrats now control the house of representatives appropriations bills the much. Money starts in the house, if he really wants money to finish the wall. He's got to get the Democrats to do it if he really wants money. Stop the wool come to start the. I if he really wants money to bail out all those farmers who voted for him and have now been screwed fifteen ways from Sunday because soybean prices have collapsed and the New York Times had a brilliant article forty eight hours ago about these mountains of soybeans in North Dakota that cannot be sold because of Trump's idiot tariff policy with China. So this is this is where I feel I should do the narrative voice and say, but Trump didn't care, but Trump didn't care and they voted for me they'd vote for him again tomorrow. And I and so when Trump says only two billion dollars to bail these guys out who are my voters. I certainly hope that the house appropriations committee says stick it where the sun don't shine sunshine can I fake sunshine. Can I just come in on the the first point there on the question of investigations because I don't disagree, but it actually a modulated somewhat because it's not just the Muller investigation. It's also been this is a target rich environment. You have. Fourteen separate investigations into Ryan. Zinke the interior secretary. You have ongoing questions about the at HHS secretary, Tom Price and his use of private jets. You have ongoing questions about the use of public funds by Scott Pruitt, former EPA administrator you have Jared Kushner security clearance, you have the secretary of commerce Wilbur Ross and his belated declarations of conflict of interest. And you know, and that's just off the top of my head. There are probably things in departments that have attracted no media attention whatsoever. Housing and urban development energy that have not been examined at all by either the press or by the relevant oversight committees. We should both fly back to Washington and see if we can get jobs as hill staffers. They obviously have to ramp up their staff there will be a lot of call for you. You know, it's interesting Jacob is that the this is obviously an it's not an exaggeration. It doesn't matter what your political persuasion. This is the most corrupt. Government since Warren G Harding's administration the teapot dome scandal, and you may if I'm not mistaken, and you can correct me. Warren G Harding's head exploded about three years into his term. And he had a massive stroke and died two new or did he I don't think he was looking at up. I don't think Harding Dodd enough. Snow? Harding died office Twenty-three and this. And that was why teapot dome didn't end up. Those. And those points go to Jacob. Well, no, I'm saying. Jacob to verify because he's young and his memory isn't anywhere near as cluttered as mine. And and you know, this is this is the my most optimistic point the day. He was elected. I am doubling down on the air, Monica listeners. I said he wouldn't he would make he wouldn't last two years. I'm having to reconsider and one of the reasons that I didn't think he'd make it two years. A Miller would get him or be his health would fail and having watched the performance just now on of this bizarre press conference, if he were to do a Warren Harding and have some kind of massive stroke. Would anyone be surprised I think it's a little bit? I personally rather not get into speculation about the president's health. Obviously there are real questions. They are given the his his previous medical care in the persona of his former personal doctor. That was the personal doctor who said that Trump was the healthiest person ever run for the presidency. You know that the doctor certainly wrote himself in wasn't dictated by Trump, and then recant Ted and now claims that his his record relating to Trump were confiscated by people working for Trump. Nevertheless, I don't think it's up. I don't think it's particularly helpful to speculate about the president's health, even though it is a legitimate interest of the national the national body politic. But I do think there is something very real about the effectiveness of an administration, which is going to be besieged on all sides, not just on questions of potential Russian collusion, but cabinet members, the president family the president's business interests the president's aids who's going to want to the presents going to want to clean house. He's gonna want to get rid of some of his his cabinet members. But who's going to want to go in under these conditions? Well, we come up with a partial answer to that as we move on a little bit because the American political cycle being what it is. Today has been pretty much the first day of campaigning for the twenty twenty election at which one of the offices up for grabs will be the oval one. We are still away off the point at which challenges for the presidency, formerly make themselves known, but Democratic Party strategist will already be scrambling through the Rune scattered by yesterday's vote in search of if not the actual candidate for the presidency in two thousand twenty then some idea of that candidate might look like Jacob as a Representative of that younger generation. Did you see anything especially in the new faces of which they were many elected yesterday, some of them very far from billion significant we have now the two youngest women ever to serve in congress. I two Muslim women. The first native American women. First gay governor has been elected in Colorado is there somewhere in their if not any of those actual people who will probably still be young for this two years from now. In fact, a couple of them constitutionally literally too young for this two years from now. But is there some really dear of the future of the Democratic Party? So there's a lot of speculation. About Beto Rourke who very narrowly lost the Texas Senate race who is a member of the house of representatives of three terms. I think so he wouldn't be the least experienced person ever to run for the presidency. He did energize the tough to come off a loss though to run for president ruling. And did it. I mean that was long time ago. I mean, it's it's she can very credibly spin the idea that he may Texas more competitive he brought victory to down ballot races to Texas. Democrats running in the house he contributed to the the wave in the house. And I think he has a pretty substantial supply of goodwill from both the more establishment and the more progressive wings of the party. So I wouldn't rule him out. I wouldn't necessarily rule him in either. I think the the person who sends out to me. I mean, I, you know, my view of it fundamentally hasn't changed. I still think you know, some combination of Booker Harris gillibrand possibly warrant although I would say she her chances have. Diminished in the last few weeks are probably likely to be in contention for but in club char from Minnesota state, which is vaguely quite democratic but not overwhelmingly so held democratic in two thousand sixteen when next door Wisconsin and next next door. Michigan did not but only by a fairly thin margin. She won her re election, overwhelmingly, she got huge votes in in rural counties. She's relatively progressive. There's a lot of speculation that I've been able to pick up today on her as a potential candidate. She's been relatively quiet, but I wouldn't be surprised if she's today reconsidering her her potential candidacy Manca we were talking earlier in the show about the opportunities. The Democrats are going to have to to gum Trump's administration up with inquiries and subpoenas and investigations, but won't should be the democratic party's actual priority. From now to two thousand and twenty do they need to be thinking in terms of taking down Donald Trump or presenting. A positive case for the Democratic Party. Can they hope to show up in twenty twenty and win by basically, just not being Donald Trump will this is the subject of a documentary did those reporting Tober, and they they face of the face a real dilemma here. So I might my basic view is. They need to par. Those two points are not they're not dissimilar because the base wants them to to really hold not just Donald Trump's feet to the fire, but the entire Republican party one of the things that I found really interesting, and I was in Georgia and Texas quite a bit of time and two of the races. I I was paying attention to candidates are met. They're still counting the votes. I mean, the votes have essentially been counted hundred percent of the votes cast yesterday have been counted. But now they have to open up all the postal ballots. And so on here's what I learned is that the energy in the party is incredibly progressive. And it's it's mostly it's not just the young. It's brought the young out, and that's good. But Bernie Sanders started doing that two years ago. What's important is that they sustain the leadership of the party sustains the idea that now that we've got this far we're not just going to go back to businesses usual in the house of representatives, which is why commented earlier about why Nancy Pelosi will face some kind of challenge about becoming speaker of the house up. She probably will win because she's actually good at at moving things around the legislature. But we'll see what happens. I think that. The Democrats dilemma is how you can be both on the attack against Donald Trump and the Republican party which is putting his back pocket, and how you can be putting your own agenda Ford, but these candidates Lucy MacBeth Gina Ortiz Jones, remember these names because even if they lose they will be figures in the party, they managed to talk about healthcare. They managed to talk about all those middle class. And I hate that term because what does middle class mean anymore. All those middle class concerns of you know, the social safety net has been shredded people voted for Donald Trump. They voted for Donald Trump because they really hated Hillary Clinton if there'd been a better candidate in two thousand sixteen preps Donald Trump would just be a joke for late night comedians. So I think that the Democrats really do have to keep double focus. Do you have to keep pushing really hard because the base wants punishment. There's no doubt about that. But. The base also wants to talk about real policies. And I think they can do it. I don't think it's an impossible dilemma and a final thought because Jacob wants to jump in is the best thing the most important one of the most important things I heard on that trip is a guy named Richard Parker who was the founding editor of mother Jones magazine, what fifty years ago, and now teaches at the Kennedy School, and he said, look the biggest thing they have to do is find someone who's authentic bento Rourke burst through because he was authentic Kamala Harris in the cavern hearings burst through into consciousness because they're authentic. That's what they need to find the one thing. I'd add that none of which I disagree with is that I think there might be some value in the Democrats having house, but not the Senate strategically because the people doing the investigating are Elijah Cummings Adam Schiff, these these long standing committee chair people and committee ranking members. None of whom with the possible exception of chef seem to have particular near-term presidential ambitions and someone like Cummings who's in his late sixties probably doesn't have presidential ambitions at all. They want to be a committee chairperson. Do the Java committee chairperson, maybe run for Senate at some point and that sort of? So there's kind of a natural separation between the parties rising stars in the Senate, the bookers and Harrises and gillibrand Zain club HR's and Bidault better or coup sort of doing his own thing a little bit. And then these these investigators so you can have on the one hand the the holding feet to the fire on the other hand, the advancing positive agenda. Now that assumes a certain degree of sophistication in the electorate and being able to disintegrate those two, but I've actually I actually think if you look at the the results and the sort of nuances and the results there is a fair degree fist in the electric. And you probably shouldn't underestimate that look we're going to take a short break. Now. You're listening to Madari house with. Me Andrew along with Jacob power killers. And Michael Goldfarb coming up up next. Indeed, the midterms in Florida the and finally state. Batman sitting opposite. You on the subway lost in another world or that smart women scribbling notes while having her flat white, well, here's what links listening to monocle twenty four Phya are free radio app. That simply and seamlessly lets you Choon in live. Download shows for later. Join meant just think you too could be settling back and joining cultural nourishment can form the Monaco arts review team briefed on the world that business with the entrepreneurs or just enjoying great music with the sessions at Midori house. Come on download the monocle twenty four out today. Dick on your headphones and having formed fun on the go monitor twenty four keeping an eye and ear on the road. You're back with Madari house with me, Andrew, Melissa. With me. I'm Michael Goldfarb and Jacob para killers now veteran contemplate is of American politics are long resigned to the caprices of Florida state, which has made a specialty of staging excruciatingly close races which often have an infuriatingly wanting to significance. Yesterday was no exception. The Senate race between incumbent Democrat Bill. Nelson Republican challenger Rick Scott appears to have been settled in favor of the latter by fewer voters than might have been distracted on route to the polls boy fight with an alligator the gubernatorial scrimp between Republican Ron Disentis and democrat, Andrew gillum. Also went the GOP's way by a tiny tiny mountain, but Floridians voted enthusiastically to restore voting rights to convicted felons who have served the sentence. Jacob rising above the obese jokes about Floridians, which I am as an Australian probably entitled to make nearly ten percent of Florida's voting population. Are rather were affected by this? So how big a deal could this be a future elections, unbelievably massive. So this is one point four million people in a state where I mean, I'm I'm old enough to remember two thousand and the presidential election decided in Florida by five hundred seventy one votes in the hanging chads, and that's not uncommon every national election info, virtually every national election, Florida since then has been decided by a margin measured to no more than five figures. There are a couple that were abroad arranged in that. But generally, speaking Florida's very closely divided state, and the this community of ex-felons, we're going to be Rian franchised is disproportionately African American Hispanic those are disproportionately democratic voting groups. So if I was a democratic strategist taking long view, I would say yes, bad that we lost the democratic. We lost the governor's race bad that we lost the Senate race, but the much bigger deal is Rian franchised in. In two thousand four I made a an hour long program called the mind of the south because the confederate mindset still frames far too much of it's the agenda center agenda, Saturn for too much of American politics. And I was in Tallahassee, and I went to an interview with one of Al Gore's team of lawyers locally, and he told me that you know, he he had urged Gortat just Amanda, total statewide recount don't don't concede you one. And then they put me in touch with a guy. I think is first name was Andrew, but his surname was Johnson. He was an African American and I went down to his church to meet him. He's a deacon of his church sang in the choir. He had gone to vote two thousand and been turned away. Why because his surname is Johnson, which is an extraordinarily common. Name amongst African Americans. And somebody said well you fell in. It's not me another Andrew Johnson may have been. What are the odds are? Yeah. John johnson. James johnson. You know, an and this was in a state that was decided by three figures couple of hundred votes. If you think of an he wasn't even a felon. If you think of the thousands of people were disenfranchised just because they're the same surname as a felon. I think that this will serve emitted make huge actually more than one point four million. I mean, yeah, it's possible. I mean, it's a very effective tool of voter suppression in the African American community, you know, if you have, you know, certain surnames common, you know, my last name is Goldfarb. I don't think anyone doubts. You know, what my ethnic background is. And if your surname is Johnson in in parts of of America. There's not a lot of doubt. And this is a really an it's pastime. Anyway, not even with voter suppression. You pay your debt? Science when I heard that. This was the law in Florida and in many other states besides. Dozen or also states that once you commit a felony your life, you pay your debt to society, and you should be able to be a citizen again. Okay. We'll finally tonight. We'll take a look at how these midterms affect the rest of the world, which possibly for the first time has paid any attention to the midterms. Well, nervous prognostication is that if President Trump finds himself stymied at homeboy hostile house of representatives. He may seek to express himself. Let's call it that abroad where any president does enjoy considerable if not familial executive powers is that a reasonable fear. Do you think I think it's a reasonable expectation? I I'm not sure so I think there's a scenario where Trump is more inspired to do risk to take risks to do things which are potentially very dangerous. But actually, I think that it's possible that the things that he will do by way of demonstra. Rating has continued power and relevance. Even when it's domestic agendas blocked, and his administration is being tied up in subpoenas are not necessarily things which will increase at least short-term risks. If you look at his big summit with Kim Jong UN, for example, which e. When you drill down into it. In terms of did it succeed in denuclearizing north create. Did it succeed in lessening long-term dangerous on the Korean peninsula? No, obviously. But the temperature of the sort of war rhetoric from Washington in particular, but concurrently from Pyongyang was dialed down significantly by Trump's apparently sincere belief that he had convinced Kim Jong UN to denuclearize. So I think there's a there is a version of this where Trump seeks to make deals he doesn't particularly pay attention to what those deals are. And again in the long term they may increase risk. But in the short term if it hurts war with Iran. That's probably a good thing. I'm not entirely sure I agree with you Jacob. We've got almost all the way through the show. We've agreed on every only competed for who gets to talk. I, but I worry about it is I I notice from afar dynamic in the White House that he is so easily. Attracted and basically board that. People within the inner circle can make policy on the hoof, and you have working as a national security adviser John Bolton is an extraordinarily dangerous fellow. And I my worry would be that. Well, Trump is fuming about Jim Acosta at CNN. And and you know, the the the subpoenas to see his tax records. Finally, because you know, the house is gonna wanna see those. He has addressed that at the press conference says he hasn't released these tax returns because the too complicated and people wouldn't understand. Oh, yeah. The because they're in Russian. Look. My worry is that there'd be freelancing going on. There are persistent reports that Jim Mattis who's who's the secretary of defense and seems to be one of the few vaguely sane people in the cabinet might be count. Or just finally had enough. Now, you know, and without Mattis to kind of confront, you know, a chicken hawk like John Bolton and say, you know, dude, we're not going to have a nuclear Throwdown with Iran, you could find pressures put in place and John Bolton is like Dick Cheney. I mean, he's a protege of Dick Cheney. He knows how to work the system. And so you have an absent minded president in one day, he wakes up, and there's a crisis that require may require military solution. That does have me worried. I have to say, I think that's a reasonable a reasonable supposition. I guess my point is more that I don't think Trump will intentionally create a war to distract think. That's pr-. Probably beyond him. I don't think he want. I think he is aware that that would almost certainly blowback against him. I think there's a real danger of miscalculation one of the the big dangers of the Trump administration has been that you don't have a coherent messaging. You have Natta saying the red line is here and pump Heo saying it's while maybe seventy five percent of where it is for Madison. Then Trump, you know, often the other direction entirely, and there's a certain degree of madman theory, where nobody really wants to test the US because they don't really know where the line is. But as people get inured to this, and you you begin to see risk taking behavior such as what Saudi Arabia has done not really necessarily punished then risks are taken more by external actors in the US may find itself in a crisis without the capacity to sorta strategically and coherently manage it. I guess I just don't think that Trump is as I say likely to in response to domestic pressures actually started war. I don't think that. Just just just finally Markel in in in about thirty seconds. Also, what really now should we expect from the next two years of Trump's administration will be more of the same? Yeah. I think it'll be much more of the same as the pressure piles on him. I think they'll be more public unraveling, and that sort of thing, and you know, I I've always said that it's a transactional relationship with the Republican party. They've got Mike Pence sitting there as vice president it's entirely possible that they just might urge him to go play golf on a permanent basis. Anything is possible. But is absolutely certain is it'll be a ratings hit that does bring us to the end of today's show, Michael Goldfarb and Jacob power killers. Thank you, both very much joining us up Matori house. The show was produced by Daniel Bates research by financial Augusta Pacheco and Gabriel de LA Sante a studio manage it was David Stevens music next nine hundred hundred entre preneurs, we've done you'll this more on the day's main stories on the daily at twenty two hundred with Paul. Those born a Midori house returns at the same time tomorrow eighteen hundred London I'm your host for that as well. I'm Andrew Miller. Thanks for listening.

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